Foods, Uncategorized

Tartar Sauce Recipe

Homemade Tartar Sauce Recipe

There are a lot of reasons to love tartar sauce. If you’re a a big fan of seafood, it may already be one of your favorite condiments, but have you ever had homemade tartar sauce? With the perfect balance of creamy, salty, tangy and sweet, this tartar sauce recipe can be used on much more than a piece of fried fish.

What is tartar sauce? It is a condiment or dip that starts out with a base of mayonnaise or aioli and then has other ingredients added to it. Tartar sauce recipes can vary slightly, but most will add relish, onion, herbs and lemon juice.

Like other condiments, tartar sauce is only as good or as healthy as its ingredients, which pretty much always include mayonnaise and sweet relish or pickles. As you may already know, a lot of mayonnaise and pickle brands include unwanted preservatives, flavorings and coloring. Plus, sweet relish or pickles are usually loaded with refined sugar.

This recipe for tartar sauce includes homemade mayonnaise and probiotic-rich homemade dill pickles, which really takes the taste of this sauce to another level. It’s also a paleo-friendly recipe. Before you keep reading, don’t worry, how to make tartar sauce is not hard, and it’s so worth the effort because homemade tartar sauce always has that freshness and flavor that you just can’t get in any pre-made version.

 

Tartar sauce recipe - Dr. Axe

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup paleo mayo or 1 cup Coconut Oil Mayonnaise
  • 1 cup Homemade Dill Pickles
  • 1 tablespoon fresh dill
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon maple sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons onion, finely chopped
  • 2–3 garlic cloves

 

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Place everything in a food processor or high-powered blender, blending until well-combined.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

 

Advertisements
Uncategorized, Foods

Chicken Scarpariello

Chicken Scarpariello With Sausage and Peppers Recipe

 

 

Looking for a healthier take on the classic sausage and peppers recipe? This chicken scarpariello dish has both chicken breasts and chicken sausages and is overflowing with delicious flavor. Of course, I recommend using organic, free-range chicken products, which I personally think taste better in addition to being healthier options overall.

This chicken scarpariello with sausage recipe takes less than an hour to make and can feed at least six people. It’s a perfect choice if you’re looking for a crowd-pleasing dish that only requires one pot and minimal effort. Before we dive into the how-to’s of this recipe, what is chicken scarpariello exactly?

Chicken scarpariello recipe - Dr. Axe

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3 tablespoons avocado oil
  • 4 chicken breasts
  • 3 chicken sausages
  • 2 sweet cherry peppers, halved and de-seeded
  • 1 orange pepper, sliced
  • 1 cup dry white cooking wine
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1 cup mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 shallot, sliced into rounds
  • 1 cup okra, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 1 tablespoon sage
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper

 

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven 350 degrees F.
  2. In a large oven-safe pan over medium-high heat, warm avocado oil.
  3. Brown chicken and sausage separately and then remove when braised but not fully cooked.
  4. Reduce to medium heat and add garlic, peppers, mushrooms, shallots, okra, oregano, sage, salt and pepper.
  5. Sauté until vegetables are soft, about 15 minutes.
  6. Add wine and broth to deglaze the pan.
  7. Scrape bottom of the pan with a wooden spatula to incorporate the flavors.
  8. Place chicken and sausage on top of the vegetables and bake in oven for 30 minutes.
  9. Allow to rest 10 minutes before serving.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Foods, Uncategorized

Spinach Quiche Recipe : Low Carb

Crustless Spinach Quiche Recipe

 

This crustless spinach quiche recipe is keeping things simple yet delicious with only five key ingredients. It’s loaded with impressive spinach nutrition, eggs and healthy raw cheese.

Get ready to make a healthy crustless spinach quiche recipe so loaded with flavor you’ll easily end up eating it for breakfast, lunch and dinner. And that’s really one of the best things about a quiche — that it makes a perfect snack or meal any time of the day.

This crustless spinach quiche recipe is delicious, so easy to make and high in protein. Plus, it’s gluten-free, vegetarian and ketogenic diet-approved.

Crustless spinach quiche recipe - Dr. Axe

INGREDIENTS:

  • 8 eggs, beaten
  • 1 package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and drained
  • 1½ cups shredded raw cheese
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil + extra for greasing
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon black pepper

 

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and grease a 9-inch pie pan with coconut oil.
  2. Heat coconut oil and onions over medium heat in sauce pan until onions are soft. Stir in spinach and cook until excess moisture has evaporated.
  3. In a bowl, combine eggs, cheese, salt and pepper. Stir.
  4. Add spinach mixture and blend together.
  5. Scoop into pan and bake for 30 minutes.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Foods, Uncategorized

Chipotle Lime Chicken Thighs With Pineapple Salsa Recipe

Chipotle Lime Chicken Thighs With Pineapple Salsa Recipe

 

chipotle chicken with salsa

 

Boneless, skinless chicken thighs are great for quick, flavorful meals. They are easy to prepare with little effort and are almost impossible to dry out. They take on any flavor well and are the perfect vehicle for fresh, healthy ingredients like fruits, vegetables, and herbs. To keep them on the healthier side, trim off visible fat before cooking. They will still stay plenty moist and flavorful!

Chipotle, garlic and lime add so much flavor with almost no effort in this recipe. A fresh pineapple salsa kicks up the flavor even more and makes this meal a fun and exciting change-up to your normal dinner routine.

Ingredients

  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • 3/4 teaspoon chipotle powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • Juice from 1 lime
  • 2 teaspoons avocado oil or other high-heat oil
  • 1/4 cup red onion, diced
  • 1/2 cup fresh pineapple, diced
  • 1 small jalapeno, seeded and diced
  • 2 tablespoons fresh cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
  • Juice from 1/2 lime

Preparation

  1. Heat oven to 350F. Trim visible fat from chicken thighs.
  2. In a small bowl, combine chipotle powder, garlic, and cumin.
  3. Squeeze lime over the tops of chicken thighs and sprinkle heavily with the spice blend. Rub to coat the tops of thighs well.
  4. Heat an oven-proof skillet on the stove over high heat. Add oil and swirl skillet to coat.
  5. Sear chicken thighs in the skillet, about 2 minutes per side. Place skillet in the oven to finish cooking, 5 to 10 minutes. Chicken is done when a thermometer inserted in the center reads 165F.
  1. While chicken is cooking, prepare the salsa. Combine red onion, pineapple, jalapeno, cilantro, and lime in a bowl.
  2. Once the chicken is done remove from oven and serve with pineapple salsa.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

You can use chicken breasts in place of thighs, but they will need to be pounded thin to ensure they cook thoroughly but do not dry out.

Cooking and Serving Tips

Use a meat thermometer to be sure chicken is cooked all the way through. You may also grill chicken thighs if you do not have an oven-proof skillet.

Serve these chicken thighs with black beans or brown rice and a green salad or grilled vegetables to round out the meal.

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

7 “Healthy” Food that Can Make You Fat

7 “Healthy” Food that Can Make You Fat

 

 

Salads, Granolas and smoothies seem like smart picks for healthy on-the-go foods, but you may be surprised to learn that many times they’re packed with extra calories, sugar, carbohydrates and salt.

 

Soups

Soups are hearty and delicious go-to’s on colder days, but not all soups are created equal. The base of your soup can make or break its healthiness. “A cream-based soup is going to be much higher in calories and fat,” says Allen. In fact, one cup of chicken noodle is about 100 calories, while one cup of broccoli cheddar is almost 250.

When you eat soup, opt for broth-based soups like vegetable or chicken noodle or cream-free tomato soups and stews instead. And steer clear of cream-heavy bisques and chowders when you can. If you have to reach for canned soups, choose low-fat, reduced-sodium soup options.

 

Salads

 

Salads, depending on what they’re made of, can be fresh and healthy picks to throw together or order in a pinch. But dieters beware: they can also sabotage your weight loss goals if they’re covered in fatty toppings like cheese, bacon, creamy dressings and croutons.

“Salads at some fast food restaurants can have almost 30 grams of fat and 500 calories, while a cheeseburger and an order of medium fries has 28 grams of fat and 630 calories, so there’s not much difference between the two,” says Allen.

Make sure your salad is actually healthy by asking for your dressing on the side, choosing the grilled version of your protein rather than the fried, and asking for little or no bacon or cheese. For a crunchy topping without all the calories, try sliced almonds or crushed bean “tortilla” chips instead. And whole grains like quinoa, bulgur or barley will help fill you up.

When it comes to dressings, choose oil and vinegar-based dressings rather than cream and mayonnaise-based options; fresh salsa can be a guilt-free salad topper, too. If you can’t bear a salad without your favorite creamy dressing, divide your salad into two. Use your favorite fatty dressing on one portion, and the healthier dressing option on the other half.

 

Smoothies

 

Sugary syrups and processed protein powders can add up to 1,000 calories at fast food chain smoothies, says Allen.

It’s better to make your own smoothies at home, or hand pick the ingredients that go into you smoothies if you order them out. If you’re new to smoothie making, here’s how much of each ingredient to include: one to two cups of liquid base, up to two cups of greens, up to three cups of fruit, plus a tablespoon of nut butter or protein powder.

Keep your smoothie healthy by using milk—like unsweetened coconut, almond or skim milk—as your base instead of juice. Then add fruits like strawberries, bananas or blueberries and a protein such as Greek yogurt, nut butter, seeds like hemp or chia or protein power (whey, soy and plant-based options are best). For added vitamins, try throwing in some spinach, kale or celery. Spices like cinnamon, nutmeg or vanilla extract can pack an extra, low-cal flavor punch, too.

 

Granola

 

Depending on what it’s made out of, granola can be super high in calories, fat and sugar, says Allen. Most granola is made of oats, nut, seeds and dried fruit—all nutrient rich ingredients—but chocolate chips and sugary syrups can add serious calories to store-bought options.

Look for granola options with raw oats, unsalted nuts and unsweetened fruit, and mix your granola into something rather than snacking on it by the handful. Add it to something like low-fat Greek yogurt, then top it with some fruit such as berries, says Allen. Hooked on granola bars? Try options that are nut or fruit based rather those that are grains-based. Homemade granola bars are easy to make, too: ingredients like unsweetened cranberries, old-fashioned oats, unsalted almonds, all-natural maple syrup, flax seeds and peanut butter can be combined and baked for a nice treat.

 

Dried Fruit

 

You may think anything made of fruit is good for you, but that’s not always the case. Certain dried fruits like apricots and dates are concentrated with calories, especially from sugar, says Allen. While they still have antioxidant and fiber components, they may actually be stripped of some vitamins during the dehydration process.

Sprinkle dried fruit like apples or cranberries in your salads rather than snacking on them straight out of the bag. And when you do eat dried fruit by itself, pair it with a low-fat cheese stick or a handful of nuts so you’ll stay fuller, longer. When selecting picks from the grocery store, aim for options without added sugar or other ingredients (the only ingredient should be the fruit itself).

 

Fruit juices

 

All-natural fruit juice can provide some of the vitamins and minerals that you find in whole fruits, as long as you control your portions. “The biggest problem with fruit juices is that most people pour more than the recommended serving size,” says Allen.

Craving apple juice? Eat an actual apple instead of reaching for juice. “You’ll get a lot more fiber eating the whole fruit than you would in fruit juice,” says Allen. When you do choose juice, opt for all-natural, 100 percent, no-sugar added juice options or the low-cal versions of your favorites. Do limit the amount you drink—the American Institute for Cancer Research recommends no more than one cup per day.

***  Never give your children Apple Juice!

 

Pretzels

 

Pretzels may have been your go-to snack food years ago, but you may want to be careful when it comes to the salty snack nowadays.

“People are starting to look at carbohydrate intake much more now than they did in the past,” says Allen. “10 or 15 years ago there was a push to reduce fat intake so we turned to things like pretzels and baked potato chips.”

But reduced-fat doesn’t give you license to eat as much as you want. With low-fat foods, people think they can eat as much as they want because it’s low fat, but they still have to watch portion sizes, says Allen.

While pretzels are a much healthier pick than greasy potato chips, pay attention to serving size: only about 16 small waffle-shaped pretzels equals one serving. And don’t eat too many flavored pretzels like honey mustard and barbeque as they likely have a lot of sugar and sodium. Your best bet: unsalted mini pretzels to keep your sodium and hunger levels in check.

 

Just be aware of what you’re eating

 

You don’t have to do away with these foods completely, but reading labels and educating yourself on serving size, calorie count, fat content and how they fit into your diet is key, says Allen. “For example, many people are leaning towards almond milk these days, but the calories per serving can range from 30 to 100.”

One of the easiest ways you can monitor what you’re eating is to track it or look it up before you indulge.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Foods, Uncategorized

Frozen Chocolate Bananas!

Frozen Chocolate Bananas!

The flavors in this simple dessert remind me of classic beach fare – frozen bananas on a stick coated with chocolate. This is a healthier version that you can whip up in no time. It contains no added sugar or dairy and is very versatile. Improvise by adding different flavors like organic peppermint oil or almond extract. Make this a few hours before you plan to serve – it’s best when just frozen. Any leftovers will keep for a couple of weeks in the freezer.
Bananas are rich in potassium – one banana contains 450 mg, one-fifth of the adult daily requirement – and offer a fair share of magnesium (33 mg), too.

Ingredients

4 very ripe bananas
2 tablespoons pure unsweetened cocoa powder
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
2 tablespoons real maple syrup

Instructions

1. Peel the bananas and place in a blender or food processor along with the cocoa powder.

2. Add the vanilla extract and the maple syrup.

3. Blend till very smooth. Pour into individual custard cups or small bowls and freeze until just frozen.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

The Benefits of Ginger

Ginger: A Natural Anti-Inflammatory Spice For Nausea And Motion Sickness

Ginger: A Natural Anti-Inflammatory Spice For Nausea and Motion Sickness

If minor aches and pains are an issue for you, try ginger, a natural anti-inflammatory agent that is useful for relieving symptoms associated with arthritis, bursitis, motion sickness, nausea and more. Ginger is commonly available in forms ranging from whole fresh root, crystallized ginger and honey-based ginger syrups to capsules containing powdered extracts. Look for products made with only 100 percent pure ginger. For inflammatory conditions, take 1,000 to 2,000mg (or 1 to 2 grams) of powdered ginger a day; for nausea and prevention of motion sickness, take 1,000 mg as a preventive, following that with 500 mg every four hours as needed. (You may also try eating two pieces of crystallized ginger, taking a spoonful of ginger syrup or sipping ginger tea.)

 

To prevent high doses from causing stomach irritation, take ginger with food. Ginger may also act as a blood thinner, so curbing daily use at least two weeks before surgery is advisable. If you are pregnant, use ginger to address morning sickness with some caution – I would not recommend using more 1,000 to 1,500 mg per day divided into two to four doses throughout, particularly during the early stages of pregnancy.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

 

 

Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Soy Foods: Possibly for Girls Only

Some people think soy is a great plant-based protein option, but what are the dangers of eating soy? Learn about the risks and benefits, plus some ways to consume soy safely.

soy beans and soy milk

Why do we eat soy?

With the rise in popularity of vegetarian and vegan diets, soy has stepped onto the scene as a source of plant-based protein. Those who don’t eat meat praise the protein content of soy. One cup of boiled soybeans contains about 29 grams of protein which is comparable to a serving of meat. Soy also contains vitamins and minerals such as copper and phosphorus.

However, other people denounce soy as dangerous or, at the least, not optimal for frequent consumption. The Paleo movement in particular, has helped highlight the dangers of eating soy, ranging from the phytoestrogens present in soy to the high levels of antinutrients in soy.

Where are soy and soy products in our food?

In the United States, soy is most commonly consumed as a replacement for animal products, as an emulsifier in processed foods, or in soy sauce. You’ll also find soy in these common products:

  • Soy-based infant formula, as a replacement for breast milk or milk-based formula
  • Chocolate bars, processed foods, and some supplements as soy lecithin used to preserve shelf life and improve texture
  • Tempeh and tofu, as a replacement for meat
  • Soy milk, as a replacement for dairy milk
  • Condiments such as soy sauce or miso paste used to add flavor to traditional Asian dishes
  • Natto and edamame, as snacks or side dishes
  • Soy protein isolate, as plant-based protein powder, either used alone as a powder supplement or used in protein bars/bites/etc.
  • Processed and conventional meat: even though soy is used as a meat alternative, it has also been used as a filler in processed meat and the diets of conventionally-raised animals are often supplemented with GMO soy feed.

What is the controversy surrounding soy?

Soy is controversial for a few different reasons, the most common being the isoflavones present in soy (see below for more information). Soy is also one of the top 8 allergens in the United States–such a highly allergenic food invites controversy, whether founded or not, unto itself.

Other controversial characteristics of soy include GMOs, antinutrients, and goitrogens. Here is some more in-depth information about each controversial characteristic of soy.

1. Isoflavones (phytoestrogens)

Isoflavones, also known as phytoestrogens, are particularly concentrated in soy. These natural compounds have a chemical structure similar to the human hormone known as estrogen; thus, they can attach to estrogen receptor sites in the human body and affect natural estrogen production and metabolism.

Having excess estrogen in the body can have an array of health consequences. These include, but are not limited to: breast cancer (though some research indicates a lower risk of breast cancer in women who consume soy), estrogen dominance, acne due to imbalanced hormones, endometriosis, male infertility(though more research is needed), and–in rare cases–gynecomastia (male breast growth).

The possible manipulation of estrogen as a result of eating soy or soy products is a big potential danger of eating soy. The harmful effects may be exacerbated with non-organic, highly processed forms of soy.

2. GMOs

As much as 80% of soybean production in the United States comes from genetically modified soybeans. GMOs were only introduced to the public food supply in 1994 and there has been no opportunity to conduct long-lasting studies of the effects of GMO-containing diets. We do not have credible information on the safety of GMOs, which has led many people to forgo consuming GMO foods completely.

3. Antinutrients

Soy, like other legumes, is high in phytic acid. Phytic acid is an antinutrient, meaning it is the plant’s natural protective system that impedes the absorption of nutrients when consumed.

If you’re eating soy for the high levels of nutrients, some of them are bound to antinutrients and are therefore unavailable to your body. Antinutrients can even bind to other minerals and vitamins present in your body, leaching them from you. Soy also contains protease inhibitors, which inhibit the metabolism of certain types of proteins.

4. Goitrogens

Soy contains naturally higher levels of goitrogens, which can interfere with proper thyroid function when consumed in excess.

What are the possible benefits of eating soy foods?

tofu veggie soup bowl

Some health experts encourage the consumption of soy for its health benefits. Like most foods, there are both downsides and upsides to consuming soy. Keep in mind that when consuming soy, you’ll get the most nutrient density from organic, non-GMO soy in its whole form.

Here are some commonly perceived benefits of eating soy and the associated research.

1. Possible Lower Risk of Breast Cancer

Some research has shown that females who consume soy prior to and during pre-adolescent breast development have a lower risk for breast cancer later in life.

2. Lower LDL (“bad” cholesterol)

Though soy has been touted as beneficial for lowering high levels of Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the amount is indirect and not significant. The FDA has revoked the claim that soy is beneficial for lowering LDL levels.

3. High in nutrients

Soy is particularly high in iron, calcium, potassium, phosphorus, and copper.

4. Lowers blood pressure

There is data to suggest that soy is hypotensive, meaning it helps lower blood pressure, and therefore can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Safer soy consumption recommendations

If you have digestive issues such as leaky gut or gut dysbiosis or autoimmune disorder, consider avoiding all soy altogether.

If you choose to incorporate soy into your diet, it’s best to be sure you’re consuming it in moderation and that you’re getting high quality, properly prepared soy. Ideally, the soy you consume should be:

  • Organic: at least 80% of soy in the United States is genetically modified, but you can avoid both GMOs and heavy pesticide use by choosing certified organic soy
  • Soaked/sprouted: like all legumes and beans, the digestibility of soy can be improved through soaking and/or sprouting. This traditional method of preparation lowers antinutrients and makes it easier to digest (though a significant amount of the antinutrients still remain.)
  • Fermented: fermented soy products like tempeh and natto offer an impressive nutrient profile, probiotics, and increased digestibility.
  • Whole: avoid soy protein isolates, which contain all of the isoflavones and antinutrients with none of the vitamins and minerals. Soy protein isolate is notoriously difficult to digest.

The moderate benefits of properly prepared, well-sourced soy do not outweigh the potential risks of digestive distress, hormonal imbalance, and nutrient depletion for those with compromised health. Avoiding soy in your diet can free you to include more nutrient-dense foods and help you avoid the risks associated with eating soy.

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

 

 

Foods, Uncategorized

Itsy-Bitsy Teeny-Weeny Colored Polka-Dot Rotini Recipe

Itsy-Bitsy Teeny-Weeny Colored Polka-Dot Rotini Recipe

Itsy-Bitsy Teeny-Weeny Colored Polka-Dot Rotini Recipe - Genius Kitchen

Ingredients

 

  • 8 oz tri-color spiral pasta, uncooked (about 3 cups dry )
  • 1 1/2 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 cup light coconut milk
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp curry powder
  • 1/4 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 cup frozen green peas, thawed or 1 cup cooked lentils
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped red bell pepper
  • 1/4 cup dried currant

 

Directions

Directions:

  1. In a medium saucepan, combine broth, coconut milk, sugar and spices.
  2. Bring to a boil.
  3. Add rotini.
  4. Reduce heat to medium-low; cover and simmer for six minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. Add peas, red pepper and currants.
  6. Simmer for 6 to 7 minutes, until liquid has been absorbed and pasta is tender.
  7. Remove from heat and let stand for five minutes before serving.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/