Category Archives: Foods

Breakfast Burrito: Easy Recipe

breakfast-burrito

 

Breakfast Burrito

 

YIELD:  1 SERVINGS      CALORIES: 180

 

One of my personal favorites!

 

Double the measurements in this recipe to make it for two. To make this a low-carb meal, sprinkle shredded cheddar cheese over top of the burrito. To make this a high-carb meal, wrap the burrito in a whole-grain tortilla, brown-rice tortilla or two corn tortillas.

 

Ingredients

2 tbsp ground turkey

3 egg whites

1 handful baby spinach

1-2 romaine lettuce leaves

1 tbsp salsa

1 tortilla

 

Directions

Spritz cooking spray in a medium nonstick pan over medium heat. Add turkey and cook through. Set aside. In a large bowl, whisk egg whites for about 45 seconds. In another nonstick pan over medium-high heat, spritz cooking spray. Add the egg whites to the pan. As the egg starts to set, add turkey and baby spinach and scramble until cooked. Wrap the turkey-egg-spinach mixture in one for two leaves of romaine lettuce. Spoon the salsa over the top, then roll up and enjoy!

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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Dr J Jaranson

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

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Protein Breakfast Bowl

protienbowl

Protein Breakfast Bowl

YIELD: 2 SERVINGS   CALORIES:437

Ingredients

1 small onion, sliced

6-8 medium mushrooms, sliced

5 oz grass-fed ground beef

1/2 tsp smoked paprika

2 eggs, lightly beaten

1 small avocado, diced

10-12 pitted black olives, sliced

salt

pepper

Directions

  1. In a heavy skillet over medium high heat, melt a little bit of coconut oil. When oil is hot, add onions, mushrooms, and salt and pepper. Cook for around 2 to 3 minutes, until the vegetables are fragrant and softened.
  2. Add ground beef and smoked paprika and continue cooking until the beef is no longer pink. Set the beef aside on a plate.
  3. Add eggs to the skillet and scramble them to your liking.
  4. Return beef to the pan. Add avocado and sliced olives.
  5. Continue cooking for about 45 seconds to a minute in order to slightly warm up the avocados and olives.
  6. Transfer to a bowl and garnish with parsley, if desired.

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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Dr J Jaranson

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

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The Path to a New You, Starts in the Kitchen

newpath

The Path to a New You, Starts in the Kitchen.

 

Add these 21 must-eat foods to your menu.

 

When you’re choosing recipes to help you and your family, focus on foods that haven’t been heavily processed with artificial sweeteners, refined sugar, unhealthy fats, or excess sodium. Be especially wary of packaged products promoted as diet foods. They may be lower in calories and fat, but they’re often higher in artificial sweeteners and sodium, ingredients manufacturers add to make the product taste better and encourage you to eat more.

 

For the foods below, we’ve included the factors that make them smart choices as well as a healthy recipe that incorporates that ingredient. You’ll find foods that satisfy your appetite with lean protein and monounsaturated fats. We’ve also included plenty of high fiber foods on our list as well. Do you want low-calorie ingredients? You’ll find lots of those superfoods too.

 

  1. Almonds | Fiber, Monounsaturated Fat
  2. Apple Cider Vinegar | Lowers Blood Glucose Levels
  3. Avocado | Monounsaturated Fat
  4. Beets | Diuretic, Low Calorie
  5. Brussels Sprouts| Fiber, Low Calorie
  6. Cauliflower | Fiber, Low Calorie
  7. Chia Seeds | Fiber, Protein
  8. Chicken | Low Calorie, Protein
  9. Egg | Protein
  10. Greek Yogurt | Protein
  11. Green Tea | Catechins
  12. Kale | Fiber, Low Calorie
  13. Mangoes | Fiber
  14. Oatmeal | Fiber
  15. Quinoa | Fiber, Protein
  16. Raspberries | Fiber, Raspberry Ketones
  17. Salmon | Protein
  18. Squash | Fiber, Low Calorie
  19. Turkey | Protein
  20. Walnuts | Monounsaturated Fat
  21. Zucchini | Diuretic, Low Calorie

 

Please adjust this for your needs and for the medications you are taking, and the medical conditions you may have.  Example: If you have a dairy restriction, no yogurt.

 

If you have any questions, please contact us.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

P Carrothers

Director of Personalized Health Care and Preventative Medicine

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

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Creamy Chicken and Broccoli Casserole

Creamy-Chicken-and-Broccoli-Casserole-600x400

 

 

Creamy Chicken and Broccoli Casserole

 

Creamy casseroles are a favorite when the weather gets chilly, but they’re not always Paleo diet friendly. This easy broccoli casserole recipe layers chicken with vegetables for a filling and comforting meal. Crisp bacon and crunchy almonds give it that casserole-like top, without starchy breadcrumbs or cheese.

 

Ingredients

 

1/2 head(s) broccoli cut into thin slices

3/4 head(s) cauliflower cut into thin slices

1/2 pound(s) mushrooms sliced

2 piece(s) chicken breast(s), boneless skinless (4-6 oz)

1 cup(s) coconut milk, full fat

1 large egg(s)

1/2 cup(s) chicken broth

1/2 cup(s) almonds sliced

4 slice(s) bacon cooked and crumbled

1 tablespoon(s) coconut oil for cooking chicken

1/8 teaspoon(s) sea salt to taste

1/8 teaspoon(s) black pepper to taste

Instructions

 

Heat a large sauté pan over medium-high heat and add 1 TB coconut oil or other cooking oil of your choice when hot.

Season chicken breasts with sea salt and pepper if desired and sauté for 10-15 minutes, turning once or twice until fully cooked. Chop into bite-size pieces.

Preheat oven to 350 F.

Layer the broccoli, cauliflower, mushrooms, and cooked chicken in a (9×13) casserole dish, seasoning with salt and pepper between each layer.

In a bowl or large measuring cup, whisk the coconut milk with the egg and chicken broth until well combined. Pour over the casserole. Cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes.

Remove from oven, uncover and sprinkle with almonds and bacon. Bake uncovered for 5-10 more minutes until almonds are lightly toasted and casserole is bubbly. Let sit for 5-10 minutes before serving.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

P Carrothers

Dir. Of Personalize Healthcare and Preventative Medicine

https://www.facebook.com/angelique.rose.50

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Sausage and Zucchini Breakfast Casserole

Sausage-and-Zucchini-Breakfast-Casserole-3.jpg

Sausage and Zucchini Breakfast Casserole

 

This quick and easy Paleo dish takes a classic combination of sausage, mushrooms and thyme and adds eggs and zucchini to make a filling and delicious breakfast casserole. We recommend assembling the casserole the night before, and then baking it in the morning – it will save you a ton of time and you will have a piping hot breakfast to start off your day right!

 

Ingredients

 

3 medium zucchini trimmed

4 large mushroom(s), white button or cremini halved

1 large onion(s), yellow peeled and quartered

1 pound(s) sausage, ground breakfast

1/2 tablespoon(s) thyme, fresh (optional)

2 tablespoon(s) almond flour

6 large egg(s)

1/2 teaspoon(s) garlic, granulated

1/2 teaspoon(s) sea salt

1/4 teaspoon(s) cayenne pepper (optional)

Instructions

 

Preheat oven to 400 F.

Place a grater blade on a medium or large food processor (or just use a box grater to shred the veggies by hand). Grate the zucchini, mushrooms and onion. With a paper towel, squeeze excess moisture out of the zucchini.

Scrape the veggie mixture into the bottom of a 8×8 or 9×9 baking dish and lightly pat down to form an even surface.

Crumble the raw sausage on top of the veggies. Sprinkle with fresh thyme and almond flour.

In a medium mixing bowl, combine eggs, granulated garlic, sea salt, and cayenne (optional) and whisk until eggs are a pale yellow (about 30 seconds).

Pour egg mixture evenly over sausage and veggies in the baking dish. It should sink to the bottom of the pan.

Place in oven and bake for 45 to 55 minutes, or until browned on top and cooked through. There will be some residual water from the vegetables.

Cool at least 15 minutes. Slice into 4 servings and enjoy warm or cold.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

  1. Carrothers

Dir. Of Personalize Healthcare and Preventative Medicine

https://www.facebook.com/angelique.rose.50

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Frequent Nut Comsumption can Help to Prevent Diabetes and Stabilize Glucose levels.

pistachio.jpg

Frequent Nut Consumption Can Help to Prevent Diabetes and Improve Blood Glucose Control

 

This year, the WHO, ( World Health Organization) is focusing on diabetes in order to increase awareness about its rise and staggering burden and consequences, in particular in low-and middle-income countries. The International Nut & Dried Fruit Council (INC) wants to raise awareness about the importance of nuts in the treatment and prevention of this disease.

 

Cyril Kendall, PhD at the department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto, explains that this increase of prevalence is linked to our changing lifestyle. “We are becoming less active and our diet is becoming overly processed. This unhealthy diet not only increases blood glucose levels but it also leads to an increase in body weight which further increases the risk of developing diabetes”. Kendall, who has been studying the relation of nut consumption and diabetes, says that “based on the current scientific evidence, nuts may play an important role in improving the risk factors for this disease. Population studies have shown that frequent nut consumption is inversely associated to diabetes development and clinical studies indicate that nuts can help to improve blood glucose control in diabetes”.

 

In fact, nut consumption has been associated with beneficial effects on glucose and insulin levels, according to the latest studies about the relationship between nut intake and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The PREDIMED study concluded that the results of two Mediterranean Diet groups which added extra virgin olive oil and nuts reduced the risk to suffer diabetes by 52%. In addition, researchers at the Human Nutrition Unit, from Rovira i Virgili University, have proven that the intake of two ounces (57 g) of pistachios per day has a significant effect: it decreases fasting glucose, and favors insulin and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Also, researchers at the Shih-Chien University and the Chang Gung University of Science and Tech (Taiwan), have shown that 60 g/day almond consumption improved glycemic control in patients with T2D.

 

Currently, about 400 million people (more than 5% of the world’s population) have T2D. It is estimated that by 2035 there will be almost 600 million people living with T2D and almost 900 million people with pre-diabetes, a silent state associated with a high risk of several deadly conditions including T2D, heart disease, hypertension, strokes and early death.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr Anne Sullivan

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

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Health Benefits of Coconut Brown Rice Pudding

coconutbrownricepudding

 

When it comes to the first and last meals of the day, it can be extremely difficult to find something that is both healthy and delicious. This challenge becomes increasingly difficult if you are attempting to eat a vegan diet. The answer to the breakfast and dessert dilemma is this delightful healthy twist on traditional rice pudding.

 

Traditional rice pudding is high in fat and heavily processed foods. By replacing regular milk with coconut milk, white rice with brown and removing the egg, the dish becomes an altogether healthier prospect.

 

This is a healthy, animal-friendly and tasty recipe for early mornings and late nights. So get out the slow cooker and start cooking!

 

Coconut Milk

 

The replacement of regular dairy milk with coconut milk not only makes this recipe a great choice for vegans, but it also provides a significant boost to your health. Coconut milk has a high copper content. Elevated levels of copper in the body have been shown to boost your immune system to fight off illness and infections.

 

Additionally, coconut milk has been proven to contain high levels of niacin (also known as Vitamin B-3). One of the significant benefits of increasing the level of niacin in your body is that it helps with a healthy increase of sex hormones and stress relieving hormones. Niacin is crucial to your reproductive and mental health.

 

Coconut Brown Rice Pudding

 

Serves: 8

 

Prep time: 5 minutes

 

Cook time: 3 hours 35 minutes (slow cooker)

 

Ingredients

 

1 cup short grain brown rice

1 can light coconut milk

2 cups water

2 tablespoons maple syrup

1 teaspoon vanilla

2 teaspoons cinnamon

1/2 cup raisins

Instructions

 

Put the coconut milk, brown rice, syrup, vanilla and water into the slow cooker and cook for three and a half hours on low heat.

Stir in the cinnamon and raisins.

Enjoy!

 

Best and Worse Nuts For Your Health

nuts!

 

Best and Worst Nuts for Your Health

 

Should you go nuts?

Nuts are nature’s way of showing us that good things come in small packages. These bite-size nutritional powerhouses are packed with heart-healthy fats, protein, vitamins, and minerals.

 

Here’s a look at the pros and cons of different nuts, as well as the best and worst products on supermarket shelves today. Of course, you can get too much of these good things: Nuts are high in fat and calories, so while a handful can hold you over until dinner, a few more handfuls can ruin your appetite altogether. And although nuts are a healthy choice by themselves, they’ll quickly become detrimental to any diet when paired with sugary or salty toppings or mixes.

 

Best nuts for your diet

Almonds, Cashews, Pistachios

 

All nuts are about equal in terms of calories per ounce, and in moderation, are all healthy additions to any diet. “Their mix of omega-3 fatty acids, protein, and fiber will help you feel full and suppress your appetite,” says Judy Caplan, RD, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

 

The lowest-calorie nuts at 160 per ounce are almonds (23 nuts; 6 grams protein, 14 grams fat); cashews (16 to 18 nuts; 5 grams protein, 13 grams fat); and pistachios (49 nuts; 6 grams protein, 13 grams fat). Avoid nuts packaged or roasted in oil; instead, eat them raw or dry roasted, says Caplan. (Roasted nuts may have been heated in hydrogenated or omega-6 unhealthy fats, she adds, or to high temperatures that can destroy their nutrients.)

Worst nuts for your diet

Macadamia Nuts, Pecans

 

Ounce for ounce, macadamia nuts (10 to 12 nuts; 2 grams protein, 21 grams fat) and pecans (18 to 20 halves; 3 grams protein, 20 grams fat) have the most calories—200 each—along with the lowest amounts of protein and the highest amounts of fats.

 

However, they’re still good nuts: The difference between these and the lowest calorie nuts is only 40 calories an ounce. As long as you’re practicing proper portion control and not downing handfuls at a time, says Caplan, any kind of raw, plain nut will give you a good dose of healthy fats and nutrients.

 

Best nuts for your heart

Walnuts

 

While all nuts contain eart-healthy monounsaturated fats, walnuts (14 halves contain 185 calories, 18 grams fat, 4 grams protein) have high amounts of heart-healthy alpha linoleic acid (ALA), a type of omega-3 fatty acid found in plants. Research has suggested that ALA may help heart arrhythmias, and a 2006 Spanish study suggested that walnuts were as effective as olive oil at reducing inflammation and oxidation in the arteries after eating a fatty meal. The authors of this study, funded in part by the California Walnut Commission, recommended eating around eight walnuts a day to achieve similar benefits.

 

Best nuts for your brain

Peanuts

 

Technically legumes but generally referred to as nuts, peanuts are high in folate—a mineral essential for brain development that may protect against cognitive decline. (It also makes peanuts a great choice for vegetarians, who can come up short on folate, and pregnant women, who need folate to protect their unborn babies from birth defects, says Caplan.) Like most other nuts, peanuts are also full of brain-boosting healthy fats and vitamin E, as well. One ounce of peanuts (about 28 unshelled nuts) contains about 170 calories, 7 grams protein, and 14 grams fat.

 

Best nuts for men

Brazil Nuts, Pecans

 

Creamy Brazil nuts are packed with selenium, a mineral that may protect against prostate cancer and other diseases. Just one nut contains more than a day’s worth, so eat these sparingly: Recent research has hinted that too much selenium may be linked to type 2 diabetes risk. One ounce of Brazil nuts (6 nuts) contains about 190 calories, 19 grams fat, and 4 grams protein.

 

Pecans are also good for men’s health: They’re loaded with beta-sitosterol, a plant steroid that may help relieve symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or enlarged prostate. One ounce of pecans (18 to 20 halves) contains about 200 calories, 21 grams fat, and 3 grams protein.

 

Best nuts for disease prevention

Almonds

 

Relatively low in calories, almonds have more calcium than any other nut, making them a great food for overall health. Plus, they are rich in fiber and vitamin E, an antioxidant that helps fight dangerous inflammation and possibly health conditions such as lung cancer and age-related cognitive decline.

 

Because they’re so versatile, almonds are often a favorite among nut eaters: You can buy them raw, toasted, slivered, or coated with a variety of fun flavors.

 

Best snack packaging for nuts

Choose 100- to 200-calorie packs

 

Because nuts are so high in calories (and so tasty, to boot!), it’s important to practice portion control when eating them as a snack. We love Blue Diamond Almonds 100-calorie snack packs, available in six flavors, including Cinnamon Brown Sugar and Dark Chocolate. Want more variety? Pick up Planters Nutrition Wholesome Nut Mix on-the-go packs, each containing a 200-calorie mix of cashews, almonds, and macadamia nuts.

 

Worst snack packaging for nuts

Avoid anything in a tub

 

We’re all for buying in bulk to save money and packaging, but it’s important not to snack straight from the box (or in this case, the giant tub) when a craving hits. Beer Nuts’ “original” formula—peanuts coated with a sweet and salty glaze—aren’t a bad choice themselves (170 calories, 14 grams fat, and 2 grams sugar per ounce), but if you’re munching on them at a party or during a “long day of game watching,” as the company’s website suggests, you’ll likely be eating more than the recommended serving size. Not to mention, the Party Mix variety also includes M&Ms and sugary yogurt-covered raisins, for an extra calorie boost. A better bet is Beer Nuts’ Original Teaser Peanut Sized bags, each containing just half an ounce of nuts.

 

Best nuts for chocolate lovers

Go for cocoa-dusted almonds

 

Rather than hiding your nuts under a thick layer of sugary chocolate candy—think Jordan almonds or peanut M&Ms—keep it simple with Emerald’s Cocoa Roast Almonds. These nuts are lightly dusted with cocoa powder and sweetened with Sucralose, and have 150 calories, 13 grams fat, and 1 gram of sugar per ounce.

 

We’d give you a “worst” nuts for chocolate lovers, but the possibilities are practically endless. Just think of it this way, says Caplan: Anything that’s more chocolate than nut really should be considered candy—not as a way to get your daily quota of healthy fats.

 

Best nuts for your sweet tooth

Try all-natural glazed nuts

 

Want something sweet and satisfying but without the extra calories and high-fructose corn syrup? Look no further than Sahale Snacks glazed nuts, in flavors like Almonds with Cranberries, Honey, and Sea Salt (160 calories, 11 grams fat, 5 grams protein per ounce) or Cashews with Pomegranate and Vanilla (150 calories, 10 grams fat, 4 grams protein per ounce). They’re sweetened with organic cane juice and tapioca syrup, and each contains only 6 grams of sugar per ounce. Just be careful not to eat the whole bag!

 

Worst nuts for your sweet tooth

Check labels for sugar content

 

Just because something has nuts in it doesn’t make it good for you, says Caplan: “Don’t justify eating a Snickers because it’s got peanuts in it.” Anything coated with or tucked inside layers of sugar, toffee, chocolate, or ice cream isn’t going to give you much nutritional benefit, and the calories can quickly add up, she says.

 

It’s not just candy, though: Beware of seemingly healthful varieties, like Planters Sweet ‘N Crunchy Peanuts. Although they still have just 140 calories and 8 grams fat per ounce, the second and third ingredients after peanuts are sugar and butter. In fact, one ounce contains 13 grams of sugar (in just a 28-gram serving size). Considering peanuts only have about 2 grams of sugar naturally, that’s 11 grams of added sugar in just one handful, out of a recommended 25 for the whole day!

 

Best nuts for a salt craving

Look for ‘lightly salted’

 

If you don’t have high blood pressure or haven’t been warned away from salt by your doctor for other reasons, a handful or two of salted nuts a day won’t hurt you, says Caplan, who has a private nutrition practice in Vienna, Va.

 

Nuts are, of course, available unsalted. But to satisfy a salty craving without going overboard, look for in-between varieties like Planters Lightly Salted peanuts, almonds, and cashews (45-55 mg sodium), or Wonderful Pistachios Lightly Salted (80 mg). Check ingredient labels, too: Some brands, like Back to Nature Salted Almonds (75 mg sodium), contain less salt than others.

 

Worst nuts for a salt craving

Steer clear of BBQ or boiled nuts

 

If you’re watching your sodium intake, watch out for hot and spicy or barbecue flavors too. Kar’s Nuts Blazin’ Hot Peanuts, for example, contain 370 mg of sodium per ounce (along with 160 calories and 14 grams fat)—a whopping 15% of your daily recommended value, in just one handful!

 

Beware boiled peanuts, as well: This Southern treat is made by soaking fresh, raw peanuts, in their shells, in a salty brine. Sodium amounts will vary based on the exact preparation, but Margaret Holmes Peanut Patch boiled peanuts, for example, contain 390 mg per ounce.

 

Best trail mix

Raw nuts, seeds, and dried fruit

 

Trail mix is available in countless varieties and from countless brands. “Look for trail mix with raw nuts,” suggests Caplan. “Or if the nuts are roasted, look for the words ‘dry roasted’ rather than ‘oil roasted.'”

 

Nuts pair great with fruit, seeds, and perhaps even a little dark chocolate, Caplan adds; just pay attention to the calorie count and serving size. We love Eden Foods’ “All Mixed Up” blend (160 calories, 12 grams fat, 8 grams protein per ounce) of organic almonds, pumpkin seeds, and dried tart cherries. If you’re more of a granola guy or gal, treat yourself to a quarter cup of Bear Naked’s Banana Nut mix (140 calories, 7 grams fat, 3 grams protein) with almonds and walnuts.

 

Worst trail mix

Save high-calorie mixes for the trail

 

High-calorie trail mix is fine when you’ve got a long hike ahead of you, but too often we eat these store-bought blends while sitting at our desks or driving in our cars. Don’t make that mistake with Planter’s Energy Go-Packs, a 1.5-ounce mix of nuts, semisweet chocolate, oil roasted soynuts, and sesame seeds: With 250 calories and 20 grams of fat a pop, they fall slightly above our healthy snacking guidelines.

 

Also check labels for sky-high sugar contents: Some trail mixes—especially those with raisins, dried cranberries, and/or candy-covered chocolate pieces—can contain up to 18 grams of sugar per serving.

 

Best nut butter

Keep ingredients simple

 

When choosing a nut butter, look for spreads with the fewest ingredients possible: Just nuts (and salt, if you want). Arrowhead Mills Organic Peanut Butter, for example, contains 100% dry-roasted peanuts, and has 190 calories, 17 grams fat, and 8 grams protein per 2 tbsp serving. (We also like their creamy cashew and almond butters, which do contain some natural canola oil.) Keep natural peanut butter in the fridge, advises Caplan, to keep it from going rancid and to prevent oily separation.

 

Worst nut butter

Skip added oils and sugars

 

Major brands have eliminated trans fats from their nut butters, but most still contain hydrogenated oils (high in saturated fat) to increase spreadability and prevent separation. Some “natural” product lines swap hydrogenated oils for palm oil, also high in saturated fat. Skippy Natural with Honey, for example, contains 200 calories, 16 grams fat (3.5 grams saturated), and 5 grams sugar per 2-tablespoon serving.

 

Nutella’s creamy chocolate-hazelnut combo is terrific for an occasional treat—but it’s hardly part of a “balanced breakfast,” as its commercials say. Two tablespoons contain just 200 calories, yes, but 21 grams of sugar. In fact, sugar and palm oil are the product’s first ingredients, even before hazelnuts.

 

Best way to eat nuts

Pair them with a healthy carb

 

Now you know all about which nuts are good for what—but to get the most health benefits, it’s also important to pay attention to how you eat them. “Nuts are a great thing to eat when you’re having a carbohydrate like fruit or juice, because it helps slow down digestion and the breakdown of sugar,” says Caplan.

 

A few winning nut-and-carb combos: Sprinkle them on salads, add them to low- or nonfat yogurt, or spread nut butter on slices of apple or pear. On the go? Pick up a 150-calorie pack of Earthbound Farms Dippin’ Doubles Apples & Peanut Butter (11 grams fat, 5 grams protein).

 

Best nuts overall

A mixed bag!

 

So which is the healthiest nut overall? A 2004 review in the Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide tackled this tough question. Luckily, they concluded, we don’t have to pick just one. Mixed nuts, ideally raw and unsalted, provide the best variety of nutrients and antioxidants.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived:  Dr. J Jaranson

312 972 WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Home Brewing Kombucha

Home Brewing Kombucha

Home Brewing Kombucha

 

What is all the hype about this funky tea known as Kombucha? Kombucha most likely started in China and spread to Russian over 100 years ago. It is often called mushroom tea because if the scoby that forms on the top, resembling a mushroom. Scoby is actually an acronym for symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast.

 

Kombucha contains multiple species of yeast and bacteria along with the organic acids, active enzymes, amino acids, and vitamin C. According to the American Cancer Society “Kombucha tea has been promoted as a cure-all for a wide range of conditions including baldness, insomnia, intestinal disorders, arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, multiple sclerosis, AIDS, and cancer. Supporters say that Kombucha tea can boost the immune system and reverse the aging process.” I will caution you however that there is little scientific evidence to support such strong claims.

 

For us Kombucha is fun to make, and is highly recommended among many of my holistic friends. It is naturally fermented with a living colony of bacteria and yeast, which is helpful for digestive health. I think it smells a little strong, but is actually pleasant tasting.

 

Instructions for Making Kombucha Tea

Ingredients

 

  • 14 cups water
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 8 tea bags
  • 1 cupstarter tea or vinegar
  • kombucha culture

 

Directions

 

  1. Combine hot water (14 cups for 1 gallon) and sugar (1 cup) in the glass jar you intend on using to brew the tea. Stir until the sugar dissolves. The water should be hot enough to steep the tea but does not have to be boiling.

 

  1. Place the tea or tea bags in the sugar water to steep. Use 8 tea bags for a gallon of tea. I prefer the flavor of green tea, but you can also use black tea. Try to find an organic tea. If you use loose tea leaves use 4 tbsp for a gallon of tea.

 

  1. Cool the mixture to room temperature. The tea may be left in the liquid as it cools. Once cooled remove the tea bags.

 

  1. Add starter tea from a previous batch to the liquid. If you do not have starter tea, distilled white vinegar may be substituted. If using vinegar use 2 cups for a gallon of tea.

 

  1. Add an active kombucha scoby (culture).

 

  1. Cover the jar with a towel or coffee filter and secure with a rubber band. Ants can smell sweet tea a mile away.

 

  1. Allow the mixture to sit undisturbed at 68-85°F, out of direct sunlight, for 7-30 days, or to taste. The longer the kombucha ferments, the less sweet and more vinegary it will taste.

 

Keep the scoby and about 1 cup of the liquid from the bottom of the jar to use as starter tea for the next batch. You will have the “mother scoby” that you added and a new “baby scoby” that will have formed on the top. You can reuse your mother scoby, and gift your baby.

 

The finished kombucha can be flavored, or enjoyed plain. Keep sealed with an airtight lid at room temp for an additional 7 days with added fruit if you like a fizzy drink like soda.  Otherwise store in the fridge to stop the fermentation process.  These little bottles of “hippy tea” have been popping up all over grocery stores for about $3 a bottle, but you can make it at home for about $1 a gallon. I’m not sure that it’s a cure-all, but at worst you have a delightful and affordable probiotic.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr  S. Siewert

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Szechuan Bison Stir Fry

Szechuan Bison Stir Fry

 

Szechuan Bison Stir Fry

 

Ingredients:

MEAT & MARINADE

 

  • 1.5 lb. Bison flank or sirloin
  • 1 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoons Mirin, sweet rice wine for cooking
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 3 tablespoons sesame oil

 

VEGETABLES

 

  • 3 celery stalks, julienned into thin, long strips
  • 1/2 cup carrots, shredded
  • 3 inch green onions sliced thinly, on a diagonal, into 1/2 pieces

 

SZECHUAN SAUCE

 

Mix together:

 

  • 1 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 teaspoons Chinese 5-spice powder
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar, packed
  • 1” ginger root (fresh), grated or very finely minced
  • 4 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 tablespoons Sriracha sauce
  • 1 tablespoons Rice wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons Hoisin sauce
  • 1 green onion, thinly sliced

 

Instructions:

  1. Slice bison, across the grain, into 1/4 inch thick strips and place in a large plastic bag.

 

  1. Add mirin and soy sauce and massage into the meat. Add cornstarch, seal the bag and toss/massage to coat the meat.

 

  1. Let meat marinate for about 10 minutes.

 

  1. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together sauce ingredients and set aside.

 

  1. Slice vegetables and set aside.

 

  1. Add sesame oil to wok or large sauté pan and heat over medium-high heat.

 

  1. Add bison to hot pan, just enough to cover the bottom of the pan – you’ll probably want to do at least 2 batches – and sauté about 2-3 minutes. Remove bison to a plate and cook remaining batches.

 

  1. Add sliced vegetables to the hot pan and cook about 1-3 minutes (depending on how tender you want them), stirring often.

 

  1. Pour in Szechuan sauce and cook about a minute, until slightly thickened.

 

  1. Add cooked bison and turn to coat in the sauce.

 

  1. Serve over jasmine rice.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr Anne K Sullivan

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

 

 

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