Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Jalapeno Popper Soup

jalapeno-popper-soup

 

Jalapeno Popper Soup (Low Carb & Gluten Free)

Serves: 4 servings

INGREDIENTS

4 slices raw bacon

4 oz cream cheese

½ cup heavy cream

2 cups water or chicken broth

2 Tbl salsa verde

½ tsp garlic powder

¾ cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese

¾ cup shredded monterey jack cheese

4 large jalapeno peppers

¼ tsp xanthan gum (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

Cook the bacon in a medium saucepan until crisp – remove and chop for garnish and set aside. In the same pan, along with the bacon grease, add the heavy cream, water or broth, and cream cheese. Simmer gently, stirring often, until the cream cheese has melted and the liquid is smooth. Whisk in the garlic powder, salsa verde and shredded cheeses until completely incorporated. Meanwhile, wash the jalapenos and broil or grill them until softened and charred. Remove the skins and seeds and chop finely. Add to the soup and cook for about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. To thicken further, add the optional ¼ tsp of xanthan gum stirring until smooth. Remove from heat and serve garnished with chopped bacon.

NOTES

Aprrox. nutrition info per serving: 425 calories, 38g fat, 2.5g net carbs, 17g protein

 

Please share with family and loved ones.  If you have a health condition that you want to reverse and get healthy, call us.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

Advertisements
Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Low Carb: FIRE POT SOUP

firepotsoup

 

Fire-Pot Soup

Low Carb

 

serves 4

 

Ingredients:

 

3/4 lb raw shrimp, deveined, tails on or off

 

8 oz extra firm tofu, cut into small cubes

 

3 tbsp thai curry paste (available at large supermarkets and Asian markets)

 

1 tbsp canola oil

 

6 thai basil leaves, torn (available at Asian markets)

 

1 tbsp fish sauce

 

2 tsp sugar substitute

 

1/2 tsp salt

 

1 14-oz can coconut milk

 

2 cups chicken broth

 

1 6-inch stalk lemongrass

 

1/2 lime, juiced

 

2 red or green Thai chilies, pierced with a knife

 

 

cilantro for serving

 

Directions:

 

Heat up a teaspoon of oil in a large nonstick skillet on high heat. Add the shrimp and saute about thirty seconds, until pink and curled. Remove shrimp and place on a plate with the cubed tofu. Set aside.

 

Heat the remaining oil in the skillet and bring back to medium high heat. Add the curry paste and “mash” together with the oil until both are combined. Stir while cooking for another two minutes and then slowly whisk in the coconut milk and broth.

 

Add the fish sauce, sugar, salt, torn Thai basil, lime juice, lemongrass stalk and chilies and simmer for ten minutes. Chop the cooked shrimp and add both that and the tofu to the skillet and heat through. Add cooked rice to individual bowls and top with soup and sprinkle with chopped cilantro. Don’t forget to discard the lemongrass and chilies—you don’t want to eat those!

 

Time: 1 hour

 

Please share with family and loved ones.  Call us with all your healthcare concerns and individual healthcare plan just for your body.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Low Carb: Brazilian Shrimp Stew

brazilian-shrimpstew

BRAZILIAN SHRIMP STEW (MOQUECA DE CAMAROES)

 

 

A delicious, easy to make bowl of soup that is Low Carb, Paleo, and Whole 30 compliant!

 

Cuisine: Seafood stew

Serves: 6 servings

INGREDIENTS

1½ lbs raw shrimp, peeled & deveined

¼ cup olive oil

¼ cup onion, diced

1 clove garlic, minced

¼ cup roasted red pepper, diced

¼ cup fresh cilantro, chopped

(1) 14 oz can diced tomatoes w/ chili’s

1 cup coconut milk

2 Tbsp Sriracha hot sauce (sambal oelek if you’re whole 30)

2 Tbsp fresh lime juice

salt and pepper to taste

INSTRUCTIONS

Heat olive oil in a medium saucepan. Saute onions for several minutes until translucent, then add the garlic and peppers and cook for several minutes more. Add the tomatoes, shrimp and cilantro to the pan and simmer gently until the shrimp turns opaque. Pour in the coconut milk and Sriracha sauce (or Sambal Oelek), and cook just until heated through – do not boil. Add lime juice and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Serve hot, garnished with fresh cilantro. Cold beer optional.

NOTES

If you can’t eat shrimp, you can substitute any mild white fish, or even chicken, for the protein in this recipe and it will taste just as amazing!

NUTRITION INFORMATION

Serving size: 1 cup Calories: 294 Fat: 19g Carbohydrates: 5g net Protein: 24g

 

Please share with family and loved ones.  Call us with your healthcare concerns, especially if you wish to prevent a health condition that may run in your family, or reverse a condition that you already have.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

 

Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Try Rosehip Oil on Your Skin.

rosehipooil

 

Don’t Skimp on Your Skin — Try Rosehip Oil Now

 

Rosehip oil has been making a name in the cosmetics industry because of its phenomenal benefits for the skin. Supermodels and actors even swear by its skin rejuvenating and clarifying effects. But what exactly is rosehip oil and where does it come from? Keep reading this article to find out.

 

What Is Rosehip Oil?

 

Rosehip oil, sometimes called rose hip seed oil, can be obtained from wild rose (Rose moschata, Rosa rubignosa or Rosa canina) bushes, which grow in various areas around the world, including Europe and South Africa.1

 

Not to be confused with rose essential oil, rose hip comes from the “hips,” the small fruits found behind the flowers, which are left once the roses have bloomed and lost their petals.

 

Rosehip oil has a subtle woody smell — it doesn’t have a rosy fragrance since it’s not made from the flower. The color can range from a deep golden hue to a rich red-orange color to a light yellow color.

 

This can be an indicator of quality: golden or reddish rosehip oil is cold-pressed, while light-colored ones may be heavily processed or obtained from an inferior source.2

 

Uses of Rosehip Oil

 

Rosehips have been used for generations by Egyptians, Mayans and Native Americans because of their healing properties.3 The Andean Indians of Chile also recognized the exceptional skin and hair care benefits of the plant as well as its essential oil.4

 

Rose hips can be used to treat wounds and inflammations. For example, researchers in Germany and Denmark found that rose hip can actually ease rheumatoid arthritis pain and improve mobility by 20 to 25 percent.5

 

Today, rosehip oil is most notably added to cosmetic products like moisturizers, shampoos and lotions for its skin and hair rejuvenating and healing properties. However, you can actually purchase rosehip oil and mix it with a safe carrier oil to make your own topical applications.

 

Composition of Rosehip Oil

 

Rosehip oil contains a bounty of nutrients including vitamins A, C and E, essential fatty acids (linolenic, linoleic, and oleic acid), stearic acid and palmitic acid.6 Carotenoids, flavonoids and trans-retinoic acid, which have therapeutic properties, are also found in this oil.7

 

Benefits of Rosehip Oil

 

Do a quick search of rosehip oil on the internet, and you will surely be blown away by the number of testimonials on its beneficial effects on skin and hair. Here are some of the most popular benefits of rosehip oil:

 

  • Promotes healthy and vibrant skin. Rosehip oil is widely used in various skin care products. It helps fight the signs of aging and assists in diminishing photoaging.

 

  • Nourishes dry hair and prevents dandruff. Apply lukewarm rosehip oil onto your scalp, leave it on for an hour and then wash it out.

 

  • Keeps nails healthy. Massaging rosehip oil onto dry and brittle nails will hydrate them and make them strong.

 

  • Helps heal wounds and burns and removes scars. Rosehip oil can help speed up the healing of wounds and burns, while keeping the area hydrated. It also helps reduce the appearance of stretchmarks, age spots, scars and hyper-pigmentation.

 

  • Relieves sunburn. Apply rosehip oil to sunburn for a soothing and healing effect, while reducing inflammation.

 

How to Make Rosehip Oil

 

High-quality rosehip oil is made via cold pressing, which uses a press or a screw-driven machine to extract the oil, while preserving its potent antioxidants and essential fatty acids, which can be reduced via a chemical extraction process. Cold pressed rosehip oil is solvent-free and rich in nutrients.

 

As mentioned above, color can be used to gauge the quality of your rosehip oil. However, I still advise looking for one with an independent organic certification. This will guarantee that the oil will come from plants that are grown and processed without chemicals, pesticides and herbicides.

 

How Does Rosehip Oil Work?

 

What makes rosehip oil stand out from other essential oils is its vitamin A content, which binds the skin cells together and acts as an astringent. This washes away impurities and tightens your skin, giving it a youthful look.

 

The essential fatty acids also hold the same effect, binding the skin cells together for a more taut appearance. Because rosehip oil’s benefits are more readily obtained through the skin, your best bet to ensure that it works for you is to apply it topically as a:

 

  • Conditioner — Add it to your favorite shampoo, or directly rub it into your scalp, and leave it on overnight.

 

  • Facial moisturizer — Gently massage two to three drops of rosehip oil onto your freshly washed face twice a day, once in the morning and at night.

 

  • Massage oil — Mix it with a safe carrier oil and use it as a massage oil.

 

  • Treatment for skin conditions — Simply rub it onto the affected area to get its healing benefits.

 

Make sure to massage rosehip oil well into your skin to absorb all its nutrients. This oil has an ultrafine consistency and is lighter than other mineral oils, so it can be absorbed more quickly, instantly hydrating the skin without clogging your pores.

 

As with any essential oil, I advise doing a skin patch test before using this oil onto your skin. Simply apply a drop on your arm and see if any allergic reactions occur. I recommend diluting this oil in a safe carrier oil, such as coconut oil or olive oil before applying it on your skin, especially if you have a very sensitive complexion.

 

Is Rosehip Oil Safe?

 

Rosehip oil is typically safe to use, as long as it is used in moderation and in diluted topical applications only. Do not ingest rosehip oil without the advice of your physician or qualified aromatherapist.

 

While it’s been said to help remove or prevent stretchmarks, I advise pregnant or breastfeeding women to use this essential oil with caution, and only with the approval of their doctor.

 

Some rosehip oils may smell slightly fishy instead of woody, which may trigger vomiting in some pregnant women. Very young children should refrain from using rosehip oil.

 

Side Effects of Rosehip Oil

 

I advise you to use rosehip oil with caution, as its high vitamin C content may pose a danger to people with diabetes, and increase the absorption of iron, which may affect people with hemochromatosis, anemia and similar conditions.8 It may cause allergic reactions, especially if used undiluted, in people with very sensitive skin.

 

Please share with family and loved ones, and do call us for your healthcare plan, and questions you have about prevention and reversal of health conditions.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article: JM

P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

Lifestyle, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Are Pumpkin Seeds for You!

pumpkim-seeds

 

Pumpkin Seeds

 

If you’re in the mood for a chewy snack that doubles as a phenomenal health food, look no further than pumpkin seeds.

 

With a wide variety of nutrients ranging from magnesium and manganese to copper, protein and zinc, pumpkin seeds are nutritional powerhouses wrapped up in a very small package. They also contain plant compounds known as phytosterols and free-radical scavenging antioxidants,1 which can give your health an added boost.

 

Best of all, because pumpkin seeds are highly portable and require no refrigeration, they make an excellent snack to keep with you whenever you’re on the go, or they can be used as a quick anytime snack at home, too.

 

9 Top Health Benefits of Pumpkin Seeds

 

  1. Heart Healthy Magnesium

 

One-quarter cup of pumpkin seeds contains nearly half of the recommended daily amount of magnesium, which participates in a wide range of vitally important physiological functions, including the creation of ATP (adenosine triphosphate, the energy molecules of your body), the synthesis of RNA and DNA, the pumping of your heart, proper bone and tooth formation, relaxation of your blood vessels, and proper bowel function.

 

Magnesium has been shown to benefit your blood pressure and help prevent sudden cardiac arrest, heart attack, and stroke, yet an estimated 80 percent of Americans are deficient in this important mineral.

 

  1. Zinc for Immune Support

 

Pumpkin seeds are a rich source of zinc (one ounce contains more than 2 mg of this beneficial mineral). Zinc is important to your body in many ways, including immunity, cell growth and division, sleep, mood, your senses of taste and smell, eye and skin health, insulin regulation, and male sexual function.

 

Many are deficient in zinc due to mineral-depleted soils, drug effects, plant-based diets, and other diets high in grain. This deficiency is associated with increased colds and flu, chronic fatigue, depression, acne, low birth weight babies, learning problems and poor school performance in children, among others.

 

  1. Plant-Based Omega-3 Fats

 

Raw nuts and seeds, including pumpkin seeds, are one of the best sources of plant-based omega-3s (alpha-linolenic acid or ALA). We all need ALA, however, ALA has to be converted by your body into the far more essential omega-3 fats EPA and DHA — by an enzyme in which the vast majority of us have impaired by high insulin levels. So, while pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of ALA, I believe it is essential to get some of your omega-3 fats from animal sources, such as krill oil, as well.

 

  1. Prostate Health

 

Pumpkin seeds have long been valued as an important natural food for men’s health. This is in part because of their high zinc content, which is important for prostate health (where it is found in the highest concentrations in the body), and also because pumpkin seed extracts and oils may play a role in treating benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, or enlarged prostate). Research suggests that both pumpkin seed oil and pumpkin seeds2 may be particularly beneficial in supporting prostate health.

 

  1. Anti-Diabetic Effects

 

Animal studies suggest that pumpkin seeds may help improve insulin regulation and help prevent diabetic complications by decreasing oxidative stress.4

 

  1. Benefits for Postmenopausal Women

 

Pumpkin seed oil is rich in natural phytoestrogens and studies suggest it may lead to a significant increase in good “HDL” cholesterol along with decreases in blood pressure, hot flashes, headaches, joint pains and other menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women.5

 

  1. Heart and Liver Health

 

Pumpkin seeds, rich in healthy fats, antioxidants and fibers, may provide benefits for heart and liver health, particularly when mixed with flax seeds.6

 

  1. Tryptophan for Restful Sleep

 

Pumpkin seeds are a rich source of tryptophan, an amino acid (protein building block) that your body converts into serotonin, which in turn is converted into melatonin, the “sleep hormone.” Eating pumpkin seeds a few hours before bed, along with a carbohydrate like a small piece of fruit, may be especially beneficial for providing your body the tryptophan needed for your melatonin and serotonin production to help promote a restful night’s sleep.7

 

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Benefits

 

Pumpkin seed oil has been found to exhibit anti-inflammatory effects. One animal study even found it worked as well as the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin in treating arthritis, but without the side effects.8

 

What’s the Best Way to Consume Pumpkin Seeds?

 

In order to preserve the healthy fats present in the seeds, pumpkin seeds should be eaten raw. If you choose to purchase seeds from a bulk bin, make sure they smell fresh – not musty, spoiled or stale, which could indicate rancidity or the presence of fungal mycotoxins. Organic pumpkin seeds are preferred, as they will not be contaminated with pesticides or other harmful chemicals.

 

However, most nuts and seeds have anti-nutrients like phytic acid that can make all the previously discussed important nutrients less bioavailable when you consume them. So if you plan on consuming seeds or nuts on a regular basis, it would be wise to soak or sprout them. To make them more palatable, you can then dehydrate them in your oven, or better yet and more cost effectively in a dehydrator. There are many dehydrators on the market, but Excalibur is generally considered the best. I have used one for over 20 years. They are readily available on Amazon.

 

If you prefer to eat the seeds roasted, do so yourself so you can control the roasting temperature and time. Raw pumpkin seeds can be roasted on a low heat setting in your oven (no more than 170 degrees F or 75 degrees Celsius), sprinkled with Himalayan or other natural salt, for about 15-20 minutes.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

  1. Mercola

Archived Article

312-972-9355

Foods, Uncategorized

Free Range Eggs, Yes or No!

free-range-eggs

Free Range Eggs

 

Organic pasture-raised eggs are a great source of proteins, which are essential to the building, maintenance and repair of your body tissues such as your skin, internal organs and muscles. They are also the major components of your immune system and hormones. Pasture-raised eggs also contain healthful saturated fats and cholesterol—both of which your body actually needs for optimal

 

The definitions of “free-range” are such that the commercial egg industry can run industrial farm egg laying facilities and still call them “free-range” eggs, despite the fact that the birds’ foraging conditions are far from what you’d call natural.

 

True free-range eggs are from hens that roam freely outdoors on a pasture where they can forage for their natural diet, which includes seeds, green plants, insects, and worms.

 

Large commercial egg facilities typically house tens of thousands of hens and can even go up to hundreds of thousands of hens.

 

Obviously they cannot allow all of them to forage freely.

 

These confined animal feeding operations, also known as CAFO’s, are where the vast majority of commercially available eggs come from.

 

But while flimsy definitions of “free range” allow such facilities to sell their products as free range, please beware that a hen that is let outside into a barren lot for mere minutes a day, and is fed a diet of corn, soy, cottonseed meals and synthetic additives is NOT a free-range hen, and simply will not produce the same quality eggs as its foraging counterpart…

 

Free Range Eggs are More Nutritious

 

Mother Earth News’ 2007 egg testing project clearly demonstrated the nutritional differences between eggs from free-range pastured hens and commercially farmed hens. This difference is not an occasional fluke—it’s the natural and inevitable result of the diet of the hen laying the egg.  Compared to official U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrient data for commercial eggs, eggs from hens raised on pasture may contain:

 

1/3 less cholesterol     2/3 more vitamin A     3 times more vitamin E

1/4 less saturated fat   2 times more omega-3 fats      7 times more beta carotene

 

 

Where and How to Find High Quality Free Range Eggs

 

Your best source for fresh eggs is a local farmer that allows his hens to forage freely outdoors. If you live in an urban area, visiting a local health food store is typically the quickest route to finding high-quality local egg sources. Your local farmers market is another source for fresh free range eggs, and is a great way to meet the people who produce your food. With face-to-face contact, you can get your questions answered and know exactly what you’re buying. Better yet, visit the farm and ask for a tour. Most will be eager to show off their operation, as long as they’ve got nothing to hide. Your egg farmer should be paying attention to proper nutrition, clean water, adequate housing space, and good ventilation to reduce stress on the hens and support their immunity.

 

Cornucopia.org offers a helpful organic egg scorecard that rates egg manufacturers based on 22 criteria that are important for organic consumers. According to Cornucopia, their report “showcases ethical family farms, and their brands, and exposes factory farm producers and brands in grocery store coolers that threaten to take over organic livestock agriculture.”

 

Besides that, you can tell the eggs are free range by the color of the egg yolk. Foraged hens produce eggs with bright orange yolks. Dull, pale yellow yolks are a sure sign you’re getting eggs form caged hens that are not allowed to forage for their natural diet.

 

How to Eat Your Eggs for Maximum Health Benefits

 

The CDC and other public health organizations will advise you to thoroughly cook your eggs to lower the risk of salmonella, but eating eggs RAW is actually the best in terms of your health. While this may sound like a scary proposition for many, it’s important to realize that salmonella risk comes from chickens raised in unsanitary conditions. These conditions are the norm for CAFO’s, but are extremely rare for small organic farms. In fact, one study by the British government found that 23 percent of farms with caged hens tested positive for salmonella, compared to just over 4 percent in organic flocks and 6.5 percent in free-range flocks.

 

So, as long as you’re getting fresh pastured eggs, your risk of getting ill from a raw egg is quite slim. According to a study by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, of the 69 billion eggs produced annually in the United States, some 2.3 million are contaminated with Salmonella—equivalent to just one in every 30,000 eggsi.

 

While eggs are often one of your most allergenic foods, I believe this is because they are typically cooked too much. Heating the egg protein actually changes its chemical shape, and this distortion can easily lead to allergies. If you consume your eggs in their raw state, the incidence of egg allergy virtually disappears. I also believe eating eggs raw helps preserve many of the highly perishable nutrients such as lutein and zeaxanthin, which are powerful prevention elements for age-related macular degeneration, which is the most common cause of blindness.

 

Fresh raw egg yolk actually tastes like vanilla, in my opinion. The egg white is usually what most people object to when they say they don’t like the texture of raw egg.  If this is an issue, consider discarding the egg white, or simply blend the whole raw egg into a shake or smoothie. Personally, I eat just the raw egg yolks—I have four nearly every morning. I remove the whites because it’s just too much protein for my challenged kidneys. Beware of consuming raw egg whites without the yolks as raw egg whites contain avidin, which can bind to biotin. If you cook the egg white the avidin is not an issue. Likewise, if you consume the whole raw egg (both yolk and egg white) there is more than enough biotin in the yolk to compensate for the avidin binding.

 

If you choose not to eat your eggs (or just egg yolk) raw, soft-boiled would be your next best option. Scrambling your eggs is one of the worst ways to eat eggs as it actually oxidizes the cholesterol in the egg yolk. If you have high cholesterol this may actually be a problem for you as the oxidized cholesterol may cause some damage in your body.

 

Cautionary Note for Pregnant Women

 

Please beware there’s a potential problem with consuming the entire raw egg if you are pregnant. Biotin deficiency is a common concern in pregnancy and it is possible that consuming whole raw eggs might make it worse. If you are pregnant you have two options:

 

Measure for biotin deficiency. This is best done through urinary excretion of 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid (3-HIA), which increases as a result of the decreased activity of the biotin-dependent enzyme methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase

Alternatively, take a biotin supplement, or consume only the yolk raw (and cook the whites)

Eggs Won’t Harm Your Heart

 

There is a major misconception that you must avoid foods like eggs and saturated fat to protect your heart. While it’s true that fats from animal sources contain cholesterol, this is not necessarily a health hazard. As I’ve discussed on many occasions, your body actually requires cholesterol, and artificially driving your cholesterol levels down is nearly always doing far more harm than good. Every cell in your body needs cholesterol. It helps to produce cell membranes, hormones, vitamin D and bile acids that help you to digest fat. Cholesterol also helps in the formation of memories and is vital for your neurological function. In other words, dietary cholesterol is your friend, not your enemy.

 

Besides, numerous studies support the conclusion that eggs have virtually nothing to do with raising your cholesterol anyway. For instance, research published in the International Journal of Cardiology showed that, in healthy adults, eating eggs daily did not produce a negative effect on endothelial function, an aggregate measure of cardiac risk, nor an increase in cholesterol levels.

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

P Carrothers

J Mercola

312-972-9355