Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Metallic Taste in Your Mouth?

Metallic Taste in Your Mouth?

 

I’ve heard that a metal taste in the mouth means something about health, but I can’t remember what it was. Can you help?

Metallic Taste in Your Mouth? | Metal Taste | Andrew Weil, M.D.

A metallic taste in the mouth is a common complaint and can be due to a variety of causes – from medication you may be taking to dental problems. In the absence of other symptoms, it is unlikely that a metallic taste in your mouth indicates serious disease. But if you haven’t had a thorough general checkup recently, I would suggest seeing your doctor to rule out any health problems such as issues with your liver and kidneys, hyperparathyroidism, or undiagnosed diabetes.

 

You also might consider visiting your dentist, because the funny metallic taste in your mouth could be a symptom of gum disease. Even if you don’t have gum problems, poor oral hygiene can affect taste. Be sure to brush your teeth carefully at least twice a day and use a tongue scraper to remove the bacteria and debris that can collect on your tongue. Dental work done in the past can break down and alter taste, so your dentist will probably look at that as well.

Not drinking enough water can also contribute to problems with this strange taste in your mouth. Increase your intake and see if it helps. While you don’t necessarily have to drink the standard recommendation of eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day, my rule of thumb is to drink as much of that amount as you can comfortably consume and more than you think you need.

Among the drugs that can cause a metallic or coppery taste in your mouth are antibiotics like Biaxin (clarithromycin); Flagyl (metronidazole) , used to treat a wide variety of infections; drugs used to treat an overactive thyroid; captopril, used to treat high blood pressure ; griseofulvin, used to treat skin infections; lithium, used in bipolar disorder; penicillamine, used for rheumatoid arthritis or to prevent kidney stones; and some drugs used in cancer treatment.

Ayurvedic supplements from India have been found to exceed acceptable amounts of metal such as mercury, lead, or arsenic and I would be cautious about purchasing them online. Multivitamins containing copper, zinc, or chromium, as well as iron or calcium supplements might cause a temporary taste of metal, but typically subside as it’s being processed by your digestive system. This taste can be symptomatic of a vitamin D overdose , but with most of the population being vitamin D deficient and extremely high dosages (over 10,000 IUs) required, I doubt this is of any great concern. A metal taste is actually more commonly associated with a deficiency of vitamin B12, D, or zinc.

While a metallic taste can be a symptom of acute metal poisoning, it’s rare since our bodies are quite efficient at sequestering and neutralizing the contaminants that it’s not able to expel through the skin, liver, and kidneys. Heavy metal poisoning such as having too much lead or copper in the body due to conditions such as Wilson’s Disease, being around fungicides containing copper sulfate, or contaminated drinking water require intervention such as chelation therapy, so consider possible exposures when speaking with your physician.

Metal on metal (MoM) hip replacements have been known to cause metal poisoning. If you have had a MoM hip replacement and you develop symptoms of metallic taste in your mouth I recommend you see your primary or orthopedic physician.

A taste disorder called dysgeusia could potentially be at the root of phantom flavors as well. When taste cells are stimulated, messages are sent through three specialized nerves to the brain to identify.

Sometimes these wires get crossed in cases of dementia, head injury, or as the result of radiation therapy. Pregnancy hormones can also cause temporary bouts of dysgeusia, especially in the first trimester. Eating citrus fruits or vinegar-marinated foods will help counteract the taste and activate salivation to dilute the unsavory taste of metal. With such a strong tie between the sense of smell and taste, respiratory infections such as sinusitis can also throw your taste buds for a loop and give you the false perception of a metallic taste.

If you rule out all of these possible causes, have been medically evaluated, and still have the metallic taste in your mouth, it might be worthwhile to consult with a practitioner of Chinese medicine. That system might have an answer for you.

Health and Wellness Associates

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

Lifestyle, Uncategorized

New Male Contraceptive?

New Male Contraceptive?

 

The Myths (And Truths) About What Two People In Love Looks Like | Mercury #romanticdatingtipsforguys

I’ve heard there’s a new male contraceptive in the works. Can you tell me when it is likely to become available?
A number of male contraceptive methods are under development, but the one that has gotten the most attention lately is a birth control pill that appears to be safe when taken daily. Called DMAU (short for dimethandrolone undecanoate), it is being developed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health at the University of Washington in Seattle and the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, CA.

The pill already has been tested in 83 men ages 18 to 50 in three doses: 100, 200 and 400 milligrams in two different formulations. The men who participated received either DMAU or a placebo, which they took once a day with food. The researchers reported that the 400 mg dose led to “marked suppression” of testosterone and reduced levels of two other hormones required for sperm production. Study leader Stephanie Page, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of medicine at the University of Washington, reported that very few of the men participating described symptoms consistent with testosterone deficiency or excess, and none of them developed serious side effects. Dr. Page noted that the men taking DMAU gained some weight and that their HDL (“good”) cholesterol declined, although she described both these changes as “mild.”

Dr. Page wrote that many men say they would prefer a daily pill as a reversible contraceptive, instead of long-acting injections or topical gels, which are also in development. She added that longer-term studies of DMAU are underway to confirm that taken daily, the drug blocks sperm production.

Development of a reliable birth control pill for men hasn’t been easy. Earlier studies found that some forms of oral testosterone delivered in a single pill can damage the liver or that the pills clear the body too quickly to be useful. DMAU contains a long-chain fatty acid that helps keep the contraceptive in the body longer.

In the works elsewhere is a gel called Nestorone-Testosterone that must be applied to the arms and shoulders daily. The hormone progestin in the gel shuts down hormones that stimulate testosterone production. An international study with 420 couples reportedly is testing whether the gel is safe and effective at preventing conception.

Another approach being investigated in India is temporary, nonsurgical vasectomy. It involves injecting a gel into sperm-carrying tubes in the scrotum. The gel damages sperm, leading to infertility. This treatment, called RISUG for “reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance,” can be undone with a second shot that breaks down the gel. I’ve read that some 540 men in India have received the treatment and that it has continued to prevent pregnancy in their partners for more than 13 years.

Despite these developments, it’s unlikely that a male contraceptive in pill or gel form will become available any time soon. For now, men should continue to use condoms, undergo vasectomy, or rely on women’s contraceptive use to prevent unwanted pregnancies.

Health and Wellness Associates

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com