Monthly Archives: March 2017

Green Beans with Mixed Mushrooms

green-beans-with-mixed-mushrooms_1

Green Beans with Mixed Mushrooms

 

This simple side borrows the casserole’s basic flavors, but gives them grabbed-from-the-garden goodness with field-picked beans, thin-sliced onions, and earthy creminis and shiitakes.

 

Ingredients

 

2 tbsp. olive oil

4 sprig fresh thyme

2 large onions

1 clove garlic

8 oz. cremini mushrooms

4 oz. shiitake mushrooms

salt

pepper

3 lb. green beans

Directions

 

Heat covered 7- to 8-quart saucepot of water to boiling on high.

Meanwhile, in 12-inch skillet, heat oil on medium-high. Add thyme and onions; cook 10 to 12 minutes or until browned and very tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in garlic and cook 1 minute. Add mushrooms and cook 5 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper. Remove and discard thyme.

Add green beans and 2 teaspoons salt to boiling water. Cook, uncovered, 8 to 9 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Drain and rinse with cold water. If making ahead, transfer mushroom mixture to medium bowl. Cover; refrigerate up to overnight. Transfer beans to resealable plastic bag; refrigerate up to overnight.

When ready to serve, return green beans to saucepot and add mushroom mixture, stirring to combine. Cook on medium until beans are heated through, stirring occasionally.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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Bacon Jam

baconjam

Bacon Jam

 

“Bacon Jam will win you legions of fans. Use the power wisely. I know of one marriage proposal after this jam was served with breakfast.” Don’t limit this jam to breakfast, try it as a sandwich spread or mixed with cream cheese as a party dip. Get creative.

 

Ingredients

 

3 lbs. bacon (use a mixture of maple, thick-cut, regular and smoked lean bacon)

4 large yellow onions, peeled and thinly sliced

2-4 cloves garlic

1 Cup apple cider vinegar

1 Cup packed light brown sugar

1 1/2 Cups very strong brewed black coffee (try using espresso)

1/2 Cup pure maple syrup

1 tsp. pepper

 

 

 

Directions

 

Cut the bacon slices into 1-inch pieces. Place the bacon in a Dutch oven/heavy large pan over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring frequently, until the bacon is browned. It is important none of the bacon or bits on the bottom of the pan burn during the entire cooking process, so ease back a bit on the heat and let it cook longer if you are unsure. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the bacon to a paper towel-lined plate. Drain all but 2 TB. of the drippings from the pan, (Connie stores them in the fridge for other recipes—we did end up with 1.5 cups extra drippings!). Place the Dutch oven back over medium-high heat. Add the onions and garlic. Stir well and reduce heat to medium. Continue cooking for about 8 minutes, or until the onions are mostly translucent. Add the remaining ingredients (except for the bacon) and stir well. Reduce the heat to low. Stir well, then raise the heat to high, bring to a boil, stirring frequently, and boil hard for 2 minutes. Add the bacon, reduce the heat to low and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally to make sure things aren’t sticking. Add 1/4 Cup of water if the mixture seems to be drying out. When the onions are meltingly soft and the liquid is thick and syrupy (our batch took about 1 1/2 hours at low heat and we did not need any extra water) remove from the heat and let stand for 5 minutes. Transfer the mixture to a food processor or blender and pulse several times or until the jam is almost the consistency of chunky peanut butter. Scrape into a jar or a container with a tight-fitting lid. Store in the refrigerator for up to 1 month. This can be served cold, room temperature or warmed.

 

Prep. time:15 minutes

Cooking time: 2 hours

Serves: 24

 

 

Nutritional Information

 

Servings 32-34; Serving Size 2 TB. (92g); Calories 240; Calories from fat 170; Total fat 19g; Cholesterol 30mg; Sodium 360mg; Carbohydrate 12g; Dietary Fiber 0g; Sugars 10g; Protein 5g.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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HeathWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

How Can I Be Sure I Have Inflammation?

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“But how can I be sure that I actually have inflammation?”

 

If you suspect you might be dealing with inflammation, there are tests that can help determine the type and level of inflammation you may have. However, I’d ask you a few questions before you spend the money, time and effort getting these specialized tests ordered. Are you struggling with sugar or carb cravings? Are you having a difficult time shedding those last 10, 20 or 100 pounds? Do you ever struggle with digestive issues such as diarrhea, constipation, bloating or gas? What about low energy levels? Have you ever followed a low-fat diet? How often do you eat foods cooked in vegetable oil? Do you sometimes push yourself too hard at the gym hoping to burn some extra calories? Did you find out at some point in your life that you have a food sensitivity or allergy? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you probably have some chronic inflammation going on that needs to heal in order for your health to improve/symptoms to go away. Nearly everyone today is living in a state of chronic inflammation unless you’ve taken the measures to do something about it. Most of us have eaten low-fat, even if we didn’t want to, just based on what was available to us at the time. Intentionally or not, almost all of us have consumed processed foods, vegetables oils and trans fats more than our bodies would like.

There are two tests that can show if you have inflammation:

 

  1. C-Reactive Protein: CRP is a general blood marker of inflammation. It measures a protein that signals a response to inflammation. It doesn’t tell us the specific cause, but it does tell us that an inflammatory response exists. Make sure you don’t have any acute inflammation going on (from a recent injury, sickness or stubbed toe) when you get this test done because CRP will be elevated in response to any inflammation, acute or chronic. You want your CRP level well below 1 and preferably at 0, indicating that no inflammation exists.
  2. Fasting blood insulin: A high insulin level when fasting may indicate chronic inflammation in the body. Remember, insulin will be high as a response to elevated blood glucose because insulin acts as a vehicle for removing glucose from the blood into storage. When insulin is high, cortisol (your stress-hormone) is being released to inhibit insulin production. As mentioned in the previous blog (LINK) elevated stress is one of the many causes of inflammation. This test would be a second option, as the CRP test is our go-to for testing inflammation.

Lastly, kneel down.  How hard is it to get up.  That can tell us more than either test result.  And it saves you a lot of money.

These two markers can be helpful, but we certainly don’t consider them to be the be-all end-all. Other clues that you may have chronic inflammation are chronic fatigue, being overweight and difficulty losing weight, chronic aches and pains, indigestion, dry skin, acne, psoriasis, and allergies. We recommend following our anti-inflammatory PFC approach to nutrition and embracing a supplement regimen to take care of any chronic inflammation that may exist.

How to HEAL Inflammation

 

Now that we understand what can be contributing to inflammation, let’s talk about the healing process. Healing chronic inflammation doesn’t look the same for everyone, but if you follow the steps listed below you can be sure you are heading in the right direction. You need to REMOVE what is causing inflammation in the first place and then HEAL the damage. Yes, this will take time, so be patient as you won’t regret the improved life you can live!

Our approach to healing inflammation is a three-pronged approach:

Remove inflammation triggers by reducing your intake of inflammatory foods and participating in lifestyle habits that are causing the inflammation (i.e. avoid the bullets listed in the previous blog.

Heal existing inflammation with anti-inflammatory foods and supplements.

Be patient. Just like the chronic inflammation didn’t happen overnight, it doesn’t heal overnight. Give your body time to do its job and support it along the way.

Fight Inflammation with Healthy Fat

 

Healthy fats (yes these include saturated fats!) help heal inflammation. Translation: eat more butter, coconut oil, olives and avocado (unless you have sensitivities to any of those) which are nourishing, healing, healthy fats. Fat, including saturated fat, supports many of the body’s critical functions, including protecting against toxic overload, strengthening cell membranes (which make the skin more resilient against inflammation), stabilizing blood sugars, and providing a vehicle for your body to absorb fat soluble vitamins (leading to improved immune function). It’s important to be picky about the fats you’re using. The good ones will promote healing and the bad ones will promote more inflammation! It is also beneficial to make the switch to pastured, grass fed meats, as antibiotics in conventional meat can cause inflammation.

Inflammation Fighting Supplements

 

Along with avoiding bad habits and potentially damaging foods listed in the previous blog, many of our clients who have been dealing with chronic inflammation for years find that a healing supplement regimen is necessary. Three key supplements that combat chronic inflammation are: probiotics, L-glutamine, and fish oil. A probiotic supplement helps repopulate the healthy bacteria in the gut, which are essential for the healing process and get depleted over time from eating processed foods, sugars and trans fats (the foods that cause inflammation). You must work with someone who can determine for you which probiotic works for you.  They are all different and there are different enzymes in each bottle. L-Glutamine works on the integrity of the thin lining of the digestive tract, which can become inflamed over time. Fish oil specifically targets that inflammation and reduces it. This is why many of our clients find relief in back pain and joint pain when they start using our fish oil.

The amount of each supplement is individualized and depends on your lifestyle, your history, your goals and how much healing needs to happen. In general, we recommend starting with an intense regimen, taking all three of these, three times each day (ideally 15-20 minutes before each meal.). Our recommendations may increase or decrease based on your specific circumstances, but this is a good starting point for most people.

Be Patient

 

Changing habits, eating nourishing, real foods in balance, listening to your body, and giving it time to heal is imperative. Because chronic inflammation is the root cause of SO MANY health issues, it’s worth it to make the effort to calm and eliminate the damage that is taking place in your body that you can’t see. Once your body begins to heal, you’ll be amazed at how much better you feel. The damage didn’t occur over night, so to expect your body to be able to heal overnight can just cause frustration. You must be patient, and allow your body to do what it was meant to do, which is to use the healthy nutrients you consume to help it function at its greatest potential.

Never eliminate everything from your diet at once.  If you are working with someone and they recommend this, they are so very wrong.  Many people can develop seizures from eliminating everything at once.

As always, we suggest working with one of our health team for individualized recommendations if you feel you aren’t sure where to start, or how to go about cutting out certain foods or changing some unhealthy habits. We are here for you!

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

Grass Fed Beef vs. Poultry

grass-fed-beef-climate-change

Grass-Fed Beef is Superior to Poultry

 

For over 50 years red meat has been vilified for its heart clogging saturated fat & cholesterol content.  In Poultry products, have been marketed as the healthiest animal protein due to their low-fat content.  New understandings of health and inflammation now reveal that grass-fed beef is significantly more nutrient dense than poultry.

Saturated fat and cholesterol have been blamed for heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases.  Research indicates that saturated fats and cholesterol are necessary for overall cellular health.  They play an extremely important role in regulating neurological, cognitive and hormone function.  A diet low in these important fats causes lowered immunity, sex hormone function and accelerated aging and brain degeneration.

Beefsnutrutional

Red Meat can be a SuperFood:

 

Red meat could be one of the best foods in an individual’s diet or one of the worst.  The key factor is what the animal is eating.  Naturally, cows eat a near 100% green diet of grass, flowers, shrubs and other wild vegetation.  Grain feeding is genetically incongruent for these animals and leads to excessive weight gain and fat accumulation.

The typical grain-feed is made up of corn and soy due to the low cost associated with government subsidies.  Grain-fed cows are extremely high in omega 6 fatty acids. The average ratio for a cow on a grain-fed diet is roughly 25:1 (omega 6:3). This is genetically incongruent for all mammal species that should naturally be around 4:1

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The Importance of Omega 6:3 Ratios:

 

Humans should naturally have an omega 6:3 ratio around 4:1 or 2:1. When these ratios become skewed, they trigger cellular inflammation and accelerated cellular degeneration. This environment causes an individual to become highly inflamed and to build degenerative disease.

The more grass an animal eats the greater their omega 3 content and the lower their omega 6 levels.  A 100% green-fed diet, which is genetically congruent for a cow would provide an omega 6:3 ratio of 2:1.  This is ideal for the cows long-term health and is highly anti-inflammatory for human consumption.  The omega 3 fatty acids present in this meat are primarily the all-important long-chain variety EPA and DHA.

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The Poultry Based Diet:

 

Chicken and turkeys cannot live on grass alone.  They lack the highly-specialized digestive tract that allows them to convert grass and roughage into a quality meal.  This is too low in calories and too high in fiber for them.  They need some addition to grass and the vast majority of farmers choose to feed them a mixture of soy and grain.  Chickens can get about 25% of their calories from grass while ducks can go up to about 50%.  The higher the level of grass, the higher the anti-oxidant and omega 3 content of the meat and eggs.

Grass-fed mammals contain high levels of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA).  CLA is considered to be one of the most potent anti-carcinogenic nutrients.   In a study published in Cancer Research, animals given a mere 1.5% of their total calories in the form of CLA had a 60% reduction in tumor growth.   Finnish researchers have found that the greater the amount of CLA in a woman’s diet, the lower her risk of breast cancer.  Women who consumed the largest amount of CLA had a 60% lower risk for breast cancer.

 grassfedbeed

Grass-fed Beef Has Much More Anti-Oxidants than Poultry:

 

Grass-fed mammals are also extremely rich in carnitine and carnosine.  Carnitine helps cellular mitochondria drive energy efficiently from fat metabolism.  Carnitine is the critical gate-keeper that allows fatty acids to pass into the mitochondrial furnace effectively.  Carnosine is a powerful antioxidant that improves muscle, brain & cardiovascular function.  It functions to reduce the effects of stress and aging by protecting the proteins of the body which aids in tissue healing and repair.

Poultry has significantly less CLA, carnitine and carnosine than grass-fed beef.  Beef also contains a lot more branched chain amino acids.  This includes the crucial muscle building amino acid leucine.  Grass-fed beef has an enormous edge over free-range poultry when one compares the fatty acids, proteins, fat-soluble anti-oxidants and minerals such as zinc.

 

Call us and set up an appointment for you Personalized Health Care Plan.  No two bodies are the same!

Health and Wellness Associates

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HealthWEllnessAssociates@gmail.com

Ways to Include Mushrooms in Your Diet

mushroomsindiet

Ways to Include Mushrooms in Your Cholesterol-Lowering Diet

 

Mushrooms are a type of fungus commonly found on the ground and sometimes on trees. This delicious food is chock-full of nutrients, including fiber, vitamin D, minerals, and protein. Since mushrooms are also low in carbohydrates and fat free, this makes them a good food to include in your diet if you are watching your cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Most edible mushrooms do not have a particularly strong taste, so they can be included in practically any dish you create.

 

However, because some mushrooms contain poisons that could harm you, it is always a good idea to be sure that the mushroom you are eating is edible before you put it on your plate. Edible mushrooms – which are commonly available in your local grocery store – are very versatile, and this list will give you some good ideas on how to include mushrooms in your heart heathy diet.

 

Including Mushrooms in Soup

If you’re looking to add a little more fiber and protein to your soup – without the added fat – mushrooms are a good ingredient to have on hand. You can either cook mushrooms to use the broth in the soup, or throw in some mushrooms and cook them with your other soup ingredients. As with any food, you should be careful what you pair with your mushrooms and other healthy ingredients, as this could add fat and calories to your soup. If you wish to add cheeses sour cream to your soup, use a low-fat version instead to decrease the amount of saturated fat added.

 

Low-fat plain Greek yogurt can also be a healthier alternative to sour cream. Speaking of cream – creaming your soups can also add saturated fat to your meal. Therefore, instead of selecting creamed mushroom soup, select soups that have a clear broth (preferably vegetable, mushroom, or low-fat chicken) and are chock-full of vegetables, whole grains, beans, lentils, or lean meats.

 

 

Using Mushrooms in Your Sides

Mushrooms can be cooked, cut up, and added to many side dishes. You can either add it into your favorite vegetable or rice side dish or substitute it for meat in some of your heartier sides. When preparing your mushrooms, make sure that you are cooking them sparingly in an oil, such as vegetable or olive oil. Although it may be tempting to sautee them in butter or margarine, doing so could introduce extra fat into your meal.

 

Mushroom-Filled Entrees

Mushrooms can be used in the main course – whether you decide to add mushrooms as part of the dish or make it the main attraction. There are many heart-healthy ways to prepare your mushrooms, including sautéing, roasting, and braising. You can also throw mushrooms on the grill along with your other lean meats and fish. When preparing your mushrooms for the main course, you should make sure that you are minimizing the amount of salt used – especially if you are watching your salt intake. If you are wanting to cut out extra fat from meat-containing entrée, you can substitute the meat you are using for a larger mushroom – such as Portobello – dice them and combine them with beans to form a meatless patty.

 

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Italian Tuna and Bean Salad

italiantuna

Italian Tuna and Bean Salad

 

This recipe goes heavy on the fresh plant-based ingredients and uses animal protein from tuna as an accent. Tuna is a low calorie, high protein fish that contains heart healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Keep canned tuna in your pantry for a quick lunch or snack at a moment’s notice.

 

Because fish has so many nutritional benefits, it is recommended to consume fatty fish twice a week. Vegetables, however, need to be consumed every day in order to reap their nutritious benefits. This recipe gets a veggie boost with fiber-rich white beans, crunchy celery, and fragrant chopped shallot and fresh parsley. Keeps things fresh with a lemon and olive oil dressing. ( I still prefer sesame (clear) oil, saffron , sunflower, coconut oil)

 

Ingredients

1, 15-ounce can white beans, drained and rinsed

1, 5-ounce can water-packed chunk light tuna, drained and flaked

2 medium ribs celery, finely chopped

1 small shallot, thinly sliced

1/4 cup chopped flat-leaf Italian parsley

3 tablespoons lemon juice

1 tablespoon olive oil

salt and pepper to taste

romaine lettuce, crackers, or toast, for serving

Preparation

Combine the beans, tuna, celery, shallot, parsley, lemon juice, and olive oil in a medium bowl.

Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Serve with large romaine lettuce leaves, crackers, or toast.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

Want to make this vegetarian? Just nix the tuna fish. You can mash up the beans with the back of a fork for a “flakier” texture.

 

For a few veggie variations, try chopped green or red bell pepper instead of or in addition to the celery, or stir in some finely chopped carrots or radishes.

 

 

Mix up the herbs and try basil instead of parsley. All of these veggie and herb variations are comparable nutritionally.

 

Can’t knock the creamy tuna salad? Try using plain Greek yogurt, or even a creamy hummus instead of mayonnaise for a fresher flavor.

 

Cooking and Serving Tips

Get to know your tuna. Albacore tuna has more omega-3 fat per ounce but since it comes from a larger species of tuna, it also has more mercury. Chunk light tuna comes from a smaller species of fish and has less mercury and omega-3 fat. Both water-packed and oil-packed tuna can be part of a healthy diet. Water-packed tuna contains fewer calories and total fat and it may be slightly cheaper than oil-packed tuna.

 

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Are You Bothered With Eczema?

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Eczema

 

Atopic dermatitis (eczema) is a condition that makes your skin red and itchy. It’s common in children but can occur at any age. Atopic dermatitis is long lasting (chronic) and tends to flare periodically and then subside. It may be accompanied by asthma or hay fever.

This is caused by a chemical that is interfering with your body.  It can become worse when you are under an emotional or physical stress.  It may also be caused by Chemical Bending DNA, which means you have Inherited the basic structure of this problem.  Depending on what stage of this condition you have, you may notice asthma, hay fever or other environmental allergens also.

This is what we treat on almost a daily basis.  Yes, it can be treated. You may have tried various medications, and lotions, and baths to treat this, and sometimes they work.  They do not take care, or get rid of the cause of this itchy condition you have.  You may have heard about Dupixent injections.

Dupixent (dupilumab) injections treat moderate-to-severe eczema in patients whose condition is not controlled by topical treatments or who should not use topical treatments. However, the drug is far from cheap. A year’s worth of the medication costs $37,000, The New York Times reported, although that price tag is still lower than biologic drugs that treat other skin diseases.

Do Not Treat a Condition Caused by a Chemical, With Another Chemical.

When people are susceptible to chemical sensitivities in their body, it is only a short time when another chemical will bring on another problem.

If you need help with eczema, we can help.  We prevent and reverse diseases.  You have heard that many times, haven’t you.

Health and Wellness Associates

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Sibling Stress

Sibling-Stress

How to Navigate A Stressful Relationship with a Sibling

 

Parents have a huge effect on the people their children become. But there’s another family dynamic that can influence us just as much, if not more: the one with our siblings. Relationships with brothers and sisters usually continue long after our parents are gone, and they affect us at every stage of life.

 

Never is this more evident than when we struggle with an adult sibling. It is normal for brothers and sisters to compete with each other as kids, and even fight; parents often assume we’ll grow out of it, and many of us do. Yet simmering resentments about family roles or parental favoritism can persist over time and cause real pain and rivalry.

 

We may also find ourselves at odds with a sibling over core values — like political or religious views, or how to best raise our kids — and these differences can intensify routine disagreements.

 

As intractable as sibling conflicts can seem, they don’t need to be permanent, says psychotherapist Jeanne Safer, PhD. Adjusting our perceptions and taking a few simple actions can help build the best possible bonds with our challenging brothers and sisters, even if the relationships might never be perfect.

 

CHALLENGES TO OVERCOME

Idealizing sibling relationships.   “We have this idea that these relationships are, or should be, wholly positive,” says Safer, “and we use them as metaphors for very high ideals: Sisterhood is powerful. All men are brothers. It can be hard to live up to the idealizations.”

Parental favoritism. Safer says parental favoritism plays a prominent role in nearly all sibling conflicts — and it has its roots in a parent’s experience with his or her own siblings. “If a parent is the youngest of three children, and has three children, she is probably going to favor the youngest child, seeing herself there unconsciously,” she explains.

Denial. Believing you’ve outgrown any childhood rivalry with your sibling, or that you should have, makes it hard to address underlying resentments.

Differing destinies. If one sibling has a more successful career, is luckier in love, or has an easier time having or raising children, this can sustain resentments developed in childhood, Safer says. She cites the case of a physician who was a failed musician. The doctor envied her less-affluent sister, who played the piano beautifully.

Opposing values. You may be a lifelong Democrat and your sister a staunch Republican, or you may let your kids roam free while your brother keeps his on a short leash. If these differences create tension, Safer believes it indicates historical factors are at play. “These differences in values can usually be handled if the underlying issues are addressed,” she says.

Divergent memories. We might be angry at siblings who don’t share our views of the family system, but Safer believes that our memories and experiences are inevitably different. “You and your siblings have the same biological parents but live in different ‘psychological families’ because of the different roles you play,” she says.

Parental interference. When conflict erupts between siblings, parents often push for immediate reconciliation, Safer notes. “This very often means that the higher-functioning sibling is supposed to suck it up and tolerate anything that the lower-functioning one does.”

STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS

Take the initiative. “If you’re waiting for your sibling to address the issues between you, you may have to wait a very long time,” says Safer. “Get the ball rolling by reaching out yourself.”

Remember the good things. If you’re preparing to address a conflict with your sibling, Safer suggests a positive focus. Recall times when he or she was kind to you, stood up for you, helped you with something. “In your conversation, bring it up and thank him or her.”

Ask your sibling about his or her experience. Ask how he or she felt in your family — and be open to the explanation. Don’t expect it to match your own. Safer suggests this type of approach: “I really want to make things better between us, and I think that starts with our childhood. What was your experience of our parents?”

Address difficulties directly. Don’t let a casual “Mom likes you best” or “I always have to take care of everything” pass without a sincere response, Safer says. Ask if the two of you can talk about it. Explain that you want to connect and get beyond your roles.

Listen nondefensively. “You need to do a lot of listening,” says Safer. “And you need to listen particularly carefully to what the sibling has to say about the person you least want to hear about — yourself.”

Offer your services. Your sibling may respond better to what you do than what you say, especially if he or she is less inclined to ask for help, Safer notes. Offer to watch the kids, do some cooking, run errands. This allows you to show your implicit regard for him or her, which can help build trust.

Settle for modest improvements. Sibling struggles are deeply rooted, and they don’t always change for the better immediately — or completely. Your sibling might disagree that your issues stem from early family life, and he or she may not be ready for change. “But trying counts,” says Safer. “If you can go from being so estranged that you can’t stand to be together to being able to be decent to each other, that’s big progress.”

 

Please contact us with any of your concerns.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived   J Spayde

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

Impetigo

impetigo

Impetigo

 

Impetigo (im-puh-TIE-go) is a common and highly contagious skin infection that mainly affects infants and children. Impetigo usually appears as red sores on the face, especially around a child’s nose and mouth, and on hands and feet. The sores burst and develop honey-colored crusts.

 

Treatment with antibiotics is generally recommended to help prevent the spread of impetigo to others. It’s important to keep your child home from school or day care until he or she is no longer contagious — usually 24- 48 hours after you begin antibiotic treatment.

Depending on the adults working environment, these bacterial blisters can develop on any age adult also.  Ask for prevention methods.

imopetigo2

 

Classic signs and symptoms of impetigo involve red sores that quickly rupture, ooze for a few days and then form a yellowish-brown crust. The sores usually occur around the nose and mouth but can be spread to other areas of the body by fingers, clothing and towels. Itching and soreness are generally mild.

 

A less common form of the disorder, called bullous impetigo, may feature larger blisters that occur on the trunk of infants and young children.

 

A more serious form of impetigo, called ecthyma, penetrates deeper into the skin — causing painful fluid- or pus-filled sores that turn into deep ulcers.

 

When to see a doctor

 

If you suspect that you or your child has impetigo, consult your family doctor, your child’s pediatrician or a dermatologist.

 

Causes

 

You’re exposed to the bacteria that cause impetigo when you come into contact with the sores of someone who’s infected or with items they’ve touched — such as clothing, bed linen, towels and even toys.

 

Risk factors

 

Factors that increase the risk of impetigo include:

 

Age. Impetigo most commonly occurs in children ages 2 to 5.

Crowded conditions. Impetigo spreads easily in schools and child care settings.

Warm, humid weather. Impetigo infections are more common in summer.

Certain sports. Participation in sports that involve skin-to-skin contact, such as football or wrestling, increases your risk of developing impetigo.

Broken skin. The bacteria that cause impetigo often enter your skin through a small skin injury, insect bite or rash.

Adults and people with diabetes or a weakened immune system are more likely to develop ecthyma.

 

Complications

 

Impetigo typically isn’t dangerous. And the sores in mild forms of the infection generally heal without scarring.

You will want to consult someone about what foods intake should change, and other precautionary measures, since once you have had impetigo you are more prone to develop an auto immune disorder.

 

Rarely, complications of impetigo include:

 

Cellulitis. This potentially serious infection affects the tissues underlying your skin and eventually may spread to your lymph nodes and bloodstream. Untreated cellulitis can quickly become life-threatening.

Kidney problems. One of the types of bacteria that because impetigo can also damage your kidneys.

Scarring. The ulcers associated with ecthyma can leave scars.

Doctors or your health care professional usually diagnose impetigo by looking at the distinctive sores. Lab tests generally aren’t necessary.

 

IF you have any concerns about this, or how to prevent an auto immune disease please contact us.

Health and Wellness Associates

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HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

 

 

What to Eat to Strengthen Those Arteries and Veins

butchersbroom

What to Eat to Strengthen Those Arteries and Veins

 

Butcher’s Broom?

Butcher’s broom is a low-growing common evergreen shrub. It is widely distributed, from Iran to the Mediterranean and the southern United States. The plant develops edible shoots that are similar to asparagus in form. Butcher’s broom has tough, erect, striated stems with false thorny leaves. The name of this plant should not be confused with broom (Cytisus scoparius) or Spanish broom (Spartium junceum).

 

What is it used for?

Traditional/Ethnobotanical uses

  1. aculeatus was given its common name, butcher’s broom, because its stiff twigs were bound together and used by butchers in Europe to keep their cutting boards clean. The plant has a long history of use. More than 2000 years ago, it was noted as a laxative, diuretic, and a phlebotherapeutic (beneficial to veins) agent. Extracts, decoctions, and poultices have been used throughout the ages, but the medicinal use of this plant did not become common until the last century. Early investigations during the 1950s indicated that extracts of butcher’s broom could induce vasoconstriction and therefore might have use in the treatment of circulatory diseases. The increasing popularity of natural and herbal remedies in Europe in the 1970s reaffirmed its position in modern medicine. Novel uses for this plant have included its use as an anti-inflammatory agent and to prevent atherosclerosis.

 

Venous conditions

A variety of compounds have been isolated from butcher’s broom. The 2 primary active saponin compounds are ruscogenin and neoruscogenin. Butcher’s broom is the active component in several produce formulations and topical treatments for venous diseases and venous insufficiency, such as varicose veins and hemorrhoids. Limited results showing some promise from clinical trials are available. The German Commission E approves oral use for supportive therapy for discomforts of chronic venous insufficiency and complaints of hemorrhoids. Butcher’s broom also may be useful for orthostatic hypotension, although data is limited.

 

Other uses

Novel modern uses for this plant have included its use as an anti-inflammatory agent and to prevent atherosclerosis. The discovery of new pharmacological activity of butcher’s broom, particularly as a cytotoxic agent, demonstrate the need for continued research on butcher’s broom.

 

What is the recommended dosage?

Extracts have been dosed at 16 mg daily for chronic phlebopathy, while a topical cream formulation was used to apply 64 to 96 mg of extract daily.

Pregnancy/nursing

Information regarding safety and efficacy in pregnancy and lactation is lacking. Avoid use.

Cup of tea, teapot and branch of clover on wooden background

Butchers Broom Tea

Preparation Methods & Dosage: To make a tea from chopped root, place 1 teaspoon of the herb in a cup of boiling water and allow to steep in a closed teapot for 10 minutes.

 

Orange Peels

Yes, add those orange peels to any tea and it will help with strengthening the veins.  Orange peels can be put into desserts and when cooking meat, and get all the same health benefits for your veins,.

 

Grapes

If you have vein and or artery issues, or have had a heart attack, grapes with seeds is the route to go.  Try never to buy grapes without seeds, for there are too many hidden chemicals in those grapes.

 

Just a few things to help you out!

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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