Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Lentils for Thyroid and Adrenal Glands

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth System

 

Have Lentils to Recharge the Adrenal Glands.

 

lentils2

Lentils are packed with copper and manganese – two minerals that you  might not find an adequate amount in your daily vitamins.
These minerals help the adrenal glands produce energy hormones for one, but also help you with thinning hair, and fat and cholesterol
absorption.  Yale researchers say that 1/2 cup daily is the amount you need, for a 30% increase in energy, thinning hair, and fat absorption
in the intestines, helping you loose up to three pounds a month.

You do not need a special recipe, or preparation for this either.  Buy Progresso lentil soup.  Add it to another soup you are making or
spaghetti sauce, chili, stews, even casserole dishes.  There is not a heavy flavor, and most people will not know you added it.

If you have thyroid problems this is a must eat!  If you have kidney problems this is a must eat!

 

Contact us with any of your healthcare concerns.

Health and Wellness Associates

Dr. A Sullivan

 

312-972-9355 (WELL)

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

 

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

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Foods, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

EGG RECALL

Company Recalls More Than 200 Million Eggs Due to Salmonella Scare

Nearly 207 million eggs produced at a farm in Hyde County, N.C., are being voluntarily recalled because of concerns of contamination with the salmonella bacteria, the egg company announced.

In a statement, Rose Acre Farms of Seymour, Ind. said that 22 illnesses but no deaths have so far been linked to the tainted eggs.

The eggs “have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella Braenderup, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems,” the company said Friday.

The recall arose after illnesses were reported in East Coast states. The outbreak “led to extensive interviews and eventually a thorough FDA (Food and Drug Administration) inspection of the Hyde County farm, which produces 2.3 million eggs a day. The facility includes 3 million laying hens with a USDA inspector on-site daily,” the company said.

The eggs under recall were distributed from the North Carolina farm to retailers and restaurants in Colorado, Florida, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia, Rose Acre said.

All of the eggs come from plant number P-1065, with a “date range of 011 through date of 102 printed on either the side portion or the principal side of the carton or package.” A full list of affected products can be found below in the company’s news release.

Even healthy people infected with the strain of salmonella “can experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain,” the company noted, and heart or arthritic issues can also develop.

“Consumers who have purchased shells eggs are urged to immediately discontinue use of the recalled eggs and to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund,” Rose Acre said. “Consumers with questions may contact the company at (855) 215-5730 between the hours of 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern Standard time.”

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr J Jaranson FABOS

Dr Gail Gray MPH – CPH

 

312-972-9355 (WELL)

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Vegie Lasagna

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth Company

Vegie and Cheese Lasagna

vegie-lasagna

Ingredients

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
3/4 cup sliced button or cremini mushrooms
3/4 cup chopped zucchini
1/2 cup peeled and chopped carrot
1/2 cup chopped red bell pepper
1/2 cup thinly sliced red onion
1 (26-oz.) jar prepared tomato basil pasta sauce
3 Tbs. prepared pesto
1 (15-oz.) carton part-skim ricotta cheese
6 hot cooked lasagna noodles, cut in half
3/4 cup (3 oz.) shredded part-skim or whole milk mozzarella cheese
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese or Grana Padano cheese

( If you read the post on Progresso Lentil Soup, this is a good recipe to add it to)

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes

Total Time: 70 minutes
Yield: Serves 6

Preparation

1. Preheat the oven to 375°F.

2. Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the mushrooms, zucchini, carrot, bell pepper, and onion, and cook, stirring often, for about 7 minutes, or until the vegetables begin to soften. Add the pasta sauce, stir well, and bring the mixture to a simmer. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes.

3. Combine the pesto and ricotta in a small bowl and mix well.

Spread about 1/2 cup of the tomato sauce mixture in the bottom of an 8-inch square baking dish or pan coated with cooking spray. Arrange 4 noodles over the tomato mixture. Top the noodles with half of the ricotta mixture and 1 cup of the tomato mixture. Repeat the layers, ending with the noodles. Spread the remaining tomato mixture over the noodles, and sprinkle with the mozzarella and parmesan cheese.

4. Cover the dish with a sheet of aluminum foil and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover the dish and bake for 20 minutes more, or until the top is golden brown. Remove the lasagna from the oven and let stand for 10 minutes before serving.

About Lasagna

In Italy, its home of origin, lasagna is a very different animal than what we’ve come to know in America. While it certainly rates as on the richest dishes in the Italian repertoire, it’s almost austere compared to its American catch-all counterpart. In Italy, lasagna reflects the seasons: A springtime lasagna is delicate with young artichokes, while in autumn, you’ll find layers of pasta mingling with woodsy fresh porcini and winter squash.

But perhaps the true beauty of the Italian approach to lasagna is that by relying more on vegetables and lighter sauces—and less on cheese.

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Have You Had Mono?

Did you have Mononucleosis?

 

mono

Millions of young Americans have lived through the fatigue and discomfort of mononucleosis.

Now, new research suggests, but doesn’t prove, that the virus that causes the illness may be linked to an increased risk for seven other serious immune-system diseases.

Those diseases include lupus; multiple sclerosis; rheumatoid arthritis; juvenile idiopathic arthritis; inflammatory bowel disease; celiac disease, crohns disease and type 1 diabetes.

“Mono” is a contagious illness that occurs most often in teens and young adults. It’s caused by the Epstein-Barr virus, one of the most common human viruses.

“Epstein-Barr virus infects over 90 percent of adults, and the infection lasts for a lifetime,” said study lead author Dr. John Harley.

“The new results are building a strong case that this virus is also involved in causing a number of autoimmune diseases for at least some patients,” added Harley. He is director of the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Center for Autoimmune Genomics and Etiology.

“It is the kind of circumstantial evidence that is comparable to a smoking gun,” he added.

And those seven diseases affect roughly 8 million Americans, Harley and his colleagues said.

However, one expert said people who have had mono shouldn’t panic.

The findings “should not be a cause for alarm,” said Dr. David Pisetsky, a professor of medicine at the Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C.

“In modern life everyone has been exposed and infected with Epstein-Barr,” he noted. “And if 99 percent of people have been exposed to Epstein-Barr, and only 0.1 percent have lupus, it means there really must be other factors at play that affect risk,” Pisetsky explained.

“I really don’t think it’s a reason for undue concern,” he added. Pisetsky is also on the scientific advisory board for the Lupus Research Alliance.

Harley’s in-depth genetic analysis revealed that at the cellular level, the Epstein-Barr virus shares a number of abnormal viral on-off switches (“transcription factors”) in common with those seven other illnesses.

Those transcription factors are meant to move along the human genome (DNA roadmap), jumpstarting cells into performing necessary tasks.

But the abnormal switches found in Epstein-Barr hijack this process. First, they bind to a specific protein — known as EBNA2. Then they move about the genome in search of disease trigger points. Once docked at a respective trigger point, the risk for that particular disease goes up, the new research suggests.

Harley said he and other scientists will continue to examine additional factors that likely also contribute to autoimmune risk. Autoimmune diseases occur when your immune system mistakenly attacks your body.

 

 

As the cause of mononucleosis, Epstein-Barr is typically transmitted via saliva, giving rise to its nickname as the “kissing disease.”

Kids and teens with mono may have a fever, muscle aches and sore throat. They often feel exhausted. However, many people — especially young children — experience no symptoms. And in most cases, mono resolves within a couple of weeks.

The new findings stem from an extensive genetic review of potential links between the Epstein-Barr virus and roughly 200 illnesses. However, the study could not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

The review actually uncovered preliminary links to 94 additional diseases, including breast cancer. But Harley’s team said further investigation is needed to confirm those associations.

Tim Coetzee is chief advocate for services and research with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. He characterizes the new findings as “an important contribution.”

“We need these kinds of studies to help us unravel how this virus could trigger disease,” he said. “The paper is also a powerful demonstration about how detailed genetic studies can help us understand human diseases.”

Careful research like this, Coetzee added, “will give us the knowledge we need to better understand the complexity of autoimmune diseases, and importantly point the way to potential prevention of these.”

 

Ask yourself if you have had a lot of strep throats, asthma, bronchitis or mono in your life.  Are you one who has allergies, If so, make an appointment with us, and we can work together to prevent any of these diseases from attacking you.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

P Carrothers

Director of Personalized Health Care

Preventative and Restorative Medicine

312-972-9355 (WELL)

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

 

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