Uncategorized

Spices that Fight Cancer

spicesthatfightcancer

The Spices that Fight Cancer

 

Our bodies fight a constant battle against cancer because many elements both in the environment and in our bodies, spur its formation. Triggers include environmental toxins, inflammation, and viruses. When cells are damaged and they start multiplying, cancer can begin.

 

Our bodies fight back, trying to kill cancer cells by several methods, including producing more killer T-cells that cause aberrant cells to self-destruct. They also use compounds found in foods to wage war. Some herbs and spices contain particularly strong cancer-fighting substances. They include:

 

  • Turmeric. Turmeric is a spice used to flavor traditional Indian dishes. Its active ingredient is curcumin, a potent anti-inflammatory that gives the spice its bright yellow color. Several studies have found it is an effective weapon against cancer.

 

A Phase II clinical trial at MD Anderson Center involved 25 patients with pancreatic cancer who were given 8 grams of turmeric a day for two months. Tumor growth stopped in two patients, one for eight months and another for two-and-a-half years. Another patient’s tumor temporarily regressed by 73 percent. Since the only two drugs approved by the FDA are effective in no more than 10 percent of patients, turmeric’s effectiveness was similar, and with no side effects. Another study found that turmeric reduced tumor growth in mice with pancreatic cancer by 43 percent.

 

 

  • Boswellia. Boswellia serrata is better known as frankincense, and has been used for centuries in Indian Ayurvedic medicine as an anti-inflammatory. Modern research is finding it also has anticancer properties. One laboratory study published in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine investigated its effect on human bladder cancer cells and found that it activated the genes responsible for suppressing the growth of cancer cells and triggering apoptosis, causing cells to commit suicide. The researchers concluded that frankincense oil was able to distinguish between cancerous and normal bladder cells and to suppress their viability. Other research found links to protection against breast, brain, pancreatic, stomach, and prostate cancers.

 

Although both turmeric and boswellia fight cancer individually, a study at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas found that the combination of extracts from turmeric and boswellia work together to prevent colon cancer. The combo was so powerful that it began influencing tumor growth as early as the second day of administration. The combo even fights cancer in people who have a mutation in a gene that makes their cancer unresponsive to common types of chemotherapy.

 

 

“We’ve known for a while that curcumin and boswellia are powerful anti-inflammatories and have potent anti-cancer properties,” says study author Ajay Goel, Director of Epigenetics, Cancer Prevention, and Geonomics at Baylor. “They are both powerful natural medicines, and both have the ability to reduce inflammation” . “The two together had a much more powerful inflammatory effect than either compound alone.”

 

  • Basil. Basil has been a sacred herb in India for thousands of years, and studies have discovered that by repairing cells damaged by oxidation, it has the possibility to kill pre-cancerous tumors. A lab study, which was published in Cancer Letters, found that basil inhibited the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.

 

Basil contains eugenol, which deters the multiplication of cancer cells and also induces apoptosis. Other cancer-fighting photochemicals of basil include rosmarinic acid, beta-sitosterol, and carnosic acid.

 

 

  • Huang qin tang. Scientists at Yale University found that a combination of four herbs known as huang qin tang boosts the effectiveness of chemotherapy in colon cancer patients. In addition, the mixture, which has been used by Chinese herbalists for 1,800 years, reduces some of the debilitating side effects of chemo including nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting. The combination, which contains the herbs Chinese peony, Chinese jujube, Chinese licorice, and baikal skullcap, has been found to have at least 62 active chemicals that work together to be effective.

 

  • Parsley. Compounds found in parsley and dill seeds help fight cancer, according to a study from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology. Both herbs contain glaziovianin A, a natural isoflavone known to have potent anti-cancer properties. Glaziovianin A inhibits the growth of tumor cells by disrupting mitosis, the process of cell division. Although it has been possible to synthesize the compounds, the process was complicated and expensive. However, Russian researchers have developed a process that is cheaper and quicker, and may point to a future effective plant-based cancer treatment. The study was published in the Journal of Natural Products.

 

 

  • White willow bark. Aspirin, the world’s most common drug, was originally derived from willow bark whose active ingredient is salacin. A Turkish study published in the journal Nutrition and Cancer found that an extract of willow called Salix aegyptiaca, can stop colon cancer cells from replicating

 

Another study found that white willow bark contains a wide variety of additional polyphenols and flavonoids in addition to salacin that fight cancer, and that people who take a daily aspirin would receive more benefits if they took willow bark.

 

  • Garlic. Garlic contains more than 30 organosulphur compounds, many with exciting anti-cancer properties. One is an organosulphur compound called diallyl trisulfide (DATS), which fights cancer by preventing, killing, or blocking the growth and spread of cancerous cells

 

According to the National Cancer Institute, studies have found that garlic can lower the risk of pancreatic cancer by 54 percent, prostate cancer by 50 percent, colon cancer by 50 percent, and stomach cancer by 52 percent. Some studies show even greater benefits: One study conducted at the University of North Carolina found that people who eat garlic cut their risk of colorectal cancer by two-thirds.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-9355

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Advertisements
Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Secrets of Sleep

Secrets-of-Sleep

The Secrets of Sleep

There are lots of reasons why older folks struggle to get a good night’s sleep. Just don’t expect much consensus from the scientific community.

 

Sleep is a precious commodity here in Geezerville. At a certain age, in fact, we begin to pursue it with the sort of evolutionary fervor we once reserved primarily for procreative activities. And yet, for many elderly Americans, a good night’s sleep remains a maddeningly elusive goal. As Jane Brody notes in a recent New York Times column, a 1995 study found that 28 percent of people over 65 had difficulty falling asleep and 42 percent said they had trouble falling asleep and staying asleep. Given our current propensity to while away our evening hours staring at various electronic screens, Brody suggests those numbers are probably even higher now.

 

I am not one of these cranky insomniacs. Most evenings, I’m conked out within a few minutes of my 11 o’clock bedtime; most mornings, I rise reasonably refreshed, around 8. My Lovely Wife, on the other hand, is a night owl who will not entertain the notion of slumber until she is completely convinced she’s exhausted enough — physically and, more importantly, mentally — to hit the pillow and stay there.

 

She’s been this way since our first child was born, nearly 29 years ago. Hyperalert to any disturbances from the crib down the hall, and secure in the knowledge that I’ve been known to sleep through minor earthquakes, she took on the responsibility and maintains it now, long after our offspring have exited the nest.

 

I’d worry about MLW if she wasn’t able to snooze happily into the mid-morning hours when necessary. (She’s self-employed and has few time-sensitive obligations.) But for those aging insomniacs who never catch enough z’s, there can be serious consequences: cognitive disorders, psychomotor retardation, immune system dysfunction, and depression, among others.

 

Scientists, physicians, and psychiatrists have been trying to figure out the mysteries of sleep for as long as people have been tossing and turning. There are plenty of suggested cures — avoiding caffeine, alcohol, and computer screens before bedtime; ramping up your exercise; eschewing midday naps; and the like — but there’s little consensus on what might be happening in the body to make us more or less likely to snooze. Or why we need to sleep at all.

 

Researchers at Harvard Medical School recently weighed in on the debate with a study suggesting that it’s all connected to the body’s immune response, specifically certain type of brain-based immune proteins known as inflammasome NLRP3. When the brain detects an infection or inflammation in the body, it releases sleep-inducing immune molecules.

 

“We already know that sleep plays a protective role in resolving infections so our observation of inflammasome activation following infection suggests this immune mechanism may have a brain-protective role,” says lead study author Mark Zielinski, PhD.

 

I’m no sleep expert, but this would lead me to believe that my nightly snoozefest is the happy result of some stubborn infection, which seems to be something of a mixed blessing. Eradicate the infection, douse the inflammation, and the reward is an endless string of sleepless nights?

 

No one really questions that there is a restorative function to sleep, but University of Wisconsin–Madison scientists argue that its primary purpose is to help us forget. In a recent study published in the journal Science, biologists Giulio Tononi, MD, PhD, and Chiara Cirelli, MD, PhD, report that the brain’s synapses grow so exuberantly during the day that the circuits get too noisy. When we sleep, our brains surreptitiously delete unnecessary memories so we aren’t overloaded with useless information, rendering our useful memories fuzzy.

 

When I mentioned this the other day to MLW, she wondered how the brain could determine the difference between necessary and unnecessary memories. I said I didn’t know and I wasn’t going to lose any sleep over it. But now I’m sorry I mentioned it all, because she probably will.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Experience Life

Dr M Williams

312-972-9355

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Your Earwax Can Tell Us a Lot about Your Health

earwax

Your Earwax Can Give You Important Clues about Your Health

 

 

I have asked many patients about wax and drainage in their ears.  Sometimes they look at me with that unbelieving eye, because no other healthcare worker has ever asked them about it. For the most part, we don’t spend a lot of time thinking about the inside of our ears, apart from a very general “are they clean?”. Perhaps we should be giving them more thought because the color of our earwax can say a lot about our general health, and it can give us valuable clues when something is wrong.

The Role of Ear Wax in the Body

Earwax is often viewed as a gross and annoying nuisance, but it is actually a very crucial part of our natural defense system. Ear wax is formed from wax glands in the external ear canal and it protects the skin and ear from water and infection.

Everyone differs in the amount of ear wax that they have, and the consistency. Ear wax can be wet, or dry, and too much or too little can be quite dangerous, increasing the risk of infection. So, you really want to have just the right amount.

 

What is the Right Amount of Ear Wax?

Every individual is different in terms of how much ear wax is the right amount, and the only way to truly know if the amount of earwax in your ears is normal is to give us a call and talk to us about it.

If you’re experiencing the following symptoms you may have a buildup of earwax, and you should call us:

Earache, fullness in the ear or a ‘plugged’ feeling

Partial hearing loss

Tinnitus, ringing, or noises in the ear

Itching, odor, or discharge

Coughing

 

What Your Earwax Says About Your Health

Color

The color of each person’s ear wax can vary, but there are some colors that are natural, and others that indicate a serious health problem.

 

“Normal earwax ranges from light orange to dark brown, but if it’s yellow, green, white, or black, that suggests an infection and you need to see your personal physician, and bring a sample with you” says Benjamin Tweel, MD, an otolaryngologist at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

 

Odd Smell

Your ear wax should never have an odor. If it does, this could be a sign of an infection.

 

“In my experience, it’s the patient who notices a smell, but it’s very possible other people might bring it up as well,” says Tweel. “Regardless, it needs to be treated.”

 

Flakiness

If your ear wax is dry and flaky you could have another skin problem that is prevalent, such as eczema. This consistency, accompanied by soreness could also be psoriasis, though it’s less common.

This is usually one of the first stages of having a problem, and it can be corrected quite easily.

 

Itchy Ears

Scratching your ear every once in a while, doesn’t mean that there’s a problem with your ear, but if you are constantly itching and scratching there is a chance you have a systemic problem.  Again, this is a first stage problem, and if it is not corrected fluid builds up in your ears and if you do not find out the cause will develop an infection.   This is what usually happens in children when ear problems are treated, but not cured.

 

Earwax Removal: Do It the Right Way

Ear wax isn’t bad, it keeps your ears dry and prevents infection, but you do want to keep it from blocking your ears. Ideally, the ears will never have to be cleaned, but this is not always the case. If you are experiencing symptoms that are interfering with your day-to-day life, consult a doctor or clean your ears safely using proper methods.

First things first, when it comes to earwax removal, do not use cotton-tipped applicators (such as Q-tips) because you risk breaking your eardrum. It’s also possible to jam ear wax even deeper into the ear shaft. These applicators may also increase the risk of bacterial infection in the external ear canal

Try this safe ear cleaning method at home:

 

Soften the wax – Use an eyedropper to apply a few drops of natural baby oil or glycerin in your ear canal.

Use warm water – After a day or two, when the wax has softened, use a rubber-bulb syringe to gently squirt warm water into your ear canal. Tilt your head to straighten the ear canal and allow the water to enter the ear, and when you are finished irrigating tip your head to the side and let the water drain out.

Dry your ear canal – When you’re finished, gently dry your outer ear with a clean towel

 

Do not have your ears irrigated if you have diabetes, a hole in the eardrum (perforation), ever had a tube in the eardrum, skin problems such as eczema, cardiac conditions, allergies or a weakened immune system.

 

For something that’s thought about so infrequently throughout the day, earwax can give us some important clues as to our general health and well-being. Taking good care of our ears will ensure that our hearing remains top-notch throughout our lives. Something as simple as changing the way that you clean your ears can have a big impact on your health.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr P Carrothers

Dir Personalized Health Care,

Restorative and Preventative Mediciine

312-972-9355

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Foods, Uncategorized

Foods For Your Brain

brain

Top Six Foods for Your Brain

That said, let’s return to the topic at hand. These are my top picks when it comes to foods that nourish your brain, heart, gut, muscles, immune system and more. Can you boost your brainpower with the foods you eat? You bet. Topping the list of brain-boosting superfoods are foods high in healthy fats. This should come as no surprise considering your brain is mainly made up of fats.

 

  1. Avocados are a great source of healthy oleic acid (monounsaturated fat, which is also found in olive oil), which helps decrease inflammation.1 Avocados have also been shown to effectively combat nearly every aspect of metabolic syndrome, a risk factor of dementia and most other chronic disease. Aside from providing healthy fats, avocados also provide nearly 20 essential nutrients, including potassium, which helps balance your vitally important potassium to sodium ratio.

 

  1. Organic coconut oil. Besides being excellent for your thyroid and your metabolism, its medium-chain fatty acids (MCTs) are a source of ketone bodies, which act as an alternate source of brain fuel that can help prevent the brain atrophy associated with dementia. MCTs also impart a number of health benefits, including raising your body’s metabolism and fighting off pathogens.

 

  1. Grass fed butter and ghee. About 20 percent of butterfat consists of short- and medium-chain fatty acids, which are used right away for quick energy and therefore don’t contribute to fat levels in your blood. Therefore, a significant portion of the butter you consume is used immediately for energy, similar to a carbohydrate. Ghee, which has a higher smoke point than butter, is a healthy fat particularly well-suited for cooking. It also has a longer shelf life.

 

  1. Organic pastured eggs. Many of the healthiest foods are rich in cholesterol and saturated fats, and eggs are no exception. Cholesterol is needed for the regulation of protein pathways involved in cell signaling and other cellular processes. It’s particularly important for your brain, which contains about 25 percent of the cholesterol in your body.

 

It is vital for synapse formation, i.e., the connections between your neurons, which allow you to think, learn new things and form memories. For a simple snack, see this healthy deviled egg recipe.

 

  1. Wild-caught Alaskan salmon. While most fish suffer drawbacks related to contamination, wild-caught Alaskan salmon and other small, fatty fish, such as sardines and anchovies, are still noteworthy for their health benefits in light of their low risk of contamination.

 

Wild-caught Alaskan salmon and other oily fish are high in omega-3 fats necessary for optimal brain (and heart) health. Research2 also suggests eating oily fish once or twice a week may increase your life span. Avoid farmed salmon, however, as they’ve been identified as one of the most toxic foods in the world. For tips on how to cook salmon steaks, see this salmon cooking guide.

 

  1. Organic raw nuts such as macadamia and pecans. Macadamia nuts have the highest fat and lowest protein and carb content of any nut, and about 60 percent of the fat is the monounsaturated fat oleic acid. This is about the level found in olives, which are well-known for their health benefits.

 

A single serving of macadamia nuts also provides 58 percent of what you need in manganese and 23 percent of the recommended daily value of thiamin. Pecans are a close second to macadamia nuts on the fat and protein scale, and they also contain anti-inflammatory magnesium, heart healthy oleic acid, phenolic antioxidants and immune-boosting manganese.

If you need help with what foods to eat and not eat with other medications you are taking, please give us a call.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-9355

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Do You Think You Have Prostate Cancer?

Prostate Cancer Facts That Could Save Your Life

man

Do You Think You Have Prostate Cancer?

 

Prostate cancer is very common among American men. According to Zero – The End of Prostate Cancer, the organization behind Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death. While all men are at risk, over 65% of prostate cancer diagnoses are in men over the age of 65. There is one death from prostate cancer every 18 minutes in America.

 

Prostate cancer can be treated successfully when diagnosed at an early stage, so early detection is key to saving lives. Recent research shows that a five-year survival rate is nearly 100%, with a 10-year survival rate at 91%. Prostate cancer is the only cancer with a 100% five-year survival rate. This article will help you understand more about prostate cancer, your risks, possible symptoms, and ways you can help support a healthy prostate.

 

Symptoms of Prostate Cancer

Symptoms of prostate cancer can be elusive because many prostate cancer symptoms are very similar to BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia), prostatitis, erectile dysfunction, or overactive bladder. These include:

 

Strong urge to urinate immediately

Frequent nighttime urination

Pain and/or burning when urinating

Difficulty starting the urinary stream

A weak urinary stream once it starts

Dribbling after you’re finished

Pain in the genital and pelvic area

Pain when ejaculating

Blood in the urine or semen

Frequent urinary tract infections

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other more serious prostate cancer symptoms may include:

 

Unexpected weight loss

Pain in the lower back or pelvic area

Anemia

Fatigue

Keep in mind that in the very early stages of prostate cancer, there are often no symptoms at all, so it’s critical to discuss testing options with your doctor in order to facilitate an early diagnosis. Prostate Cancer Risk

Age, family history, ethnicity, and diet are the leading factors contributing the greatest risk for prostate cancer development.

 

Men over the age of 65 are the most likely to develop prostate cancer, as are men with one or more close relatives who have had the disease. For reasons not fully understood, African-American men are 2.5 times more likely to develop prostate cancer than white men. They are also more likely to die from it.

 

Diet is thought to be a significant risk factor with a high-fat diet raising the likelihood of developing the disease. Several studies indicate that obesity may contribute to a higher risk of aggressive forms of prostate cancer, in addition to speeding up the long-term risk of disease progression.

 

Pesticide, chemical, and defoliant exposure has been found to increase risk and severity of prostate cancer. Farmers, Vietnam and Korean War veterans, and those exposed to metal cadmium, such as welders, are more vulnerable.

 

While most prostate cancer is very slow growing and stays in the prostate, a few cases are aggressive and can metastasize to other parts of the body. Men over the age of 40 should discuss their risk factors and testing options with their doctor.

 

10 Things You Should Know About Prostate Cancer

  1. One in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime.

 

  1. It is estimated that there will be 233,000 new prostate cancer cases in 2014 – more than lung and colorectal combined.

 

  1. Know your risk and take appropriate action. The biggest risk factors are sex, race, and family history.

 

  1. Testing for prostate cancer is quick and easy and can be done with a simple blood test and a physical exam.
  2. There are no symptoms of early stage prostate cancer, making it critical to understand your risk and talk to your doctor about testing after you turn 40.

 

  1. Early detection saves lives.

 

  1. Exercising regularly, maintaining a healthy weight, and eating a heart-healthy diet can reduce your risk of prostate cancer.

 

  1. Nearly 100 percent of men diagnosed with prostate cancer in its early stages are still alive five years after diagnosis.

 

  1. Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men.

 

  1. There are more than 2.8 million men in the US who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer.

 

Don’t be a statistic. The World Health Organization (WHO) announced earlier this year that it anticipates a 57% increase in cancer cases worldwide over the next 20 years. At least half of all cancers, including prostate cancer, can be prevented with healthy lifestyle choices. When making decisions about your health, go with the facts that have been proven over and over again in countless studies: don’t smoke, limit alcohol consumption, and focus on a healthy diet and exercise.

Contact us for your personalized healthcare plan

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr Chad Larson

 

312-972-9355

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Preventing and Reversing Anxiety

anxiert

Preventing and Fighting Anxiety

Are you anxious? Well, you’re truly not alone. Millions of people suffer from anxiety, due to either physical, physiological or mental health challenges. Some people deal with their anxiety by seeing a doctor, who will typically prescribe a drug such as Valium, Xanax or an anti-depressant. These drugs might do well at reducing the more immediate feelings that are related to anxiety, but they will not solve any underlying problems, nor are they a cure.

 

Depending on one’s health insurance, these drugs can be expensive if there is a need to take them long-term. They can often cause some frustrating side effects, too. Some anxiety medications even have the potential to lead to addiction. Thankfully, medications aren’t the only way to fight back against anxiety. There are also a few vitamins that can support the body in fighting the stress response naturally.

Don’t sit back and tell yourself that “it runs in my family”.  I agree, we see a lot of it in family lines, but it is mainly due to gender bending DNA, and there are ways to turn it around.

 

B Vitamins – 5 Different Varieties

There are many kinds of B vitamins that are necessary to keep the body’s fight or flight response working properly. You can support your stress levels by being sure you get healthy levels of the following vitamins:

 

B1 aka Thiamin, improves memory and mood.

B3 aka Niacin, helps the body’s natural production of serotonin, which is a neurotransmitter that is necessary for mental stability.

B5 aka Pantothenic acid, helps to maintain the balance and harmony of the neurotransmitters.

B6 aka Pyridoxine, reduces symptoms that are related to anxiety.

B9 aka Folic acid, helps keep the neurotransmitters balanced.

B12 aka Cyanocobalamin, works to prevent symptoms of things such as changes in personality, depression, irritability, memory impairment, fatigue, psychosis, and mania.

You can consume the B vitamins in food sources that include meat, cereal, poultry, fish, beans, and green peas. Keep in mind to stay in the daily recommendations for the B vitamins, as they can become toxic at high levels when taken as supplements.

Please make sure you are asking a healthcare provider how to take these vitamins. If they tell you to take a One A Day, or a Multivitamin, then they are not knowledgeable of how this should be done.

Never take a B-12 injection.  Never take a B-12 Shot!  Never!

 

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is an antioxidant that assists in the transportation of oxygen to the brain. A brain that gets the proper amount of oxygen is more alert and healthier in general. It is found in nuts, some oils, lettuce, and cabbage. It is always best to get your E vitamins through food sources, but if you take supplements, it is best not to exceed the daily recommendations.

 

Vitamin C

Vitamin C supports not only the building blocks in the body and the immune system, but also promotes a healthy fight or flight response. In large doses, it can even have a calming effect. This vitamin can be found in oranges, grapefruit, lemons, peas, lettuce, tomatoes, and cabbage. Unlike many B or E vitamins, you can exceed the daily recommendations of this vitamin with few issues.

 

So, when you power your body with vitamins, you can support healthy stress levels naturally. This can potentially lower or eliminate the amount of medications you need to deal with anxious feelings. Plus, it helps your body run like a well-oiled machine, too.

You can not go to the drug store, and please never go to GNC, or pick vitamins up at the grocery store without knowing how to take these, and which ones you need to take together,and which ones you don’t take together.

We are helping more people undo their vitamin regiment, because it was making them very ill.

Call us, and ask those questions, we will be happy to help you.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

  1. F. Steele

Dr P Carrothers

Dir of Personalized Healthcare,

Restorative and Preventative Medicine

312-972-9355

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Heart Attacks in Men

heartattackmen

 Heart Attacks in Men

 

Pain, discomfort, and pressure in the chest are the most common symptoms of heart attack in men. These can include a sensation of fullness or squeezing in the chest. These symptoms are sometimes accompanied by pain in one or both arms, the jaw, back, stomach, or neck. While women are more likely than men to experience symptoms other than the characteristic chest pain and pressure, men can also experience other types of symptoms or mistake a heart attack for another condition, such as gastroesophageal reflux. Other signs and symptoms of heart attack include

shortness of breath,

nausea,

vomiting,

fatigue,

lightheadedness,

fainting,

dizziness,

pressure in the upper back, and

a feeling of breaking out in a cold sweat.

Causes of heart attacks in men

 

Heart attacks are caused when there is an inadequate supply of oxygen-carrying blood to the muscle of the heart. A heart attack is medically known as a myocardial infarction. Blockage of a coronary artery by a blood clot and/or atherosclerotic plaque (from coronary artery disease) is the most common cause for the interruption in blood flow to the heart muscle.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-9355

Dr J Jaranson

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Too Much Online Time Raises Suicide Risk

Sisters teenage girls with smart phone and headphones listening music and ommunicate in social networks

Too Much Time Online Raising Suicide Risk in Teen Girls

 

A spike in the amount of time teenage girls in the United States spend online is a likely culprit behind the surge in rates of depression, suicide and contemplation of suicide, new research suggests.

 

The finding stems from an analysis of fatal injury data collected between 1999 and 2015 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as two large ongoing surveys that have been tracking the thoughts of roughly a half-million American teens since 1991.

 

“Around 2012, rates of depression, suicide attempts and suicide itself suddenly increased among teens, especially among girls,” said Jean Twenge. She is a psychology professor at San Diego State University and the study’s lead author.

“The increase occurred right around the same time smartphones became popular,” Twenge said.

 

“We found that teens who spent more time online were more likely to have at least one suicide-related outcome, such as depression, thinking about suicide, making a suicide plan, or having attempted suicide in the past,” she added.

 

The researchers first reviewed CDC data concerning teen suicide, finding that the suicide rate for girls aged 13 to 18 had shot up by 65 percent between 2010 and 2015. The investigators then reviewed teen responses to the Monitoring the Future survey and the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System survey.

 

The polls revealed that the percentage of girls who said they’d experienced symptoms of severe depression had increased by 58 percent in that time frame. Hopelessness and suicidal contemplation had gone up by 12 percent.

 

At the same time, nearly half of teens who indicated they spend five or more hours a day on a smartphone, laptop or tablet said they had contemplated, planned or attempted suicide at least once — compared with 28 percent of those who said they spend less than an hour a day on a device.

 

Depression risk was also notably up among teens who spent excessive time on a device, the findings showed. Results of the analysis were published Nov. 14 in the journal Clinical Psychological Science.

 

Boys are likely to be affected in the same way as girls, Twenge said, although she noted that boys tend to “spend less time on social media and more time on games, which might not affect mental health as much.”

 

Twenge also acknowledged the possibility “that instead of time online causing depression, depression causes more time online,” but she said that prior research suggests that’s not the case.

 

“In addition, depression causing online time doesn’t explain why depression increased so suddenly after 2012,” Twenge noted. “Under that scenario, more teens became depressed for an unknown reason and then started buying smartphones — an idea that defies logic.”

 

That said, teens who spend less than two hours a day online do not appear to face any elevated mental health risks, suggesting there might be a practical sweet spot for device use short of total abstinence.

 

“So parents can try to limit their teens’ use to two hours a day [and] insist that phones be left outside of the bedroom at night to encourage better sleep,” Twenge suggested.

 

Scott Campbell, an associate professor of communication studies at the University of Michigan, took a wary stance on the findings. He said more research is needed to focus not just on how much time kids spend online, but on what they’re actually doing while online.

 

“Like food, alcohol, sex, shopping and just about everything else, too much screen time is bad for you. In that sense, I am not terribly surprised that the heaviest of media users in this study reported the lowest well-being,” he said.

 

“However, I am very cautious about the findings because we need to be open to the possibility that depression might drive young people toward heavy screen time, as noted in the study,” Campbell added.

 

Dr. Anne Glowinski, a child psychiatrist, expressed little surprise with the study findings, while also suggesting that increased device use could be driving teenage mental issues on many fronts.

 

“For instance, increased virtual time could be related to nighttime virtual time — which is related to poor sleep, which is related to depression and thus suicide,” she said.

 

“Online time could [also] be taking time away from time that is mental health-promoting, such as community activities in person, time with family, exercise or meditation,” Glowinski suggested. She is director of child and adolescent psychiatry education and training at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

As for parental advice, Glowinski suggested that “it’s a good idea to have clear discussions before placing a smartphone in your child’s hands.” She also urged parents to set clear rules so that children know their usage is limited, both in terms of when they can hop online and what they are allowed to do once there.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr. M Williams

312-972-9355

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Foods, Uncategorized

Holiday Green Bean Casserole

Elegant-Green-Beans_EXPS_TGCBBZ17_31193_D05_03_3b

ELEGANT GREEN BEANS RECIPE

 

INGREDIENTS

1 can (8 ounces) sliced water chestnuts, drained

1 small onion, chopped

1 jar (4-1/2 ounces) sliced mushrooms, drained

6 tablespoons butter, divided

1/4 cup all-purpose flour ( I use coconut flour)

1 cup 2% milk ( I use less than ½ c)

1/2 cup chicken broth

1 teaspoon reduced-sodium soy sauce

1/8 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

Dash salt

1 package (16 ounces) frozen French-style green beans, thawed

1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese ( Philadelphia cream cheese is good)

1 cup crushed French-fried onions

 

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 350°. In a small skillet, saute water chestnuts, onion and mushrooms in 2 tablespoons butter 4-5 minutes or until crisp-tender; set aside.

In large skillet, melt remaining butter; stir in flour until smooth. Stir in milk, broth, soy sauce, pepper sauce and salt. Bring to a boil; cook and stir 2 minutes or until thickened. Remove from heat; stir in green beans and cheese.

Spoon half of the bean mixture into a greased 1-1/2-qt. baking dish. Layer with water chestnut mixture and remaining bean mixture.

Bake, uncovered, 45 minutes. Top with French-fried onions. Bake 5 minutes or until heated through. Yield: 8 servings.

 

NUTRITIONAL FACTS

3/4 cup: 218 calories, 15g fat (8g saturated fat), 35mg cholesterol, 392mg sodium, 17g carbohydrate (5g sugars, 3g fiber), 5g protein.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-9355

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Foods, Uncategorized

Pumpkin Pie

pumpkinpie

Pumpkin Pie

 

This is a great recipe !  It does not contain the evaporated milk, or corn syrup that most have in them.

This is made with Maple Syrup

 

INGREDIENTS

1 can (16 ounces) solid-pack pumpkin

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

1 tablespoon butter or margarine, softened

1 cup sugar

1 cup milk

2 tablespoons maple syrup

2 eggs

1 unbaked pie shell (9 inches)

Whipped cream, optional

 

DIRECTIONS

In a mixing bowl, combine all ingredients except last two. Pour into the pie shell. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 350° and continue baking for about 45 minutes or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool to room temperature. Refrigerate. Garnish with whipped cream if desired. Yield: 8 servings.

 

NUTRITIONAL FACTS

1 piece: 308 calories, 11g fat (5g saturated fat), 66mg cholesterol, 148mg sodium, 49g carbohydrate (32g sugars, 3g fiber), 5g protein.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-9355

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/