Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Loneliness and Breast Cancer Survival

loneliness

Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival

 

Loneliness may impede long-term breast cancer survival; a new study suggests.

 

In the years after treatment, women who don’t have strong social ties are more likely to have their cancer return or die from it than women with friends and a support network, the researchers found.

 

Reviewing data on nearly 10,000 breast cancer patients, the researchers linked isolation with a 40 percent higher risk of cancer recurrence compared to socially connected women.

 

These solitary women also had a 60 percent increased risk of dying from breast cancer and a 70 percent increased risk of dying from any cause, the study found.

 

The results weren’t unexpected, the researchers said.

 

“It is well established that women generally and those with breast cancer with greater social ties have a lower risk of death overall,” said lead researcher Candyce Kroenke. She’s with Kaiser Permanente’s Division of Research in Oakland, Calif.

 

People are social animals, said Kassandra Alcaraz, strategic director for health equity research at the American Cancer Society.

 

“We were not meant to be isolated, so the benefits we get from relationships with others and being part of a community are not surprising,” she said. “We know that social relationships are important to general health and well-being.”

 

Exactly why this is so isn’t entirely clear, Alcaraz said. “Having social ties may provide access to real assistance, like having someone to take you to the doctor or having someone to talk to about your concerns or connecting you with resources that can help you cope with the cancer,” she said.

 

Also, social well-being is correlated with physical well-being, Alcaraz added. Having connections to others helps reduce stress and depression and thus leads to better health outcomes, she said.

 

“We need to think of health in a more expansive way. Social influences can be just as important as other risk factors, such as obesity and smoking,” Alcaraz said.

 

Kroencke and her colleagues agreed, saying doctors should consider a woman’s social supports when making predictions for her recovery.

 

For this study, the researchers looked at a woman’s social connections in the two years after her breast cancer diagnosis to see how having friends, a spouse, relatives or community ties might affect her survival.

 

The report was published online Dec. 12 in the journal Cancer.

 

Data was collected on just over 9,000 women. Over an average follow-up of 11 years, more than 1,400 cancers returned. Also, more than 1,500 women died, nearly 1,000 from breast cancer, the researchers found.

 

The links between social connections and prognosis were strongest among women with earlier stage cancer, the researchers said.

 

Also, specific associations differed by age, race, ethnicity and country, Kroenke said.

 

For example, ties to relatives and friends predicted lower breast cancer deaths for nonwhite women. And marriage predicted lower breast cancer deaths only among older white women.

 

In addition, community ties predicted better outcomes in older white and Asian women.

 

“Our findings demonstrate the generally beneficial influence of women’s social ties on breast cancer outcomes, including recurrence and breast cancer death,” Kroenke said.

 

The results don’t mean that loners are doomed to an early death, nor do they show a direct cause-and-effect relationship between isolation and worse survival.

 

Still, it’s important for doctors and other health care workers to help patients connect with support groups and other programs so they won’t remain socially isolated, Alcaraz said.

 

“Social ties have positive health benefits, and social isolation is detrimental to health,” she said. “And it is not unique to breast cancer or to cancer for that matter.”

 

Please share with family and loved ones.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

Advertisements
Foods, Uncategorized

Jackfruit: and recipe

Jackfruit

 

Having a distinct musky smell and deliciously sweet taste, jackfruit is a unique tropical fruit that is typically harvested during summer and fall.

 

It can grow to enormous sizes, measuring between 10 and 60 centimeters in length, 25 to 75 centimeters in diameter, and can weigh between 10 and 100 pounds, making it the largest tree-borne fruit in the world.

 

Specimens weighing more than 100 pounds have also been recorded.

 

Jackfruit originated from the rainforests of India’s Western Ghats and spread to other parts of the country, the East Indies and Southeast Asia. It is now planted in central and eastern Africa and has become quite popular in Brazil and Suriname. In Bangladesh, jackfruit is touted as the national fruit and it is considered the second-most important crop after mangoes.

 

The exotic jackfruit is green when unripe, and then turns light brown and spreads a strong fragrant smell once it is ripe. Like durian, jackfruit is round or oblong-shaped, and has an outer surface that is covered with blunt thorn-like projections that soften as the fruit ripens. Inside each fruit are hundreds of small, succulent yellow lobes. Most jackfruit trees can bear as many as 250 large fruits every season. The tree is used as timber as well.

 

Although jackfruit is still considered an exotic tropical fruit in the U.S., it is becoming more popular in the vegan and vegetarian circles as a meat substitute. After about one hour of cooking, unripened jackfruit starts to resemble the flavor and mouth-feel of pulled pork.

 

Health Benefits of Jackfruit

Jackfruit is a nutritional bonanza: it is rich in vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber, which makes it a good natural laxative. It can help improve digestion, as adequate fiber can be an effective natural remedy to prevent constipation, and it can also benefit those who want to lose or maintain their weight by giving a feeling of fullness.

 

Jackfruit is also known to contain significant amounts of vitamin A and flavonoid pigments (carotene-ß, xanthin, lutein and cryptoxanthin-ß), offering antioxidant and vision support. As it is low in calories and sodium and does not contain cholesterol or unhealthy fats, its luscious fruit lobes make a healthy, appetizing treat you can relish.

 

The enigmatic fruit is rich in B-complex vitamins, containing niacin, pyridoxine, riboflavin and folic acid. It is a viable source of minerals, such as iron, magnesium, potassium and manganese as well.

 

As a good source of vitamin C — also a powerful antioxidant — jackfruit offers about 23 percent of the recommended daily allowance (RDA), which makes it useful in helping fight off infectious agents while scavenging harmful free radicals in the body.

 

However, consume jackfruit in moderation because it contains fructose, which may be harmful to your health in excessive amounts.

Studies on Jackfruit

A study published in the journal Plant Foods for Human Nutrition indicated that the pulp of jackfruit is a natural source of antioxidants that protect cells from free radical damage. This means the fruit can help slow down skin aging and can even assist in repairing damaged molecules, like DNA.1

 

Jackfruit contains lignans and saponins, which are beneficial phytonutrients that have been shown to offer anti-cancer properties. Lignans have been found to help block the effects of the hormone estrogen, which may decrease risk of hormone-associated cancers (uterine, ovarian, breast and prostate). Saponins, on the other hand, are known to optimize immune function and reduce risk of heart disease.2

 

Another study published in The Ceylon Medical Journal categorized jackfruit as a low-glycemic index fruit, which is attributed to its dietary fiber content.3 Consumption of unripe jackfruit can even be used to fight high blood sugar level, according to a Sydney University Glycemic Index Research Service study.4

 

Researchers also regard jackfruit as a “miracle” food crop that could be a replacement for staple crops that are under threat from climate change. It is very easy to grow and can survive high temperatures, pests and diseases, and is even drought-resistant.

 

According to Shyamala Reddy, a biotechnology researcher at the University of Agriculture Sciences in Bangalore, India, the jackfruit is rich in calories and nutrients and if a person eats 10 to 12 bulbs, he or she won’t need food for another 12 hours. For these reasons, this fruit could be utilized to help save millions of people from hunger.5

 

Jackfruit Healthy Recipe:

 

 

Easy Jackfruit Curry

 

Ingredients: 

500 grams fresh jackfruit   

2 medium tomatoes pureed       

1 tsp. virgin coconut oil

½ tsp. cumin seeds    

½ tsp. mustard seeds

½ tsp. nigella seeds

2 bay leaves      

2 dried red chili peppers    

1 small onion (chopped)

1 inch ginger (chopped)     

1 tsp. coriander powders   

½ tsp. turmeric

¼ tsp. black pepper   

½ to ¾ tsp. Himalayan salt 

1 to 1.5 cups of water

 

Procedures:

 

Heat extra virgin coconut oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the cumin, nigella and mustard seeds and let them sizzle for about a minute. Add the bay leaves and red chili peppers, and then cook for several seconds. Add the onion, garlic and ginger, and just a pinch of Himalayan salt. Cook until translucent (five to six minutes) and remember to mix occasionally.

Add the turmeric, coriander and black pepper, mixing well. Stir while adding the pureed tomato, jackfruit and the rest of the salt. Cover and cook for approximately 15 minutes.

Uncover and cook for another few minutes to make the tomato puree thicker. The jackfruit can also be shredded.

Add the water and then cover and cook for 15 minutes. Taste and adjust the flavor accordingly, then reduce the heat to medium low and cook for an extra 10 minutes or longer, until your desired consistency is achieved. Garnish with cilantro and serve.

 

We have not tried this recipe, and would love to hear your feedback

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Opioid’s Surpass Cigarette Smoking

opiod

 

Opioid Addiction Now Surpasses Smoking

 

It’s time to face the facts. America has a very serious drug addiction problem, and it stems from overprescription of painkillers. According to a recent report by the U.S. surgeon general, more Americans now use prescription opioids than smoke cigarettes.1

 

Substance abuse in general has also eclipsed cancer in terms of prevalence. Addiction to opioids and heroin is costing the U.S. more than $193 billion each year. Alcohol abuse is costing another $249 billion. In total, the cost of substance abuse far exceeds the cost of diabetes, which is also at a record high.

 

Opiates such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, fentanyl and morphine are also killing more Americans than car crashes.2 In 2014, more than 49,700 Americans died from opioid or heroin overdoses while 32,675 died in car accidents. According to the surgeon general’s report, in 2015:

 

27 million Americans took opioids

More than 66 million (nearly 25 percent of the total adolescent and adult population) reported binge drinking at some point in the previous month

 

In 1964, the U.S. surgeon general’s report on the health effects of smoking helped reshape the general attitude toward tobacco use. Surgeon general, Dr. Vivek Murthy, hopes his call to action on drug addiction and substance abuse will have a similar impact. As noted in a recent NPR interview with Murthy:3

 

“We now know from solid data that substance abuse disorders don’t discriminate. They affect the rich and the poor, all socioeconomic groups and ethnic groups. They affect people in urban areas and rural ones. Far more people than we realize are affected …

 

For far too long people have thought about substance abuse disorders as a disease of choice, a character flaw or a moral failing. We underestimated how exposure to addictive substances can lead to full blown addiction.

 

Opioids are a good example. Now we understand that these disorders actually change the circuitry in your brain … That tells us that addiction is a chronic disease of the brain, and we need to treat it with the same urgency and compassion that we do with any other illness.”

 

According to the report, every dollar invested in treatment saves $4 in healthcare costs and lost productivity, and another $7 in reduced criminal justice costs. Murthy’s plan to address the addiction epidemic involves policy makers, regulators, scientists, families, schools and local communities.

 

This amounts to another American bailout, this time taxpayers will be footing the bill for a pharmaceutical induced epidemic – paying the same medical system that caused the problem for the antidote.

 

A Brief History on Heroin

 

Heroin was initially introduced by Bayer Co. in 1898. It was hailed as a “wonder drug,” commonly used to treat pain and cough. Addiction rates grew once it was discovered that its effects were amplified when injected. As reported by CNN in an article covering the history of opioids:4

 

“In 1914, the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act imposed a tax on those making, importing or selling any derivative of opium or coca leaves. By the 1920s, doctors were aware of the highly addictive nature of opioids and tried to avoid treating patients with them.

 

Heroin became illegal in 1924 … By the mid- and late-1970s, when Percocet and Vicodin came on the market, doctors had long been taught to avoid prescribing highly addictive opioids to patients.

 

But an 11-line letter printed in the New England Journal of Medicine [NEJM] in January 1980 pushed back on the popular thought that using opioids to treat chronic pain was risky.

 

In it, Jane Porter and Dr. Hershel Jick mentioned their analysis of 11,882 patients who were treated with narcotics. They wrote that ‘the development of addiction is rare in medical patients with no history of addiction.'”

 

Prescription opioids had been increasingly prescribed to patients with terminal illnesses, but prescription patterns took a radical turn in the mid-1990s, when opioids became the focus of a campaign aimed at increasing prescriptions to non-terminal patients with pain.

 

The Birth of OxyContin

 

Purdue Pharma started selling OxyContin in 1996. Two years later, the company produced a promotion video that was distributed to 15,000 doctor’s offices across the U.S. In the video, a doctor is featured saying:

 

“The rate of addiction among pain patients who are treated by doctors is less than 1 percent. They don’t wear out; they go on working; they do not have serious medical side effects. So, these drugs, which I repeat, are our best, strongest pain medications, should be used much more than they are for patients in pain.”

 

Doctors apparently took notice, because a year later, opioid prescriptions had skyrocketed by an astounding 11 million. As noted in the video above, for many years, medical students were taught that if a patient is in serious pain, opioid painkillers will not have an addictive effect.

 

Not only does this defy logic, but this notion has also been scientifically proven FALSE. These drugs are addictive whether you’re in pain or not, and the claim that less than 1 percent of pain patients develop an addiction to them was based on misinterpretation of Jick’s limited data.

 

As one doctor admits, the campaign was aimed at destigmatizing the use of opioids, and in so doing, they often “left evidence behind.” Pain has such an adverse impact on quality of life, doctors owed it to their patients to be more aggressive in the treatment of pain, the rationale went. As a result of this biased “education campaign,” prescriptions for narcotic pain relievers rose by 600 percent in one decade, laying the groundwork for today’s drug addiction epidemic.

 

Many Drug Addicts Got Their Start After a Minor Injury

 

As described in the BBC News video at the top of this article, many of today’s addicts became hooked after receiving a prescription for an opioid following a relatively minor injury. Their injury healed, but the subsequent addiction is now ruining their lives, and the lives of their families.

 

Many, including young people, have also died as a result. As noted by Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): “We know of no other medication routinely used for a nonfatal condition that kills patients so frequently.”5 According to Frieden, studies show that addiction affects about 26 percent of those using opioids for chronic non-cancer pain. Worse, 1 in 550 patients on opioid therapy die from opioid-related causes within 2.5 years of their first prescription!

 

In addition to that, most studies investigating long-term use of opioids have lasted a mere six weeks or less, and those that lasted longer have, by and large, found “consistently poor results.” Several of them found that opioid use worsened pain over time and led to decreased functioning — an effect thought to be related to increased pain perception.

 

How Revolving Door Policy Allowed Drug Addiction to Spiral Out of Control

 

I’ve written about the dangers of the revolving door policy that allows regulators to be hired by industry and vice versa on numerous occasions. In this case, former Drug ­Enforcement Administration (DEA) and Department of Justice (DOJ) officials hired by the drug industry fought for lenience and a “soft approach” to the burgeoning drug addiction problem.

 

They succeeded, thereby allowing the problem to grow more or less unrestrained, despite official promises to the contrary. As revealed in a Washington Post exposé:6

 

“A decade ago, the [DEA] launched an aggressive campaign to curb a rising opioid epidemic … The DEA began to target wholesale companies that distributed hundreds of millions of highly addictive pills to the corrupt pharmacies and pill mills that illegally sold the drugs for street use.

 

Leading the campaign was the agency’s Office of Diversion Control, whose investigators around the country began filing civil cases against the distributors, issuing orders to immediately suspend the flow of drugs and generating large fines.

 

But the industry fought back. Former DEA and Justice Department officials hired by drug companies began pressing for a softer approach. In early 2012, the deputy attorney general summoned the DEA’s diversion chief to an unusual meeting over a case against two major drug companies. ‘That meeting was to chastise me for going after industry, and that’s all that meeting was about,’ recalled Joseph T. Rannazzisi, who ran the diversion office …

 

[O]fficials at DEA headquarters began delaying and blocking enforcement actions, and the number of cases plummeted … The judge who reviews the DEA diversion office’s civil caseload noted the plunge. ‘There can be little doubt that the level of administrative Diversion enforcement remains stunningly low for a national program,’ Chief Administrative Law Judge John J. Mulrooney II wrote in a June 2014 quarterly report …”

 

Even DEA Officials Suspected Foul Play

 

In 2013, DEA lawyers also began insisting on increasingly higher standards of proof before moving cases forward. This included proof of intent — a factor that is very difficult to prove and typically only required in criminal cases. In 2011, 131 cases were filed against distributors, manufacturers, pharmacies and doctors involved in the illegal distribution of opioids. In 2014, that number dropped to 40.

 

In that same time frame, the number of “immediate suspension orders” dropped from 65 to nine. The suspension order allows the agency to freeze shipments of narcotics, effective immediately. Many DEA officials began suspecting Clifford Lee Reeves II, the lawyer in charge of approving their cases, of secretly working for the drug industry.

 

“We all had a feeling that someone put him there to purposely stonewall these cases,” Frank Younker, a former DEA supervisor in the Cincinnati field office told The Washington Post. Younker retired two years ago after three decades with the DEA. Kathy Chaney, a DEA group supervisor in Columbus, Ohio said:

 

“We got so frustrated, I finally told my group, ‘We’re not going to send any cases up to headquarters.’ In 25 years, I had never seen anything like it. It was one of the reasons I left. Morale was terrible. I couldn’t get anything done. It was almost like being invisible … We were all very dedicated, and we were all deeply disappointed that the program was being manipulated this way.”

 

Chaney’s own mother died from an accidental Percocet overdose in 1979. She became addicted after receiving the drug following a car accident. Her mother’s death was one of the reasons Chaney joined the DEA in the first place.

 

As these comments reveal, there are many good, solid workers out there, fighting to protect public health, yet corporations have been allowed to infiltrate key positions and manipulate from the top down, preventing any real progress that might harm the industry’s bottom line. This is exactly why it’s so important to combat this transfer of officials between government agencies and the industries they’re supposed to investigate and police.

 

19 Non-Drug Solutions for Pain Relief

 

In October, comedian John Oliver took aim at the burgeoning drug epidemic,7 noting the roots of the problem: narcotic pain killers, and more importantly, drug companies that falsely claimed they were non-addictive and safe to use for virtually all kinds of pain. Well, the jig is now up, and such claims can no longer be made. It’s extremely important to be fully aware of the addictive potential of opioid drugs, and to seriously weigh your need for them.

 

There are many other ways to address pain. Below are 19 suggestions. Clearly, there are times when pain is so severe that a narcotic pain reliever may be warranted. But even in those instances, the options that follow may allow you to at least reduce the amount you take, or the frequency at which you need to take them. If you are in pain that is bearable, please try these options first, before resorting to prescription painkillers of any kind.

 

Eliminate or radically reduce most grains and sugars from your diet

 

Avoiding grains and sugars will lower your insulin and leptin levels and decrease insulin and leptin resistance, which is one of the most important reasons why inflammatory prostaglandins are produced. That is why stopping sugar and sweets is so important to controlling your pain and other types of chronic illnesses.

Take a high-quality, animal-based omega-3 fat

 

My personal favorite is krill oil. Omega-3 fats are precursors to mediators of inflammation called prostaglandins. (In fact, that is how anti-inflammatory painkillers work, by manipulating prostaglandins.)

Optimize your production of vitamin D  As we have said before, always consult your healthcare provider or call us and we will help you, because vitamin D must be taken with other vitamins, and never by inself.

 

Optimize your vitamin D by getting regular, appropriate sun exposure, which will work through a variety of different mechanisms to reduce your pain.

Medical cannabis

 

Medical marijuana has a long history as a natural analgesic. Its medicinal qualities are due to high amounts (up to 20 percent) of cannabidiol (CBD), medicinal terpenes and flavonoids.

 

Varieties of cannabis exist that are very low in tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) — the psychoactive component of marijuana that makes you feel “stoned” — and high in medicinal CBD. Medical marijuana is now legal in 28 states. You can learn more about the laws in your state on medicalmarijuana.procon.org.8

Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT)

 

EFT is a drug-free approach for pain management of all kinds. EFT borrows from the principles of acupuncture in that it helps you balance out your subtle energy system. It helps resolve underlying, often subconscious, and negative emotions that may be exacerbating your physical pain.

 

By stimulating (tapping) well-established acupuncture points with your fingertips, you rebalance your energy system, which tends to dissipate pain.

 

Among volunteers who had never meditated before, those who attended four 20-minute classes to learn a meditation technique called focused attention (a form of mindfulness meditation), experienced significant pain relief — a 40 percent reduction in pain intensity and a 57 percent reduction in pain unpleasantness.9

 

 

K-Laser, Class 4 Laser Therapy

 

If you suffer pain from an injury, arthritis or other inflammation-based pain, I’d strongly encourage you to try out K-Laser therapy. It can be an excellent choice for many painful conditions, including acute injuries. By addressing the underlying cause of the pain, you will no longer need to rely on painkillers.

 

K-Laser is a class 4 infrared laser therapy treatment that helps reduce pain, reduce inflammation and enhance tissue healing — both in hard and soft tissues, including muscles, ligaments or even bones. The infrared wavelengths used in the K-Laser allow for targeting specific areas of your body and can penetrate deeply into the body to reach areas such as your spine and hip.

Chiropractic

 

Many studies have confirmed that chiropractic management is much safer and less expensive than allopathic medical treatments, especially when used for pain such as low back pain.

 

Qualified chiropractic, osteopathic and naturopathic physicians are reliable, as they have received extensive training in the management of musculoskeletal disorders during their course of graduate healthcare training, which lasts between four to six years. These health experts have comprehensive training in musculoskeletal management.

Acupuncture

 

Research has discovered a “clear and robust” effect of acupuncture in the treatment of back, neck and shoulder pain, osteoarthritis and headaches.

Physical therapy

 

Physical therapy has been shown to be as good as surgery for painful conditions such as torn cartilage and arthritis.

Massage

 

A systematic review and meta-analysis published in the journal Pain Medicine included 60 high-quality and seven low-quality studies that looked into the use of massage for various types of pain, including muscle and bone pain, headaches, deep internal pain, fibromyalgia pain and spinal cord pain.10

 

The review revealed that massage therapy relieves pain better than getting no treatment at all. When compared to other pain treatments like acupuncture and physical therapy, massage therapy still proved beneficial and had few side effects. In addition to relieving pain, massage therapy also improved anxiety and health-related quality of life.

Astaxanthin

 

Astaxanthin is one of the most effective fat-soluble antioxidants known. It has very potent anti-inflammatory properties and in many cases works far more effectively than anti-inflammatory drugs. Higher doses are typically required and you may need 8 milligrams (mg) or more per day to achieve this benefit.

Ginger

 

This herb has potent anti-inflammatory activity and offers pain relief and stomach-settling properties. Fresh ginger works well steeped in boiling water as a tea or grated into vegetable juice.

Curcumin

 

In a study of osteoarthritis patients, those who added 200 milligrams (mg) of curcumin a day to their treatment plan had reduced pain and increased mobility. A past study also found that a turmeric extract composed of curcuminoids blocked inflammatory pathways, effectively preventing the overproduction of a protein that triggers swelling and pain.11

Boswellia

 

Also known as boswellin or “Indian frankincense,” this herb contains specific active anti-inflammatory ingredients. This is one of my personal favorites as I have seen it work well with many rheumatoid arthritis patients.

Bromelain

 

This enzyme, found in pineapples, is a natural anti-inflammatory. It can be taken in supplement form but eating fresh pineapple, including some of the bromelain-rich stem, may also be helpful.

Cetyl Myristoleate (CMO)

 

This oil, found in fish and dairy butter, acts as a “joint lubricant” and an anti-inflammatory. I have used this for myself to relieve ganglion cysts and a mildly annoying carpal tunnel syndrome that pops up when I type too much on non-ergonomic keyboards. I used a topical preparation for this.

Evening Primrose, Black Currant and Borage Oils

 

These contain the essential fatty acid gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), which is useful for treating arthritic pain.

Cayenne Cream

 

Also called capsaicin cream, this spice comes from dried hot peppers. It alleviates pain by depleting the body’s supply of substance P, a chemical component of nerve cells that transmits pain signals to your brain.

Methods such as yoga, Foundation Training, acupuncture, exercise, meditation, hot and cold packs and mind-body techniques can also result in astonishing pain relief without any drugs.

Grounding

 

Walking barefoot on the earth may also provide a certain measure of pain relief by combating inflammation.

 

I would like to add that if you have taken opioids for a length of time, or your parents have, then you may have chemical bending DNA, and many problems have been passed down in your family.

 

Please share with family and loved ones, and please call us to help you if you suffer from this situation or any other healthcare need.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived  JM

P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

 

 

Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Aspartame Linked to Leukemia and Lymphoma

dietpop

Aspartame, Proven Linked to Leukemia and Lymphoma

 

As few as one diet soda daily may increase the risk for leukemia in men and women, and for multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in men, according to new results from the longest-ever running study on aspartame as a carcinogen in humans. Importantly, this is the most comprehensive, long-term study ever completed on this topic, so it holds more weight than other past studies which appeared to show no risk. And disturbingly, it may also open the door for further similar findings on other cancers in future studies.

The most thorough study yet on aspartame – Over two million person-years

 

For this study, researchers prospectively analyzed data from the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study for a 22-year period. A total of 77,218 women and 47,810 men were included in the analysis, for a total of 2,278,396 person-years of data. Apart from sheer size, what makes this study superior to other past studies is the thoroughness with which aspartame intake was assessed. Every two years, participants were given a detailed dietary questionnaire, and their diets were reassessed every four years. Previous studies which found no link to cancer only ever assessed participants’ aspartame intake at one point in time, which could be a major weakness affecting their accuracy.

 

One diet soda a day increases leukemia, multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas

 

The combined results of this new study showed that just one 12-fl oz. can (355 ml) of diet soda daily leads to:

 

– 42 percent higher leukemia risk in men and women (pooled analysis)

– 102 percent higher multiple myeloma risk (in men only)

– 31 percent higher non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk (in men only)

 

These results were based on multi-variable relative risk models, all in comparison to participants who drank no diet soda. It is unknown why only men drinking higher amounts of diet soda showed increased risk for multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Note that diet soda is the largest dietary source of aspartame (by far) in the U.S. Every year, Americans consume about 5,250 tons of aspartame in total, of which about 86 percent (4,500 tons) is found in diet sodas.

 

 

 

Confirmation of previous high quality research on animals

 

This new study shows the importance of the quality of research. Most of the past studies showing no link between aspartame and cancer have been criticized for being too short in duration and too inaccurate in assessing long-term aspartame intake. This new study solves both of those issues. The fact that it also shows a positive link to cancer should come as no surprise, because a previous best-in-class research study done on animals (900 rats over their entire natural lifetimes) showed strikingly similar results back in 2006: aspartame significantly increased the risk for lymphomas and leukemia in both males and females. More worrying is the follow on mega-study, which started aspartame exposure of the rats at the fetal stage. Increased lymphoma and leukemia risks were confirmed, and this time the female rats also showed significantly increased breast (mammary) cancer rates. This raises a critical question: will future, high-quality studies uncover links to the other cancers in which aspartame has been implicated (brain, breast, prostate, etc.)?

 

There is now more reason than ever to completely avoid aspartame in our daily diet. For those who are tempted to go back to sugary sodas as a “healthy” alternative, this study had a surprise finding: men consuming one or more sugar-sweetened sodas daily saw a 66 percent increase in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (even worse than for diet soda). Perhaps the healthiest soda is no soda at all.

 

I have found two diet drinks that do not have aspartame in them.  Diet Rite, and Shasta products.  If you know of any please share with us.  Many diabetics don’t have a lot of choices.

 

Please share with family and loved ones.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL