Foods, Uncategorized

Healthy Chicken Fried Rice

chickenfriedrice

Healthy Chicken Fried Rice

 

Craving takeout? You can have this healthy fried brown rice with chicken and asparagus on the dinner table in 30 minutes, about the same amount of time you’d wait for delivery. This recipe swaps fiber-rich brown rice for white rice, which helps keep you full and keeps blood sugar steady.

 

Ingredients

2 tablespoons peanut oil, divided

1 pound chicken breast, chopped into bite sized pieces

½ yellow onion, peeled and chopped

1 carrot, trimmed and chopped

3 garlic cloves, peeled and minced

1 tablespoon minced ginger

2 cups chopped asparagus, from approximately a 1-pound bunch

⅓ cup water

2 cups cooked white or brown rice, chilled

2 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce

¾ cup frozen green peas

Preparation

Heat 1 tablespoon peanut oil on medium-high heat in a large skillet. Add chicken and cook until golden on all sides and cooked through, about 5 to 7 minutes. Remove chicken from skillet and set aside in a bowl.

 

Wipe skillet clean. Add remaining tablespoon oil to the skillet and heat on medium-high. Add onion, carrot, garlic, and ginger. Saute 2 to 3 minutes until onion is translucent. Stir in asparagus and ⅓ cup water, scraping up any browned bits at the bottom. Cook until asparagus is tender but still bright green and water has evaporated, about 5 minutes.

 

 

Stir in rice and soy sauce and cook, stirring occasionally, until slightly crispy and warmed through, about 5 minutes total. Stir in peas and cook an additional minute to warm through.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

If you’re usually not a fan of the heavier flavor of brown rice, you may be surprised to find you like it in this dish. The nutty flavor of brown rice is brought out by a quick stir fry in peanut oil. However, if you’re still not sold, you could try a mix of white and brown rice or make this with white rice.

 

Think of this quick and easy recipe as a template for making grain and vegetable stir fries. Look beyond rice and try different whole grains. Quinoa is packed with protein and has the same fluffy texture. Millet has a mild flavor that many people who do not enjoy brown rice will find pleasant. You could even make this with other whole grains like farro or spelt grains, which lend a nutty flavor and chewy texture from their larger grains.

 

To make this dish vegan, swap cubes of tofu for the chicken. You may want to marinate it first or toss with a seasoning spice, like lemon pepper seasoning. Tofu by itself is pretty bland. You could also make this with chunks of pork tenderloin or lean ham.

 

For gluten-free fried rice, use tamari instead of soy sauce.

 

 

Tamari is a soy sauce made from only soybeans rather than a blend of soy and wheat. If you are allergic to soy, look for coconut aminos, which has a similar umami flavor.

 

Feel free to use any combination of vegetables you or your family enjoy! I’ve made this with zucchini, green beans, broccoli, and peppers—whatever is on sale or seasonal at the grocery store.

 

For those with peanut allergies, make this with sesame oil, which adds a similar nutty flavor, or your favorite neutral flavored oil, like canola or avocado oil. Avoid olive oil, which is too strongly flavored for this dish.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived 2017

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

 

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Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Signs of Vitamin D Deficiency

vitaminD

Signs of Vitamin D Deficiency

 

Approximately 36% of healthy young adults and approximately 57% of inpatients in the United States and Europe suffer from vitamin D deficiency – that’s a staggering figure! Vitamin D is essential to strong bones and also to optimal muscle function. It has also been connected to reduced risk of death from heart failure, various cancers, hypertension and diabetes. Yes, it’s that important.

Many of the people who are vitamin D deficient do not even know. You can always request lab testing from your doctor and this is a very good thing to do. I recently had very thorough lab work which checked everything from my thyroid function to kidney function, vitamins and minerals – and it really helps not only isolate potential issues but can also sometimes catch life threatening illnesses early!

 

Although we are warned against sun overexposure, the best way to get enough vitamin D is through sun exposure. How much sun you need a day depends on many factors such as age, skin color, time of the day, season, and…. the use of sunscreen. Yes, if you put sunscreen on it blocks the vitamin D production. 10 to 15 minutes of natural sun per day is considered optimal. You can even spread this out so as to reduce risk of overexposure.

 

It’s interesting to note that in some cultures (for example China) it is considered fashionable and chic for women to be pale, not tanned. In China women go to great lengths to preserve their alabaster complexions.

Aside from sunshine, the two other main sources of vitamin D are food and supplements. For those who – for whatever reason – wish not to expose their skin to the sun, vitamin D supplementation may be a good idea

12 Signs of Vitamin D Deficiency

  1. Muscle and Bone Weakness:

Vitamin D is important for bones, muscles and teeth. Weakened bones, teeth, or muscles may be a sign that you are not getting enough of it.

 

  1. Feeling Blue Or Sad:

Researchers have found that woman with low levels of vitamin D are more likely to be depressed or struggle with deep feelings of sadness.

  1. Great Pain Sensitivity:

People who struggle with chronic pains often have inadequate vitamin D levels.

 

  1. Chronic Gum Disease:

People with lower levels of vitamin D are more vulnerable for swelling, reddening, and bleeding of gums.

 

  1. High Blood Pressure:

Vitamin D is important for your heart too. When you don’t get enough of it, you’re blood pressure may rise.

 

  1. Fatigue and Sleepiness:

People with lower levels of vitamin D lack the energy during the day and may have a constant feeling of fatigue.

 

  1. Mood Swings:

Vitamin D plays a role in serotonin production. This “feel good hormone” has a major impact on our mood.

  1. Decreased Endurance:

Studies have shown that athletes with lower vitamin D levels preform less and have lower energy levels compared to other athletes.

 

  1. Overweight:

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin, stored in our fat cells. People who are overweight or obese therefore need more vitamin D.

 

  1. Gut Issues:

People who struggle with fat absorption (ex. Crohn’s, celiac and non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and inflammatory bowel disease), may have lower vitamin D levels as well.

 

  1. Head Sweater:

Excessive head sweating is a common, early sign of vitamin D deficiency.

 

  1. Allergies:

Adequate vitamin D can reduce allergies. A study done on 6000 individuals showed that people with low vitamin D levels are more susceptible to allergies

 

The concern is there are many kinds of vitamin D and which one is right for you.  Contact us and that is our job to figure out what is correct for your body, not your neighbors or spouses.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived 2017

Dr. P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Common Painkiller Increase Risk of Heart Attack

commonheartattack

Common Painkillers Boost Heart Attack Risks

 

Common prescription and over-the-counter painkillers, including ibuprofen, boost the risk of heart attack, according to new research that backs earlier findings linking such drugs to cardiac hazards.

 

The study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), finds that higher risk of heart attack depends on dose and arises as early as the first week of use.

But the researchers said the new findings indicate doctors and patients should more carefully weigh the risks and benefits of so-called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Such medications include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cambia), celecoxib (Celebrex), and naproxen (Midol, Aleve).

 

Asprin, which is also an NSAID, was not among the painkillers linked to heart attacks and has consistently been shown to help prevent cardiovascular disease and certain forms of cancer.

“Given that the onset of risk of acute myocardial infarction [heart attack] occurred in the first week and appeared greatest in the first month of treatment with higher doses, prescribers should consider weighing the risks and benefits of NSAIDs before instituting treatment, particularly for higher doses,” the researchers concluded.

 

 

The findings are based on an analysis of studies by an international team of researchers led by Michèle Bally of the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center (CRCHUM), formerly an epidemiology doctoral student at McGill University in Canada.

The researchers examined the medical records of nearly 447,000 people, more than 61,000 of whom had a heart attack, from Canada, Finland, and the United Kingdom.

 

The findings showed that taking any dose of NSAIDs for one week, one month, or more than a month was associated with an increased risk of heart attack.

Overall the increased risk of a heart attack was between 20 percent and 50 percent greater for those using NSAIDs than those not taking them.

The findings also indicated the higher the dose or frequency of taking the drugs, the greater the risk of heart attack.

 

The study is the largest investigation of its kind to examine real-world patient experiences.

 

After previous studies reached similar conclusions, the Food and Drug Administration required cardiovascular risk warnings be added to the labels of all NSAIDs (except aspirin) in 2005, updated those requirements in 2015.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived 2017

Nick Tate

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/