Foods, Uncategorized

An Underrated Fruit You Should Eat

Health and Wellness Associates

honeydew

Honeydew melons are large and oval shaped melons with a smooth rind that range in color from white to pale green. The flesh is usually pale green as well, although some varieties have a gold flesh.

Honeydews are rich in water and contain fewer carbohydrates than other fruit varieties. But, as with most foods, it is important to portion control.

Honeydew is available fresh almost all year, with peak season from June to October.

 

Health Benefits of Honeydew

Honeydew melons are an excellent source of vitamin C, providing more than half a day’s worth (53%) in one half-cup serving.

Vitamin C acts as an antioxidant in blood and cells, plays a role in boosting immunity, and assists in collagen produce, making it important in anti-aging.

Honeydew is also a good source of potassium. Potassium has the potential to reduce blood pressure. It also maintains fluid and electrolyte balance and is required for proper nerve conduction and muscle contraction.

Common Questions About Honeydew

Does honeydew differ from cantaloupe nutritionally?

The biggest difference between cantaloupes and honeydew melon is the vitamin A content. Cantaloupe contains more than a day’s worth of vitamin A, whereas honeydew contains a mere two percent.

As for calories and carbohydrates, honeydew and cantaloupe match up almost identically. Honeydew has slightly more calories (about four) and slightly more carbohydrates (about 1.5) as compared to cantaloupe.

Picking and Storing Honeydew

Choose melons that are heavy for their size and have a smooth, undamaged rind with a waxy feel to them. Avoid melons that are very soft or feel damp at the stem end.

Smell your honeydew. It should give off a strong, sweet aroma.

Touch the honeydew. It should yield slightly and spring back when you press the blossom end (which is opposite the stem end).

If your melon isn’t quite ripe yet, store it at room temperature. Refrigerate it as soon as it ripens to avoid it from becoming overly ripe.

After melon has been cut it should be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator and can last a few days.

Healthy Ways to Prepare Honeydew

Because melons have such a high percentage of water cooking them destroys their texture, making them mushy.

Therefore, honeydew is best served simply sliced or paired with protein such as, low-fat Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, or ricotta. Honeydew can also be used as garnish or used in fruit salads and smoothies. Puree honeydew to make cold, refreshing soup.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Asparagus : One of the best!

Health and Wellness Associates

 

Asparagus Is a Very Healthy Vegetable

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Asparagus spears are both delicious and nutritious, so they’re a perfect vegetable to add to your diet. You can find asparagus that is green, white, or purple. In the United States, the green variety is most common, while white asparagus is prevalent throughout Europe.

The great news is that you can enjoy asparagus all year long as it’s a common fixture in produce markets.

Yet, the peak season for asparagus is in spring, so be sure to take advantage of the best spears of the year during that time.

Asparagus is a low-calorie, low carbohydrate, and high fiber food choice. One-half cup contains only 20 calories and 3.7 grams carbohydrate. It also delivers seven percent of your daily fiber needs.

 

Health Benefits of Asparagus

Asparagus is an excellent source of vitamin K. It’s also a very good source of vitamin A, riboflavin (B2), folate, thiamin, and iron. A good amount of vitamin C can also be found in it.

It’s important to note that if you take Warfarin (coumadin), it’s best to maintain consistent intakes of vitamin K. Try to eat the same amount of high vitamin K foods like asparagus and green leafy vegetables each day.

Asparagus is a good source of many phytonutrients, including antioxidants which may help protect our cells from damage.

It also contains a fairly large amount of glutathione which may help to fight against cancer.

Asparagus is also a source of insulin, a type of fiber that supports healthy gut bacteria. This is an area of research that is now getting a great deal of attention. We are learning the value of gut health in disease prevention and health maintenance.

It’s believed that asparagus is a natural diuretic and at least one recent animal study has backed up this claim. It can help reduce bloating due to a combination of minerals and the plant protein called asparagine.

 

Is There a Nutritional Difference Between White and Green Asparagus?

In comparison, both white and green asparagus contain roughly the same amount of calories, carbohydrates, and fiber in one serving. The difference is that white asparagus is grown underground. Because it is not exposed to light, it does not produce chlorophyll. Therefore white asparagus contains less chlorophyll than the green spears.

White asparagus contains marginally less vitamin C as well. White asparagus tends to be thicker than the green variety, so it tastes better when cooked through—it doesn’t lend the crisp texture that green asparagus does.

 

Why Does Asparagus Make Your Urine Smell?

There’s nothing unusual about having a strange odor to your urine after eating asparagus.

The vegetable contains sulfurous amino acids that break down during digestion. This produces smelly chemical compounds that present themselves as you urinate. It’s perfectly natural and not something to be alarmed about.

 

Picking and Storing Asparagus

When selecting fresh asparagus, choose stalks that have a tightly closed bud. The stalks should be rich in color, stand firm, and appear plump and straight. Avoid asparagus that is limp, mushy, or dull in color.

Asparagus can also be purchased frozen and canned. Avoid frozen asparagus that is packaged with cheese, butter, or other types of sauces. Instead, chose plain asparagus and add the toppings on your own.

Be sure to wash canned asparagus before use.

Fresh asparagus can dry out quickly, so it’s important to store it properly to maintain freshness. To extend its shelf life and prevent food waste:

Keep your asparagus in the rubber band and trim off the bottoms (about 1 inch).

Wrap the ends in a moist paper towel.

Stand them up in a small amount of water (about 1 inch) in the refrigerator.

The stalks should not be washed until just before you’re ready to cook.

 

Healthy Ways to Prepare Asparagus

Asparagus is a great vegetable to use in a pinch because it can be cooked quickly. Make extra asparagus and add it to your morning meal or use it for hearty, healthy soups. Make a simple marinade and grill, roast, or saute your asparagus to pair with proteins for a balanced meal or dress up your asparagus and eat it in or as a salad.

Health and Wellness Associates

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Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Gonorrhea

gonorrhea

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are on the rise in the U.S., with gonorrhea being one of the most common. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced that gonorrhea is the second most-reported STD, with around 820,000 new cases recorded every year.

What Is Gonorrhea?

Gonorrhea is an STD caused by the bacterial strain Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and it can affect both men and women. Most cases of gonorrhea are asymptomatic (no symptoms develop), but when symptoms  do appear, they often cause great distress. A classic indicator of gonorrhea is the presence of a sticky, pus-like discharge in the penis and the vagina. A burning feeling may be experienced during urination as well. In some cases, pain in the abdomen (or testicles for men) may develop.

Common Misconceptions About Gonorrhea

Due to the prevalence of gonorrhea, many myths have popped up regarding how you can treat or avoid it in the first place, some of which you may have heard before:

Gonorrhea Can’t Be Transmitted Through Oral Sex

The male and female genitals aren’t the only organs that gonorrhea can infect. If a partner has gonorrhea, it can manifest in the throat through oral sex.

Your Body Can Get Rid of Gonorrhea on Its Own

It’s highly unlikely that your immune system alone can fight off gonorrhea, and that you can’t get it again once the infection is gone. You certainly need some form of treatment to experience relief from its symptoms, and there’s a high chance the disease can return.

The Hot Tub Will Kill Off Gonorrhea or Other STD-Causing Microbes

People generally think that gonorrheal bacteria and other STD-causing microbes can be killed by soaking in a tub of warm water. On the contrary, these microorganisms can survive in warm water for long periods of time. In addition, the warm water opens up your pores, making your skin more vulnerable to cuts that can allow the microbes to enter your system.

You Can Immediately Tell if You Have Gonorrhea

Many cases of gonorrhea are actually asymptomatic, making it hard to know who is truly infected. The only way to stop the spread of gonorrhea is to have yourself and your partner tested for STDs regularly.

The Good News: Gonorrhea Is Treatable and Preventable

Conventional treatment for gonorrhea usually involves the use of antibiotics . However, this is not recommended nowadays as the bacteria have evolved and are now resistant to the medication. The CDC states that there is only one class of antibiotic left that may help treat gonorrhea, but chances are this antibiotic will also become ineffective in the long run.

Instead, home remedies can be used to help kill the bacteria. You’ll be surprised to know that simple household items can help treat gonorrhea , such as coconut oil.

Aside from being treatable, you can prevent gonorrhea from happening in the first place by practicing safe sex methods, such as using condoms and limiting your sex partners. Furthermore, this guide will educate you on how gonorrhea spreads, effective preventive methods and possible health complications that may arise if you don’t treat it right away.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

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HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com