Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Fill Up With Walnuts

canwalnutsfeelfull

Walnuts Can Help Fill You Up

 

Research from Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reveals that consuming walnuts affects a brain area that regulates hunger and cravings. This finding emerged from a study of 10 obese volunteers who spent two 5-day sessions in the hospital’s Clinical Research Center. During one of these sessions, the participants drank daily smoothies containing 48 grams of walnuts. During their other stay, the smoothies tasted the same and were nutritionally identical but contained no walnuts. At the end of each session, the researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to monitor the volunteers’ brain activity while they viewed images of hamburgers, desserts and other desirable foods as well as neutral items such as flowers, rocks and foods considered less desirable. After drinking walnut smoothies, the images of desirable foods triggered increased activity in a brain area called the right insula, which helps regulate appetite. This activity was much less pronounced in the fMRI monitoring that followed consuming smoothies that were walnut-free. Neither participants nor researchers knew during which session the walnut smoothies were served. The volunteers also reported that they felt less hungry during the session they received the walnut-rich smoothies.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Andrew Weil

Dr G Carney

312-972-9355 (WELL)

 

HealthWEllnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates

Advertisements
Diets and Weight Loss, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Energy Drinks

energydrinks

Recent research reveals some troubling side effects of these popular beverages.

Energy drinks are one of America’s most popular dietary supplements, according to the National Institutes of Health, but that doesn’t mean they’re actually a boost for your health. There’s been a lot controversy surrounding the drinks following several recent overdoses — and even deaths — linked to the beverages. In 2014, World Health Organization researchers labeled the rise in energy-drink consumption a “danger to public health.”

So, what’s in an energy drink, and how does it affect your body?

A 2015 Mayo Clinic study, published in JAMA, examined the effects of drinking a single 16-ounce can of a popular energy drink (Rockstar Punched). Researchers conducted the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study on 25 healthy volunteers with an average age of 29.

THE EFFECTS

  • 74%: The average percentage increase of the fight-or-flight stress hormone norepinephrine in study participants’ blood levels.
  • 6.2%: The average percentage increase in study participants’ systolic blood pressure.

THE INGREDIENTS

Researchers observed that the effects could be the results of the following stimulants in Rockstar Punched.

  • Caffeine: 240 mg (by comparison, a shot of espresso has about 64 mg)
  • Sugar: 62 grams (15½ teaspoons)
  • B vitamins and ginkgo biloba (additional stimulants)

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Buffalo Cauliflower

buffalocauliflower

Buffalo Cauliflower with Blue Cheese Sauce

Ingredients

 

Cheese Sauce:

1/3 cup nonfat sour cream

2 tablespoons crumbled blue cheese

1 tablespoon skim milk

2 teaspoons mayonnaise

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Buffalo Cauliflower:

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

1/4 cup hot sauce, such as Frank’s

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

2 tablespoons olive oil

Kosher salt

8 cups cauliflower florets (from about 1 medium head)

 

Directions

 

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

 

For the cheese sauce: Whisk together the sour cream, blue cheese, milk, mayonnaise, 1/8 teaspoon salt and a few grinds of pepper in a small bowl. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, about 30 minutes

 

For the Buffalo cauliflower: Meanwhile, microwave the butter in a small microwave-safe bowl on high until melted. Whisk in the hot sauce and lemon juice and set aside.

 

Mix olive oil, 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/2 cup water in a large bowl. Add the cauliflower and toss until well coated. Spread the cauliflower on a rimmed baking sheet and roast until beginning to brown and just tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Whisk the hot sauce mixture again, drizzle over the cauliflower and toss with tongs to coat. Roast the cauliflower until the sauce is bubbling and browned around the edges, 5 to 7 minutes more. Serve hot with the cheese sauce.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived  2009

312972Well

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

How to Eat Low Carb at Burger King

burgerking

How to Eat Low-Carb at Burger King 

Burger King is the second largest hamburger fast food chain restaurant, so it’s often convenient. But how does it stack up in terms of offerings for those of use who are cutting carbs? Here’s how to find your way around the Burger King (BK) menu.

 

Find Information About Carbs

There is a nutritional information brochure at Burger King, but it won’t tell you about custom options such as ordering a burger without the bun.

 

 

But some of that information is available online:

 

Nutritional Information: Information, including carbohydrates, on all the standard Burger King menu items. Unfortunately, there is no way to tell about the individual components. McDonald’s does this, and it’s very helpful. You might be able to guess about the condiments by looking at the McDonald’s tool.

 

Ordering Burgers

Obviously, ordering burgers without the bun is the way to go. You will get the burger in a plastic container with most of the condiments. As with many other places, mayo seems to be considered a condiment for the bun, not the burger, and you won’t get it unless you ask for it. You may have to ask for a knife and fork to go with it. Hamburgers have zero carbs, but some of the condiments have carbohydrate. Other than saying that the ketchup has 3 grams of carbohydrate and the mayonnaise zero, BK does not give information about the condiments.

 

Other Sandwiches

The best bet on other sandwiches is the Tendergrill Chicken Sandwich without the bun at 3 grams of carbohydrate. If you get the Veggie Burger bunless, it will cost you 19 grams of carb, and the rest of the sandwiches go up from there.

 

Salads

Salads at BK are, unfortunately, a little disappointing.

 

 

In particular, the last time I checked them out the side salads were almost entirely iceberg lettuce. A thin slice of tomato and a few tiny carrots complete the “Garden Salad”. The base for the meal salads was a little better, as it had the more-nutritious romaine lettuce included.

 

The only low-carb meal salad option is the Tendergrill Chicken Garden Salad, at 8 grams of net carbohydrate (not counting dressing and skip the croutons). The Tendercrisp Chicken Salad has 23 grams of net carbs because the chicken is breaded.

 

The dressings, as always, contain a wide range of carbohydrate. The best one is the Ranch Dressing at 2 grams of carbohydrate per packet. Do NOT get the Fat Free Ranch Dressing, as it contains

 

15 grams of sugar! The Creamy Caesar and Light Italian dressings could also reasonable choices, at 4 and 5 grams, respectively. And you don’t have to use the whole thing, of course.

 

Sides and Desserts

The only real possibility is the Fresh Apple Fries (which aren’t fried, BTW) at 5 grams net carbs. Skip the caramel sauce of course.

 

If you just want a Chicken Tender or two, they are a little over 2 grams of carb apiece. Choose the Ranch dipping sauce at 1 gram per container.

 

Breakfast

There are a couple of omelet sandwiches that you could get without the bun, but there is no information about carb counts in that case.

 

 

Beverages

Obviously water, diet sodas, and coffee are the zero carb options (or almost so). Don’t be tempted by the iced coffee, with a diet-busting 66 grams of carbohydrate. And believe it or not, the shakes go up to 154 grams of carbohydrate and 960 calories!!

 

With care, an occasional meal at BK won’t break your diet, but there isn’t enough nutrition available there to make it a habit

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

L Dotson

Dr P Carrothers

312-972-Well

 

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Best and Worst Choices for KFC Foods

kfc

Best and Worst Health Choices at KFC

 

Most healthy eaters consider chicken to be a diet-friendly food. But the menu at Kentucky Fried Chicken can challenge even the most dedicated dieter. If you check KFC nutrition facts, you’ll see that many menu items are loaded with fat and calories—including the chicken. But it is possible to eat at KFC when you’re trying to lose weight and even to make healthy choices on the menu.

 

Analyzing the KFC Menu

The KFC menu is built around items that are fried.

 

 

So even though chicken is usually a good source of lean protein, most of the chicken items on this menu are going to less healthy. In addition, the side dishes—primarily comfort foods like mashed potatoes, corn bread and macaroni and cheese—will increase your fat and calorie intake while providing very little nutritional value.

 

However, there are a few grilled selections on the Kentucky Fried Chicken menu that are better for your health. For example the Grilled Chicken Breast provides just 180 calories and 6 grams of total fat. You’ll also get 31 grams of metabolism-boosting protein when you choose this food.

 

Most Popular KFC Food

Original Recipe and Extra Crispy Chicken are very popular choices at KFC. But the Original Recipe Chicken Breast is loaded with fat and sodium (see label). If you select the Extra Crispy Chicken Breast, you’ll consume 390 calories, 23 grams of fat and 870 milligrams of sodium.

 

Extra Crispy Tenders are also a menu favorite at KFC.

 

 

A single order provides 140 calories, 7 grams of fat 10 grams of protein and 310 milligrams of sodium. And wings are another popular food. An order of KFC Chicken Hot Wings provides 70 calories, 4 grams of fat, 4 grams of protein and 160 milligrams of sodium. But a serving size is just 22 grams, which is very small. You are likely to consume several servings of this food.

 

Sandwiches and wraps are also popular at KFC. The Crispy Twister, for example, includes a tortilla, extra crispy tenders, mayo, tomatoes, shredded cheese and lettuce. There are 630 calories in the KFC twister wrap, and 34 grams of fat.

 

Healthiest Options on the Kentucky Fried Chicken Menu

Grilled items will be best for your diet at KFC, but if you love the taste of fried chicken, you still have options. Choose one of these meals to keep your fat and calorie intake in control.

 

Traditional KFC Meal: 480 calories

 

Original Recipe Chicken Breast: 320 calories

Corn on the Cob: 70 calories

Mashed Potatoes: 90 calories

Grilled Chicken Meal: 385 calories

 

Kentucky Grilled Chicken Breast: 180 calories

Green Beans: 25 calories

Biscuit: 180 calories

Crispy Chicken Salad Meal: 450 calories

 

Crispy Chicken Caesar Salad: 330 calories

Marzetti Light Italian Dressing: 15 calories

 

Cornbread Muffin (half muffin): 105 calories

 

 

Least Healthy Choices on the KFC Menu

 

 

One of the reasons that a Kentucky Fried Chicken meal is challenging for dieters is that many menu items are served family-style. This can make portion control very difficult. In addition, many of the most popular foods at KFC are fried. So even though they provide a dose of healthy protein, it comes bundled with fat and calories.

 

To stick to your diet when you eat at KFC, follow these three rules to avoid common mistakes that can send your daily fat and calorie intake through the roof.

 

Order only single-serve items. Skip the family-style buckets and platters – even if you are eating with a group. That way you know you are consuming only the calories that are posted on the menu board. You may also want to avoid KFC’s popular Go Cups if you are trying to slim down. You don’t get enough food to justify the 500 (or more) calories you’ll consume when you eat one.

Be smart with salad choices. Salads are usually healthy, but there aren’t any grilled salad choices at KFC. Each of the entree salads at Kentucky Fried Chicken comes with fried chicken on top. And the calorie counts listed do not include dressing. You can include these in your diet (see the meal listed above) if you crave crispy chicken, but a healthier choice is to order the side salad and add a piece of grilled chicken on top.

Be selective about sides.  The KFC sides you choose can make or break your entire meal. So check the nutrition facts for your favorite dish before you order. The healthiest side dish is Green Beans with only 25 calories and zero grams of fat. Potato wedges are the worst with 290 calories and 15 grams of fat. You might also want to skip the BBQ Baked Beans. Even though beans sound healthy, this recipe will add 210 calories to your total intake.

Lastly, remember to drink water instead of soda when you visit KFC or any fast food restaurant. It’s a better choice for your body when you consume the high sodium levels that you find in many fried foods. And try to make your food choices before you go. That way you’re not distracted by the pictures on the menu board and you’ll be more likely to stick to your diet.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

M Frey

Dr P Carrothers

312-972-Well

 

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Best and Worst Food Choices at McDonalds

eggmcmuffin

Best and Worst Health Choices at McDonald’s

 

Analyzing the McDonald’s Menu

 

McDonald’s and many other fast food restaurants post calorie counts for each of their food products.

 

 

But if you are in the drive-thru lane you might not have time to grab your calculator and do the math. So be safe and stick to sandwiches that include grilled meat or chicken to keep the calorie count low. You’ll also boost your daily protein intake with those choices.

 

It’s also a good idea to skip the French fries and choose fruit instead. If you want to indulge, get a small size of fries and choose a smaller sandwich. And your best bet for saving calories? Skip the soda! Get water and add lemon to make the water taste better.

 

The best way to stay healthy at McDonald’s is to order a la carte. That means you bypass the popular Value Meals and only order the menu items that you love so you don’t waste calories on foods you don’t need.

While you might imagine that burgers rule at McDonald’s, French fries, chicken sandwiches, and chicken nuggets are also very popular. Even breakfast items rank very high on the McDonald’s must-have list. These are calorie counts for some of the most popular items:

 

A 4-piece order of Chicken McNuggets provides 180 calories, 11 grams of fat, 10 grams of protein and 11 grams of carbohydrate.

 

The more popular 10-piece order of Chicken McNuggets provides 440 calories, 27 grams of fat, 24 grams of protein and 26 grams of carbohydrate. Double those numbers for the 20-piece chicken nugget calories and nutrition.

An Egg McMuffin provides 290 calories, 12 grams of fat, 17 grams of protein and 29 grams of carbohydrate.

A McChicken sandwich provides 350 calories, 15 grams of fat, 14 grams of protein and 40 grams of carbohydrate.

One Quarter Pounder with Cheese provides 540 calories, 27 grams of fat, 31 grams of protein and 42 grams of carbohydrate.

A Filet-O-Fish sandwich provides 390 calories, 19 grams of fat, 17 grams of protein, 38 grams of carbohydrate.

A Cheeseburger provides 300 calories, 12 grams of fat, 15 grams of protein and 33 grams of carbohydrate.

If you choose to enjoy your meal with one of McDonald’s popular sweetened drinks, you’ll have to add more calories. A large McDonald’s Sweet Tea contains 160 calories and a large Coca-Cola contains 300 calories.

Healthiest Options on the McDonald’s Menu

There are some items that are lower in calories. Depending on the meal you choose to enjoy, there are several different ways to enjoy a full meal for under 500 calories.

 

McDonald’s Breakfast Under 500 Calories

There are some items you should avoid if you are watching your waistline.

 

 

The Sausage, Egg & Cheese McGriddle provides 550 calories. And the Bacon Egg & Cheese McGriddle doesn’t fare much better at 420 calories. These items, however, should keep you satisfied and won’t ruin your daily calorie count:

 

Fruit & Maple Oatmeal: 310 calories

Apple Slices: 15 calories

Coffee: 0 calories (no cream or sugar)

Lowfat Milk: 100 calories

Total: 425 calories

 

Fruit and Yogurt Parfait: 150 calories

Iced Latte: 60 calories (medium with nonfat milk)

Hash Browns: 150 calories

Total 360 calories

 

Egg McMuffin: 290 calories

Hash Browns: 150 calories

Black coffee: 0 calories

Total: 440 calories

Low-Calorie McDonald’s Lunch or Dinner

Most dieters will visit McDonald’s for their popular lunch or dinner burgers and fries.

 

So can you enjoy these popular favorites and still keep your weight loss program on track? Yes! Just stay away from the super-sized items and high-fat condiments like mayonnaise and cheese.

 

Milk: 100 calories (1% low fat)

Southwest Grilled Chicken Salad (no cheese or tortilla strips): 260 calories

Fruities (Mandarin orange): 35 calories

Total: 395 calories

 

Premium Grilled Chicken Sandwich: 380 calories

Side Salad: (no dressing) 20 calories

Water: 0 calories

Total: 400 calories

 

Hamburger: 250 calories

Kids Fries: 110 Calories

Small Diet Soda

Total: 360 calories

 

Cheeseburger: 300 calories

Side Salad: 20 calories

Newman’s Own Low Fat Dressing: 80 calories

Water

Total: 400 calories

 

Hamburger: 250 calories

Small fries: 230 calories

Water

Total 480 calories

Unhealthiest Food on the McDonald’s Menu

As you might expect, the fries won’t do wonders for your diet. An order of large French Fries contains 510 calories, 24 grams of fat, and 66 grams of carbohydrate. And you might also want to avoid the Double Quarter Pounder with Cheese which will add 780 calories and 45 grams of fat to your daily total.

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

M Frey

Dr P Carrothers

312-972-Well

 

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Diets and Weight Loss, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Study Confirms Preservative in Cereal Promotes Obesity.

cereal

Study Confirms Preservative in Cereal Promotes Obesity

 

Many animal studies have suggested that chemicals added to breakfast cereals and other common products are adding to America’s obesity crisis, but showing exactly how the process happens in humans has been difficult. Scientists at Cedars-Sinai have solved the problem.

 

The researchers tested three chemicals that are common in modern life. Butylhydroxytoluene (BHT) is an antioxidant commonly added to breakfast cereals and other foods to protect nutrients and keep fats from turning rancid; perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a polymer found in some cookware, carpeting and other products; and tributyltin (TBT) is a compound in paints that can make its way into water and accumulate in seafood.

 

The investigators used hormone-producing tissues grown from human stem cells to demonstrate how chronic exposure to these chemicals can interfere with signals sent from the digestive system to the brain that let people know when they are “full” during meals. When this signaling system fails, people may continue to eat, thus gaining weight.

 

“We discovered that each of these chemicals damaged hormones that communicate between the gut and the brain,” said Dhruv Sareen, Ph.D. When the three chemicals were tested together, the result was even more pronounced.

 

Of the three chemicals tested, BHT produced some of the strongest detrimental effects, Sareen said. BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene) is a chemical allowed to be used as a food additive to prevent oxidation.

 

 

BHT is on the Food and Drug Administration’s GRAS — generally recognized as safe — list. It is used in foods, such as cereals — although some food manufacturers have eliminated it from their products — and is also used in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Some studies, however, have indicated that in addition to weight gain, BHT also increases the risk of cancer, and can cause liver enlargement.

 

Sareem said that while other researchers have shown the compounds can disrupt hormone systems in laboratory animals, the new study is the first to use human pluripotent stem cells and tissues to show how they may disrupt hormones that are critical to preventing obesity in people.

 

Sareem’s research found that the chemical damage occurred in early-stage “young” cells, suggesting that the findings may indicate that a defective hormone signaling system could perhaps impact a pregnant mother as well as her fetus in the womb.

 

More than 80,000 chemicals are approved in the United State for use in everyday items such as foods, personal care products, household cleaners and lawn-care products, according to the National Toxicology Program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. While the program states on its website that relatively few chemicals are thought to pose a significant risk to human health, it also states: “We do not know the effects of many of these chemicals on our health.”

 

It has been difficult to test these chemicals on humans because of the health risks of exposing human subjects to possibly harmful substances, so many widely used compounds remain unevaluated in humans for their health effects, especially to the hormone system.

 

“By testing these chemicals on actual human tissues in the lab, we potentially could make these evaluations easier to conduct and more cost-effective,” Sareen said.

 

Earlier studies have suggested that BHT increases the risk of cancer, and can cause liver enlargement.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/angelique.rose.50

 

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Lower Your Blood Pressure with Onions

onion-flower

Lower Your BP with Onions

 

Lower your Blood Pressure with a daily dose of onions.

 

In a Spanish study, eating 1/3 cup of onions daily, any kind of onions,

 

it cut patients blood pressure by 21% in five weeks. Onions are

 

rich in quercetin, a natural diuretic that lowers pressure by

 

flushing our excess fluids and salt. Many people stop eating onions

 

because of bad breath worries, but please put them back in your

 

diet and make sure any older people put them back in their diets

 

also, to avoid congestive heart problems.

 

If you are having any concerns, please call us and ask to set up a consultation.

 

Picture:  Onion Flower

 

Health and Wellness Associates

 

Archived

 

312-972-Well

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Diets and Weight Loss, Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

The Link Between Sugar and Depression

staring

The Link Between Sugar and Depression

 

Men consuming more than 67 grams of sugar per day were 23 percent more likely to develop anxiety or depression over the course of five years than those whose sugar consumption was less than 40 grams per day

Other studies have also linked high-sugar diets to a higher risk of depression and anxiety, showing a low-sugar diet is an important part of the prevention and treatment of common mental health problems

Sugar increases your risk of depression by contributing to insulin and leptin resistance, suppressing BDNF, affecting dopamine, damaging your mitochondria and promoting chronic inflammation

 

How Sugar Raises Your Depression Risk

A number of other studies have also identified mechanisms by which excessive sugar consumption can wreak havoc with your mental health. For example, eating excessive amounts of sugar:

 

  • Contributes to insulin and leptin resistance and impaired signaling, which play a significant role in mental health.

 

  • Suppresses activity of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key growth hormone that promotes healthy brain neurons. BDNF levels tend to be critically low in both depression and schizophrenia, and animal models suggest this may actually be a causative factor.

 

  • Affects dopamine, a neurotransmitter that fuels your brain’s reward system9 (hence sugar’s addictive potential10,11,12) and is known to play a role in mood disorders.13

 

  • Damages your mitochondria, which can have body-wide effects. Your mitochondria generate the vast majority of the energy (adenosine triphosphate or ATP) in your body. When sugar is your primary fuel, excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secondary free radicals are created, which damage cellular mitochondrial membranes and DNA.

 

Needless to say, as your mitochondria are damaged, the energy currency in your body declines and your brain will struggle to work properly. Healthy dietary fats, on the other hand, create far fewer ROS and free radicals. Fats are also critical for the health of cellular membranes and many other biological functions, including and especially the functioning of your brain.

 

Among the most important fats for brain function and mental health are the long-chained animal-based omega-3 fats DHA and EPA. Not only are they anti-inflammatory, but DHA is actually a component in every cell of your body, and 90 percent of the omega-3 fat found in brain tissue is DHA.

 

  • Promotes chronic inflammation which, in the long term, disrupts the normal functioning of your immune system, thereby raising your risk of depression. A 2004 cross-cultural analysis14 of the relationship between diet and mental illness found a strong link between high sugar consumption and the risk for depression and schizophrenia.

 

It also concluded that dietary predictors of depression are similar to those for diabetes and heart disease. One of the hallmarks of these diseases is chronic inflammation, which sugar is a primary driver of. So, excessive amounts of sugar can truly set off an avalanche of negative health events — both physical and mental.

 

Inflammation May Be the No. 1 Risk Factor for Depression

Another previous study published in the International Breastfeeding Journal15 found inflammation may be more than just another risk factor. It may actually be the primary risk factor that underlies all others. According to the researchers:

 

“The old paradigm described inflammation as simply one of many risk factors for depression. The new paradigm is based on more recent research that has indicated that physical and psychological stressors increase inflammation. These recent studies constitute an important shift in the depression paradigm: inflammation is not simply a risk factor; it is the risk factor that underlies all the others.

 

Moreover, inflammation explains why psychosocial, behavioral and physical risk factors increase the risk of depression. This is true for depression in general and for postpartum depression in particular.”

 

In another study,16 the researchers suggested “depression may be a neuropsychiatric manifestation of a chronic inflammatory syndrome.” Here, they refer specifically to inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Studies have also found depression is closely linked to dysfunction in the gut-brain axis, in which gut inflammation plays an important role.

 

Artificial Sweeteners Are Also Strongly Associated With Depression

Unfortunately, many are under the mistaken belief they can protect their health by swapping refined sugar for artificial sweeteners. Nothing could be further from the truth, as research suggests artificial sweeteners may actually be more detrimental to your health than regular sugar. For example:

 

  • In a 1986 evaluation of reactions to food additives,17 aspartame (in commonly consumed amounts) was linked to mood alterations such as anxiety, agitation, irritability and depression.

 

  • A 1993 study18 found that individuals with mood disorders are particularly sensitive to aspartame, suggesting its use in this population should be discouraged. In the clinical study, the project was halted by the Institutional Review Board after a total of 13 individuals had completed the study because of the severity of reactions within the group of patients with a history of depression.

 

  • In 2008, researchers asserted that excessive aspartame ingestion might be involved in the pathogenesis of certain mental disorders and may compromise emotional functioning.19

 

  • Research presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology in 2013 found that consumption of sweetened beverages — whether they’re sweetened with sugar or artificial sweeteners — was associated with an increased risk of depression.20,21 The study included nearly 264,000 American adults over the age of 50 who were enrolled in an AARP diet and health study.

 

At the outset, participants filled out a detailed dietary survey. At a 10-year follow-up, they were asked whether they’d been diagnosed with depression at any point during the past decade.

 

Those who drank more than four cans or glasses of diet soda or other artificially sweetened beverages had a nearly 30 percent higher risk of depression compared to those who did not consume diet drinks. Regular soda drinkers had a 22 percent increased risk.

 

To Cure Depression, Be Sure to Address Root Causes

According to the World Health Organization, depression is now the leading cause of ill health and disability worldwide,22,23 affecting an estimated 322 million people, including more than 16 million Americans. Globally, rates of depression increased by 18 percent between 2005 and 2015.24 According to the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health, 11 percent of Americans over the age of 12 are on antidepressant drugs. Among women in their 40 and 50s, 1 in 4 is on antidepressants.25

 

While a number of different factors can contribute to depression, I’m convinced diet plays an enormous role. There’s no doubt in my mind that radically reducing or eliminating sugar and artificial sweeteners from your diet is a crucial step to prevent and/or address depression.

 

One simple way to dramatically reduce your sugar intake is to replace processed foods with real whole foods. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables is associated with lower odds of depression and anxiety,26,27 an effect ascribed to antioxidants that help combat inflammation in your body. Certain nutrients are also known to cause symptoms of depression when lacking, so it’s important to eat a varied whole food diet.

 

Another major contributor to depression and anxiety is microwave exposure from wireless technologies, which I address below. To suggest that depression is rooted in poor diet and other lifestyle factors does not detract from the fact that it’s a serious problem that needs to be addressed with compassion and non-judgment. It simply shifts the conversation about what the most appropriate answers and remedies are.

 

Considering the many hazards associated with antidepressants (the efficacy of which have been repeatedly found to be right on par with placebo), it would be wise to address the known root causes of depression, which are primarily lifestyle-based. Drugs, even when they do work, do not actually fix the problem. They only mask it.

 

Antidepressants may also worsen the situation, as many are associated with an increased risk of suicide, violence and worsened mental health in the long term. So, before you resort to medication, please consider addressing the lifestyle strategies listed below.

Nondrug Solutions for Depression

Limit microwave exposure from wireless technologies

 

Studies have linked excessive exposure to electromagnetic fields to an increased risk of both depression and suicide.28 Power lines and high-voltage cables appear to be particularly troublesome. Addiction to or “high engagement” with mobile devices can also trigger depression and anxiety, according to recent research from the University of Illinois.29

 

Research30 by Dr. Martin Pall reveals a previously unknown mechanism of biological harm from microwaves emitted by cellphones and other wireless technologies, which helps explain why these technologies can have such a potent impact on your mental health.

 

Embedded in your cell membranes are voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs), which are activated by microwaves. When that happens, about 1 million calcium ions per second are released, which stimulates the release of nitric oxide (NO) inside your cell and mitochondria. The NO then combines with superoxide to form peroxynitrite, which in turn creates hydroxyl free radicals, which are the most destructive free radicals known to man.

 

Hydroxyl free radicals decimate mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, their membranes and proteins. The end result is mitochondrial dysfunction, which we now know is at the heart of most chronic disease. The tissues with the highest density of VGCCs are your brain, the pacemaker in your heart and male testes.

 

Hence, health problems such as Alzheimer’s, anxiety, depression, autism, cardiac arrhythmias and infertility can be directly linked to excessive microwave exposure.

 

If you struggle with anxiety or depression, be sure to limit your exposure to wireless technology. Simple measures include turning your Wi-Fi off at night, not carrying your cellphone on your body and not keeping portable phones, cellphones and other electric devices in your bedroom.

 

Call us for information and help with preventative medicine.  If you are not comfortable with that, make sure your physician is certified or had done a specialty in preventative medicine. The trick question to ask is, where did you go to school for that.   Easy to look up, not many schools offer it.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr Anna Sullivan

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/