Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Your Brain is at Risk with Certain Foods and Cosmetics

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Your Brain is at Risk with Certain Foods and Cosmetics

titaniumdioxide

Millions of tons of titanium dioxide are produced globally each year. It adds whiteness and brightness to products and also helps them resist discoloration. Titanium dioxide also reflects ultraviolet (UV) light, which is why it’s often used as an ingredient in sunscreens.

 

Most titanium dioxide (close to 70 percent) is used as a pigment in paints, but it’s also added to cosmetics, toothpastes, pharmaceuticals, paper and food.

 

Titanium dioxide is generally considered to be a relatively inert, safe material, but an increasing number of products are now using titanium dioxide nanoparticles, and that may change everything.

 

Nanoparticles are ultramicroscopic in size, making them able to readily penetrate your skin and travel to underlying blood vessels and your bloodstream.

 

Evidence suggests that some nanoparticles may induce toxic effects in your brain and cause nerve damage, and some may also be carcinogenic.

 

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies titanium dioxide as a Group 2B carcinogen, which means it’s “possibly carcinogenic to humans.” This was based on an animal study showing inhaling high concentrations of titanium dioxide dust may lead to lung cancer.

brain

Is Titanium Dioxide in Foods Dangerous?

Candies, sweets and chewing gum have been found to contain the highest levels of titanium dioxide. White powdered doughnuts, candies and gums with hard shells, products with white icing and even bread, mayonnaise, yogurt and other dairy products may contain titanium dioxide.

 

As such, one analysis of exposure to titanium dioxide through foods found children receive the highest exposure levels (two to four times more than adults) because it’s so commonly added to sweets.1 Only a “limited number” of the products tested in one study listed titanium dioxide on the label.2

 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration actually allows manufacturers to use up to 1 percent food-grade titanium dioxide without declaring it on labels.3

 

It should be noted that many titanium particles used in food products are not nanoparticles (defined as smaller than 100 nanometers in diameter). However, some are.

 

According to research published in Environmental Science and Technology, up to 36 percent of the titanium dioxide found in nearly 90 food products was of the nanoparticle variety.4

 

It’s unclear what health risks may be linked to ingestion of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but research suggests there’s cause for concern.

 

One animal study published in Cancer Research, for instance, found titanium dioxide nanoparticles may induce clastogenicity (causing breaks in chromosomes), genotoxicity, oxidative DNA damage and inflammation.

 

The researchers suggested they may be a cause of cancer or genetic disorders and concluded:5

 

“These results have been observed after only 5 days of treatment via drinking water, and in multiple organs suggesting a systemic effect …

 

We also showed that in utero exposure to TiO2 NPs [titanium dioxide nanoparticles] results in an increased frequency in DNA deletions in the fetus.

 

… These data suggest that we should be concerned about a potential risk of cancer or genetic disorders especially for people occupationally exposed to high concentrations of TiO2 NPs

 

…[A]nd that it might be prudent to limit ingestion of TiO2 NPs through nonessential drug additives, food colors etc.”

 

Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles May Harm Your Brain

The use of nanoparticles is increasing rapidly, and titanium dioxide nanoparticles are the second most produced engineered nanomaterial in the world.6

 

Its usage in consumer products has outpaced the research into its safety, such that humans are being repeatedly exposed before we know the consequences. What is known, however, is that titanium dioxide nanoparticles are capable of moving from your lungs or gastrointestinal tract to other organs.7

 

Further, animal studies indicate significant accumulation of nanoparticles in the brain, while toxicity studies have shown the particles have negative effects on brain cell viability and function.8

 

One recent study even showed titanium dioxide nanoparticles induced “an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting mitochondrial damage.”

 

The researchers believe exposure to the particles may lead to neurological dysfunction.9 Specifically, the nanoparticles were found to harm astrocyte cells, which help regulate serotonin, dopamine and other neurotransmitters.

 

High levels of exposure (100 parts per million) killed two-thirds of such brain cells within one day. It also harmed the cells’ mitochondria, which may ultimately lead to cell death.

 

Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Damage

The study also revealed that astrocyte cells that weren’t killed were left damaged; they became unable to absorb glutamate, a neurotransmitter, such that it accumulated outside the cell, which may be implicated in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.10

 

Other research also suggests titanium dioxide nanoparticles may have hidden brain risks. For instance:

 

Prenatal exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles may result in alteration to the cerebral cortex, olfactory bulb and brain regions intimately related to dopamine systems of offspring mice.11

Exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles may alter oxidative and inflammatory responses as well as the renin-angiotensin system in the brain (which plays a role in cardiovascular health, including hypertension, and aging), thereby modulating brain function.12

Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) induce strong oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in glial cells in your brain. According to research published in Free Radical Biology & Medicine:13

“TiO2 NPs can enter directly into the brain through the olfactory bulb and can be deposited in the hippocampus region …

 

TiO2 NPs … produced morphological changes, damage of mitochondria, and an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential, indicating toxicity.”

 

What About Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Personal Care Products?

Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are found most often in personal care products such as toothpaste, sunscreen and, to a lesser extent, shampoos, deodorants, and shaving creams. As with food, use of these nanoparticles in personal care products is on the rise.

 

In 2005, about 1,300 metric tons were used in personal care products, but this had increased to 5,000 metric tons by 2010 and is expected to continue increasing until at least 2025.14

 

Although most studies suggest titanium dioxide does not penetrate human skin, even in nanoparticle form, one study found that the nanoparticles could possibly penetrate the outer layer of skin depending on the particle coating and skin (with or without hair).15

 

As further reported in Environmental Science and Toxicology:16

 

“The only FDA-stipulated limitation for sunscreens is that the TiO2 concentration be less than 25%. Most have a lower concentration, between 2% and 15%.

 

With the wide prevalence of sunscreen use and the lack of a distinction between TiO2 nanomaterials and larger-sized particles, the general public is being exposed to nanomaterials of which they are largely ignorant.”

 

Environmental Risks Are Unknown

Also concerning is what happens when all of the nanoparticles in personal care products (and excreted after they’re consumed in your food) are washed down the drain and flushed down the toilet. Study author Paul Westerhoff, a professor in the School of Sustainable Engineering and The Built Environment at Arizona State University and Senior Sustainability Scientist to the Global Institute of Sustainability, told Nanowerk:17

 

“… [W]e can expect the percentage of TiO2 [titanium dioxide] that is produced in or near the nano range to increase. TiO2 nanomaterials in foods, consumer products, and household products are discharged as feces/urine, washed off of surfaces, or disposed of to sewage that enters wastewater treatment plants.

 

While these plants capture most of the TiO2, nanoparticles measuring between 4 and 30 nm were still found in the treated effluent. These nanomaterials are then released to surface waters, where they can interact with living organisms.”

 

Tips for Avoiding Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are ubiquitous in processed foods, so the best way to avoid them is to eat real food. To avoid these particles in your toothpaste, consider making your own out of coconut oil. As for sunscreen, the other major source, first realize that titanium dioxide (and zinc oxide) is a top choice for sun protection (and doesn’t carry the same risks as hormone-disrupting sunscreen chemical oxybenzone).

 

To be on the safe side, however, look for non-nanoparticle titanium dioxide that is tested and guaranteed to be non-nano. Further, minimize your sunscreen use as much as possible, using it only when you’ll be in the sun for extended periods and the use of clothing to cover-up or going into the shade aren’t options.

 

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Monsanto may soon face “FLOOD” of lawsuits from cancer victims of Roundup herbicide

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Monsanto may soon face “FLOOD” of lawsuits from cancer victims of Roundup herbicide

 

 

monsantolawsuits.jpg

Monsanto, the maker of the world’s most popular weed killer Roundup, could soon be facing an unrelenting flood of lawsuits from people who got cancer from their product.

On Tuesday, a federal judge decided to allow three expert witnesses to give their testimony pertaining to Roundup’s carcinogenicity. U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria ruled that the three experts could testify, and he even went so far as to say that their opinions were not “junk science.” The judge will be residing over more than 400 of the lawsuits against Monsanto.

In his opinion, Chhabria wrote: “So long as an opinion is premised on reliable scientific principles, it should not be excluded by the trial judge; instead the weaknesses in an unpersuasive expert opinion can be exposed at trial, through cross-examination or testimony by opposing experts.”

The firm is currently defending itself in a trial with 46-year-old Dwayne Johnson, who says he became ill with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma after he used Roundup for more than two years in his role as a school groundskeeper in California. The dying man is just the first in a list of around 4,000 people with similar lawsuits.

Johnson’s lawyer, Timothy Litzenburg, and Monsanto have agreed not to talk to the media until a jury is in place, but as the representative of hundreds of other victims, he has spoken in the past about the direct link between the rise in Roundup use and the spike in non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Another of his clients, 68-year-old coffee bean farmer Christine Sheppard, likened Monsanto’s antics to those of the tobacco industry. She said: “They hid reports linking its weed killer to cancer.” She’s suing them because she’d like to see the product banned and removed from store shelves so others won’t have to suffer like she did.

 

Monsanto knew that Roundup caused cancer and sold it anyway

It’s important to note that this case is not only about Roundup causing cancer but also the fact that Monsanto has long known these products can be deadly and went out of its way to hide it.

The EPA has helped them by ignoring data illustrating the link between non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and glyphosate. The Scientific Advisory Panel found that they threw out studies that shed the products in a negative light, including one that showed farmers who were exposed to the chemical had a 27 to 50 percent higher risk of cancer than control groups.

Should the jury side with Johnson in his case, Monsanto can expect to be flooded with similar lawsuits, with thousands of plaintiffs waiting to see what happens. According to investigative journalist Carey Gillam, the litigation could potentially go on for decades and cost billions of dollars to Monsanto and its new owner, Bayer.

Not surprisingly, Monsanto Vice President Scott Partridge said that the opinions of the experts Judge Chhabria is allowing to testify are “shaky.” He says that “robust” evidence proves glyphosate has “absolutely no” connection to cancer. He’s repeated the lie so often that he might even be starting to believe it.

The real question now is whether or not it will hold up in court. Monsanto doesn’t shy away from using tactics like fabricating and manipulating data, discrediting scientists and other experts who are brave enough to tell the world how dangerous their products are, and mounting deceitful PR campaigns designed to pull the wool over the public’s eyes.

An attorney for the plaintiffs in the upcoming lawsuits, Michael Baum, expressed relief that the judge resisted Monsanto’s efforts to get the suits thrown out, adding that he was looking forward to getting his clients their day in court.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Good Ole Cottage Cheese

Health and WEllness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Good Ole Cottage Cheese

cottage-cheese-with-flax-seeds-132295347-581b816c3df78cc2e85d90f8cottage cheese with flax seeds

 

Cottage cheese is a staple in many healthy eating plans. The dairy food provides benefits especially for people who are trying to lose weight or improve their health. But cottage cheese calorie count and nutrition can vary depending on the type that you buy.

 

Cottage Cheese Calories and Nutrition Facts

Many healthy eaters who include cottage cheese in their meals buy the 2 percent low-fat variety. This version provides enough fat for flavor but not as much as the regular variety. So how do the fat and calorie count compare across the different varieties of cottage cheese?

 

Skim/nonfat cottage cheese: 80 calories per half cup serving, 0 grams fat, 0 grams saturated fat

1% cottage cheese: 90 calories, 1.5 grams fat, 1 gram saturated fat

2% cottage cheese: 90 calories per half cup serving, 2.5 grams fat, 1.5 grams saturated fat

4% (regular) cottage cheese: 110 calories per half cup serving, 5 grams fat, 3 grams saturated fat

Keep in mind that a single serving of this dairy product is just four ounces or a half cup. At mealtime, it is very easy to scoop much more than that onto your plate. So be sure to account for your full portion size if you are counting calories.

Cottage cheese is low in sugar and an excellent source of phosphorus, calcium, riboflavin, and vitamin B12.

However, the dairy food is high in sodium. So if you are trying to cut back on salt, this might not be the best choice for you. Some brands, however, make low sodium or no salt added versions of cottage cheese that contain less sodium.

 

Nutrition and Health Benefits of Cottage Cheese

Many healthy eaters consume cottage cheese because of the relatively low-calorie count.

Bodybuilders often choose cottage cheese as a snack or as part of a meal because it is a quick and convenient source of protein. A single serving provides over 15 grams of the muscle-building nutrient.

Cottage cheese is also a low carb food. The carbohydrate count for a single serving is just over 4 grams or 16 calories from carbohydrates. If you don’t eat any toppings on your cottage cheese this food makes it easy to keep your carb count low.

 

Lastly, cottage cheese is easy to incorporate into a meal and needs no special preparation to enjoy. For that reason, many dieters include it in their meal plans. The food is easy to carry, simple to eat if you are on-the-go, and pairs well with other healthy, diet-friendly foods like fruits and vegetables.

 

What’s the Difference Between Large and Small Curd?

When you buy cottage cheese, you can choose between different fat contents, but you can also choose from different curd sizes. Curds are the thick lumps in the food. There is no real nutritional difference between small curd or large curd (sometimes called “chunk style’) cottage cheese. The difference is simply a result of the way the cheese is made.

 

Choosing and Storing Cottage Cheese

After you buy cottage cheese, make sure to keep it refrigerated and tightly sealed.

It is a perishable food so it is best to consume cottage cheese before the expiration date on the package. Shelf life can depend on how the food was manufactured. Except for dry cottage cheese (that has no liquid part), this food does not freeze well.

 

Healthy Ways to Include Cottage Cheese in Your Diet

Cottage cheese is great plain, but you can also pair it with other foods to make a complete meal. Try any of these ideas.

Add a side of savory vegetables like broccoli or radishes for a healthy lunch or snack

Top with fruit such as blueberries, raspberries, strawberries or melon to satisfy your sweet tooth

Sprinkle with nuts such as almonds or walnuts, or with seeds such as flax seeds for crunch and flavor

Make a cottage cheese dessert by mixing in dark chocolate chips or cocoa nibs.

 

Cottage cheese calories are a good source of energy and the dairy product can be a good addition to your diet, especially when you pair it with other healthy foods. Get creative and try new flavors to keep this food on your meal plan.

 

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