Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Rx to Wellness

Joint Pain and Diabetes

jointpain

SILVER SPRING, Md. – The Food and Drug Administration issued a warning Friday that a group of drugs used to treat diabetes can cause severe and persistent joint pain.

A warning is being added to the labels of all types of dipeptidyl peptidase-4, or DPP-4, inhibitors, including sitagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, and alogliptin, about the risk for joint pain.

DPP-4 inhibitors are used to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes as part of treatment programs that also include changes to diet and exercise.

“Patients should not stop taking their DPP-4 inhibitor medicine, but should contact their health care professional right away if they experience severe and persistent joint pain,” the agency said in a press release. “Health care professionals should consider DPP-4 inhibitors as a possible cause of severe joint pain and discontinue the drug if appropriate.”

FDA researchers reviewed cases of severe joint pain due to the drugs as listed in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System database, finding that patients developed persistent pain in their joints anywhere from one day to years after beginning the treatment.

Most patients’ pain went away within a month of discontinuing their use of the drugs, however those who either restarted the same drug or another found their pain returned.

The agency is asking patients and caregivers to report pain connected with DPP-4 inhibitors to their MedWatch program.

Health and Wellness Associates

312-972-WELL

Foods

Chicken, Shrimp and Andouille Jambalaya

jambalya

Chicken, Shrimp, and Andouille Jambalaya

You’re going to love this chicken, shrimp, and andouille jambalaya recipe! It tastes amazing, and it’s diabetic-friendly!

Here’s what you need:

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 1/2 lbs boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • 1 lb andouille sausage, prepare it into 1/4-inch slices
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2 celery ribs, diced
  • 1/2 green bell pepper, diced
  • 1/2 red bell pepper, diced
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/4 teaspoon sweet paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4-1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 1 1/2 cups long grain rice
  • 1 (14 ounce) can tomatoes, chopped, with juice
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 2 cups stock
  • 8 ounces medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 3 green onions, finely chopped

Directions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Using a large pan, brown the chicken thighs in hot oil. Brown both sides, then remove. Be sure to drain the oil.
  3. Mix together your andouille, onion, celery, bell pepper, thyme, oregano, paprika, salt, and cayenne pepper. Cook it for about 5 minutes while continuously stirring it until the onions are cooked.
  4. Add rice, tomatoes with juice, and broth. Bring it to boil for about 2 minutes.
  5. Set the rice mixture in a baking dish and top with chicken.
  6. Bake at 350 degrees F for 40-45 minutes or until rice and chicken are done and tender.
  7. Stir in your remaining ingredients including shrimp, parsley, and green onions. Cover and cook for another 5 minutes until the shrimps curl and turns golden pink.
  8. Serve and share!

Health and Wellness Associates

312-972-WELL

Health and Disease

Unprocessed Saturated Fats are Good For You

eggsandonions

 Unprocessed Saturated Fat Is Good for You

Focusing your diet on REAL FOOD (raw whole, ideally organic, and from pasture raised cows) rather than processed fare is one of the easiest ways to sidestep dietary pitfalls like harmful fats — not to mention other harmful ingredients like refined sugars, genetically modified organisims (GMOs) and additives that have never been properly tested for safety. Beyond that, it’s really just a matter of tweaking the ratios of fat, carbs and protein to suit your individual situation.

One key though is to trade refined sugar and processed fructose for healthy fat, as this will help optimize your insulin and leptin levels. We’ve spent decades trading healthy saturated fats for carbs and trans fats, and there can be no doubt that this has had an enormous influence on disease statistics, raising incidence of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and Alzheimer’s — all the top killers.

Healthy fat is particularly important for optimal brain function and memory. This is true throughout life, but especially during childhood. So, if processed food still make up the bulk of your meals, you’d be wise to reconsider your eating habits. Not only are processed foods the primary culprit in obesity and insulin resistance, processed foods can also affect the IQ of young children. One British study revealed that kids who ate a predominantly processed food diet at age three had lower IQ scores at age 8.5. For each measured increase in processed foods, participants had a 1.67-point decrease in IQ.

Another study published in the journal Clinical Pediatrics  also warns that frequent fast food consumption may stunt your child’s academic performance.