Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Ways to Help Your Cholesterol Level

5 Ways to Help You with Your Cholesterol Level

5 Foods That Can Help Manage High Cholesterol Levels - Dr. Weil's Daily Tip

For people battling high cholesterol, choosing meals wisely can be a challenge, but it is essential. Restaurants, parties, even an office potluck may present unhealthy temptations. But simple dietary modifications can help you eliminate those unhealthy choices:

  1. Reduce sugar and flour. Recent research indicates that added sweeteners and flour-based carbohydrates, which are far too abundant in the American diet, are major contributors to obesity and heart disease.  Be aware of the flour-based foods that may seem less obvious, such as breads, tortilla chips and cereals, as they are all high carbohydrate foods. As far as your cholesterol profile goes, they will raise your triglycerides. Recent research suggests that higher non-HDL cholesterol, comprised of LDL and triglycerides connect strongly to heart disease risk.  Gluten Free means there is still flour and sugar in the products.
  2. Avoid trans-fat. Stay away from items that list “hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oil” on the label, especially snack foods such as chips or popcorn. Try baked or air-popped versions instead.
  3. Use fresh garlic regularly in your meals. Garlic has been shown to help lower cholesterol levels.
  4. Drink green tea daily. The antioxidants in green tea help lower cholesterol and prevent the cholesterol in your blood from oxidizing.  Women need to limit the amount that they drink daily.
  5. Eat plenty of soluble fiber. It has a powerful cholesterol-lowering effect. The best sources are beans and lentils, apples, citrus fruits, oats, barley, peas, carrots and freshly ground flaxseed.
  6.  Dairy Products :  The sugar and the additives they they are allowing in dairy products now will increase your cholesterol.  Even if it says organic, or gluten free, you will not be able to consume dairy products.

You do not see anything in here written about eggs , red meat, bacon or ham, because all of that has been dis-proven time and time again.

In addition, relax. There is quite a bit of data connecting stress, both physical and emotional, to elevated cholesterol levels. We talk about relaxation a lot, but rarely do we think of it as a way to lower cholesterol.

Always contact us if you need help, or have a question?

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Do You Have Ringing In Your Ears?

Tinnitus, or chronic ringing in your ears, affects about 1 in 5 people. While it’s typically not serious, it can significantly impact your quality of life, and it may get worse with age or be a symptom of an underlying condition, such as age-related hearing loss, ear injury or a circulatory system disorder.1

In the majority of cases, tinnitus is diagnosed after the age of 50 years, however, recent research has shown that tinnitus in youth is surprisingly common and on the rise, likely due to increased exposure to loud music and other environmental noise.2

Worse still, it may be a sign of permanent nerve damage that could predict future hearing impairment.

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One-Quarter of Youth May Experience Tinnitus, Risk Hearing Loss Later in Life

In a study of 170 students between the ages of 11 and 17 years, researchers from McMaster University in Canada found “risky listening habits,” including exposure to loud noise at parties or concerts, listening to music with ear buds and use of mobile phones excluding texting, were the norm.

More than half of the study participants reported experiencing tinnitus in the past, such as experiencing ringing in the ears for a day following a loud concert.

This is considered a warning sign; however, nearly 29 percent of the students were found to have already developed chronic tinnitus, as evidenced by a psychoacoustic examination conducted in a sound booth.3

Youth with and without tinnitus had a similar ability to hear, but those with tinnitus had significantly reduced tolerance for loud noise and tended to be more protective of their hearing.

Reduced sound level tolerance is a sign of damage to the auditory nerves because, when nerves used to process sound are damaged, it prompts brain cells to increase their sensitivity to noise, essentially making sounds seem louder than they are.

Prevention Is the Best Solution to Tinnitus

Auditory nerve injury that’s associated with tinnitus and heightened sensitivity to loud noises cannot be detected by typical hearing tests, which is why it’s sometimes called “hidden hearing loss.” Further, such damage is permanent and tends to worsen over time, causing increasing hearing loss later in life.

Because there is no known cure, the best solution is prevention. Study author Larry Roberts, Ph.D., of McMaster University’s Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour has compared the emerging risks from loud noises to early warnings about smoking.

At this point, many people are unaware that listening to loud music via earbuds or at parties may be permanently damaging their hearing, particularly since they may still hear normally at this point in time.

If more people were aware of the risks, more would take steps to turn down the volume and give their ears a break. Roberts told Science Daily:4

“It’s a growing problem and I think it’s going to get worse … My personal view is that there is a major public health challenge coming down the road in terms of difficulties with hearing …

The levels of sound exposure that are quite commonplace in our environment, particularly among youth, appear to be sufficient to produce hidden cochlear injuries … The message is, ‘Protect your ears.'”


Tinnitus Is Associated With Psychiatric Disorders and Stress

In adults, the majority of people with tinnitus (77 percent) may suffer from co-existing psychiatric disorders ranging from anxiety to personality disorders. Further, 62 percent of tinnitus patients may suffer from depressive disorders while 45 percent may have anxiety disorders.5

Further, there appears to be a close link between tinnitus and stress, such that stress may make tinnitus worse and vice versa. In one study, emotional exhaustion — or the feeling of being drained due to chronic stress — was a strong predictor of tinnitus severity.6

In addition, chronic stress may be as large a risk factor for developing tinnitus as exposure to occupational noise. Research has found that exposure to highly stressful situations and occupational noise each double the risk of tinnitus.7

Further, stress is especially influential in the transition from mild to severe tinnitus, with researchers concluding, “Stress management strategies should be included in hearing conservation programs, especially for individuals with mild tinnitus who report a high stress load.”8

Also of note, many people with tinnitus first noticed the ringing in their ears during a stressful life event, such as divorce, being laid off, sickness in family members, accidents or surgery. As noted in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry (JNNP):9

These events can heighten the brain’s arousal, and the tinnitus may be noted cortically [by the cerebral cortex]. This interaction between reduced auditory sensation and brain compensation might explain why some people are very bothered by their tinnitus and others just adjust to it.”

The researchers have suggested that tinnitus is not simply a condition affecting the auditory system but rather is neuropsychiatric in nature, which would explain why it often occurs alongside cognitive and behavioral symptoms.

Other Tinnitus Associations to Be Aware Of: Sleep, Trauma, Headaches and More

Tinnitus is often described as a symptom, not a disease in itself, and it may result from a variety of conditions. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one common cause, with nearly 40 percent of military personnel with TBI also experiencing tinnitus.10

Tinnitus is also associated with pain disorders and headaches, including migraines, and often leads to sleep difficulties such as delayed sleep, mid-sleep awakenings and chronic fatigue. In addition, tinnitus is also associated with cognitive deficits, including slowed cognitive processing speed and problems with attention.11

There are different types of tinnitus as well, and the variety may give clues as to its origin. For instance, tinnitus may occur in one or both ears and be described as:12

  • Throbbing or pulsing, which may be due to vascular tumors near the ear
  • High-pitched and continuous (this is most common)
  • Clicking, which may be related to muscle spasms in the roof of your mouth, which cause the Eustachian tube in your ear to open and close; temporomandibular joint (TMJ) issues may also cause a clicking sound in your ear
  • Buzzing or humming

Abnormal bone growth in the middle ear, known as otosclerosis, may also cause tinnitus, as can damage to your vestibulocochlear nerve, which transmits sound from your ear to your brain. Such damage may occur from acoustic neuroma tumor or drug toxicity, for instance.

Additionally, certain medications, including certain cancer drugs, sedatives, and anti-inflammatories like ibuprophen and aspirin may also trigger tinnitus.

If this condition is causing you serious emotional or physical distress, seek professional help. In many cases, however, natural interventions such as those described below may help.

Effective Tinnitus Treatments

A slew of pharmaceuticals, including antidepressants, anxiety drugs, mood stabilizers and anticonvulsants, have been used to treat tinnitus.  A meta-analysis of a range of tinnitus management strategies revealed only antidepressants had a possible benefit, but even that study could not conclude that antidepressants were the answer.13

Considering their risks, and the fact that some antidepressants may cause ringing in the ears, non-drug options present the best course of action — and of these there are many.14

In many cases natural interventions, including the following, may help:

Cognitive behavioral therapy: which has been shown to improve quality of life in people with tinnitus.15 Even internet-based guided CBT has been shown to effectively manage tinnitus.16

Acupuncture: which was found to improve tinnitus severity and patients’ quality of life.17

Nutritional interventions, herbal remedies and melatonin: specifically, zinc deficiency and vitamin B12 deficiency may be associated with tinnitus.18,19 Herbal remedies, including Japanese cornel, dogwood, bayberry, hawthorn leaf, ginkgo and black cohosh may also be useful.20

In animal studies, ginkgo extract led to significant improvement in tinnitus, including complete relief in some cases.21 Melatonin also shows promise, and in one study melatonin supplementation led to a significant decrease in tinnitus intensity and improved sleep quality in patients with chronic tinnitus.22

Organic black coffee: research has shown that women who consumed higher amounts of caffeine (mostly in the form of coffee) were less likely to have tinnitus.23

Specifically, women who consumed less than 150 milligrams of caffeine a day (the amount in about 12 ounces of coffee) were 15 percent more likely to develop tinnitus than those who consumed 450 milligrams to 599 milligrams.24 The researchers weren’t sure why caffeine may reduce tinnitus risk, although past research has shown it has a direct effect on the inner ear or may be involved through its role in stimulating your central nervous system.

Stress management: including exercise, relaxation exercises and the Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT), is important for tinnitus treatment and prevention.

Simple Home Remedies May Provide Relief

If tinnitus is interfering with your quality of life, home remedies may help to relieve your symptoms (and if not, there’s no harm done in trying). Organic Facts compiled several examples worth considering:25

Warm salt pillow: fill a fabric bag with warm salt. Lie down on the pillow and alternate each ear on the bag. Reheat the salt as necessary and repeat several times a day. Foot baths: alternate your feet in hot and cold foot baths. This may dilate your blood vessels and stimulate blood flow toward your head, helping to relieve tinnitus symptoms.
Garlic oil: blend six cloves of fresh garlic with 1 cup of olive oil (the garlic should be finely minced in the process). Let the mixture steep for a week then strain out the garlic. Apply a few drops of the oil in each ear. Music: soft soothing music, white noise, nature sounds or even humming to yourself may help relieve tinnitus.
Stimulate your little toe: use a toothpick to gently stimulate the edge of your little toe near the toenail. This should result in a tingling sensation near the top of your toe. Doing this once a day may relieve tinnitus symptoms. Ear drumming: gently drum on each ear using your fingertips for two to three minutes twice a day to help relieve ringing.
Jawbone massage: massage the hollow and top areas of your jawbone behind your earlobes using coconut oil or sesame oil. You can also apply a hot compress to this neck area for relief.

How to Protect Your Ears From Loud Noise Exposures

While there are many causes of tinnitus, loud noise exposure is a primary culprit, especially among youth. It’s far easier to prevent related damage to your ears than it is to treat it. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends teens and young people take the following steps to protect their hearing and avoid hearing loss (although the advice applies to people of all ages):

Turn down the volume on personal audio devices Try a decibel meter app for your smartphone, which will flash a warning if the volume is turned up to a potentially damaging level Wear earplugs when you visit noisy venues (or when using loud equipment like lawnmowers or leaf blowers)
Use carefully fitted noise-cancelling earphones/headphones, which may allow you to listen comfortably at a lower volume Limit the amount of time you spend engaged in noisy activities Take regular listening breaks when using personal audio devices
Restrict the daily use of personal audio devices to less than one hour

J Mercola

P Carrothers

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Restless Legs Syndrome

What is Restless Legs Syndrome?

An Absolute Cure for Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)

 

Have you ever seen someone who was sitting on a sofa, or laying down in bed and they can not stop moving their foot and let back and forth?

Restless legs syndrome (RLS), sometimes called restless leg syndrome,1 is a neurological disorder that can be characterized by an uncontrollable urge to move your legs. Crawling or tingling sensations are felt, often at night.

Also known as the Willis-Ekbom disease,2 it affects about 7.2 to 11.5 percent of the general population3— mostly women and people 45 years old and below, although it can occur to anyone at any age. Pregnant women are also said to be prone to this condition, according to an American Academy of Neurology study.4

The irresistible urge to move affects an individual’s quality of rest or sleep, resulting in excessive daytime sleepiness,5 reduced total sleep time, longer sleep latency and more frequent insomnia.6

What Causes Restless Legs Syndrome?

The cause of restless legs syndrome remains a mystery, as researchers are yet to determine its single unifying cause. But what they know is that it is often hereditary, which is referred to as primary or familial RLS.7

Restless legs syndrome is likely to develop if you are taking certain medications or if you are suffering from a disease.8 In some cases, underlying health conditions such as iron deficiency anemia or kidney failure may also cause secondary restless legs syndrome or uremic RLS.9 Other conditions linked to RLS are peripheral neuropathy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), low iron (ferritin) levels and end-stage renal disease with dialysis.10

Other potential triggers of restless legs syndrome include:11,12

  • Medicines (anti-nausea, antidepressants, antipsychotics, antihistamines and calcium channel blockers)
  • Lack and defective use of iron
  • Increasing age
  • Frequent blood donations

Restless Legs Syndrome Symptoms to Watch Out For

The name of this condition implies its distinct symptom: the urge to move the legs. Other restless legs syndrome symptoms associated with movement include walking, jiggling of legs, tossing and turning, and stretching.13 People with RLS feel sensations of throbbing, pulling, itching or crawling in their legs. These symptoms may occur either on one side of the body, on both or alternately.14

This syndrome is also associated with insomnia, decreased quality of life, and increased morbidity and mortality in end-stage renal disease.15 According to the Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation, these are the five essential features of RLS:16

  • A strong urge to move your legs, which is caused by tingling sensations
  • Worsening of symptoms when resting or inactive
  • Fewer symptoms when moving or doing physical activities
  • Symptoms are only felt at night or worsen in the evening
  • Sleep disturbances that include failure to stay asleep and periodic limb movements (PLMs)

Most people who have restless legs syndrome also experience periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), which can be identified by involuntary leg twitching or jerking movements during sleep. These usually occur every 10 to 60 seconds and may cause interrupted sleep.17

These symptoms may vary from one person to another — some may experience RLS once or twice a week, while for severe cases, it may occur more often.18 According to the National Health Service UK, although this condition is not life-threatening, its symptoms may worsen if the underlying cause isn’t identified and addressed.19

 

Restless Legs Syndrome in Children

Because they may not always be able to explain how they feel, diagnosing restless legs syndrome in children can be difficult. If they can’t describe it, a factor that may help determine childhood RLS is having a biological parent or sibling with RLS,20 in addition to the five essential features of RLS as mentioned above.

One of the common effects of RLS in children is sleep disturbance, as found by a 2007 study.21Periodic limb movement disorder is also likely to happen in children with restless legs syndrome.22

 

Be Cautious if You Experience Restless Legs Syndrome During Pregnancy

Restless legs syndrome during pregnancy is usually temporary, but it is considered a risk factor in developing chronic idiopathic restless legs syndrome.23 According to NHS, 1 in 5 pregnant women may experience the symptoms of RLS in their third trimester, but the condition wanes after they give birth.24 Aside from the symptoms mentioned, pregnant women with transient RLS exhibit lower hemoglobin levels and mean corpuscular volumes (smaller blood cells25).26

 

How to Get Rid of Restless Legs Syndrome: Treatment Options You Can Consider

One of the easiest ways to get rid of restless legs syndrome is through exercise, which was found to be effective in minimizing its symptoms.27 One study found that aerobic exercises may help alleviate RLS symptoms in people undergoing chronic hemodialysis,28 while yoga was found to help reduce stress and improve the mood and sleep quality of women with restless legs syndrome.29

Here are some lifestyle changes that you can follow to reduce the symptoms of restless legs syndrome:30,3132,33,34,35

  • Create and implement a sleeping schedule — Listen to your body so you would know when to schedule your best sleeping time — possibly when the symptoms are least pronounced. You may also check this article, “Military Method for Falling Asleep in Two Minutes, ” to learn how to fall asleep faster.
  • Balance exercises for older adults- Tight rope walk, flamingo stand, rock the boatDo moderate-intensity aerobic and leg-stretching exercises — Since inactivity may prompt the sensations caused by RLS, doing exercises such as hip rotation, hamstring stretch, straight leg stretch and knee-to-chest stretch may help alleviate the uneasy feeling.36 As found by a 2008 study, aerobic exercises may also help boost the functional ability, sleep quality and exercise capacity of people with RLS and on hemodialysis.37
  • Find an activity to distract your mind from RLS — To lessen the discomfort caused by the tingling sensations, keep yourself busy with activities such as solving puzzles, playing board games or doing needlework.
  • Exercises for Restless Leg Syndrome - Sit and Be Fit
  • Squeeze in quick leg exercises during breaks — If you’re working in an office, take a five-minute walk or do stretches at least every hour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additionally, here are some restless legs syndrome medications or approaches that were found to help ease its symptoms:

  • Rotigotine transdermal patch — In a 2010 study, rotigotine transdermal patches were found to help lessen the symptoms of RLS38 because of their dopamine agonist content, which are needed by the brain for movement control.39
  • Intravenous (IV) iron — The symptoms of RLS usually occur at night because this is when iron and dopamine levels dip.40 IV iron may help alleviate this,41 but remember to consult a health care professional first for proper dosing and to avoid the risk of Alzheimer’s disease due to a high iron level.42
  • Pneumatic compression devices (PCDs) — One study43 found that PCDs, which inflate to supply high pressure around the foot and calf, and then deflate, may help minimize RLS symptoms as they help increase blood flow.44

Before trying any of these, remember to seek your health care provider’s recommendations because some medications, such as opioids and benzodiazepines, may actually have more severe effects to your health.

How to Stop Restless Legs Syndrome Immediately

One of the easiest ways to stop restless legs syndrome immediately is by moving your legs. Constant movements such as walking back and forth, swaying your legs while sitting, and tossing and turning in bed may help minimize the sensations.46 Here are other ways on how to stop restless legs syndrome47,48

  • Place a cold or warm compress on your legs so you can be distracted from the tingling or crawling feeling
  • Take a walk to the bathroom, or simply get out of the bed
  • Gently massage your legs

 

Foods to Limit on a Restless Legs Syndrome Diet

While it may offer certain cognitive benefits53 to some people, caffeine, which stimulates the nervous system, may cause insomnia, anxiety and even depression among sensitive individuals. It was also found to be one of the major causes of restless legs syndrome.54 If you suffer from RLS, it’s best to limit your intake or completely avoid drinks and foods with caffeine such as tea, soft drinks and coffee.

Sugar intake must also be regulated to lessen the sensations felt at night,55 especially if the underlying cause of RLS is nerve damage induced by diabetes.56

 

Are There Supplements for Restless Legs Syndrome?

Aside from the remedies and lifestyle changes mentioned, some studies found that supplemental vitamin D,57 and magnesium in form of oral therapy58 and intravenous magnesium sulfate (for pregnant women)59 may be beneficial in minimizing the symptoms of RLS.

However, I recommend seeking your health care provider’s advice before considering supplementation. They may suggest certain supplements, especially if the underlying cause of your restless legs syndrome is vitamin deficiency.60

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Restless Legs Syndrome

Q: What triggers restless legs syndrome?

A: Restless legs syndrome may be triggered by the following factors: medicine, nerve damage, lack of iron or defective use of iron, kidney failure, increasing age, pregnancy and frequent blood donations.

Q: Can anxiety cause restless legs syndrome?

A: One study found anxiety symptoms in people with RLS, but it was not the implied underlying cause.66

Q: Does restless legs syndrome hurt?

A: According to people with RLS, only unpleasant feelings like throbbing, pulling, itching or crawling sensations in their legs may be felt.

Q: How do I stop restless legs syndrome at night?

A: Because movements may help lessen the sensations, I recommend taking a short walk to your kitchen, bathroom or any part of the house. You may also gently rub or massage your legs when you’re having symptoms.67

Q: What vitamins help restless legs syndrome?

A: Studies have found that vitamin D and magnesium may help minimize the symptoms of restless legs syndrome.

Q: What foods should you avoid if you have restless legs syndrome?

A: Generally, food and beverages with caffeine content must be avoided.

Q: Do bananas help minimize the symptoms of restless legs syndrome?

A: Yes. Bananas are rich in magnesium,68 which may help alleviate the crawling sensations and other symptoms of RLS.

Q: How do you calm restless legs naturally?

A: You may reduce the tingling or crawling sensations by moving constantly. You may simply walk, sway your legs or gently massage them.

Q: Can ibuprofen help restless legs syndrome?

A: Yes, ibuprofen may help ease its symptoms,69 but I advise you to follow the home remedies and lifestyle changes mentioned instead, because this medication may expose you to other dangers, such as increasing your risk of heart attack.70

 

J Mercola

P Carrothers

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Do You Have SIBO Symptoms? Here Is What You Need to Know!

Do You Have SIBO Symptoms?

Here Is What You Need to Know!

SIBO symptoms - Dr. Axe

Millions of Americans suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms and distress each year. Diagnoses of leaky gut syndrome, Crohn’s and celiac disease, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) continue to grow, and researchers still can’t quite put their fingers on why our digestive systems are under attack.

Recently, researchers have started to acknowledge there’s another digestive disorder lurking: small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, or SIBO. It’s more prevalent than previously believed, and it occurs in many people suffering from IBS and certain other underlying conditions. (1)


What Is SIBO?

SIBO is the acronym for “small intestinal bacterial overgrowth,” defined as excessive bacteria in the small intestine, or small bowel. While bacteria naturally occurs throughout the digestive tract, in a healthy system, the small intestine has relatively low levels of bacteria; it’s supposed to be at highest concentrations in the colon. (2)

The small intestine is the longest section of the digestive tract. This is where the food intermingles with digestive juices, and the nutrients are absorbed into the bloodstream. If SIBO is indicated, malabsorption of nutrients, particularly fat-soluble vitamins and iron, can quickly become a problem.

When in proper balance, the bacteria in the colon helps digest foods and the body absorb essential nutrients. However, when bacteria invades and takes over the small intestine, it can lead to poor nutrient absorption, symptoms commonly associated with IBS, and may even lead to damage of the stomach lining.

When you have SIBO, as food passes through the small intestine, the bacterial overgrowth interferes with the healthy digestive and absorption process. The bacterium associated with SIBO actually consumes some of the foods and nutrients, leading to unpleasant SIBO symptoms, including gas, bloating and pain.

Even when treating small intestinal bacterial overgrowth with antibiotics, relapse rate is high. This is a chronic condition that can be cured, but it takes patience, perseverance and a change in diet. In fact, SIBO treatment includes a healing diet, and some foods should be avoided until the gut flora is back in balance.


SIBO Symptoms

The indications of SIBO mirror the symptoms of other gastrointestinal disorders, including IBS. According to a study published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology, there’s good reason for the similar symptoms — there’s a definite association between IBS and SIBO. Researchers suggest that physicians give consideration of excluding SIBO before giving a definitive diagnosis of IBS. (3)

Common symptoms of SIBO and IBS include:

  • Nausea
  • Bloating
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Malnutrition
  • Weight loss
  • Joint pain
  • Fatigue
  • Rashes
  • Acne
  • Eczema
  • Asthma
  • Depression
  • Rosacea

Causes and Risk Factors of SIBO

There are a number of underlying conditions believed to contribute to small intestine bacterial overgrowth. These include aging, dysmotility (when muscles in the digestive system don’t work properly), chronic pancreatitis, diabetes, diverticulosis, a structural defect in the small intestine, injury, fistula, intestinal lymphoma and scleroderma. (4)

The use of certain medications, including immunosuppressant medications, proton pump inhibitors, immune system disorders, recent abdominal surgery and celiac disease are also associated with an increased risk for developing SIBO. Celiac disease can be of particular concern as it disturbs gut motility leading to improper small intestine functioning. (5)

According to a study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, 66 percent of patients with celiac disease who maintained a strict gluten-free diet tested positive for bacterial overgrowth.

In this study, patients were treated individually with a combination of antibiotics, prescription medications for worms and parasites, and a change in diet. All patients reported their symptoms were abated after SIBO treatment. (6)

Another underlying cause of SIBO symptoms is blind loop syndrome. This occurs when the small intestine actually forms a loop, causing food to bypass parts of the digestive tract. This causes food to move more slowly through the system, and the result is a breeding ground for bacteria. (7)

Metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes that’s not properly controlled, are believed to lead or contribute to certain gastrointestinal disorders. In fact, a study published in Diabetes & Metabolism indicates that SIBO was present in 43 percent of diabetics with chronic diabetes. (8)

Aging is another risk factor for developing small intestine bacterial overgrowth. As we age, the digestive tract slows down. It’s generally accepted that non-hospitalized adults over the age of 61 have a 15 percent prevalence rate of SIBO, in contrast with just under 6 percent in individuals 24 to 59 years old. A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society also found that over 30 percent of disabled older adults have SIBO. (9)

Rosacea, a skin condition that causes redness and rashes on the face, (10) is also associated with SIBO symptoms. Researchers from the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Genoa in Italy found that rosacea patients have a significantly higher prevalence rate of SIBO.

For those who suffer with rosacea, there’s good news — this study also indicates “an almost complete regression of their cutaneous lesions and maintained this excellent result for at least 9 months” after the eradication of SIBO. (11)

As you can see, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is linked, caused or associated with a wide array of conditions. Even those not thought to be related to the gastrointestinal tract seem to correlate with SIBO symptoms.


Breath Testing for SIBO

In order to diagnose SIBO, doctors use a hydrogen breath test to measure the amount of gas produced by the bacteria in the small intestine. The test measures the amount of hydrogen and methane in your body. This works because the only way the human body produces these gases is through the output of bacteria.

A solution containing one of the following sugars is used to complete the breath test:

  • Lactulose
  • Glucose
  • Xylose

First the patient participates in a special diet for two days prior to the test. Then the patient drinks a solution containing one of the sugars listed above, which feeds the bacteria. The breath test measures how much hydrogen and methane has been produced by the bacteria as a result. These results allow your health care professional to determine if you are experiencing SIBO. (1213)


Complications Associated with SIBO

SIBO, left untreated, can cause potentially serious health complications. It’s vital to get rid of the bacterial overgrowth as soon as possible.

Bacteria overgrowth in the small intestine can lead to malnutrition, one of the biggest concerns with SIBO. Essential nutrients, protein, carbohydrates and fats aren’t properly absorbed, causing deficiencies, including iron deficiency, vitamin B12 deficiency, calcium deficiency and deficiencies in the fat-soluble vitamins — vitamin A deficiency, vitamin D deficiencyvitamin E deficiency and vitamin K deficiency.

These deficiencies can lead to symptoms, including weakness, fatigue, confusion and damage to the central nervous symptom. (14)

Vitamin B12 deficiency is more common than most people believe. There are a number of factors that can lead to deficiency, besides SIBO. Vegetarians and vegans are at particular risk, as are individuals who have inadequate stomach acid or take medications that suppress stomach acid — such as proton pump inhibitors, H2 blockers and other antacids.(15)

As noted above, these commonly prescribed medications are linked to SIBO.

According to Harvard Medical School, the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency can appear gradually — or very rapidly. Symptoms may include numbness or tingling in extremities, anemia, jaundice, decline in cognitive function, memory loss, fatigue, weakness, and even paranoia or hallucinations. (16)

In a report in the British Journal of Haematology, researchers indicate that megaloblastic anemia, a blood disorder that causes the loss of red blood cells, is directly related to bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. This is due to the malabsorption of vitamin B12. (17)

If you have SIBO or a vitamin B12 deficiency, it’s imperative to catch megaloblastic anemia quickly; prolonged vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to permanent nerve damage. (18)

If you experience any of these symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency, in addition to any of the common SIBO symptoms mentioned above, take charge of your health, and get started ridding your body of small intestinal bacteria.

B12 can not!  be taken alone.  Many more symptoms and problems will happen if  you do.   Please do not get a B12 shot!  The chemicals in this medication will wreck you intestinal flora.

Treating SIBO

Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is most often treated with antibiotics such as rifaximin (brand name Xifaxan). This helps reduce the problem bacteria but also kills off the healthy bacteria necessary for proper digestive functioning. For some patients with SIBO caused by blind loop syndrome, long-term antibiotic courses may be required. (19)

Even with antibiotics, SIBO is difficult to treat. In fact, a study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, researchers concluded SIBO patients treated with antibiotics have a high recurrence rate and that gastrointestinal symptoms increased during the recurrences. (20)

The good news is that researchers have found that herbal remedies are as effective as three courses of antibiotic therapy in patients who don’t respond well to rifaximin. (21) This study mentions a variety of herbal remedies but doesn’t include dosing or further details. Oregano oil, berberine extract, wormwood oil, lemon balm oil and Indian barberry root extract are all mentioned in the study.

So how do you treat SIBO and SIBO symptoms? First, it’s important to identify if there’s an underlying cause. The next step is to start reversing the nutritional deficiencies. A healthy diet, nutritional supplements and lifestyle changes are necessary to get the body back in balance.

My first recommendation to overcome SIBO is to consume smaller amounts of food during meals. Spread your meals out at 5–6 smaller portions per day rather than 3 larger meals. Eating smaller meals allows you to digest foods more quickly, which is crucial to overcoming SIBO. Overeating is one of the worst things for SIBO because it causes food to sit longer in the stomach and can also damage gastric juice production. Low stomach acid production is one of the main contributing factors of SIBO because stomach acid kills off bacteria in your upper GI regions.

Next, one of the key things you can do today to help get rid of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is to start probiotic supplements and eat probiotic-rich foods immediately. A pilot study from researchers at the Center for Medical Education and Clinical Research in Buenos Aires, Argentina, found probiotics have a higher efficacy rate than metronidazole for individuals with SIBO. (22)

In this study, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Streptococcus faecalis and Bifidobacterium brevis were administered for five days to half of the study group, while the other half of the study group received antibiotics for five days. All participants ate the same diet, which limited consumption of dairy products, legumes, leafy green vegetables and alcohol.

The results? An astounding 82 percent of the group receiving probiotics reported clinical improvement, while only 52 percent of the group receiving antibiotics reported clinical improvement.

In addition to probiotics and combatting nutrient deficiencies, it’s important to change your diet.

Please do not take it upon yourself to figure out your condition or to treat yourself.  You must work with a holistic healthcare provider, and your primary care doctor may have one to recommend.    Look for a provider in preventative medicine, functional medicine, or regenerative medicine.

Dr Josh Axe

Dr Gemma Carney

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Bacon, Zucchini & Feta Risotto with a Hint of Lemon Zest

 Bacon, Zucchini & Feta Risotto with a Hint of Lemon Zest Recipe

 

Yields three main servings or four entree serves

Pressure Cooker, Oven and On the Stove Methods of Cooking

 

Low fodmap bacon and zucchini risotto with feta and a hint of lemon zest- A Fussy Fodmapper Recipe (low fodmap, gluten free, low lactose, fructose friendly, no garlic, no onion)

 

Ingredients

 

1 1/2 tablespoons of onion infused olive oil

2 rashers/slices of bacon, roughly chopped (approx 50g)

Green part of one leek, finely sliced

1 cup of Arborio rice

½ cup dry white wine

500 mls of chicken stock

Additional 500mls of stock for stove top or oven baked methods

One zucchini, grated (up to 120g)

Zest of ½ a lemon

To serve

Salt and Pepper to taste

Feta cheese

Garlic infused olive oil to taste

 

Method

 

In the pressure cooker:

Set the pressure cooker to ‘Sautee’ and add ½ tablespoon of the onion-infused oil.  Cook the bacon in the oil then remove it and set aside.

Next, add the leeks and the remaining onion-infused olive oil to the pot and sauté until soft. Add the Arborio rice and cook for 1-2 minutes or until the rice is translucent.  Then add the wine, stirring until the rice has absorbed it. Add the stock and stir to combine.  Close the lid for the pressure cooker and set to pressure cook (my pressure cooker has a Risotto function, if yours doesn’t, set to pressure cook for seven minutes).

When finished, turn the pressure cooker to the ‘Keep Warm’ function. Stir through the bacon, zucchini and lemon zest and let the risotto sit for 3-5 minutes until the zucchini has softened.

To serve, add salt and pepper to taste, drizzle with a small amount of the garlic-infused olive oil (amount depending on taste but be careful, it is potent) and top with a crumble of the feta cheese.

 

In the oven:

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees.  In a frypan add ½ tablespoon of the onion-infused oil.  Cook the bacon in the oil then remove it and set aside.

Next, add the leeks and the remaining onion-infused olive oil and saute until soft. Add the Arborio rice and cook for 1-2 minutes or until the rice is translucent.  Add the wine, stirring until the rice has absorbed it.

Transfer the rice mixture to a casserole dish and add the stock, stirring to combine.  Place the lid on your baking dish (or cover with aluminium foil) and place in the oven. Cook for 20 minutes then add the bacon, zest and grated zucchini, stirring to mix it through the risotto mixture.  Continue to cook for another 10 minutes or until the rice is cooked through and all of the stock has been absorbed by the rice.

When finished, add salt and pepper, drizzle with a small amount of the garlic-infused olive oil (amount depending on taste but be careful, it is potent) and give the rice a stir to combine all of the ingredients.  Top with a crumbling of feta cheese.

 

On the stove method:

Set your stove-top to a medium-high heat.  In a deep-dish frypan add ½ tablespoon of the onion-infused oil.  Cook the bacon in the oil then remove it and set aside.
Next, add the leeks and the remaining onion-infused olive oil and saute until soft.  Add the arborio rice and cook for 1-2 minutes or until the rice becomes translucent. Stir in the wine and continue to cook until the rice has absorbed the liquid. Reduce the heat to low-medium and add a small amount of the stock (about ½ a cup), stirring until it has been absorbed by the rice.  Repeat this step until all of the stock has been used and the rice is cooked through.
Stir through the bacon, grated zucchini and zest.  Continue to cook for a few minutes until the zucchini softens then transfer the risotto to your serving dish.  Add salt and pepper to taste, drizzle with the garlic-infused olive oil and top with a crumbling of feta cheese. Enjoy!

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Diets and Weight Loss, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Weight Loss Surgery? Really?

Woman Loses Legs After Weight-Loss Surgery

 

Weight Loss Surgery Meme | TELL ME AGAIN THAT WEIGHT-LOSS SURGERY IS THE EASY WAY OUT... | image ... #weightlosssurgerybeforeandafter #fatloss #weightlosssurgeryrecipes #weightloss #weightlosssurgery #weightlosssurgerysleeve

 

If you’re significantly overweight, you may feel you’d be willing to do anything to get the weight off, even resorting to surgery. And with rates of obesity skyrocketing — two-thirds of all U.S. states already have obesity rates exceeding 25 percent — the use of bariatric (weight loss) surgery has increased 10-fold since 2000 in some areas.

But before you decide to go under the knife, you must understand the risks involved — and know that they can be severe and even deadly. Due to complications from weight loss surgery, the woman in the video above lost both of her legs, while others, like 55-year-old Paula Rojeski, have made the ultimate sacrifice and lost their lives!

These are not rare events.

Since 2009, five people have died after Lap-Band surgery from one group of weight loss clinics in California alone. Please understand that you, too, could be forced to make a similar sacrifice if you opt for weight loss surgery, which is especially tragic because there are safe ways to lose weight that can help virtually everyone. You don’t need to risk your life, or your limbs, to achieve your weight loss goals!

 

The Truth About Bariatric Surgery!

Nearly Half of Weight Loss Surgeries Result in Major Complications

All surgeries have inherent risks, but bariatric surgeries seem to have a much higher ratio of complications. In fact, nearly 40 percent of patients who undergo weight loss surgery experience major complications, including:

Band erosion Malnutrition Infection
Kidney stones Bowel and gallbladder problems Liver failure
Black-outs Increased risk of death Abnormal band expansion

Complications occur for both types of surgery, gastric banding and the more invasive gastric bypass. Gastric banding consists of surgically inserting a band around the top section of your stomach, and cinching it into a small pouch. This is often touted as a simpler, less invasive procedure to gastric bypass, and whereas gastric banding is at least reversible, while gastric bypass is not, the complications are often so debilitating that patients opt to have the bands removed completely.

A study published earlier this year found that:

  • Nearly 50% of patients required removal of their bands
  • Nearly 1 out of 3 patients experienced band erosion
  • 60 percent needed to undergo additional surgery

As such, the researchers had no choice but to conclude:

LAGB [laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding] appears to result in relatively poor long-term outcomes.”

Even according to LapBand.com, one American clinical study that included a 3-year follow-up reported a staggering 88 percent of gastric banding patients experienced one or more adverse events, ranging from mild to severe. Common complications, from gastric banding included the following — and keep in mind that excess weight increases your risks even further, which means everyone who undergoes weight loss surgery is at even greater risk:

Gastroesophageal reflux Band slippage and/or pouch dilation Stomach obstruction
Esophageal dilation Reduced esophageal function Difficulty swallowing
Leaking or twisted access port into the stomach Band eroding into the stomach

One in 50 Die after Gastric Bypass

Would you risk an elective surgery if you knew you had a one in 50 chance of dying within 30 days? This is the actual risk reported for gastric bypass surgery by a study published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. You had also better hope that your surgeon knows what he or she is doing, as risk of death was associated with surgical inexperience. Within the surgeon’s first 19 procedures, the odds of death within 30 days were 4.7 times higher!

In this procedure, a section of your small intestine is typically removed entirely, and your stomach is reconnected further down your intestine, bypassing the duodenum, hence the name “gastric bypass.” Your duodenum — that first section of your small intestine — is responsible for the majority of nutrient absorption. Hence, if you make it through the surgery, malnutrition is a common concern after this type of surgery.

You should also know that once you receive this surgery, you will not be able to eat normally for the rest of your life. According to the Barrington Bariatric Center, not only will you need to exist on a diet of solely pureed food for at least two weeks, but even in “Stage 2” of your transitional post-surgery diet you may only be able to eat 2 ounces of ground chicken breast before feeling full.

Gastric Bypass Will Wreak Havoc on Your Digestive Processes and Ability to Absorb Nutrients

Gastric bypass involves stapling your stomach into a pouch that’s only a half-ounce in size, so it literally cannot hold much. The idea is that you’ll feel full faster, since your stomach will be unnaturally tiny, but it also means you’ll often be eating meals that are sorely lacking in nutritional requirements.

A small opening is also created to allow food to empty slowly from the pouch. Because the opening is so small (made this way deliberately to keep the small amount of food you’ve eaten in your stomach longer, making you feel “full”), food must be chewed very thoroughly or it won’t be able to fit through the opening, leading to vomiting.

You’ll also be instructed to eat the protein portion of your meal first, because you very well may get too full to fit in a vegetable or anything else. Even liquids must be restricted for up to 45 minutes before and after a meal, lest they take up what little space you have to consume actual food. As you might suspect, because bariatric surgery patients can consume very little roughage, constipation is often a problem. It is even described as “normal” to have a bowel movement only once every two or three days!

Hair loss and muscle loss are also common after the surgery — both signs that your body is not receiving proper nutrition.

If this, plus constipation and vomiting are not enough to make you think twice, you should also know that certain foods, including tomato sauces, mayonnaise, fruit juice, dressings and others, will lead to “dumping syndrome,” aka cramps, nausea and diarrhea. Snacking is also expressly forbidden after gastric bypass, as you’re only allowed three small meals a day, and you may have to write off certain foods entirely because your body just can’t digest them anymore.

This includes:

  • Red meats
  • Membranes of oranges or grapefruit
  • Skins of fruits and vegetables (this is where the bulk of the antioxidants are!)
  • Fibrous vegetables such as celery and sweet potatoes
  • Chili and other spicy foods

This is simply NOT a healthy way of eating, and the long-term implications are just as severe as the short-term risks. Likely because of the related malnutrition, a possible link between gastric bypass surgery in adolescent girls and an increased risk for neural tube defects, which can lead to varying degrees of disability such as paralysis and mental retardation due to damage to the nervous system, in their future children has been revealed.  People who receive bariatric surgery also more than double their risk of fractures, and are about three times more likely to break a hand or foot than normal.

A FAR Better Alternative — Lose Weight in Three Steps

Overall, 75 percent of American adults and nearly one-third of children and teens are currently obese or overweight … and weight-loss surgery centers are seeing dollar signs as their customer base keeps rising. But you can count yourself out of these statistics, and spare yourself from the potentially serious and even deadly consequences of weight loss surgery, by losing weight naturally. I believe there are three primary recommendations that could make all the difference in the world for most people.

They are:

  1. Severely restricting carbohydrates (sugars, fructose, and grains) in your diet
  2. Increasing healthy fat consumption
  3. Engaging in Peak Fitness exercises

In terms of your weight, calories from fructose are just about as bad as they come, as they will turn off your body’s appetite-control system. Fructose does not appropriately stimulate insulin, which in turn does not suppress ghrelin (the “hunger hormone”) nor stimulate leptin (the “satiety hormone”), which together results in your eating more and developing insulin resistance.

My recommendation is to keep your total fructose intake below 25 grams of fructose per day if you’re in good health, and below 15 grams a day if you need to lose weight.

Fructose is also “isocaloric but not isometabolic,” according to Dr. Robert Lustig. This means you can have the same amount of calories from fructose or glucose, fructose and protein, or fructose and fat, but the metabolic effect will be entirely different despite the identical calorie count. This is largely because different nutrients provoke different hormonal responses, and those hormonal responses determine, among other things, how much fat you accumulate.

This is why counting calories alone is often not enough to lose weight successfully!

When you eat according to my nutrition plan, most people will lose weight without counting calories at all because it’s all about eating the proper ratios of the right types of food. This includes eating healthy sources of fat, because eating healthy fats is conducive to weight loss.

When you eat fats as part of your meal, they actually slow down your food absorption so that you can go longer without feeling hungry.

Case in point is the fat conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), found in grass-fed beef and full-fat raw dairy products from grass-fed cows (raw butter, raw milk, raw-milk cheese, etc.), which is associated with reduced body fat and weight. Again, you can get all the details of a healthy diet that will naturally propel you toward your ideal body weight by reading through my comprehensive nutrition plan.

The foods you choose to eat will be the driving force behind successfully achieving your weight loss goals, but exercise is still important, especially the right type of exercise.  It’s important that you are engaging in high-intensity activities like Peak Fitness exercises, which engage a certain group of muscle fibers that you cannot engage through aerobic cardio. Engaging these muscle fibers causes a cascade of positive health benefits, including improved fat burning, and you only need to do them for 20 minutes, three times a week.

There is simply no need to resort to surgery for weight loss — virtually everyone who restricts their carbohydrate consumption (including fructose, sugar and grains), increases their intake of healthy fats, and engages in proper Peak Fitness type of exercises will slim down safely and naturally, and enjoy better health and increased longevity because of it.

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Chicken Parmesan Casserole

Chicken Parmesan Casserole Recipe

Ingredients

  • 5 cups cubed cooked chicken
  • 1 cup no-sugar-added marinara sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 ounce Parmesan cheese, grated(about 1 cup)
  • 1 1/2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese (about 6 ounces)
  • 1-ounce pork rinds, crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed dried basil

Preparation Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 F and lightly grease an 8-inch square baking pan
  2. Spread the chicken in the greased dish and pour the tomato sauce over it.
  3. Sprinkle with the red pepper flakes. Top with the Parmesan and then the mozzarella.
  4. Lightly sprinkle the crushed pork rinds and basil over the top.
  5. Bake for 25 minutes, until the cheese, is melted and bubbly.

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Chive Potato and Cheese Fritter SIBO , IBS, FODMAT recipe

Chive Potato and Cheese Fritter

Low FODMAP and Gluten Free Recipe - Chive, potato & cheese fritters

For the fritters

100g/3½oz leftover baked, boiled or raw potatoes, such as King Edward or Maris Piper, grated  ( never instant )

½ tsp caraway seeds

2 scallions, thinly sliced (green end only)

1 tbsp chopped chives

50g hard cheese, such as parmesan, finely grated

1 egg, beaten

3½ tbsp cold water

50g/1¾oz gluten free self-raising flour

sunflower oil , for deep frying

Method

For the fritters, put the potatoes in a bowl and season with salt, pepper and the caraway seeds.

Mix in the chives and cheese. Pour in the egg and water, stir, then mix in the gluten free flour to make a thick batter.

Pour 2.5cm/one inch oil into a deep saucepan and heat to 180C/350F.

To test if it’s hot enough, dribble some of the batter into the hot oil. It should sizzle and turn golden-brown after a minute or so.

Watch the pan. Carefully lower tablespoons of the batter into the hot oil and cook for one minute, then turn and cook the other side until golden and firm.

Transfer to kitchen paper using a slotted spoon.  Sprinkle with the scallions (green end only) and serve.

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

Gut Dysfunction Can Easily Lead to Systemwide Inflammation

SIBO Summer Cookbook

 

Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth or SIBO is a very common condition, and if you have it, many of the healthy interventions that are commonly recommended to improve gut health simply won’t work. They’ll actually make you worse.

“What happens in [SIBO], as the name kind of hints at, is you have an overgrowth of bacteria in the small intestine. What’s interesting here is it’s not an infection per se, because it’s not bacteria that shouldn’t be there. Oftentimes it’s bacteria that’s normal to the system. It’s just overgrown.

In SIBO, our goal [is to re-establish a healthy balance]. One of the ways we can achieve that goal is by using an elimination diet of one food group at a time , which … essentially just means prebiotics … compounds that feed bacteria.”

The classic symptom of SIBO is altered bowel function. Some will have constipation; others diarrhea, while some oscillate between the two. Abdominal pain, bloating or discomfort are also common telltale signs, and estimates suggest SIBO may be an underlying cause in a majority of IBS cases.

Interestingly, SIBO has also been linked to skin conditions such as rosacea, and neurological conditions such as restless leg syndrome. Treating SIBO has also been shown to improve rheumatoid arthritis, and studies have shown an association between SIBO and thyroid autoimmunity and/or hypothyroidism.

“This is where it gets challenging, because we can’t put SIBO just in the digestive box,”Ruscio says. “There may be someone who has a skin condition and a joint condition that is only attributable to their SIBO. I’d like to paint this perspective for people in terms of how to navigate this.

My philosophy is, once you’ve taken some steps to generally improve your diet and your lifestyle, if you’re still floundering, I think the next best step for most people … would be taking steps to ensure you have optimal gut health. Because there’s not necessarily a constellation of symptoms that would say you have SIBO or another gut condition. Rather, I look at it more as a sequencing maneuver.”

How to Diagnose and Treat SIBO

According to Ruscio, a breath test is the best method of diagnosis. This involves eating a preparation diet the day before the test, and then collecting a series of breath samples after drinking a solution of either lactose or glucose. Breath samples are typically collected every 15 to 20 minutes for about three hours.

“Essentially, what we’re looking for are the changes in the gas levels on those breath samples. Those can tell you if you have SIBO or if you don’t have SIBO,” he says. As mentioned, — in which you specifically avoid most fruits and vegetables — is often prescribed to address SIBO third class symptoms.

“Every gut is an ecosystem. Every gut does not require the same inputs to thrive. This is one phase where that ecosystem requires a reduction of — at least temporarily — from various  foods to allow things to rebalance …

You can do a plus or minus the rules of paleo, meaning if you’re going to do a paleo,  diet, you’ll have no grains and you’ll have no dairy. Some people may prefer that, or some people may prefer the standard low-diet, which allows some grains. There’s a time and a place, I think, for each. But that’s where you can start.”

Alternatively, you can perform a urinary organic acid test, which tests for over 100 metabolites in your urine. There are a number of characteristics ones that show up if you have SIBO, so that is an alternative diagnostic strategy.

Gluten Sensitivity  and Histamine Intolerance

It’s worth noting that what may appear to be nonceliac gluten sensitivity may actually be a sensitivity, or a histamine intolerance. Histamine is a neuroactive compound. It’s also a singling molecule for your immune system. And, like a low step-diet, the low-histamine diet can seem paradoxical, as it eliminates fermented foods, which are high in histamine, as are avocado, spinach and many fishes.

“Why this is important is because if we were living in an overly idealistic situation, then we could just wave a wand and say, ‘OK, you’re going to go grain-free, dairy-free, low-step, low-histamine and low-carb.’ But if you actually have to do that, things become really challenging.

What I have been seeing in the clinic is patients coming in afraid of food … They come in afraid to eat anything. Some of these patients are literally making themselves sick because they’re trying to adhere to two, three, four or five diet rules all at once. This is really pushing me to kind of open my mind a bit on grains.

I used to be much more antigrain. But noticing that some people had bigger dietary battles to fight, like   histamine — if they have to really focus on avoiding  histamine, we’ve got to give them some room somewhere else. For some, giving them some room to bring back grains into their diets actually is quite helpful …

I was eating, at one point, what I called the ‘lazy man’s paleo diet.’ I’d have a can of tuna with an avocado. That’s low-carb. It’s quick and easy. I’d wash it down with some sauerkraut and a kombucha. And then at lunch I’d have spinach along with some salmon. A lot of the convenient paleo, low-carb foods are fairly rich in histamine.

I remember very distinctly being at my desk working one day — a beautiful sunny day, with no reason for me not to be happy — and I had this fog over me. I was very irritable.

I was thinking to myself, ‘What the heck is going on?’ It took me a couple of days to put it together, but I was eating a high-histamine food at every meal. I was just saturating my system with histamine. I just needed to make a simple change of spacing out those high-histamine foods.”

In short, whether you’re suspecting a nonceliac gluten sensitivity or histamine intolerance, the key is to find a diet that does not irritate your gut. For many, this might be a low-carb, paleo-type approach, potentially with a reduction of histamine-rich foods.

“The nice thing about this is it only takes usually about two weeks to notice if one of these diets is working for you. This is what I walk people through in the book. ‘OK. You start here. We’ll give this diet a two-week trial, and then re-evaluate.’

You might be done with the diet at that point or you may have to make a tweak and give that another two weeks. It doesn’t take long. But it’s a series of self-experiments to see what works best for your system. And then once you’re feeling well, you know you’ve gotten the diet that’s the best for your unique gut ecosystem.”

With any ” gut” sensitivity or condition you may have, taking laxatives will not help with constipation, but it will produce more bacteria in your gut.  This is true of ant-acids, which again should never be taken with SIBO.

If you are having those problems, the answer is not another prescription, but ask a good health care provider for an alternative method.  You need someone who can look at the foods you are eating and detect which foods are causing the problem.   Keep track of the foods you eat!

 

As a general rule, once you start healing your gut, you should start feeling improvements in a couple of weeks to a few months. That said, some will respond within days, and be fully healed in weeks. It really all depends on what your problem is, and how severe the dysfunction. As noted by Ruscio:

“There’s more going on than just the intestinal cells repairing. There are the intestinal cells. There’s the local immune system. There’s the microflora and the balance of the microflora. All of these things have to kind of integrate. Some of these things feedback on each other.

I should mention, be careful with what you read about SIBO, because some circles would have you believe SIBO is this chronic condition that you can never heal … That’s not true for the vast majority of people. The prognosis is much more hopeful for healing the gut than most people realize. Healing can occur within weeks to months for the majority of people.”

Health and Wellness Associates

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Lower Your Blood Pressure With The Foods You Eat

6 Foods That Lower Blood Pressure

 

Over 70 million Americans suffer from high blood pressure and 30 percent of Americans have prehypertension, making this condition extremely crucial to control. However, sometimes prescription drugs used to control hypertension can have potentially dangerous side effects.

a medical technician takes a patient's blood pressure

With the recent recall of several blood pressure drugs due to potential contamination, it’s more important than ever to try natural ways to keep blood pressure under control.

Here are six foods that can help control blood pressure:

 

  • Insoluble fiber. Dr. Oz says that eating foods like beans, 100 percent whole wheat or bran products, green beans, potatoes, cauliflower, or nuts helps balance the gut biome which in turn produces fatty acids that reduce cardiovascular problems such as blood pressure, irregular heart beat, and atherosclerosis. Insoluble fiber also adds bulk to stool and helps food pass more quickly through the stomach and intestines, protecting your heart from high blood pressure.
  • Leafy greens. According to Medical Daily, the potassium found in leafy green vegetables eliminates sodium from the body which in turn can reduce blood pressure. Kale and spinach are options that provide a good portion of your daily recommended intake. The Environmental Working Group recommends that you consume organic greens due the high levels of pesticide residues in commercially grown veggies.
  • Berries. Berries, and specifically blueberries, contain nitric acid which can have protective effects on heart health. “There’s something very special about the composition of blueberries that is responsible for their effect on blood pressure,” Florida State researcher Sarah A. Johnson told The New York Times. “Other fruits and plant extracts have not produced the same results.”
  • Olive oil. The most popular heart-healthy diets are the DASH and the Mediterranean both of which recommend using olive oil in your diet. The benefits may be attributed to the polyphenols as well as the monounsaturated fats. These “good” fats make a fine replacement for butter which contains unhealthy fat. Studies show that women, in particular, experience the greatest health benefits from using olive oil.
  • Salmon. The American Heart Association recommends consuming fatty fish twice weekly. Studies have found that high omega-3 content may play a role in lowering blood pressure and targeting inflammation in the body. Prevention also notes that salmon contains vitamin D which “helps the body absorb calcium, protects against depression, and regulates blood pressure,” according to their website.
  • Chocolate. As long as you stick to dark chocolate and watch the portion size, you can enjoy a number of health benefits. The dark variety contains compounds called flavanols which experts believe have beneficial effects on blood pressure, cholesterol levels, cognition, and more. To avoid weight gain, limit your consumption to an ounce daily and make sure your chocolate contains at least 70 percent cocoa.

You Are What You Eat, So dont be Cheap, Easy or Fake

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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