Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Health and Disease

Bone Broth, How, When and Why

bonebroth

For thousands of years there have been

traditional foods like fermented vegetables and cultured dairy

that have been touted for their health benefits.

But one common healing

food that is now being recognized for it’s incredible health benefits is bone

broth.

Bone broth benefits are

numerous and extensive so let me share a few ancient secrets with you.

Bone Broth Benefits

I have found bone

broth to be the #1 thing you can consume to:

  • Heal leaky gut
  • Overcome

    foods intolerances and allergies

  • Improve

    joint health

  • Reduce

    cellulite

  • Boost

    immune system

Chicken soup isn’t just

good for the soul: there’s a reason that it’s prescribed by doctors and mothers

alike when you’re feeling under the weather.  All bone broths beef,

chicken, fish, lamb and more are staples in the traditional diets of every

culture and the basis of all fine cuisine.  That’s because bone broths are

nutrient-dense, easy to digest, rich in flavor and–they boost healing.

Bone broth or stock was

a way our ancestors made use of every part of an animal.  Bones and

marrow, skin and feet, tendons and ligaments that you can’t eat directly, can

be boiled then simmered over a period of days.

This simmering

causes the bones and ligaments to release healing compounds like collagen,

proline, glycine, and glutamine that have the power to transform your health

Nutrition researchers Sally Fallon and Kaayla

Daniel of the Weston A. Price Foundation explain that bone broths contain

minerals in forms that your body can easily absorb: calcium, magnesium,

phosphorus, silicon, sulphur and others.

They contain chondroitin sulphates and glucosamine, the compounds sold

as pricey supplements to reduce inflammation, arthritis and joint pain.1

A study of chicken soup (broth) conducted by the University

of Nebraska

Medical Center

wondered what it was in the soup that made it so beneficial for colds and

flu.  They found that the amino acids

that were produced when making chicken stock reduced inflammation in the

respiratory system and improved digestion.

Also, research is proving it can also boost the immune system and heal

disorders like allergies, asthma, and arthritis.2

Sally Fallon explains that most store bought “stock and

“broth” today aren’t “REAL”.  Instead,

they use lab-produced meat flavors in bouillon cubes, soup and sauce

mixes.  Also, manufacturers began using

monosodium glutamate (MSG), which is recognized as a meat flavor but in reality

is a neurotoxin.

If you want real bone broth you can make it yourself at home

which I will explain at the end of this chapter.  You will need to get grass fed bones from

your local farmers market or from a online health food store like Wise Choice

Market.

The Magic of Collagen and Gelatin

Real collagen is the source of stock’s immune-boosting

properties.  You’ve probably seen this

jiggling layer atop the broth in your cooling roasting pan and discarded it but

think again next time–this is the good stuff.

Collagen is the protein found in connective tissue of

vertebrate animals.  It’s abundant in

bone, marrow, cartilage, tendons, and ligaments.  The breakdown of collagen in bone broths is

what produces gelatin.

•Gelatin (the breakdown of collagen) was one of the first

functional foods, used as a medical treatment in ancient China.

•Dr. Francis Pottenger and other world class researches have

found gelatin and collagen to have the listed benefits:

•Gelatin helps people with food allergies and sensitivities

tolerate those foods including cows milk and gluten.

•Collagen protects and soothes the lining of the digestive

tract and can aid in healing IBS, crohn’s, ulcerative colitis and acid reflux.

•Gelatin promotes probiotic balance and growth.

•Bone broth increases collagen reducing the appearance of

wrinkles and banishing cellulite.

•Because gelatin helps break down proteins and soothes the

gut lining, it may prove useful for leaky gut syndrome and the autoimmune

disorders that accompany it.

•Gelatin provides bone-building minerals in easily absorbable

ways, preventing bone loss and reducing join pain.3

And here is another incredible benefit from the collagen

found in bone broth, it can make your skin look amazing!  According to Donna Gates, author of Body

Ecology, bone broth makes your skin supple and can decrease cellulite!

She says cellulite comes from a lack of connective tissue

and if someone has very smooth skin it’s because their skin is high in

connective tissue.  Donna explains that

consuming collagen-rich bone broth can reduce cellulite and tighten your skin

making you look younger.

Healing Amino Acids

Gelatin in bone broths contains “conditional” amino acids

arginine, glycine, glutamine and proline.

These amino acids also contribute to stock’s healing properties.

Conditional amino acids are those classified as nonessential

amino acids that are essential under some conditions: you don’t produce them

very well if you are ill or stressed.

Kaayla Daniel points out that unhealthy Western diets, heavy

on processed carbohydrates, low in quality grass-fed animal products, and

devoid of homemade soups and broths, make it likely that these amino acids are

chronically essential.

What do these conditional amino acids do?

Arginine

•Necessary for immune system function and wound healing

•Needed for the production and release of growth hormone

•Helps regenerate damaged liver cells

•Needed for the production of sperm

Glycine

•Prevents breakdown of protein tissue like muscle

•Used to make bile salts and glutathione

•Helps detoxify the body of chemicals and acts as

antioxidant4

•Is a neurotransmitter that improves sleep and improves

memory and performance

Proline

•Helps regenerate cartilage and heal joints

•Reduces cellulite and makes skin more supple

•Helps repair leaky gut

Glutamine

•Protects gut lining

•Metabolic fuel for cells in small intestine

•Improves metabolism and muscle building

Talk about some incredible health benefits!  For these reasons, I have most of my patients

consume bone broth as a partial fast, detox, or during meals to help heal their

gut and detoxify their cells, gut and liver.

How to Make Bone Broth

There are a few important basics to consider when making

good stock.  You can make bone broth with

animal components alone but in his chicken soup study, Dr. Rennard found that

the combination of animal products and vegetables seemed to have synergistic

effects, working together to be more beneficial than either alone.

Cup of Fresh BrothSally Fallon says that it’s important to

use body parts that aren’t commonly found in the meat department of your

grocery store, things like chicken feet and neck.

You’ll also want to buy animal products that you know are

pasture-fed and free of antibiotics and hormones.

Fallon describes the essentials as bones, fat, meat,

vegetables and water. If you’re making beef broth or lamb broth, you should

brown the meat before putting it into a stock pot.  Fish and poultry are fine to put in a pot

without browning first.  Add a bit of

apple cider vinegar to your pot to help draw the minerals from the bones.

Cooking Suggestions

1.Place bones into a large stock pot and cover with water.

2.Add two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar to water prior

to cooking. This helps to pull out important nutrients from the bones.

3.Fill stock pot with filtered water.  Leave plenty of room for water to boil.

4.Heat slowly. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to

simmer for at least six hours.  Remove

scum as it arises.

5.Cook slow and at low heat. Chicken bones can cook for 24

hours. Beef bones can cook for 48 hours. A low and slow cook time is necessary

in order to fully extract the nutrients in and around bone.

6.You can also add in vegetables such as onions, garlic,

carrots, and celery for added nutrient value.

After cooking, the broth will cool and a layer of fat will

harden on top.  This layer protects the

broth beneath.  Discard this layer only

when you are about to eat the broth.

Check out my recipes on how to make chicken bone broth and

beef bone broth.

Bone Broth Benefits as Therapy

Remember, bone broth is rich in minerals that support the

immune system and contains healing compounds like collagen, glutamine, glycine,

and proline.

The collagen in bone broth will heal your gut lining and

reduce intestinal inflammation.  In

addition, collagen will support healthy skin and can reduce the appearance of

cellulite.  Also, the glycine in bone

broth can detoxify your cells from chemicals and improve brain function.

I recommend consuming 8oz 1-2x daily as a soup, a plain

beverage, or doing a bone broth fast.  I

typically drink 8oz upon waking every morning.

Have you ever had bone broth?  Do you think you might give it a try?

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

847-972-WELL

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.