Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Blueberry Apple Crisp

blueberry apple crumble

Who doesn’t love a Raw Blue Berry Apple Crisp with Coconut Vegan Whip Cream? You could even warm this up to 118 degrees or so and it would still be raw. Uber delicious HEALTHY whole food desserts for those cold winter nights. Enjoy! I am about to make this myself right now I’m so inspired!  I recommend all organic ingredients and gluten free. THIS is the best dessert ever! 

Ingredients

Crust:

1 cup almonds

1/2 cup walnuts

¼ cup medjool dates, pitted

½ cup unsweetened coconut

Filling:

3 medium apples, cored and coarsely chopped

3 cups blueberries

1/4 cup medjool dates

2 tsp cinnamon

½ tsp  ground ginger

Instructions

Crust:

In a food processor, pulse the ingredients until they form a coarse meal. Press half of the mixture into single serving ramekins.. Reserve the remaining crumble.

Filling:

In a food processor, blend one apple, 2 cups blueberries,  and the remaining ingredients until smooth. Add the two remaining apples in the food processor and pulse into small pieces. Add remaining blueberries and pulse just a moment to mix. Do not over blend – it’s best with small chunks of fruit. Pour the filling onto the prepared crust. Sprinkle the reserved crumble mixture on top.

Serve immediately or chill until ready to serve.  It’s also very flavorful when warmed to release the flavors.

Even more special when topped with:

Vegan Whipped Cream:

Ingredients:

2- 14 oz cans organic coconut milk (or make your own coconut milk if you like!)

2 tsp vanilla extract

Instructions:

Chill coconut milk for several hours or overnight.

Spoon out the thick creamy white part of the milk; set aside the watery remainder to enjoy in a smoothie or other recipe.

In a large bowl, whip the coconut cream on high until medium firm peaks form.

Use immediately.

**You may refrigerate this a few days, but it will lose its consistency and will need to be re-whipped.

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Health and Disease, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Popular Heartburn Drugs Linked to Chronic Kidney Disease

nexium

Popular Heartburn Drugs Linked to Chronic Kidney Disease

In a recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers from John Hopkins University found that the drugs that treat acid reflux and heartburn (like Prevacid, Prilosec and Nexium) may not be as safe as once thought. While most considered the drugs effective and relatively free from side effects, this new study shows two things: a large number of people taking the meds don’t actually need them and proton pump inhibitors (PPI) raise the risk of kidney disease from 20 to 50 percent. And those facts come on the heels of another study from last June done by Stanford University which found those medications contributed to a higher chance of heart attacks.

 

Researchers looked at the records of more than 10,000 people and found that the, “risk of the onset of chronic kidney disease was 20 to 50 percent higher in those who took the PPIs. No increased risk was seen in people who took a different class of heartburn drugs like Pepcid and Zantac, which work by blocking histamine production in the cells lining the stomach”(PPIs block the secretion of acid into the stomach).

 

More from the article:

 

“JUST AS IT IS A FALLACY THAT PPIS ARE SAFE TO TAKE EVERY DAY FOR AN EXTENDED PERIOD OF TIME, SO IT IS ALSO A FALLACY THAT HEARTBURN IS CAUSED BY TOO MUCH STOMACH ACID, ACCORDING TO NOTED NATURAL HEALTH PRACTITIONER DR. JOSEPH MERCOLA. CONTRARY TO WHAT IS WIDELY BELIEVED, REFLUX IS CAUSED BY TOO LITTLE ACID. FURTHERMORE, TAKING DRUGS THAT SUPPRESS STOMACH ACID MERELY TREATS THE SYMPTOMS RATHER THAN ATTACKS THE ROOT OF THE PROBLEM. IN FACT, THE MEDICATIONS ACTUALLY WORSEN THE CONDITION THAT PRODUCES THE SYMPTOMS, A RESULT THAT PERPETUATES THE PROBLEM. HE RECOMMENDS THAT PEOPLE WHO TAKE PPIS SHOULD GRADUALLY WEAN THEMSELVES OFF OF THEM INSTEAD OF STOPPING COLD TURKEY. AFTERWARDS, MERCOLA ADVISES TAKING NATURAL REMEDIES AND ADOPTING LIFESTYLE MODIFICATIONS.”

 

What many health practitioners have known for a long time is that it’s possible to treat heartburn naturally- and therefore- safely; some people use yellow mustard, many take apple cider vinegar (from the Mother is always best and either straight or in water), and still others have found success using a different type of salt, like a pink himalayan (if you use added salt in your food).

 

Some of those lifestyle modifications would be eating foods that help, rather than hurt and stress, your gut biome; fermented vegetables (kimchee/sauerkraut), kefir, and for those non-vegans, yogurt made from raw milk, are all great. And don’t be afraid to move your body! Exercise is good for you and will help. Then there are the more obvious things like smoking, caffeine and excessive alcohol.

 

Sadly, some kidney problems are irreversible and chronic kidney disease can result in kidney failure (which necessitates either dialysis or a transplant). Now, the research doesn’t prove PPIs cause chronic kidney disease but their findings should be considered serious enough to at least pay attention to and unless you really, really need them, you shouldn’t take them. In fact, it almost makes more sense to try alternative therapies first and use the PPIs as a last resort. Once you start to look at the issue, you really only have two options- treat your body better or take PPIs (and maybe play russian roulette with the outcome).

 

Please share with family and loved ones and call with all your healthcare concerns and for your personalized healthcare plan.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Carrot and Sweet Potato Soup

creamy-carrot-and-sweet-potato-soup

Carrot and Sweet Potato Soup

RECIPE

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 onion, finely sliced
8 large carrots, roughly chopped

2 medium sweet potatoes, mashed
2 tablespoons dry cooking wine

6 cups vegetable stock (fresh or homemade)

Large handful of fresh chopped cilantro (coriander)

4 tablespoons creme fraiche (note: use low fat plain yoghurt as an alternative)

Directions

In a large pan heat the olive oil and add the sliced onions. Gently sautee for approximately 5 minutes until soft. Add the carrots and mashed sweet potatoes and cook for another 5 minutes (stirring often).

Now add the stock and bring the soup to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for approximately 25 to 30 minutes or until carrots are tender and liquid has reduced. Remove from heat and allow to slightly cool. Place the soup mixture in a food processor or blender if you prefer a smooth soup, a little less if you prefer a chunkier texture. Place the soup back in the pan and gently heat again. Season with salt and pepper and serve garnished with a the fresh cilantro and a dollop of creme fraiche in each bowl.

Health benefits

-Carrots contain over 16 vitamins and minerals including vitamin A,B6,C and K and minerals manganese, copper and biotin. They contain powerful anti-oxidant properties and are known to assist a healthy cardiovascular system and even prevent cancer. Carrots are well known for their ability to improve vision due to their high content of beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is converted into vitamin A upon consumption and is a strong preventer against cancer types, high blood pressure and forms of heart disease.

– Onions are also a great source of vitamins and minerals including vitamin B1,B6 and C and minerals manganese, biotin and phosphorus. Onions have anti-inflammatory properties that are great for supporting your immune system and protecting against disease. Onions belong to a family of vegetables called “Allium” which have been linked to the decrease of multiple types of cancer.

– Sweet potatoes contain vitamins A,B6 and C and minerals potassium, manganese andcopper. They have strong anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. Sweet potatoes are low in fat and high in fibre, making it a healthy addition to any meal as they support healthy digestion. By selecting orange coloured sweet potatoes you will gain more vitamin A.

-You will find minerals calcium, potassium and magnesium in fresh coriander. Coriander also boasts antioxidant,anti-microbial and anti-bacterial properties making it a powerful medicinal herb for treating many diseases and ailments.

 

Please share with family and loved ones, and call us with your healthcare concerns and personalized healthcare plan.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived – Carrothers

312-972-WELL

Diets and Weight Loss, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Emotional Eating

emotioanleating

Emotional Eating
Eating habits and “The battle for the mind!”
The emotional process of eating Eating can be a highly emotional process. Food does more than just fill our stomachs. If you take more notice of what you are eating, why you are eating it and what you are feeling it may surprise you. While eating to satisfy hunger is a normal function, emotional eating can be a self defeating and destructive force in someone’s life.
Emotional eating is to eat for a reason other than hunger.
Emotional eating moods can include: stress, distress, depression, happiness, boredom, anxiety, sadness, agitation, avoidance, compulsion, tired, weak, sleepy, frustration, disappointment, adversity, failure.
University studies have been done do see what foods people eat to match what mood they are in. People tend to eat popcorn, pizza or steak when they are happy, ice cream, cookies and cake when they are sad, and potato chips when they are bored. Studies also show that depressed people tend to eat twice as much at a snack session than happy people, linking depression to obesity.
Comfort foods are eaten either to achieve a feeling or maintain a feeling. They can even be an addictive response providing endorphins and exogenous opioids to the brain.
Programed to eat with emotions We are programmed early in life to attach different emotions with different food. When a child is sad what do we give them? Cookies or candy? So the pattern for comfort through food is often set up early and re-enforced throughout life. We program our kids to respond to foods at an early age. Punishment can be equated to hunger when the punishment is forcing a child to miss a meal because of bad behavior. Rewards of sweets for good behavior can set up patterns for emotional eating also.
Five differences between emotional eating and normal hunger:
University of Texas Counseling and Mental Health Center web site:
1. Emotional hunger comes on suddenly; physical hunger occurs gradually.
2. When you are eating to fill a void that isn’t related to an empty stomach, you crave a specific food, such as pizza or ice cream, and only that food will meet your need. When you eat because you are actually hungry, you’re open to options.
3. Emotional hunger feels like it needs to be satisfied instantly with the food you crave; physical hunger can wait.
4. Even when you are full, if you’re eating to satisfy an emotional need, you’re more likely to keep eating. When you’re eating because you’re hungry, you’re more likely to stop when you’re full.
5. Emotional eating can leave behind feelings of guilt; eating when you are physically hungry does not.
According to the University of MD 75% of all overeating is due to emotions.
The brain connection to eating Your gut is densely lined with neuro-peptides and receptors that exchange emotional information. The pancreas alone releases 20 emotionally laden peptides. These emotionally charged peptides regulate assimilation and storage of nutrients. They also help transmit information about being full or hungry to the brain.
Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Gluten interferes with leptin, which is a hormone that does several things in the body. Leptin signals the brain that the tummy is full; it signals fat cells to break up; and leptin also normalizes pain receptors in the spinal column. An imbalance in leptin levels alone can cause overeating, interfere with the fat burning process and actually cause fibromyalgia pain.
Fungi and bacteria reside in the colon and produce over 80% of the body’s neuro chemicals. Gut bacteria have been proven to influence everything you do. This would of course include emotional eating. The human body contains 10 times more bacteria than human cells and should maintain 90% good, friendly bacteria to function optimally. Bacteria and fungi control the environment of the body by slowing down digestion and rewarding or punishing you for things you eat.
Eating healthy tips
Eat when you are hungry and not when you are sad or angry. Never eat because of an emotional feeling you are trying to bury. This can make your food toxic and interfere with normal digestive function by speeding up or slowing down digestion. Emotional eating can cause your body to crave carbohydrates and saturated fats and lead to an inordinate storage of fats.
Toxic thoughts lead to toxic emotions, which lead to a toxic body!
Reduce carb intake, especially the refined carbs that are also called “comfort foods.” Comfort foods release feel-good neuro chemicals to the body and brain. However, this comfort is short-lived and ends up in a downward spiral. Carbs are also not good food for thinking. Refined carbs cause spikes and eventual shortfalls in blood glucose. Eat proteins and not refined carbs before a big test or when you really need to be sharp and alert. Carbs dull the thinking process and blanket the peptides we talked about earlier.
Neurological function begins with digestion!
Your thoughts can careen out of control without a good supply of Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs) which are found in abundance in fish, eggs, nuts and seeds. Chronic EFA deficiency is implicated in the growing prevalence of brain disorders (i.e. Tourettes, ADD/ADHD, autism, depression, hyperactivity, inattentiveness and other disorders), as well as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and other diseases.
When you feel hungry, try drinking some water to see if the sensation goes away. If it is indeed hunger, then you have a good start on your digestion with the water you just imbibed! Without water, your digestion is adversely affected and your brain cannot function properly.
Eat slow and relaxed. This will give you more time to chew the food, mix it with enzymes from the saliva and improve your overall digestion. When you eat slower the brain has more time to keep up with the peptide signals that tell you when you have eaten enough.
Establish new habits when the urge for comfort foods comes up. Do positive activities that organize the brain, like taking a brisk walk with the arms swinging, jumping jacks or bicycling. Doing complex math problem or spelling words backwards, counting backwards and skip-counting can help logics take control when you are emotional.
Eat like a king for breakfast, a prince for lunch and a pauper for supper.
It comes down to a battle for the mind. Eat for the purpose of supporting a healthy body and mind. Eating for emotional fulfillment leaves you where you started emotionally, and maybe a bit too full.
Please share with family and loved ones. Call for an appointment with us to discuss your personal healthcare plan.
Health and Wellness Associates
Archived – Stellpflug
312-972-WELL