Diets and Weight Loss, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Study Confirms Preservative in Cereal Promotes Obesity.

cereal

Study Confirms Preservative in Cereal Promotes Obesity

 

Many animal studies have suggested that chemicals added to breakfast cereals and other common products are adding to America’s obesity crisis, but showing exactly how the process happens in humans has been difficult. Scientists at Cedars-Sinai have solved the problem.

 

The researchers tested three chemicals that are common in modern life. Butylhydroxytoluene (BHT) is an antioxidant commonly added to breakfast cereals and other foods to protect nutrients and keep fats from turning rancid; perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a polymer found in some cookware, carpeting and other products; and tributyltin (TBT) is a compound in paints that can make its way into water and accumulate in seafood.

 

The investigators used hormone-producing tissues grown from human stem cells to demonstrate how chronic exposure to these chemicals can interfere with signals sent from the digestive system to the brain that let people know when they are “full” during meals. When this signaling system fails, people may continue to eat, thus gaining weight.

 

“We discovered that each of these chemicals damaged hormones that communicate between the gut and the brain,” said Dhruv Sareen, Ph.D. When the three chemicals were tested together, the result was even more pronounced.

 

Of the three chemicals tested, BHT produced some of the strongest detrimental effects, Sareen said. BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene) is a chemical allowed to be used as a food additive to prevent oxidation.

 

 

BHT is on the Food and Drug Administration’s GRAS — generally recognized as safe — list. It is used in foods, such as cereals — although some food manufacturers have eliminated it from their products — and is also used in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Some studies, however, have indicated that in addition to weight gain, BHT also increases the risk of cancer, and can cause liver enlargement.

 

Sareem said that while other researchers have shown the compounds can disrupt hormone systems in laboratory animals, the new study is the first to use human pluripotent stem cells and tissues to show how they may disrupt hormones that are critical to preventing obesity in people.

 

Sareem’s research found that the chemical damage occurred in early-stage “young” cells, suggesting that the findings may indicate that a defective hormone signaling system could perhaps impact a pregnant mother as well as her fetus in the womb.

 

More than 80,000 chemicals are approved in the United State for use in everyday items such as foods, personal care products, household cleaners and lawn-care products, according to the National Toxicology Program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. While the program states on its website that relatively few chemicals are thought to pose a significant risk to human health, it also states: “We do not know the effects of many of these chemicals on our health.”

 

It has been difficult to test these chemicals on humans because of the health risks of exposing human subjects to possibly harmful substances, so many widely used compounds remain unevaluated in humans for their health effects, especially to the hormone system.

 

“By testing these chemicals on actual human tissues in the lab, we potentially could make these evaluations easier to conduct and more cost-effective,” Sareen said.

 

Earlier studies have suggested that BHT increases the risk of cancer, and can cause liver enlargement.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/angelique.rose.50

 

Uncategorized

Caffeine Could Help Stop Post op Pain

caffeinecould

Caffeine Could Help Stop Post-Op Pain: Study

 

New American research has found that for patients who suffer from sleep deprivation before surgery, caffeine before the operation could be an alternative way to reduce post-operative pain associated with a lack of sleep.

 

Previous research has shown that a lack of sleep both pre- and post-op can worsen pain after surgery. This new study from the Department of Anesthesiology at Michigan Medicine set out to see if there were any interventions that could help minimize the effect of sleep loss and reduce the severity of pain experienced after surgery.

 

The team focused on caffeine as a potential treatment, which may seem surprising given that caffeine is a stimulant to increase alertness.

 

“Most people would be confused by the idea of using caffeine while we insist on the dangers of not getting enough sleep,” noted study author Giancarlo Vanini, M.D.

 

However, as caffeine blocks the actions of the sleep-inducing neurotransmitter adenosine, causing us to feel more awake, the team proposed that caffeine might counteract the negative impact of sleep deprivation on surgical pain.

 

 

“Insufficient sleep enhances pain perception, so we reasoned that caffeine might also be useful for reversing the increase in pain caused by sleep loss,” Vanini said.

 

The team used a rat model of surgical pain to test whether sleep deprivation before surgery would increase postoperative pain, and whether being given caffeine pre-emptively, before the sleep deprivation, would block the increase in postoperative pain caused by this lack of sleep.

 

The results showed that sleep deprivation before surgery did indeed increase postoperative pain, and also extended recovery time after surgery.

 

However, as the team hypothesized, caffeine helped mitigate the negative effects of insufficient sleep prior to surgery, blocking the increase in surgical pain.

 

Vanini explained that caffeine’s positive effect may be due to its role in blocking neurochemical changes caused by sleep deprivation in the brain areas that control sleep and wakefulness, and are connected to major pain-related areas.

 

“These results are relevant because sleep disorders and insufficient sleep are highly prevalent problems in our society,” he added. “Additionally, often times patients travel long distances during the night or early morning before being admitted into the hospital for elective surgery. In one way or another, most patients do not get adequate sleep before surgery.”

 

The team now plan to carry out more research to better understand caffeine’s effect on reducing pain in surgical patients.

 

The results are online in the journal Sleep.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/angelique.rose.50

Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Prostate Cancer Test Saves Lives, Risks Remain

PSA

 

Prostate Cancer Test Saves Lives, Risks Remain

 

Men who get a controversial blood test that looks for signs of prostate cancer appear to have a reduced risk of death from the malignancy, according to a new analysis by an international group of researchers.

The analysis re-examined data from two earlier studies that had led experts to recommend against routine use of the test, which measures levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA).

 

“The trials taken together indicate there is an important benefit,” said Ruth Etzioni, who is the senior author of the analysis from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington.

 

A flaw of the earlier trials is that some men who were assigned to a no-screening group actually did get the PSA test on their own, making it difficult to identify differences between the screening group and the no-screening group.

 

The unclear results – and the risk that the blood tests could lead to unnecessary biopsies and treatments – led the government-backed U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) to recommend against PSA screening.

 

The new analysis attempts to clear up the confusion by reexamining the data in computer models, to account for the men who got PSA tests when they weren’t supposed to. Etzioni’s team compared men in the two trials based on the intensity of screening they received.

 

In one of the trials, PSA testing was tied to a 25 percent to 31 percent reduced risk of death from prostate cancer, the researchers report in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

 

 

In the other trial, PSA testing was tied to a 27 percent to 32 percent reduced risk of death from prostate cancer, they found.

 

Etzioni said the new results don’t mean all men should be screened for prostate cancer.

 

In the U.S., about one in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, according to the American Cancer Society, but most men with the slow-growing cancer won’t die from it.

 

As a result, it’s often reasonable to monitor prostate cancers instead of treating them, since the side effects of treatment – which can include incontinence and impotence – may be more harmful than helpful.

In a proposed update to its recommendation, the USPSTF suggests that men ages 55 to 69 should be able to decide if they want PSA testing based on a discussion with their doctors about the possible benefits and risks, such as biopsies and unneeded treatment.

 

“This finding confirms or reinforces what everybody has been moving to over the last 5 to 8 years,” said Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society. “There is some benefit to prostate cancer screening and there are some harms associated with it.”

 

Brawley, who wasn’t involved in the new analysis, told Reuters Health that the benefits of screening are becoming more apparent as doctors move away from aggressively treating all prostate cancers and instead decide to monitor the many that will likely never advance and cause death.

In an editorial published with the new analysis, Dr. Andrew Vickers of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City identified ways to help ensure the benefits of prostate cancer screening outweigh the harms.

 

For example, he advises shared decision-making between doctors and patients, carefully selecting which men to biopsy and not screening elderly men, who are unlikely to benefit.

 

“The controversy about PSA-based screening should no longer be whether it can do good but whether we can change our behavior so that it does more good than harm,” wrote Vickers.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/angelique.rose.50