Foods, Uncategorized

Avocado Chicken Salad

avocadochicken

 

 

Avocado Chicken Salad

 

Most store bought and deli chicken salad is made with a ton of high-calorie mayonnaise, dark and white meat chicken, and is slapped on some form of white bread. It might have a tiny piece of wilted lettuce to make you feel good. While you may think you’re making a healthy choice, in reality, that chicken salad sandwich is probably loaded with fat, sodium, and calories.

 

Make a better-for-you version with wholesome ingredients like white meat chicken breast, avocado, Greek yogurt, and plenty of veggies for a flavorful, creamy meal. It’s also loaded with protein from the chicken and yogurt and has satisfying healthy fats and fiber thanks to the avocado. It also has much less sodium and saturated fat than traditional chicken salad, making it a smart choice for lunch.

 

Ingredients

1 large chicken breast (about 2 cups shredded)

garlic powder, to taste

freshly cracked black pepper

1 small avocado, mashed

2 tablespoon plain nonfat Greek yogurt

2 tablespoon lemon or lime juice

1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

freshly cracked pepper

1/2 cup diced onion, any kind

1/2 cup diced celery (about 1 rib)

Preparation

Heat oven to 350F.  Season chicken breast with garlic powder and pepper. Place in a baking dish and cover with foil. Bake 25 to 35 minutes, or until a thermometer inserted into the center reads 165F. Remove chicken and let cool before shredding.

In a large bowl, smash avocado. Stir in yogurt, lime juice, garlic powder and pepper. Stir in chicken, onion and celery. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

 

 

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

Dress up your avocado chicken salad with cilantro, cumin, and diced jalapeno for a Southwest flavor.

 

For a dairy-free version, omit the yogurt and swap in more avocado (about the equal amount).

 

Cooking and Serving Tips

Save a step (and time) by making this recipe with leftover cooked chicken. You can make this recipe to have on hand for lunches all week long. It tastes great rolled in a whole wheat tortilla, on a sliced of toasted whole wheat bread, or on top of a fresh green salad.

Call us with all your food concerns, for your condition

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

DR G Carney

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

 

 

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Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Danger! Replace these Houshold Items!

Danger

Danger! Replace These Household Items Now

 

Your home is your castle, and also your haven. But common household items may be turning your sanctuary into a hazard and increasing your risk for colds, viruses, and food poisoning as well as deadly diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and cancer.

 

Below are five common, but possibly dangerous, items you should consider replacing … now.

 

Aluminum pots and pans. Aluminum pots and pans may increase your risk for neurological diseases because small amounts of aluminum leach into foods, especially those containing acids. Experts have linked aluminum to Alzheimer’s disease as well as Parkinson’s disease, kidney and liver damage, weakened bones, and multiple sclerosis.

 

“Aluminum is cumulative, and even small doses over time become highly toxic,” board-certified neurosurgeon Dr. Russell Blaylock . “It’s a powerful neurotoxin. When aluminum combines with certain acids, such as those in orange juice, aluminum absorption is increased 11-fold,” he says. “If you’re cooking with fluoridated water, the aluminum and fluoride bind, so you’re producing aluminum fluoride, an extremely toxic compound.”

 

The worst scenario for a health disaster involving cookware is boiling water for tea in an aluminum kettle or pan, says Blaylock. “Black tea is already high in aluminum and fluoride, and you’d be getting very high levels of aluminum fluoride. Replace aluminum pots and pans with stainless, says Blaylock.

 

Scratched “non-stick” cookware. Manufacturers use the chemical PFOA (perfluororctanoic acid) when making Teflon (also known as polytetrafluoroethylene or PTFE), the “no stick” cookware. But the pots and pans that are so easy to clean could be increasing your risk for several conditions, including breast cancer, preeclampsia, thyroid disease, and ulcerative colitis.

 

Teflon and similar coatings, such as T-Fal and Silverstone, emit PFOAs when heated to a high temperature. The fumes can cause flu-like symptoms in people, nicknamed “Teflon flu.” A study by the Environmental Working Group found that heating a nonstick pan to 680 degrees on an ordinary electric stove released six toxic gasses including two that are known to cause cancer.

 

 

Studies have found that empty pans can reach 800 degrees in only five minutes, and some studies show that enough PFOAs are emitted to kill pet birds at temperatures as low as 325 degrees.

 

At high temperatures, Teflon also releases tetrafluoroethylene, a known carcinogen, and another chemical called monofluoroacetic acid, which can be fatal even in small amounts. When heated to 887 degrees, Teflon also emits perfluoroisobutene, a substance used in chemical warfare. When pans are scratched, the harmful chemicals are released at even lower temperatures.

 

Older cookware, scratched or not, is more likely to emit toxins, and many manufacturers have agreed to produce non-stick cookware that would not emit PFOAs. To be on the safe side, replace questionable pots and pans with stainless steel. Dr. Blaylock warns of one exception — don’t buy Chinese stainless. “It is usually extremely low-grade and it will degrade,” says Dr. Blaylock.

Kitchen sponges. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that food poisoning sickens 1 in 6 Americans every year (48 million). Of those, 128,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 die. Salmonella and E. coli, two of the most common, hide on kitchen surfaces and in sponges, which are usually wet and provide an ideal environment for germs to multiply.

 

To stay safe, replace sponges on a regular basis. Sanitize wet sponges by microwaving them for two minutes, washing in the dishwasher, or placing them in boiling water laced with a couple of tablespoons of vinegar for three or four minutes.

 

Fire extinguishers. You probably have at least one fire extinguisher in your home, but how long has it been since you’ve even given it a second look? Fire extinguishers can de-pressurize over time and be worthless in an emergency. Check the label to see how long yours should last — some are expected to work for only about five years.

The National Fire Protection Association recommends non-rechargeable units be replaced every 12 years and rechargeable ones tested and recharged every six years. If your home is humid, your extinguisher may need replacing more often.

 

Check the pressure gauge on your extinguisher every month to make sure it falls in the green area. If not, replace it immediately. Also check for corrosion, cracked hoses, and broken handles — all indicate your fire extinguisher needs to be replaced.

 

Plastic food containers. Bisphenol A (BPA) is used to make plastics used in food and beverage containers and is often used in the lining of metal cans. BPAs are proven endocrine disruptors and can increase the risk for breast and prostate cancer, heart disease, and obesity. “BPA actually disturbs the hormone production in our bodies,” Dr. Erika Schwartz, a leading expert on hormones tells Newsmax Health.

 

Avoid BPA by choosing fresh foods and those in glass containers instead of those in cans. Buy plastic containers with the recycling labels No. 1, No. 2, No. 4, and No. 5 on the bottom. Avoid those with No. 3, No. 7, or PC (polycarbonate). Cloudy or soft containers don’t contain BPA.

 

Call us for your healthcare concerns

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

DR G Carney

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

 

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Sleep Apnea Linked to Cognitive Decline

sleepapnea

Sleep Apnea Tied to Cognitive Decline

People who experience certain breathing problems at night may be more likely to develop cognitive impairment than individuals without any difficulties breathing while they sleep, a research review suggests.

Data obtained from 14 previously published studies with a total of more than 4.2 million men and women showed that people with sleep-disordered breathing had 26 percent higher odds of developing cognitive impairment, researchers report in JAMA Neurology.

“Identification of this sleep disorder in elderly persons might help predict future risk of cognitive impairment and thus is important for the early detection of dementia,” said lead study author Yue Leng of the University of California, San Francisco.

“Moreover, sleep-disordered breathing is a treatable disease,” Leng said by email. “If sleep-disordered breathing is a risk factor for dementia, then treatment of sleep-disordered breathing might benefit cognition and help reduce the risk of dementia in the long run.”

 

Many people with nighttime breathing problems had what’s known as apnea, a potentially serious sleep disorder that involves repeated stops and starts in breathing. Risk factors for sleep apnea include older age and obesity.

 

In the smaller studies included in the analysis, the increased risk of cognitive impairment associated with sleep-disordered breathing ranged from 23 percent to 86 percent.

 

When researchers analyzed the increased risk across all of the smaller studies with a similar design, excluding one that was done much differently, the overall increased risk of cognitive impairment associated with sleep-disordered breathing was 35 percent.

Sleep-disordered breathing was also associated with slightly worse “executive function” – that is, the mental processes involved in planning, paying attention, following instructions, and multi-tasking, for example – but it didn’t appear to influence memory, the study also found.

 

The researchers had only limited data on executive function, however, which made it difficult to determine whether any changes associated with sleep-disordered breathing might be clinically meaningful.

 

The analysis also didn’t account for obesity, which is independently a risk factor for both apnea and cognitive impairment, noted Marie-Pierre St-Onge, a researcher at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City who wasn’t involved in the study.

 

“It’s possible that the reduction in oxygen reaching the brain from apnea could, over time, lead to brain injuries that can lead to cognitive impairment,” St-Onge said by email. “There is also a link between obesity and mild cognitive impairment and between obesity and sleep-disordered breathing.”

 

Shedding excess weight might help, said Hui-Xin Wang of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm.

 

“Weight-loss strategies, including physical exercise and diet, have been evaluated as a treatment strategy to improve sleep-disordered breathing and reduce the risk of cognitive decline,” Wang, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email.

 

Beyond weight loss, treatments for apnea may include wearing a breathing mask or jaw support at night to keep airways open.

 

More research is needed, however, to determine whether and to what extent treating sleep apnea might lower the risk of cognitive decline, said Kristen Knutson of the Center for Circadian and Sleep Medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

 

“There are therapies available for apnea that would improve sleep and potentially improve health, including cognitive function,” Knutson, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email. “People who have trouble sleeping or who snore loudly and frequently should raise this issue with their doctors and discuss potential treatments.”

Call us with any of your healthcare concerns.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr G Carney

312-972-9355

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com