Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Can Foods Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

antiinflammatoryfoods

Can Food Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease?

 

To help minimize your risk of Alzheimer’s disease, an Anti-Inflammatory Diet. It is rich in omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants – both of which can help address inflammation, which experts now consider a primary contributor to many diseases, including Alzheimer’s. You can get started by eating plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as omega-3 rich foods such as walnuts, wild Alaskan salmon, and freshly ground flaxseed.

 

There was also a recent study at UCLA showing that a gluten-free diet was part of a lifestyle program that reverse the symptoms of early Alzheimer’s. This may not be necessary for everyone, but many of our integrative medicine fellows see patients improve their brain fog symptoms on a gluten-free diet. It may be worth a three- to four-week trial to see for yourself.

 

Supplements are important too. Please ask your healthcare provider to go over a supplement regiment just for you.  If they say take a  one-a-day, then run away!

 

Call us to give you a personalized healthcare plan.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr P Carrothers

Dir. Of Personalized Healthcare and Preventative Medicine

312-972-Well

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

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Foods, Uncategorized, Vitamins and Supplements

Foods to Get More Vitamin D in your Diet

vitaminDfoods

Foods to Get More Vitamin D in Your Diet

 

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that’s essential for proper absorption of calcium in your digestive tract, and it helps maintain blood levels of calcium and phosphate. So, getting enough vitamin D is necessary for bone health throughout your life — vitamin D deficiency can lead to rickets in kids and osteoporosis in adults.

 

The thing is, people don’t get much vitamin D from the diet. Your body makes vitamin D when your skin is exposed to UV rays from the sun. It only takes a few minutes of sun exposure every day to get your vitamin D, but if you live in a place where it gets colder in the winter, there’s a good chance you won’t get enough sun exposure for several months out of each year.

 

Most experts recommend a daily intake of 600 International Units. You won’t find many foods that are high in vitamin D, but there are some. Flip through this slideshow to learn more about these foods.

 

Maitake mushrooms, or “hen in the woods” mushrooms, are a delicious and low-calorie source of vitamin D, as well as potassium and several B-complex vitamins. One cup of diced maitake mushrooms has more than 700 International Units of vitamin D. Maitake mushrooms might also have health benefits beyond being nutritious.

 

Halibut is a good source of vitamin D, with about 200 International Units in a 3-ounce serving of fish. Halibut is also a good source of protein, B-complex vitamins, zinc, magnesium, and potassium. Eating halibut also provides you with essential omega-3 fatty acids.

 

Regular portabella mushrooms have a small amount of vitamin D, but portabellas grown with extra exposure to ultraviolet light have much more. One whole UV-exposed portabella mushroom has about 375 International Units of vitamin D. Portabellas are also an excellent source of selenium, potassium, and several B-complex vitamins.

 

Fish oils contain vitamin D so it makes sense that fatty fish like salmon are good for getting vitamin D. Three ounces of fresh pink salmon have 370 International Units and three ounces of canned sockeye salmon has almost 800 International Units of vitamin D. Salmon is also an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, protein and an antioxidant called astaxanthin. And don’t let the idea that salmon is a ‘fatty fish’ scare you off — a six-ounce piece of salmon only has about 200 calories.

Trout is another good source of vitamin D, and since it’s a white fish, it has a milder flavor than oilier fish like salmon and tuna. Three ounces of rainbow trout has about 650 International Units of vitamin D. Trout is also an excellent source of protein, B-complex vitamins, and minerals.

 

Vitamin D is found in the yolks, so eating whole eggs is a good way to get some vitamin D in your diet. Each egg yolk has about 40 International Units of vitamin D so eating two eggs contributes 80 International Units to your daily intake. Eggs are also an excellent source of protein and lutein. One egg has about 70 calories.

 

Chanterelle mushrooms are another good plant-based source of vitamin D. One cup of chanterelles has more than 100 International Units of vitamin D. These mushrooms are also an excellent source of potassium and low in calories — that one cup of chanterelles has only 20 calories.

 

Canned tuna has about 40 International Units of vitamin D in a three-ounce serving so each can has about 80 International Units). Canned tuna is also a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, potassium, magnesium, selenium and zinc. It’s convenient too — keep canned tuna on hand for sandwiches, salads and for using in recipes.

 

Vitamin D is also available as a dietary supplement, either alone or combined with other nutrients. Calcium supplements usually contain vitamin D. Vitamin D supplements are generally safe but follow label directions and keep them away from young kids — vitamin D in large amounts can become toxic over time. And you should also speak with your healthcare provider before taking vitamin D supplements if you have any health conditions.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr P Carrothers

312-972-Well

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Foods, Uncategorized

Butterscotch Bliss Layered Dessert Recipe: Low Carb

butterschotch

BUTTERSCOTCH BLISS LAYERED DESSERT RECIPE  : Low Carb

 

INGREDIENTS

1-1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs, ( I use oatmeal cookies)

Sugar substitute equivalent to 1/2 cup sugar, divided

6 tablespoons butter, melted

2 packages (8 ounces each) reduced-fat cream cheese

3 cups cold fat-free milk, divided

2 packages (1 ounce each) sugar-free instant butterscotch pudding mix

1 carton (8 ounces) frozen reduced-fat whipped topping, thawed  ( I use heavy whipping cream, whipped and then freeze it)

1/2 teaspoon rum extract

 

DIRECTIONS

In a small bowl, combine the cracker crumbs, half of the sugar substitute and butter. Press into a 13-in. x 9-in. dish coated with cooking spray.

In a small bowl, beat the cream cheese, 1/4 cup milk and remaining sugar substitute until smooth. Spread over crust.

In another bowl, whisk remaining milk with the pudding mix for 2 minutes. Let stand for 2 minutes or until soft-set. Gently spread over cream cheese layer. Combine whipped topping and extract; spread over the top. Refrigerate for at least 4 hours. Yield: 24 servings.

Editor’s Note: This recipe was tested with Splenda no-calorie sweetener.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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