Foods, Uncategorized

Crunchy Noodle Salad

crunchynoodlesalad

 

Crunchy Noodle Salad

 

Ingredients

Kosher salt

1 pound thin spaghetti

1 pound sugar snap peas

1 cup vegetable oil

1/4 cup rice wine vinegar

1/3 cup soy sauce

3 tablespoons dark sesame oil

1 tablespoon honey

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

3 tablespoons toasted white sesame seeds, divided

1/2 cup smooth peanut butter

2 red bell peppers, cored and seeded, and thinly sliced

4 scallions (with and green parts), sliced diagonally

3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley leaves

 

Directions

Watch how to make this recipe

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the spaghetti and cook according to package directions. Drain and set aside.

 

Meanwhile, bring another large pot of salted water to a boil, add the sugar snap peas, return to a boil, and cook for 3 to 5 minutes, until crisp tender. Lift the sugar snap peas from the water with a slotted spoon and immerse them in a bowl of ice water. Drain.

 

For the dressing, whisk together the vegetable oil, rice wine vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, honey, garlic, ginger, 2 tablespoons sesame seeds and peanut butter in a medium bowl.

 

Combine the spaghetti, sugar snap peas, peppers and scallions in a large bowl. Pour the dressing over the spaghetti mixture. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of sesame seeds and the parsley and toss together.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

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Uncategorized

Herbs For Respiratory System

echineacea

 

Herbs for Respiratory System

Most people realize how important their lungs are to overall health, not only providing oxygen needed by every cell in the body but also filtering out small blood clots from the veins and even providing cushioning for the heart. Yet even if someone does not smoke, exposure to air pollution, some medications or even trauma can do damage to the lungs and cause problems like bronchitis, asthma, pneumonia and even lung cancer. Below, however, are herbs which can protect the lungs and promote respiratory health.

Mullein

Mullein has long been used as a remedy for many respiratory complaints, including viral infections like flus and colds, as well as conditions like bronchitis and laryngitis. It is a natural expectorant and can relieve congestion from excess phlegm and can also help quiet bronchial spasms and relieve pain.

Licorice

Licorice is a natural demulcent herb, meaning that it can help to soothe down irritation of the mucous membranes which line the respiratory tract. It also contains lichochalcone, a compound which decreases inflammation and has even been shown to help fight off the proliferation of cancer cells.

Gingko Biloba

Most people think of this as an herb to improve memory and cognition, but it is also useful for respiratory health. One study showed that those undergoing bypass surgery displayed fewer signs of inflammation or irritation in the lungs if given extracts of this herb.

Echinacea

Echinacea is a natural antimicrobial which can fight off bacteria and viruses that can hurt the lungs and can also strengthen the general immune system to make it more effective at warding off illnesses. It does this primarily through increasing the white blood cell count.

Rosemary

Rosemary’s natural oils have antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties which can help to remedy bronchitis, flus and colds, coughs and other respiratory infections. One of its active compounds, called carnosol, is also being tested as an anti-carcinogen.

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus has long been used to treat a number of lung conditions, including sore throat, sinus infections, bronchitis and colds and flus. It has properties which make is an antimicrobial, antispasmodic and a natural expectorant and decongestant.

Irish Moss

Despite its name, this is actually a type of seaweed and is actually already used in an array of prescription medications that are used to treat lung ailments like the flu, pneumonia, and unproductive coughs. It acts as a decongestant and antimicrobial agent.

Hyssop

Hyssop is able to decongest the lungs and respiratory tract and is a natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. When used in a syrup, it is able to treat cough and soothe down the mucous membranes which line the throat and which get irritated by an array of respiratory problems.

Slippery Elm

Slippery elm is an anti-inflammatory, expectorant and antiseptic and can be used to treat conditions from the entire respiratory tract and is beneficial for bronchitis, coughs, and asthma and is excellent for soothing the mucous membranes of the nose and throat.

Coltsfoot

This is a natural treatment for whooping cough, colds, and bronchitis and can help rid the body of mucous and reduce inflammation in the respiratory tract which can accompany a number of lung conditions.

All these herbs are natural and healthy ways to treat lung ailments and to keep the respiratory tract healthy and functioning.

If you have a family member that has had respiratory or cardiac problems, or you live with someone that smokes, have bronchitis,COPD, or other respiratory problems, please call us.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

312-972-Well

Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Head Lice: It is That Time of Year Again

headlice

 

Head Lice

 

Head lice are tiny parasites that live on the human head. They live and thrive by sucking tiny amounts of blood from the scalp and reproduce by laying their eggs in the hair. Perhaps surprisingly, head lice don’t spread disease.

 

What do head lice (and their eggs) look like?

The adult head louse has six legs and is about the size of a sesame seed. Descriptions of their color vary, but generally they range from beige to gray and may become considerably darker when they feed.

Lice often appear to be the same color as the hair they’ve infested, making them hard to see with the naked eye. You can spot them most easily in the areas behind the ears and along the hairline on the back of the neck.

Female lice lay up to ten minuscule eggs a day. Lice eggs (called nits) are oval in shape. They may appear to be the color of their host’s hair, ranging from white to yellow to brown.

What’s the life cycle of a typical louse?

The female louse attaches her eggs to human hair shafts with a waterproof, glue-like substance. This ensures that the nits can’t be washed, brushed, or blown away, unlike dandruff and other bits of stuff in the hair that often gets mistaken for nits.

She lays her eggs a fraction of an inch from the scalp, where it’s nice and warm – just right for hatching. Nits typically hatch eight or nine days after they’re laid. Once the eggs have hatched, their yellow or white shells remain attached to the hair shaft, moving farther from the scalp as the hair grows. As a result, empty nit shells attached to hairs are usually found farther away from the scalp than live eggs are.

Baby lice, known as nymphs, are not much bigger than the nits and tend to be light in color. Nine to 12 days later, they become adults and mate, the females lay their eggs, and the cycle continues.

An adult louse can live up to 30 days on the human head.

How did my child get lice?

Your child probably picked up lice from an infested sibling or playmate. Lice are crawling insects. They can’t hop, jump, or fly, but they can crawl from one head to another when people put their heads together – for example, when they hug or lay their heads on the same pillow.

Once female lice find their way to a child’s head, they lay eggs and begin to populate the area. You can’t catch nits; they have to be laid by live lice.

Since lice can live for up to a day off of the human head, it’s theoretically possible to get infested if your hair makes contact with items such as hats, combs, or brushes if they were used recently by an infested person. However, this is less likely than human-to-human spread.

A healthy louse will rarely leave a healthy head (except to crawl onto another healthy head!), and lice found on combs are usually injured or dead.

Are lice more common in dirty conditions?

It’s a myth that lice are a product of poor hygiene or poverty. Head lice are equal-opportunity parasites. They like clean hair as well as dirty hair and can flourish in even the wealthiest communities.

So, when lice are going around, it’s no one child or family’s fault. If your child has lice, chances are they’re traveling through the neighborhood or school. And your child has probably unknowingly infected others.

Head lice are most common among preschool- and elementary school-age children and their families and caregivers. Some studies suggest that girls get head lice more often than boys. This may be because they have more head-to-head contact with each other and longer hair that provides more warmth and darkness (two things lice love).

Interestingly, lice are much less common among African Americans in the United States than among people of other races. This may be because lice claws have a tougher time grasping the shape and width of African American hair.

How to tell if you have lice?

 

When you became a parent, you probably never imagined yourself hunting for lice in your child’s hair. But that’s just what you (or someone) will have to do if you suspect that your child is infested.

When the bad news comes from a school

Many schools do regular lice checks during the school year, examining every child’s head.  If they find lice, they’ll let you know. Be sure to do your own checking, though, to confirm their finding.

You may instead get a note warning that someone in your child’s class or school has lice. That’s your signal to check your own child’s head. It’s best to do this as soon as possible, because the sooner you find the lice, the easier they are to handle. And if you do find lice, you’ll need to check (and possibly treat) the whole family.

How to inspect your child’s head

The sesame-seed-size creatures and their teeny-tiny eggs are quite hard to spot. To find out whether you need to take action, try the following two- to three-step process.

If you can’t spot them via a visual inspection (step 2), try wet combing (step 3). A 2009 study in the Archives of Dermatology found that “wet-combing” accurately identified active head lice infestations in 90 percent of cases. In contrast, visual inspections accurately identified 29 percent.

You’ll need really good light and a pair of strong drugstore reading glasses or a magnifying glass (unless you have the eyes of an eagle). If you move on to step three, you’ll also need a metal lice comb and some hair conditioner.

Step 1: Look for the signs and symptoms of head lice

Your child may have one or more of these symptoms:

A tickling feeling on the scalp

A sensation that something is moving in the hair

Itching caused by an allergic reaction to lice bites (kids may scratch or rub their scalp, especially around the back of the head or ears)

Sores on the head caused by scratching

Irritability

Trouble sleeping (lice are more active in the dark)

Step 2: How to search for lice, stage one (dry hair)

Check your child’s scalp. Part the hair in various places and check the scalp behind the ears and at the nape of the neck. You may notice sores or a rash where your child has been scratching.

Look for movement in the hair. You’re not likely to see the lice themselves. They’re very small, move quickly, and avoid light, so they’re difficult to spot.

Look for lice eggs, known as nits. These tiny white or yellowish tear drop-shaped sacs are attached to the hair near the scalp (within a quarter inch if they haven’t yet hatched). Nits may be easier to feel than to see: They’ll feel like grains of sand.

 

Make sure the “nits” you see are really nits. Nits are often hard to distinguish from dandruff or flakes of hair products. The difference is that nits stick to the hair like glue while dandruff and other flakes are easily removed from the hair shaft.

Make sure the nits you find are still alive. If the only nits you find are more than a quarter inch from the scalp, they may have already hatched and your child may no longer be infested. (Nits can only hatch in the warmth right next to the scalp. After they hatch, the empty egg remains attached to the hair and grows farther and farther from the scalp.) Only viable nits – those very close to the scalp – or live lice are proof of a current infestation.

Step 3: How to search for lice, stage two (wet hair)

You’ll need to go on to this step if you can’t tell whether there’s an infestation by looking at your child’s hair and feeling it, the way you did in step 2. Studies  have found that a lice comb is the best tool for finding live lice. (A flea comb may also work.) The teeth on a regular comb are too far apart to nab the tiny lice.

Wet your child’s hair.

Pour on lots of conditioner.

Comb the hair out in sections, from the roots to the ends, with a lice comb.

If there are lice in your child’s hair, you should see them on the comb. (Shaking the comb out into a plastic bowl after every swipe can help you see them better.)

If you determine that your child does have lice, check the other kids and adults in your house. You’ll need to treat everyone to effectively rid your family of lice. If you follow these steps and you’re still not sure, have your child checked by a doctor or at a lice salon.

How to get rid of lice in your child’s hair

If your child has lice, you’ll need to take steps to get rid of them.

Lice are itchy and annoying and they won’t go away on their own. And your child can spread them to others – even to you – through close, usually head-to-head contact. That’s why parents often find themselves scratching too.

First, confirm that your child has lice

Before you go down this labor-intensive road, make sure your child has a confirmed case of head lice. That means you’ve spotted viable nits (lice eggs) or live lice in your child’s hair.

If you haven’t seen the signs yourself or feel uncertain about what you’re seeing, find out how to tell for sure whether your child has lice.

Then, choose a method for getting rid of lice

You’ll hear lots of conflicting recommendations for dealing with lice. Even official health sources such as government agencies and doctor associations differ. And friends, relatives, and online resources offer all sorts of home remedies and alternative medicines.

Consult your doctor or another health professional to make sure the method you choose is likely to be safe and effective.

Here are the options recommended by doctors, lice experts, and parents:

  1. Lice medicine and lice combing combined Many parents try this approach: Apply drugstore lice medicine to the hair and follow up with frequent comb-outs using a high-quality metal lice comb.
  2. Over-the- counter lice-killing medicine alone A 2010 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) report on head lice recommends using a drugstore pediculicide (lice-killing product). These are sold as a cream rinse, shampoo, gel, mousse, or other hair product. The AAP recommends applying as directed and then reapplying on day nine to catch any lice that may have hatched.  Tea Tree Oil Shampoo is one of the most effective treatments.

The report says that lice combs don’t help eradicate lice once you’ve applied the lice medicine, although they’re useful for diagnosing a case of head lice and for combing out lice and eggs killed by the pediculicide.

  1. Do Not go out and cut your childrens hair.  Lice to not live in the air, they live on the scalp, plus you are spreading lice to the person or persons that get their hair cut after you.

4.Lice comb alone The National Pediculosis Association is one group that advocates combing lice and nits from the hair with a special lice comb instead of using a pediculicide. The group doesn’t rule out pediculicides completely but warns that these medicines are pesticides and potentially harmful to children. It states on its website, “The NPA believes that the mechanical method of removing head lice with a comb is the safest and most effective method.”

 

Alternative methods You’ll find all sorts of “natural” lice remedies at drugstores, natural food stores, and online. These products are not regulated by the FDA and there’s no scientific proof that they’re safe or effective (and some could be toxic, so be careful). Home remedies ranging from olive oil, baby oil, mayonnaise, and petroleum jelly to using a blow dryer are also popular, but not scientifically tested.

 

If you need help or have more questions call us at:

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

  1. Mancini

Chicago Childrens Hospital

312-972-WELL

Foods, Uncategorized

Basil Shrimp and Zucchini Pasta

basilshrinpzucchinipasta

 

Basil, Shrimp & Zucchini Pasta

 

This quick-cooking, healthy dinner is a simple combination

 

of zucchini, shrimp and pasta flecked with plenty of fresh basil.

 

If you have leftover cooked pasta from another meal, use it and skip Step 2.

 

Since the recipe combines a starch, vegetables and the shrimp,

 

all you need is a fruit or vegetable salad to round out the menu.

 

 

Ingredients

 

 

◾1/2 cup chopped fresh basil leaves, divided

◾1 8-ounce can tomato sauce

◾2 teaspoons plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, divided

◾2 cloves garlic, minced

◾1/4 teaspoon salt

◾1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper, or more to taste

◾Pinch of cayenne pepper, or to taste

◾1 pound peeled and deveined raw shrimp (31-40 per pound; see Note)

◾2 cups orecchiette or other small pasta, preferably whole-wheat

◾2 medium zucchini or summer squash or 1 of each

 

 

Preparation

1.Combine 1/4 cup basil, tomato sauce, 2 teaspoons oil, garlic, salt, pepper and cayenne in a medium bowl. Stir in shrimp; let stand for at least 10 minutes and up to 30 minutes.

2.Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large pan of boiling water until just tender, 8 to 11 minutes or according to package directions. Drain.

3.Quarter squash lengthwise and cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking. Add the shrimp mixture along with the squash. Cook, stirring, until the shrimp are pink and just barely cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in the pasta and heat, stirring, until piping hot, 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in the remaining 1/4 cup basil and season with pepper.

 

Tips & Notes

Note: Shrimp is usually sold by the number needed to make one pound. For example, “21-25 count” means there will be 21 to 25 shrimp in a pound. Size names, such as “large” or “extra large,” are not standardized, so to get the size you want, order by the count per pound. Both wild-caught and farm-raised shrimp can damage the surrounding ecosystems when not managed properly. Fortunately, it is possible to buy shrimp that have been raised or caught with sound environmental practices. Look for fresh or frozen shrimp certified by an independent agency, such as the Marine Stewardship Council. If you can’t find certified shrimp, choose wild-caught shrimp from North America—it’s more likely to be sustainably caught.

Nutrition

 

Per serving: 315 calories; 8 g fat ( 1 g sat , 5 g mono ); 143 mg cholesterol; 40 g carbohydrates; 0 g added sugars; 24 g protein; 7 g fiber; 622 mg sodium; 687 mg potassium.

 

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (38% daily value), Magnesium (30% dv), Folate & Potassium (20% dv), Vitamin A (19% dv), Zinc (18% dv), Iron (17% dv)

 

Carbohydrate Servings: 2

 

Exchanges: 2 starch, 1 vegetable, 2 lean meat, 1 fat

 

Please share with family and loved ones, and call us with your healthcare concerns.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archive

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Lower Your Blood Pressure with A Daily Dose of Onions.

onions

 

Lower your Blood Pressure with a daily dose of onions.

In a Spanish study, eating 1/3 cup of onions daily, any kind of onions,

it cut patients blood pressure by 21% in five weeks. Onions are

rich in quercetin, a natural diuretic that lowers pressure by

flushing our excess fluids and salt. Many people stop eating onions

because of bad breath worries, but please put them back in your

diet and make sure any older people put them back in their diets

also, to avoid and congestive heart problems.

 

As always please share with family and loved ones.  If you need help with your personalized healthcare plan, please call us.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived: P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Morgellons Disease and GMO in Skincare Products

morgellons

 

Morgellons Disease and GMO in skin care products

 

Morgellons is a disease in which unusual thread-like fibers appear under the skin. The person feels like something is crawling, biting or stinging all over.

Dr. Joe Cummins, Professor Emeritus at the University of Western Ontario, states the link between morgellons disease and GMO foods is connected. Professor Cummins noted that Morgellons sufferers tested for Agrobacterium tumefaciens (AT) infestation. According to biochemist Vitaly Citosky, who carried out research on agrobacterium, “Agrobacterium is capable of genetically transforming not only plants, but also other eukaryotic species, including human cells, and is used in the production of some genetically modified organisms.”

There is more and more evidence that this disease may not be “delusional” and could be related to genetically modified foods.

 

GMO in skincare products: how to avoid them?

Unless skincare products are certified non-GMO or come from a company that is working on the certification process, there is a good chance that they contain GMOs. For example, canola has been modified to produce high levels of lauric acid, a key ingredient in soaps and detergents (this allows for reduced cost). Plant-derived ingredients were among the very first cosmetics, and large percentages of many agricultural commodities have been genetically modified. Indeed, genetically modified organisms have been developed to assist in the production of cosmetic ingredients. Other examples include soybean oil, corn oil, corn flour, proteins from yeast and lecithin.

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived: P Carrothers

312-972-WELL