Foods, Uncategorized

Fruit By The Foot Recipe

fruitbythefoot

Homemade Fruit By The Foot

 

INGREDIENTS:

 

4 cups mixed berries (I used raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, and blackberries)

1/2 cup unsweetened apple juice or water

1 teaspoon lemon juice

1/4 teaspoon lemon zest

1 tablespoon honey (you may need more if your berries are really sour)

*If using frozen berries, omit the apple juice and substitute 1/2 cup unsweetened apple sauce

INSTRUCTIONS:

 

Combine all of the ingredients in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Simmer for 20 minutes, until the berries have popped and some of the liquid has evaporated.

Pour the mixture into a blender, then carefully blend until smooth.

Line 2 rimmed baking trays with a SilPat or parchment paper, then pour half of the fruit mixture through a fine mesh sieve and onto the first tray and half onto the second. Use a spatula to lightly spread the mixture evenly across the baking sheet, to about 1/8 inch thick.

If you have a dehydrator with a fan in the back, these will only take about 3 hours on the high (150 degrees) setting. Without a fan, they’ll take about 8-10 hours on 150 degrees. I would assume that a convection oven would also take less time, but have not tried it yet.

You will know they’re done when you touch them lightly with your finger and they are no longer sticky. If the edges get a little too brittle and dry, you can brush a tiny bit of water over it and will be good as new!

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

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Uncategorized

Chocolate Muffins Veggie Style!

chocolateveggiemuffins

Chocolate Muffins

 

Veggie Style

 

INGREDIENTS:

 

1 tablespoon coconut oil, for greasing

3/4 cup shredded zucchini

4 large eggs

1/2 cup maple syrup

1/2 cup Apple & Broccoli squeeze packets

1/3 cup coconut flour

1/4 cup cacao powder

3 tablespoons arrowroot powder

1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda

3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1/4 teaspoon sea salt

1/2 cup dairy-free chocolate chips

INSTRUCTIONS:

 

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line a muffin tin with baking cups or grease with coconut oil.

Place the shredded zucchini on a tray lined with a paper towel to drain some of the moisture while you prepare the batter.

Place the eggs, maple syrup, and Apple & Broccoli puree in the stand-mixer and mix on medium speed until combined.

Add the coconut flour, cacao powder, arrowroot powder, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, and sea salt and mix again on medium speed until combined.

Wrap the paper towel around the zucchini and give it a light squeeze to remove excess moisture and fold it into the batter along with 1/4 cup of the chocolate chips.

Divide the batter evenly among the muffin cups, filling each 2/3 of the way full. Sprinkle the remaining 1/4 cup of the chocolate chips on top. Bake for 22-25 minutes. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then on a wire rack until completely cool.

 

 

Freezing : Let them cool completely then freeze in a ziploc or a resealable container.

Reheating: I take a few out at a time and keep them in the fridge so they’re ready to be eaten. If you want to eat them directly from the freezer, throw them in an oven or toaster oven on 350° F for 10 minutes to thaw and heat.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

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Thank you to S. Valentino

 

Foods, Uncategorized

Blender Bread

blenderbread

Blender Bread

INGREDIENTS:

 

ghee or coconut oil for greasing pan

8 eggs

1/2 cup unsweetened almond milk

4 teaspoons apple cider vinegar

3 cups whole raw cashews, about 450g

7 tablespoons coconut flour

2 teaspoons baking soda

1 teaspoon sea salt

INSTRUCTIONS:

 

 

Place a heatproof dish filled with 2 inches of water on the bottom rack of the oven and preheat the oven to 325°F. Lightly grease a 10 by 41⁄2-inch loaf pan with ghee or coconut oil. Line the bottom and sides of the pan with parchment paper so the ends hang over the sides.

Combine the eggs, almond milk, vinegar, cashews, baking soda, and salt in a high-speed blender and process on low speed for 15 seconds. Scrape down the sides and then process on high for 30 seconds, or until very smooth. Add the coconut flour and blend again for 30 seconds. If the batter is too thick to blend, add up to 2 tablespoons water until it is moving easily through the blender. Transfer the batter to the prepared loaf pan.

Bake for 60 to 70 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

Allow the bread to cool in the pan for 30 minutes, then gently remove the loaf using the parchment paper overhangs and allow to cool on a wire rack before serving or storing. Store the loaf tightly wrapped in parchment and cling wrap in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

To freeze – wrap the loaf tightly in parchment paper and place inside a freezer reseal able bag. Press all of the air out and zip it tight. Defrost in the refrigerator overnight.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

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Ty to S. Valentino for sending this

picture from yahoo

Health and Disease, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Do Not Give Your Child Anti-freeze!

antifreeze

Miralax is advertised as natural. It’s described as a tool to pull water into your colon so your gut can eliminate naturally. But there’s nothing natural about Miralax, as its active ingredient polyethylene glycol is a petroleum derivative. In essence, it’s plastic.

 

What’s more, Miralax is not approved for use in children. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has only approved it for adult usage and even then only for seven days at a time. If your pediatrician or doctor has recommended Miralax for your child you better ask why?  Even the slow moving FDA has said NO to children in 2008.

 

No one knows what for sure what happens when children take PEG laxatives chronically, but a growing number of adverse events are being reported, including concerning neurological disturbances, kidney problems and more. With scrutiny increasing, and a new study into their side effects underway, it’s time to think twice before turning to laxatives for constipation.

 

Laxatives with the active ingredient polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG 3350), the most popular of which is Miralax, are commonly given to children with constipation. Some of these children end up using the drug daily for years, which their parents (and likely their doctors as well) probably assume is safe.

FDA Study Detected Antifreeze Chemicals in Laxatives

 

In 2008, the FDA tested eight batches of Miralax because “many of the reported adverse events were classic symptoms of ethylene glycol ingestion.”4 Ethylene glycol (EG) and diethylene glycol (DEG) are ingredients in antifreeze so, in other words, the government tested the laxative after receiving reports of children exhibiting symptoms of antifreeze poisoning following their use.

 

The study “confirmed the presence of small amounts of ethylene glycol and diethylene glycol in all lots tested,”5 with the FDA describing them as impurities resulting from the manufacturing process. Those results were not released and only came to light after being “buried in the agency’s brief to researchers, issued last year [2014].”6 Yet, in 2009 the FDA’s drug safety oversight board raised several concerns about the use of these laxatives in children.7

 

They noted that children may be more susceptible to variations in PEG product quality and effects of large doses of PEG given for weeks or longer is not known. They also stated that “it is unknown if prolonged duration in solution would change the chemical properties of PEG-3350,” or, in other words, what might happen when the substances are ingested and/or metabolized.

 

In addition to finding EG and DEG in the products, PEG may be breaking down into EG and DEG in your body (polyethylene glycol is a chain of EG molecules).

So ask yourself again, why is someone recommending this for my children?

 

Thousands of Neurological Adverse Events Reported

 

There have been more than 7,000 reports related to PEG laxatives filed in the FDA’s Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS), according to Carol Chittenden, co-director of the Empire State Consumer Project, an advocacy group. This is likely an underestimate of the true problem, as for every adverse event that’s reported, there may be 100 more that are not reported.

 

Following thousands of complaints from parents, many of them in discussion groups online, the Empire State Consumer Project petitioned the FDA to investigate the safety of PEG 3350 in 2012. Part of the petition called for the FDA to add a boxed warning about children on PEG 3350 laxatives, which the FDA has not acted on.

 

However, in September 2014 the FDA awarded a nearly $325,000 grant The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to study whether PEG 3350 is absorbed by the very young and whether it contributes to the development of psychiatric problems. Among the adverse events reported, many of them are neurological in nature. According to the FDA:8

 

“Neuropsychiatric adverse events [in children using PEG products] may include seizures, tremors, tics, headache, anxiety, lethargy, sedation, aggression, rages, obsessive-compulsive behaviors including repetitive chewing and sucking, paranoia, and mood swings.”

 

There were also reports of metabolic acidosis, which is a disturbance in the body’s acid-base balance, leading to too much acid in your blood. While some cases of metabolic acidosis are mild others can lead to shock or even death. Poisoning resulting from ethylene glycol from antifreeze produces many of these same symptoms, including metabolic acidosis and neurologic effects.

 

If you or your child has experienced any adverse events while taking a PEG 3350 laxatives like Miralax, please report them – both to your physician and directly to the FDA’s Adverse Event Reporting System.

 

So why is someone prescribing Miralax for my child with an outrageously high number of seizures and tremors, aggression and other neurological problems.

 

PEG Laxatives Are Also Prescribed for Colon Prep Prior to Colonoscopy

 

Even if you’re not constipated, you may have taken PEG 3350 if you’ve had a colonoscopy screening. The laxative is commonly included as part of the preparation. Any PEG 3550 effects will, in this case, be limited to just one exposure, albeit a large one, unlike in the children that take this laxative chronically.

 

However, if you’re planning to schedule a colonoscopy and want a truly safe, non-toxic alternative, talk with your physician about using magnesium citrate only. The only side effect of magnesium citrate is loose stools, which is why it’s a non-toxic alternative for colonoscopy prep.

 

In addition, some practitioners are having a lot of success using colon hydrotherapy as a prep just prior to the colonoscopy. Unfortunately, at this time this is not widely available. Remember that your only option for colon prep is not to simply take the potentially toxic PEG 3550 laxatives.

If your physician is not willing to offer you an alternative, then seek out a physician who will.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived JM

P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

 

 

 

Lifestyle, Uncategorized

On The Go?

onthego

Do you know that terrible feeling when anxiety gets the best of you? Your heart starts to race and sink, palms get sweaty, lump forms in your throat… and your mind just WON’T STOP?

With our busy schedules and stress-packed lives, it’s no wonder we feel like that often… how are you supposed to relax and unwind when you’re always on the go and in a rush?

Your wish is to ease anxiety and make the racing thoughts STOP so you can finally live in peace

You are not alone. Many people can’t relax, can’t stop moving their feet when they are sitting.  People can’t stop thinking when they are sleeping.  People who cannot sit down for any length of time and just relax.  People who go on vacation and have to keep doing and doing and doing. People who are always doing things even though they admit they felt burned out. Being nervous, stressed, and lack of rest will keep making things worse. But there is a remedy!

The Healthcare Professionals here at Health and Wellness Associates are here to help you with this problem.  This could be a heavy metals problem or a digestive problem.  Yes, a chemical problem too.

Many chemicals have been put through your body and it does take its toll.  We can help you find out what it is and what to do about it.  Do Not Take More Chemicals, meaning a prescription to cure a chemical problem.

Please share with family and loved ones.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

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Uncategorized

5 Drugs Keeping Men Down

pills

Prescription Drugs And Erectile Dysfunction: 5 Drugs Keeping Men Down

 

These five categories of drugs may cause erectile dysfunction.

 

Most men who take prescription medications know that they’re going to come with a list of side effects, which usually include drowsiness, headaches, dry mouth, or upset stomach. Sometimes, they’re a bit more serious, encompassing everything from skin irritation to allergic reactions and anaphylactic shock. But most of these guys forget one of the more unwanted side effects: erectile dysfunction.

 

Around the country, erectile dysfunction, or simply ED, affects as many as 30 million men, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. Though this figure probably doesn’t include all those men taking prescription meds, they certainly experience the same effects, such as anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, and a decreased quality of life. Nevertheless, it’s important to know which medications may cause these side effects, and speak to a doctor about possible alternatives — or just prepare to have trouble keeping it up. Here are five of them.

Benzodiazepines

 

It’s interesting that benzodiazepines, which are commonly used for anxiety — but also seizures and insomnia — can cause ED, and thus further anxiety. In fact, you’ll find that it’s a running theme. Anxiety is well known to cause ED, as increased levels of stress harm the body and take away from a man’s libido.

Though common benzodiazepines, such as Xanax, Ativan, Valium, and Librium, may help calm a man’s anxieties through sedative effects, they may also end up lowering a man’s desire to have sex, as well as his ability to stay erect.

Antidepressants

 

Another condition that causes ED in itself, major depression affected an estimated 16 million adults in 2012. Antidepressants are also used to treat anxiety disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, and even long-term pain. One of the major forms of antidepressants, called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are comprised of the drugs Celexa, Prozac, Zoloft, and Lexapro.

Up to 60 percent of people taking SSRIs may experience ED, according to Medscape. Though it’s unclear how it causes ED, experts suspect it relates to the way the drugs influence function of the neurotransmitters serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine, all of which relate to feelings of well-being.

Beta Blockers

 

High blood pressure damages blood vessels, including those in a man’s penis; causing ED. But beta blockers, one of the drugs most commonly prescribed to people who have blood pressure, may also cause them to experience ED. Drugs that fall into this category include Sectral, Lopressor, Cogard, and Tenormin.

Just like antidepressants, these drugs also affect neurotransmitters in the brain, specifically epinephrine (adrenaline). In this particular case, they counteract the stimulatory effects of the molecule, tamping down on a person’s excitement. At the same time, some evidence suggests beta blockers also messes with the areas of a man’s nervous system that make him erect.

Antihistamines

 

Millions of men suffer from allergies, but some of the most common drugs, such as Benadryl and Dramamine, may be causing them to have ED, too. Though it’s unclear exactly how it causes ED, personal accounts of its effects suggest that it could alter the way men’s nervous systems react to stimulation around the penis. It also seems to be temporary, with sensation coming back gradually after ending use.

H2 Blockers

 

Also called H2-receptor antagonists, this category of drugs include the popular heartburn drugs Zantac and Pepcid. They’re used to treat gastrointestinal disorders like gastric ulcers, erosive esophagitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

For the most part, they cause ED when taken in high doses, and the drug Tagamet (cimetidine) is most likely to give men problems. Along with Ed and a decreased libido, they can also lower a man’s sperm count.

Though life on these drugs may seem grim within the sexual arena, taking them is important for treating whatever disease a doctor has prescribed them for. Also, by talking with a doctor about alternative treatments, lowering doses, or taking supplements, anyone who takes these drugs may be able to get some of their sexual health back.

 

So what do you do?

 

As always give us a call.  The answer to many of the symptoms described here, which started someone on the cycle of various prescriptions, can be treated and reversed with other ways.  Taking a chemical to treat a symptom is only going to cause more problems for you.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Naturally Flavored Waters

flavoed-waer

Say goodbye to soda, juice, and bottled water with these refreshing, healthy flavors! I’m keeping 2-3 flavors of this “spa water” in my fridge now, so I have a variety to motivate me to drink more water.

 

I was a hardcore Dr. Pepper girl for years. Then I gave up regular soda because of the high sugar content and switched to diet soda. Next we were warned to avoid the chemicals in diet soda; and more recently studies have indicated that diet soda actually causes rather than prevents weight gain (source). Geez. Lots of us moved on to bottled water, but that has landfill and environmental consequences and can be less healthy than regular tap water (source). Juice has more nutrition than soda, but is comparable in sugar, carb, and calorie content (source). Dang. It’s hard to keep up.

 

Simply water

At the end of the day, regular old tap water–or at least a filtered version of it–seems to be the way to go.  I’m fortunate that St. Louis is considered to have some of the best tasting tap water in the U.S. I still prefer the taste of it filtered through a Brita Water Filter Pitcher–we’ve been using one for years. But, I still don’t drink enough water.

 

Aside from my morning coffee, I honestly forget to drink fluids throughout the day. I know that it’s important for my health. I don’t dislike water, but I do get kind of bored with it. That was the motivation for starting to make flavored waters.

 

Subtle flavor without sweetness

These aren’t sweet waters, so they’ll be disappointing if that’s what you’re expecting. This is water with subtle flavors infused into it. Water with a little something extra. A touch of flavor–not an explosion of flavor–with little or no sweetness. You’ve probably had pitchers of ice water with lemon served at restaurants. This is the same idea, but with more variety. Many spas serve fancy waters like these, and it turns out that they couldn’t be simpler to make. And, they are oh-so-refreshing.

 

 

The KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) approach to Flavored Waters

My natural tendency is to go overboard and overcomplicate things, so I really have to fight that when I’m developing recipes. I read about and was tempted to try all kinds of methods for flavoring water that involve blenders, boiling, specialty infuser pitchers, and lots of different ingredients. But, I know myself. If I truly want to transition completely away from soda & juice and drink more water throughout the day, I have to make this simple so it can be an easy routine for me to maintain. When I read celebrity chef Jamie Oliver’s quick and uncomplicated approach to making flavored waters, I was inspired to follow his lead and keep it simple. My easy formula for making KISS flavored waters is to use only fruit and herbs, water, ice, and a jar or pitcher. This is something I can make in a minute or two so I can always have flavored waters on hand in my fridge.

 

How to make

Naturally Flavored Water

 

Supplies Needed:

 

fruit — whatever kind you like (except no bananas); make sure it’s good and ripe for maximum sweetness and flavor.  I like to use all kinds of citrus and berries. I also found pineapple and watermelon to work well for flavoring water. If you don’t want to buy whole ones, many grocery stores sell small containers of pre-cut fruit.

herbs — these are optional, but many herbs are a surprising complement to fruit flavors; almost any herb will work depending on your personal preference

jars or pitchers — I use 2 quart mason jars primarily, but any 2 quart pitcher will do.

fruit infusion pitcher–I recently purchased one of these–it’s another option if you think you’ll be making infused waters regularly; a very easy, tidy way to strain fruit from water.

fruit infusion water bottle–I love using this for a portable, on-the-go option.

muddler or wooden spoon for mashing fruit and herbs

water — I use filtered water, but regular tap water is fine if yours tastes good to you

 

Fresh vs. frozen fruit. When in season, I prefer to use fresh fruit. However, when fruit is out of season, the fresh version can be tart or flavorless. Because fruit that is to be frozen is picked at the peak of ripeness, it is often the better option for the best flavor, sweetness, and nutrients. I find this to especially to be the case with berries and peaches.

A variety of fresh herbs. Use whatever herbs you like or happen to have on hand. I picked all of these from my herb garden and have tried them in flavored waters. It’s surprising how well they blend with most fruit flavors, and they amp up the refreshing factor of the water. Mint is the most obvious herb choice. I also have tried basil, rosemary, sage, thyme, lavender, and tarragon. All good.

 

I’ll share some of the fruit and herb combos that I’ve recently tried for flavoring water. But, honestly, you can combine most fruits and herbs according to your favorite flavors and what you have on hand in your fridge. I’ll show you how to make 5 flavor combos. You can take it from there, creating endless flavor combos of your own.

 

Quantities: The quantities in my flavored water recipes are all for 2 quart jars or pitchers. However, I ran out of the 2 quart jars and used a few 1 quart jars, halving the recipe ingredients. So, don’t be confused by the different jar sizes. It’s easy to make a full or half batch depending on your jar or pitcher size.

 

The first 2 waters are

flavored with fruit only (no herbs)

WASH FRUIT THOROUGHLY! The citrus and berries need to be really, really clean to keep contaminants and bacteria out of your flavored water. I recommend organic fruit, if it isn’t going to be peeled.

 

  1. 1. All Citrus Flavored Water (adds refreshing tartness to water) — slice 1 orange, 1 lime, 1 lemon into rounds, then cut the rounds in half. Add to jar, press and twist with a muddler or the handle of a wooden spoon. Press enough to release some of the juices, but don’t pulverize the fruit into pieces. Fill the jar with ice. Pour in water to the top. Stir it with the handle of a wooden spoon or a chopstick. Put a lid on it, put it in the fridge, and chill.

You can drink it right away, but the flavor intensifies if it’s made an hour or two ahead. It’s even better the next day. 24 hours later straight from the fridge, the ice still hasn’t melted completely in mine. The ice at the top serves as a sieve so that you can pour the flavored water without getting fruit bits in your glass.

 

  1. Raspberry Lime Flavored Water (beautiful color and mildly tart) — Quarter 2 limes; with your hands, squeeze the juice into the jar, then throw in the squeezed lime quarters. Add raspberries. Press and twist with a muddler to release some of the juices (don’t pulverize the fruit). Fill the jar with ice, then add water to the top. Stir, cover, and refrigerate.

 

 

The next 3 waters are

flavored with fruit and herb combos

 

  1. 3. Pineapple Mint Flavored Water (a hint of minty sweetness). Add a sprig of mint to the jar–you can throw in the whole sprig; or, remove the leaves from the sprig, if you prefer to have the mint swimming around and distributing in the jar. Muddle the mint–the goal is to bruise the leaves and release their flavor–don’t pulverize them into bits. Add pineapple pieces, press and twist with the muddler to release juices. Add ice to the top and then water. Stir, cover, and refrigerate.

 

  1. 4. Blackberry Sage Flavored Water (subtle, refreshing flavor). Add sage leaves to jar and bruise with a muddler. Add blackberries; press and twist with muddler to release their juices. Fill jar with ice cubes, add water to the top, stir, cover and refrigerate.

 

  1. Watermelon Rosemary Flavored Water (lovely flavor combo). Add a sprig of rosemary to jar and muddle gently (rosemary releases a strong flavor without much muddling). Add watermelon cubes; twist and press gently to release juices. Fill jar with ice cubes, add water to the top, stir, cover and refrigerate.

How long will they keep? Put a lid on them, put them in fridge, and they will keep for up to 3 days. It only takes a few minutes to make several varieties to keep on hand. No more boring water for me!

Pour a glass. When there’s still ice left in the jar (my ice lasts up to 24 hours in the fridge), it will filter out the fruit/herb bits as you pour the water into a glass. After the ice melts, if you don’t want to drink fruit bits along with the water, use a small wire strainer to remove them as you pour the water into your drinking glass. UPDATE: Another option that was suggested by reader Kelley in the comments section is to use a sprout strainer lid made to fit wide mouth mason jars. I bought one, and it works great! (Thanks for the tip, Kelley!)

 

Sweeten it up, if you must. If you have a sweet tooth and find these flavored waters undrinkable without some sweetener, go ahead and stir in some simple sugar syrup, honey, agave syrup, or whatever sweetener you prefer. 1 teaspoon of sugar only has 15 calories, so go ahead and add one to your glass. Given that a single can of soda or juice has the equivalent of 10 teaspoons of sugar, you are still way better off drinking slightly sweetened water. If you are hooked on sweet tasting drinks and want to reduce or eliminate sugar or artificial sweeteners, you may need to wean yourself gradually. Unsweetened beverages are an acquired taste. I prefer them now, but it took me awhile to get there.

 

Or, try making my Naturally Flavored Fruit & Herb Honey Syrups. Just stir these into your chilled water for a healthier way to add a hint of flavored sweetness.

Great for entertaining! Flavored waters are very popular now, as more people are avoiding soda and juice. Make a variety of flavored waters to offer at your next party. Look how gorgeous they are! Refreshing, healthy, inexpensive, and beautiful. Plus you can make and refrigerate them well in advance of the party.

 

You might also enjoy these recipes:

 

 

General formula for whatever fruit/herb combo you desire.

  1. If using herbs, add a sprig of fresh herbs to jar/pitcher; press and twist with muddler or handle of wooden spoon to bruise leaves and release flavor; don’t pulverize the herbs into bits.
  2. Add approx. 2 cups of fruit to jar/pitcher; press and twist with muddler or handle of wooden spoon, just enough to release some of the juices
  3. Fill jar/pitcher with ice cubes.
  4. Add water to top of jar/pitcher.
  5. Cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days.

 

Suggested flavor combinations:

ALL CITRUS (no herbs) —  Slice 1 orange, 1 lime, 1 lemon into rounds, then cut the rounds in half. Add to jar and proceed with muddling, add ice & water.

RASPBERRY LIME (no herbs)  — Quarter 2 limes; with your hands, squeeze the juice into the jar, then throw in the squeezed lime quarters. Add 2 cups raspberries. Muddle, add ice & water.

PINEAPPLE MINT — Add a sprig of mint to the jar (you can throw in the whole sprig; or, remove the leaves from the sprig, if you prefer to have the mint swimming around and distributing in the jar). Muddle the mint. Add 2 cups pineapple pieces, muddle, add ice & water.

BLACKBERRY SAGE — Add sage sprig to jar and muddle. Add 2 cups blackberries; muddle, add ice & water.

WATERMELON ROSEMARY —  Add rosemary sprig to jar & muddle. Add 2 cups watermelon cubes; muddle, add ice and water.

 

 

Please Share

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived: Michelle

312-972-WELL

Foods, Uncategorized

Florentine Meatballs

 

Florentine Meatballs

 

Ingredients

 

1 box frozen spinach, defrosted in the microwave

1 1/3 pound (1 package) ground turkey breast

1 medium onion, finely chopped, divided

3 cloves garlic, chopped

1 large egg

1 3/4 cups milk, divided

3/4 cup bread crumbs, 3 handfuls   ( I would use Panko, made from rice)

1/2 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano, 2 palm fulls

Coarse salt and black pepper

Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling

2 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

1 cup chicken stock

1 (10-ounce) sack shredded provolone or blend of Italian cheeses, available on dairy aisle

1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg, eyeball it

1/4 cup parsley leaves, chopped

 

Directions

 

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

 

Wring defrosted spinach dry in a clean kitchen towel. Place turkey in a bowl and make a well in the middle of it. Add the spinach, all but 3 tablespoons of the onion, all of the garlic, 1 large egg, about 1/4 cup milk, bread crumbs, grated Parmesan, salt and pepper. Mix well. Form into 12 large balls and drizzle with extra-virgin olive oil. Arrange on a nonstick cookie sheet and roast 20 minutes, or until cooked through.

 

While balls are in the oven, heat a small sauce pot over medium heat. Add a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil and 2 tablespoons butter. Melt butter, add remaining finely chopped onion and cook 2 minutes then whisk in flour. Cook flour 1 minute, then whisk in 1 1/2 cups milk and 1 cup stock. Bring liquid up to a boil then stir in shredded provolone or blended Italian cheeses. Season the sauce with salt, pepper and nutmeg, turn heat to lowest setting.

 

Place 3 balls on dinner plates and top with sauce, garnish with parsley.

 

Please Share

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

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Thank you Anthony Kaminski for sharing with us

florentinemeatballs

Foods, Uncategorized

Caribbean Spiced Pork Tenderloin with Peach Salsa

porkwithsalsa

Caribbean-Spiced Pork Tenderloin with Peach Salsa Recipe

 

Ingredients

3/4 cup chopped peeled fresh peaches

1 small sweet red pepper, chopped

1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and chopped

2 tablespoons finely chopped red onion

2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro

1 tablespoon lime juice

1 garlic clove, minced

1/8 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon pepper

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 tablespoon brown sugar

1 tablespoon Caribbean jerk seasoning

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed

1/2 teaspoon seasoned salt

1 pork tenderloin (1 pound)

 

Directions

In a small bowl, combine the first nine ingredients; set aside. In another small bowl, combine the oil, brown sugar, jerk seasoning, thyme, rosemary and seasoned salt. Rub over pork.

Grill, covered, over medium heat for 9-11 minutes on each side or until a thermometer reads 145°. Let stand for 5 minutes before slicing. Serve with salsa. Yield: 4 servings (1-1/3 cups salsa).

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

Foods, Uncategorized

Jambalaya : Slow Cooker

jambalaya

Jambalaya

Slow cooker

Ingredients

1 can (14-1/2 ounces) diced tomatoes, undrained

1 can (14-1/2 ounces) beef or chicken broth

1 can (6 ounces) tomato paste

3 celery ribs, chopped

2 medium green peppers, chopped

1 medium onion, chopped

5 garlic cloves, minced

3 teaspoons dried parsley flakes

2 teaspoons dried basil

1-1/2 teaspoons dried oregano

1-1/4 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

1 pound boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch cubes

1 pound smoked sausage, halved and cut into 1/4-inch slices

1/2-pound uncooked medium shrimp, peeled and deveined

Hot cooked rice

 

Directions

In a 5-qt. slow cooker, combine the tomatoes, broth and tomato paste. Stir in the celery, green peppers, onion, garlic and seasonings. Stir in chicken and sausage.

Cover and cook on low for 4-6 hours or until chicken is no longer pink. Stir in shrimp. Cover and cook 15-30 minutes longer or until shrimp turn pink. Serve with rice.

Freeze option: Place individual portions of cooled stew in freezer containers and freeze. To use, partially thaw in refrigerator overnight. Heat through in a saucepan, stirring occasionally and adding a little water if necessary. Yield: 11 servings.

Feel free to share with family and loved ones.

Health and Wellness Associates

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