Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Health Benefits of Coconut Brown Rice Pudding

coconutbrownricepudding

 

When it comes to the first and last meals of the day, it can be extremely difficult to find something that is both healthy and delicious. This challenge becomes increasingly difficult if you are attempting to eat a vegan diet. The answer to the breakfast and dessert dilemma is this delightful healthy twist on traditional rice pudding.

 

Traditional rice pudding is high in fat and heavily processed foods. By replacing regular milk with coconut milk, white rice with brown and removing the egg, the dish becomes an altogether healthier prospect.

 

This is a healthy, animal-friendly and tasty recipe for early mornings and late nights. So get out the slow cooker and start cooking!

 

Coconut Milk

 

The replacement of regular dairy milk with coconut milk not only makes this recipe a great choice for vegans, but it also provides a significant boost to your health. Coconut milk has a high copper content. Elevated levels of copper in the body have been shown to boost your immune system to fight off illness and infections.

 

Additionally, coconut milk has been proven to contain high levels of niacin (also known as Vitamin B-3). One of the significant benefits of increasing the level of niacin in your body is that it helps with a healthy increase of sex hormones and stress relieving hormones. Niacin is crucial to your reproductive and mental health.

 

Coconut Brown Rice Pudding

 

Serves: 8

 

Prep time: 5 minutes

 

Cook time: 3 hours 35 minutes (slow cooker)

 

Ingredients

 

1 cup short grain brown rice

1 can light coconut milk

2 cups water

2 tablespoons maple syrup

1 teaspoon vanilla

2 teaspoons cinnamon

1/2 cup raisins

Instructions

 

Put the coconut milk, brown rice, syrup, vanilla and water into the slow cooker and cook for three and a half hours on low heat.

Stir in the cinnamon and raisins.

Enjoy!

 

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

One Patients RA Treatment. Did it Work?

RA

 

Sarah’s RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis )  Treatment

 

When I first saw Sarah, we discussed her diet, and I suggested there might be a genetic influence involved as she’s Scottish-Irish. Many of her family members also had autoimmune problems, including multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Her genetic background suggested she may have an intolerance of wheat and gluten.

“You said I should eliminate that out of my diet as well as processed foods and sugar. You also did a metabolic typing. I did a very thorough questionnaire about how I metabolize food, about my energy levels, and about the stress in my life.

 

Along with my blood type, I was given a very special protocol of which foods would help me heal… I did a lot of vegetable juicing, which really helped me. I juiced probably 48 ounces a day of green juice.

 

I also ate a lot of organic grass-fed beef, ostrich, bison, free-range chicken and raw dairy. You even recommended raw eggs and raw egg yolks. Because I was in Wisconsin, I found an organic farm close to me. I got most of my meat, raw milk and my eggs from there. I bought all my fresh vegetables from local farmers markets. I got to know area farmers and learn about their farming practices.

 

I would buy a variety of vegetables and meats from them because I knew how they grew their food and raised their animals. I even used to meet the ostrich farmer in a parking lot across from the co-op where she used to sell her meats and buy it direct at a lower price. I also incorporated a lot of probiotics in my diet, and increased my vitamin D levels. Instead of suppressing my immune system with drugs to control my disease, I was using food to redesign my immune system and make it as strong as possible.

 

Apart from diet, the other important issue you advised me to address was the level of stress in my life. At that time, I was a teacher, new and passionate about the field. I worked very long hours, beyond what was healthy. Additionally, I dedicated several hours per week to triathlon training, and had some emotional stress in my life is well.

 

You, emphasized how stress and emotions impact immunity and now that I am studying Eastern medicine I have learned it is one of the primary causes of disease. I still question whether it was the amount of work and stress in my life which triggered the onset of my disease.

 

I cut back on the amount I was working and doing, and made more time for rest and enjoyment. You, also taught me Emotional Freedom Technique, a method of tapping along traditional energetic acupuncture meridians to help relieve emotional issues. I began incorporating EFT into my daily life, which was a simple and time-effective method to help me better deal with everyday stress and anxiety.

 

The Importance of Vitamin D

 

Vitamin D is a really important component. It stimulates 200 to 300 anti-microbial peptides that are even more powerful than antibiotics, which help improve and regulate your immune system and fight infections. Sarah, as many others with RA, noticed her symptoms were at their worst during the winter, and would often dissipate during the summer. This is what you call a giant clue that vitamin D is at work…

 

Invariably, unless you’re aggressively addressing your vitamin D level with sun exposure or supplementation, your blood levels of vitamin D will drop to dangerously low levels sometime in January, February, or March, when sun exposure is at its lowest. Optimizing your vitamin D is extremely important.

Essentially, if you’re using a supplement, you need to take whatever dosage is required to reach and maintain a therapeutic level, which can only be done by a healthcare worker that understands this.

Nourishing your gut microbiome is another important component. In addition to eating more fermented foods, it’s equally important to cut out sugar from your diet as it will feed pathogenic microbes and decimate your immune system, leaving you susceptible to autoimmune diseases of all kinds.

“I learned how to ferment my own vegetables and dairy products. I made my own kombucha, yogurt, cultured butters, milk kefir and coconut kefir. It took almost two years to get my system in balance, but right away, I noticed a difference.

In about two weeks my cravings for wheat, breads, and sugar diminished… My healthcare worker also told me that I had leaky gut and digestive proteins in my bloodstream.

 

I talked to my healthcare team, and after three months after being very strict with the diet. I felt better; I’d lost about 10 pounds. I had so much more energy and felt lighter. But when they did my analysis and showed me was — that I had completely changed — that’s when I really believed that food was medicine…

 

I was able to resume my regular activities… I was able to return to racing. That year, after following your protocol for about a year, I actually won an entire triathlon… So I went from being told I’d never run again to winning a race. Slowly, slowly the symptoms diminished. After two years of being very strict [with my diet], my symptoms went to complete remission, and they’ve stayed that way. It’s been over 10 years.

 

I still work out. Right now, I train Brazilian capoeira, which incorporates martial arts, dance, and acrobatics. I’m still able to do gymnastics. I can still do back flips at age 43. I still run occasionally. I still swim and bike. I do yoga and cross-country skiing when I’m in the north. So, I’m very active and very healthy. In fact, I feel that by you helping me, it really extended my life. I feel much younger than my age.”

 

I just want to wish Sarah the best, and her testimony we hope is helpful for others.

 

Sarah did go through more steps than she had wrote about, but

There IS Hope for RA Patients!

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Foods, Uncategorized

Best and Worse Nuts For Your Health

nuts!

 

Best and Worst Nuts for Your Health

 

Should you go nuts?

Nuts are nature’s way of showing us that good things come in small packages. These bite-size nutritional powerhouses are packed with heart-healthy fats, protein, vitamins, and minerals.

 

Here’s a look at the pros and cons of different nuts, as well as the best and worst products on supermarket shelves today. Of course, you can get too much of these good things: Nuts are high in fat and calories, so while a handful can hold you over until dinner, a few more handfuls can ruin your appetite altogether. And although nuts are a healthy choice by themselves, they’ll quickly become detrimental to any diet when paired with sugary or salty toppings or mixes.

 

Best nuts for your diet

Almonds, Cashews, Pistachios

 

All nuts are about equal in terms of calories per ounce, and in moderation, are all healthy additions to any diet. “Their mix of omega-3 fatty acids, protein, and fiber will help you feel full and suppress your appetite,” says Judy Caplan, RD, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

 

The lowest-calorie nuts at 160 per ounce are almonds (23 nuts; 6 grams protein, 14 grams fat); cashews (16 to 18 nuts; 5 grams protein, 13 grams fat); and pistachios (49 nuts; 6 grams protein, 13 grams fat). Avoid nuts packaged or roasted in oil; instead, eat them raw or dry roasted, says Caplan. (Roasted nuts may have been heated in hydrogenated or omega-6 unhealthy fats, she adds, or to high temperatures that can destroy their nutrients.)

Worst nuts for your diet

Macadamia Nuts, Pecans

 

Ounce for ounce, macadamia nuts (10 to 12 nuts; 2 grams protein, 21 grams fat) and pecans (18 to 20 halves; 3 grams protein, 20 grams fat) have the most calories—200 each—along with the lowest amounts of protein and the highest amounts of fats.

 

However, they’re still good nuts: The difference between these and the lowest calorie nuts is only 40 calories an ounce. As long as you’re practicing proper portion control and not downing handfuls at a time, says Caplan, any kind of raw, plain nut will give you a good dose of healthy fats and nutrients.

 

Best nuts for your heart

Walnuts

 

While all nuts contain eart-healthy monounsaturated fats, walnuts (14 halves contain 185 calories, 18 grams fat, 4 grams protein) have high amounts of heart-healthy alpha linoleic acid (ALA), a type of omega-3 fatty acid found in plants. Research has suggested that ALA may help heart arrhythmias, and a 2006 Spanish study suggested that walnuts were as effective as olive oil at reducing inflammation and oxidation in the arteries after eating a fatty meal. The authors of this study, funded in part by the California Walnut Commission, recommended eating around eight walnuts a day to achieve similar benefits.

 

Best nuts for your brain

Peanuts

 

Technically legumes but generally referred to as nuts, peanuts are high in folate—a mineral essential for brain development that may protect against cognitive decline. (It also makes peanuts a great choice for vegetarians, who can come up short on folate, and pregnant women, who need folate to protect their unborn babies from birth defects, says Caplan.) Like most other nuts, peanuts are also full of brain-boosting healthy fats and vitamin E, as well. One ounce of peanuts (about 28 unshelled nuts) contains about 170 calories, 7 grams protein, and 14 grams fat.

 

Best nuts for men

Brazil Nuts, Pecans

 

Creamy Brazil nuts are packed with selenium, a mineral that may protect against prostate cancer and other diseases. Just one nut contains more than a day’s worth, so eat these sparingly: Recent research has hinted that too much selenium may be linked to type 2 diabetes risk. One ounce of Brazil nuts (6 nuts) contains about 190 calories, 19 grams fat, and 4 grams protein.

 

Pecans are also good for men’s health: They’re loaded with beta-sitosterol, a plant steroid that may help relieve symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or enlarged prostate. One ounce of pecans (18 to 20 halves) contains about 200 calories, 21 grams fat, and 3 grams protein.

 

Best nuts for disease prevention

Almonds

 

Relatively low in calories, almonds have more calcium than any other nut, making them a great food for overall health. Plus, they are rich in fiber and vitamin E, an antioxidant that helps fight dangerous inflammation and possibly health conditions such as lung cancer and age-related cognitive decline.

 

Because they’re so versatile, almonds are often a favorite among nut eaters: You can buy them raw, toasted, slivered, or coated with a variety of fun flavors.

 

Best snack packaging for nuts

Choose 100- to 200-calorie packs

 

Because nuts are so high in calories (and so tasty, to boot!), it’s important to practice portion control when eating them as a snack. We love Blue Diamond Almonds 100-calorie snack packs, available in six flavors, including Cinnamon Brown Sugar and Dark Chocolate. Want more variety? Pick up Planters Nutrition Wholesome Nut Mix on-the-go packs, each containing a 200-calorie mix of cashews, almonds, and macadamia nuts.

 

Worst snack packaging for nuts

Avoid anything in a tub

 

We’re all for buying in bulk to save money and packaging, but it’s important not to snack straight from the box (or in this case, the giant tub) when a craving hits. Beer Nuts’ “original” formula—peanuts coated with a sweet and salty glaze—aren’t a bad choice themselves (170 calories, 14 grams fat, and 2 grams sugar per ounce), but if you’re munching on them at a party or during a “long day of game watching,” as the company’s website suggests, you’ll likely be eating more than the recommended serving size. Not to mention, the Party Mix variety also includes M&Ms and sugary yogurt-covered raisins, for an extra calorie boost. A better bet is Beer Nuts’ Original Teaser Peanut Sized bags, each containing just half an ounce of nuts.

 

Best nuts for chocolate lovers

Go for cocoa-dusted almonds

 

Rather than hiding your nuts under a thick layer of sugary chocolate candy—think Jordan almonds or peanut M&Ms—keep it simple with Emerald’s Cocoa Roast Almonds. These nuts are lightly dusted with cocoa powder and sweetened with Sucralose, and have 150 calories, 13 grams fat, and 1 gram of sugar per ounce.

 

We’d give you a “worst” nuts for chocolate lovers, but the possibilities are practically endless. Just think of it this way, says Caplan: Anything that’s more chocolate than nut really should be considered candy—not as a way to get your daily quota of healthy fats.

 

Best nuts for your sweet tooth

Try all-natural glazed nuts

 

Want something sweet and satisfying but without the extra calories and high-fructose corn syrup? Look no further than Sahale Snacks glazed nuts, in flavors like Almonds with Cranberries, Honey, and Sea Salt (160 calories, 11 grams fat, 5 grams protein per ounce) or Cashews with Pomegranate and Vanilla (150 calories, 10 grams fat, 4 grams protein per ounce). They’re sweetened with organic cane juice and tapioca syrup, and each contains only 6 grams of sugar per ounce. Just be careful not to eat the whole bag!

 

Worst nuts for your sweet tooth

Check labels for sugar content

 

Just because something has nuts in it doesn’t make it good for you, says Caplan: “Don’t justify eating a Snickers because it’s got peanuts in it.” Anything coated with or tucked inside layers of sugar, toffee, chocolate, or ice cream isn’t going to give you much nutritional benefit, and the calories can quickly add up, she says.

 

It’s not just candy, though: Beware of seemingly healthful varieties, like Planters Sweet ‘N Crunchy Peanuts. Although they still have just 140 calories and 8 grams fat per ounce, the second and third ingredients after peanuts are sugar and butter. In fact, one ounce contains 13 grams of sugar (in just a 28-gram serving size). Considering peanuts only have about 2 grams of sugar naturally, that’s 11 grams of added sugar in just one handful, out of a recommended 25 for the whole day!

 

Best nuts for a salt craving

Look for ‘lightly salted’

 

If you don’t have high blood pressure or haven’t been warned away from salt by your doctor for other reasons, a handful or two of salted nuts a day won’t hurt you, says Caplan, who has a private nutrition practice in Vienna, Va.

 

Nuts are, of course, available unsalted. But to satisfy a salty craving without going overboard, look for in-between varieties like Planters Lightly Salted peanuts, almonds, and cashews (45-55 mg sodium), or Wonderful Pistachios Lightly Salted (80 mg). Check ingredient labels, too: Some brands, like Back to Nature Salted Almonds (75 mg sodium), contain less salt than others.

 

Worst nuts for a salt craving

Steer clear of BBQ or boiled nuts

 

If you’re watching your sodium intake, watch out for hot and spicy or barbecue flavors too. Kar’s Nuts Blazin’ Hot Peanuts, for example, contain 370 mg of sodium per ounce (along with 160 calories and 14 grams fat)—a whopping 15% of your daily recommended value, in just one handful!

 

Beware boiled peanuts, as well: This Southern treat is made by soaking fresh, raw peanuts, in their shells, in a salty brine. Sodium amounts will vary based on the exact preparation, but Margaret Holmes Peanut Patch boiled peanuts, for example, contain 390 mg per ounce.

 

Best trail mix

Raw nuts, seeds, and dried fruit

 

Trail mix is available in countless varieties and from countless brands. “Look for trail mix with raw nuts,” suggests Caplan. “Or if the nuts are roasted, look for the words ‘dry roasted’ rather than ‘oil roasted.'”

 

Nuts pair great with fruit, seeds, and perhaps even a little dark chocolate, Caplan adds; just pay attention to the calorie count and serving size. We love Eden Foods’ “All Mixed Up” blend (160 calories, 12 grams fat, 8 grams protein per ounce) of organic almonds, pumpkin seeds, and dried tart cherries. If you’re more of a granola guy or gal, treat yourself to a quarter cup of Bear Naked’s Banana Nut mix (140 calories, 7 grams fat, 3 grams protein) with almonds and walnuts.

 

Worst trail mix

Save high-calorie mixes for the trail

 

High-calorie trail mix is fine when you’ve got a long hike ahead of you, but too often we eat these store-bought blends while sitting at our desks or driving in our cars. Don’t make that mistake with Planter’s Energy Go-Packs, a 1.5-ounce mix of nuts, semisweet chocolate, oil roasted soynuts, and sesame seeds: With 250 calories and 20 grams of fat a pop, they fall slightly above our healthy snacking guidelines.

 

Also check labels for sky-high sugar contents: Some trail mixes—especially those with raisins, dried cranberries, and/or candy-covered chocolate pieces—can contain up to 18 grams of sugar per serving.

 

Best nut butter

Keep ingredients simple

 

When choosing a nut butter, look for spreads with the fewest ingredients possible: Just nuts (and salt, if you want). Arrowhead Mills Organic Peanut Butter, for example, contains 100% dry-roasted peanuts, and has 190 calories, 17 grams fat, and 8 grams protein per 2 tbsp serving. (We also like their creamy cashew and almond butters, which do contain some natural canola oil.) Keep natural peanut butter in the fridge, advises Caplan, to keep it from going rancid and to prevent oily separation.

 

Worst nut butter

Skip added oils and sugars

 

Major brands have eliminated trans fats from their nut butters, but most still contain hydrogenated oils (high in saturated fat) to increase spreadability and prevent separation. Some “natural” product lines swap hydrogenated oils for palm oil, also high in saturated fat. Skippy Natural with Honey, for example, contains 200 calories, 16 grams fat (3.5 grams saturated), and 5 grams sugar per 2-tablespoon serving.

 

Nutella’s creamy chocolate-hazelnut combo is terrific for an occasional treat—but it’s hardly part of a “balanced breakfast,” as its commercials say. Two tablespoons contain just 200 calories, yes, but 21 grams of sugar. In fact, sugar and palm oil are the product’s first ingredients, even before hazelnuts.

 

Best way to eat nuts

Pair them with a healthy carb

 

Now you know all about which nuts are good for what—but to get the most health benefits, it’s also important to pay attention to how you eat them. “Nuts are a great thing to eat when you’re having a carbohydrate like fruit or juice, because it helps slow down digestion and the breakdown of sugar,” says Caplan.

 

A few winning nut-and-carb combos: Sprinkle them on salads, add them to low- or nonfat yogurt, or spread nut butter on slices of apple or pear. On the go? Pick up a 150-calorie pack of Earthbound Farms Dippin’ Doubles Apples & Peanut Butter (11 grams fat, 5 grams protein).

 

Best nuts overall

A mixed bag!

 

So which is the healthiest nut overall? A 2004 review in the Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide tackled this tough question. Luckily, they concluded, we don’t have to pick just one. Mixed nuts, ideally raw and unsalted, provide the best variety of nutrients and antioxidants.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived:  Dr. J Jaranson

312 972 WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/