Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Gluten-Free Cinnamon Lemon Coconut Bliss Balls Recipe

Gluten-Free Cinnamon Lemon Coconut Bliss Balls Recipe

gluten free balls

Word of warning: these cinnamon lemon coconut bliss balls are ever so slightly addictive. But that’s alright because each one has just under 100 calories and only 3 grams of sugar, so you can use your own best judgment on when to indulge.

Want to know the key to keeping the sugar so low? The unusual but delicious pairing of cinnamon and lemon zest. If you love lemon and cinnamon and you’ve never tried this combo before, you’ll be hooked!

In addition to being low in sugar, they’re also a good source of heart-healthy mono and polyunsaturated fats. Plus, they’re super easy to make? The hardest part is zesting the lemon, but you can still be noshing in under 10 minutes flat—perfect when you’re craving a little something sweet!​

Ingredients

  • 2 cups fine almond flour
  • ¼ cup pure maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons almond oil
  • 2 teaspoons lemon zest, or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, or to taste
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt or table salt
  • ¼ cup shredded unsweetened coconut ​

Preparation

  1. Combine almond flour, maple syrup, almond oil, lemon zest, cinnamon, and salt in a food processor bowl. Process until mixture is well combined and slightly sticky.
  2. Line a large plate or small baking sheet with plastic wrap and divide dough into 20 pieces. Roll each piece into a ball.
  3. Place shredded coconut on a small plate and roll each ball in the coconut, then return to plate or baking sheet. May serve immediately or store covered in refrigerator until ready to eat

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

You may substitute the almond oil for any neutral tasting vegetable oil or liquid coconut oil. Feel free to add additional lemon zest and coconut if desired. Start with recommended amounts, then add more as needed.

Cooking and Serving Tips

You can make a big batch of these and store them in a well-sealed container in the freezer. Enjoy them frozen, or thaw them out a little in the refrigerator before serving. These bliss balls are perfect for dessert or an afternoon treat with a cup of tea.

 

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

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Foods, Uncategorized

6 Foods You Should Never Eat Raw

6 Foods You Should Never Eat Raw

 

We all know that we should include more raw food in our daily diet such as fresh fruits and vegetables. But some foods, even some vegetables, can be toxic in their undercooked state.

6 Foods You Should Never Eat Raw

“Many foods can be dangerous when eaten raw,” the team dietitian for the Orlando Magic basketball team tells Newsmax. “For example, eggplant contains solanine, a poisonous compound that can cause vomiting, diarrhea and damage to the central nervous system and needs to be cooked. Animal protein in general — dairy, raw cauliflower,poultry, pork and eggs — can be very dangerous when eaten raw because of the bacteria and parasites that can be found in these foods.”

Here are six more foods that should never be eaten raw:

  1. Cookie dough. We’ve all been guilty of licking the bowl, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a formal warning titled “Say No to Raw Dough!” urging folks NOT to yield to temptation and indulge. Raw dough contains flour and often eggs, both products that can harbor harmful germs and bacteria in their uncooked states.
  2. Potatoes. This vegetable, like eggplant, contains solanine. Green potatoes are particularly high in solanine and can be toxic even when cooked, according to Prevention. When you bake potatoes in a casserole or stew, make sure they are thoroughly cooked.
  3. Sprouts. Adding bean sprouts to salads is a great way to jazz up the meal, but uncooked sprouts can contain harmful bacteria, such as salmonella and E. Coli.
  4. Steak tartare. As delicious as this gourmet dish of raw ground beef mixed with eggs dish appears, that’s how dangerous it can be. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says on its website, Eatright.org, that we should never consume rare or even medium rare meat because in the grinding process, harmful bacteria on the surface gets ground into the meat. Ground meat needs to cooked to an internal temperate of 160 F.
  5. Raw milk. Drinking raw milk has become trendy as many people believe it can cure many diseases, but Collingwood warns it’s a health hazard. “Drinking unpasteurized milk can be dangerous because of the bacteria it can contain,” she says.
  6. Raw asparagus. This is another vegetable that should be cooked even though it’s not toxic, according to Alternative Daily. Cooking enhances the cancer-fighting antioxidants in this vegetable and increased the absorption of vital nutrients like vitamins A, B, C, E, and K. Cooking will also help break down the fiber making it more easily digestible.

“While you may have eaten raw cookie dough or steak tartare without incident in the past, all it takes is one time that you willnews get sick and it can be potentially deadly, especially for someone with a compromised immune system,” says Collingwood.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

 

Foods, Uncategorized

Sugar-Free Coconut Shrimp Recipe

Sugar-Free Coconut Shrimp Recipe

Coconut Shrimp

Coconut shrimp is a fan favorite finger food—it is crispy, slightly sweet, and of course, features delicious shrimp! But restaurant and party versions of this appetizer can often be over sweet and therefore loaded with sugar. In this sugar-free version of coconut shrimp, the sweetener in the coating is optional, so you can add a bit to mimic the popular restaurant versions’ sweetness if you desire.

These sugar-free coconut shrimp can be served as an appetizer, party food, or main course.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup coconut flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (ground, or 1 teaspoon ground ancho pepper)
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • Optional: sugar substitute (such as stevia) to taste
  • 1/2 cup coconut (unsweetened shredded coconut)
  • Cooking oil of your choice, such as vegetable or canola, for frying
  • 1 pound large shrimp (raw, peeled and deveined and thaw if frozen)

Preparation

  1. Mix coconut flour with seasonings in a shallow bowl.
  2. Whisk the eggs with a fork in a small dish, and mix with the 2 tablespoons water. Add sweetener if desired.
  3. Put shredded coconut in a separate dish.
  4. Pour oil into a large skillet to about 3/4 inch depth. Heat to 350 to 360 F, or until the end of a wooden spoon handle dipped into the oil collects bubbles around it.
  5. Holding shrimp by the tail, roll in the seasoned coconut flour and shake to get most of it off—you just want a thin coating. Then dip in egg mixture, again shaking off the excess. Finally, roll in coconut.
  6. 6Place shrimp in the oil and fry until golden, about 2 minutes per side. Don’t crowd the pan, which will lower the temperature of the oil—this makes them absorb more oil and end up heavy and greasy. Tongs are the best tool for turning and removing the shrimp.
  7. Remove shrimp from the oil to a paper towel or cooling rack.

Cooking and Nutrition Notes

To thaw shrimp, place frozen shrimp in a colander and place under cold running water for several minutes until shrimp are no longer icy and stiff. Place between paper towels to absorb the water.

When frying the shrimp, you can put each in the oil as you bread them, but you will have to watch the shrimp you put in the skillet first closely to make sure they’re not getting overcooked (and don’t forget to flip!). An alternative method is to bread a few shrimp at once and then put them all in the pan at the same time (as long as they fit without being too crowded).

Keep in mind that the calorie count listed here can vary since the amount of oil used by each cook can differ depending on the pan size. It is also difficult to get a precise number since the frying temperature will affect the amount of oil absorbed. In addition, the exact amount of coconut breading per shrimp will vary.

Nutrition Highlights (per serving)

CALORIES354
FAT23g
CARBS23g
PROTEIN13g

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/