Foods, Uncategorized

Slow Cooked Buffalo-Barbecue Chicken Wings

chickenwings

Slow Cooker Buffalo-Barbeque Chicken Wings

 

Ingredients

 

3lb chicken wingettes and drummettes

1cup honey barbecue sauce

1cup Buffalo wing sauce

Lime wedges and sliced green onions, if desired

 

Directions

 

Spray 3 1/2- to 4-quart slow cooker with cooking spray. Place chicken in slow cooker. In small bowl, stir together barbecue sauce and Buffalo wing sauce. Pour over chicken wings. Stir to coat.

 

Cover; cook on Low heat setting 3 hours.

 

Set oven control to broil. Spray broiler pan rack with cooking spray. Use slotted spoon or fork to place chicken on rack in pan. Broil with tops of chicken 3 inches from heat 3 to 4 minutes or until browned, turning halfway through broiling time.

 

Serve with remaining sauce for dipping. Garnish with lime wedges and green onions.

 

If you like your wings a little on the hot side, swap a little more of the barbecue sauce for additional buffalo sauce. Or, if you like a milder wing, add more barbecue sauce and less buffalo sauce.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

312-972-WELL

 

 

Foods, Uncategorized

Sausage Egg Bake

sausageeggbake

Sausage Egg Bake

 

Ingredients

 

1lb bulk pork sausage (spicy, if desired)

1box (7 oz) Green Giant™ Steamers™ frozen antioxidant blend vegetables

10eggs

1cup whole or 2% milk

1bag (20 oz) refrigerated O’Brien hash browns

2cups shredded pepper Jack cheese (8 oz)

3tablespoons chopped fresh basil leaves

 

Directions

 

Heat oven to 350°F. Spray 13×9-inch (3-quart) baking dish with cooking spray. In 8-inch nonstick skillet, cook sausage over medium-high heat 5 to 7 minutes, stirring frequently, until no longer pink; drain.

 

Remove pouch of vegetables from box. Place pouch, printed side up, on microwavable plate. Do not cut slit in pouch. Microwave on high about 2 minutes or until just thawed. In large bowl, beat eggs and milk with whisk. Stir in potatoes, cooked sausage, vegetables, 1 cup of the cheese and 1 tablespoon of the basil. Pour into baking dish. Bake now, or cover and refrigerate up to 12 hours.

 

Bake 60 to 65 minutes, uncovered, until center is set. Sprinkle with remaining cheese during last 5 minutes of bake time. Sprinkle with remaining basil just before serving.

 

Serve with salsa or chopped fresh tomatoes.

 

To complete your brunch, serve with fresh cut fruit and warm muffins or scones.

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

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Foods, Uncategorized

Slow Cooked Garlic Chicken

garllicchicken

Slow Cooked Garlic Chicken

 

Ingredients

 

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon paprika

½ teaspoon pepper

1 teaspoon olive oil

3 to 3 1/2 lb cut-up frying chicken

1 large onion, sliced

1 medium bulb garlic (about 20 cloves)

 

** This sounds like a lot of garlic, but the garlic flavor dissipates during the long cooking. Plan to serve the cooked garlic with another part of the meal. It is delicious on bread or mashed potatoes.

 

Directions

 

1 In small bowl, mix salt, paprika, pepper and oil to form paste; spread evenly over each piece of chicken.

2 In 5- to 6-quart slow cooker, place onion slices. Arrange chicken over onion. Separate garlic into cloves; do not peel cloves. Place garlic cloves around chicken.

3 Cover; cook on Low setting 7 to 8 hours.

4 With slotted spoon, remove chicken, onion and garlic from slow cooker; place on serving platter. Squeeze garlic cloves to use cooked garlic on mashed potatoes, vegetables or bread.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

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Foods, Uncategorized

Slow Cooked Beef Stew

beefstew

Slow Cooked Beef Stew

 

Ingredients

 

1 ½ lb beef stew meat, cut into 3/4-inch cubes

5 tablespoons all-purpose flour, divided

1 lb small (2 1/2 to 3-inch) red potatoes, quartered

1 ½ cups frozen pearl onions (from 16-oz package)

1 bag (1 lb) ready-to-eat baby-cut carrots

1 jar (12 oz) beef gravy

1 can (14.5 oz) Muir Glen™ organic diced tomatoes, undrained

 

Directions

 

On waxed paper, sprinkle beef with 2 tablespoons flour, 1 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper; toss to coat. In 10-inch skillet, heat about 1 tablespoon of oil over medium-high heat. Add coated beef; cook and stir 4 to 6 minutes or until browned, stirring occasionally.

 

In 4- to 6-quart slow cooker, layer potatoes, onions and carrots. Add browned beef; sprinkle with any remaining flour mixture. Top with gravy and tomatoes.

 

Cover; cook on Low heat setting 8 to 10 hours.

 

As always please adjust the recipe for your needs.  If you need help, call us.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Your Diet and Acne

acne

Acne is the most common skin condition in the U.S. About 85% of people in the Western world experience acne during their teenage years, but it can occur at any age. Acne is more than just pimples and it can leave permanent scars. In many people, acne can seriously affect quality of life, causing low self-esteem, withdrawal from social situations, anxiety, and depression.

There are four major components of acne2:

  1. Excessive production of oil by the skin
  2. Skin cells dividing excessively or “hyperproliferation”
  3. Bacteria
  4. Inflammation

A pimple or lesion forms when a pore in the skin begins to clog with old, dead skin cells. Usually these cells are simply shed from the surface of the skin, but if too much oil is being produced, the dead cells can stick together and become trapped inside the pore. Bacteria also play a role, they can grow and multiply inside the pore, resulting in an inflammatory response.1

Scientific studies have demonstrated that the diet is very important, because what we eat can affect the hormones that contribute to the oil production, hyperproliferation, and inflammation that cause acne. The two acne-promoting dietary factors that have been most extensively studied are dairy products and high glycemic load foods. These factors influence hormonal and inflammatory factors increasing acne prevalence and severity.3,4 Hormonal influences that raise insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels are key.5 Elevated IGF-1 levels lead to changes in gene expression that cause inflammation, hormonal changes, increased oil production, and development of acne lesions. Of important concern is that the same hormonal milieu of high IGF-1 and high insulin, also promotes breast and prostate cancer, so it is important to maintain a diet that is hormonally favorable all through life.

In addition to dairy and high glycemic foods, excessive oil production by the skin can be exacerbated by oil intake. Vegetable oils drives omega-6 intake up, which have pro-inflammatory effects, and high omega-6 intake is associated with the development of acne.4,6-8 The effects of oil intake on acne is exacerbated by the consumption of high glycemic carbohydrates, such as commercial baked goods. Higher intake of omega-3 fatty acids is associated with reduced likelihood of acne, as omega-3s counteract the pro-inflammatory processes that drive acne. Just because overeating nuts and oil (especially peanuts and peanut butter) can contribute to sebum production and acne, does not mean nuts and seeds need to be eliminated from the diet to help acne. It is the combination of the glycemic load of the diet and other hormonal promoters acting together to produce acne. So excessive intake of fat may increase sebum production, but this tendency is permitted and exacerbated by the glycemic effect of the diet. When your diet has more beans, greens, seeds, onions and mushrooms, and is free of high glycemic carbohydrates, it can tolerate more fat, without any acne-promoting effects on sebum production, because the antioxidant and phytochemical exposure is higher, and the glycemic load of the diet is lower. So up to two ounces of raw nuts and seeds can generally be eaten by those on an oil-free Nutritarian diet without creating acne. But once you start eating refined and high glycemic carbohydrates, your body will be more sensitive to the fat in your diet, maybe even from nuts.

The two most important hormonal factors that drive acne are IGF-1 and insulin. In addition to avoiding oils, to prevent or resolve acne, avoid dairy products and high-glycemic load foods, especially sweeteners and commercial baked goods and make sure to get an adequate supply of micronutrients. Remember, high glycemic carbohydrates can raise both insulin and IGF-1.

 

 

  1. Avoid Dairy
  2. Avoid High Glycemic load foods
  3. Include protective Micronutrients.

If you need help working out a personalized diet plan, call us and set up an appointment, and we will be happy to work one out just for you.

Feel free to share this with family and frients.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Furhman

312-972-WELL