Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Hair Loss

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Hair Loss

echineachea.jpg

 

 

 

About 40% of both men and women, have visible hair loss by

age 40.  There is a supplement combo that

reduces hair loss in 90% of the men and women who take it daily.

 

 

Fish Oil  400 mg, fish oil is still the best source of Omega3 fatty acids which quell

inflammation and help nerve endings heal, both of which can reduce hair loss. Omega

3’s also reduce wrinkles.

 

 

Blackcurrant seed oil, 460mg     This supplement has an ideal balance of

omega 6’s and omega 3 fatty acids, which together help stimulate the growth of

hair.   This also help with hormonal balances and menopause symptoms.

 

 

 

Vitamin C 30 mg,

This nutrient is abundant in citrus fruits, bell peppers and berries,

booster the blood vessels that help the scalp retain hair.

 

 

 

Vitamin E    5mg     This supplement works in conjunction with

vitamin C to reduce the free radical damage that contributes to hair loss.

 

 

 

Lycopene 1 mg.   This

super nutrient zaps hair harming free radical.

It also helps you skin resist sun damage.

 

 

 

Contact us with your questions

 

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Picture:  Echineachea in my garden.  Also known as Vitamin C, and you can put the petals in salads.

Advertisements
Uncategorized, Health and Disease, Foods, Lifestyle

Healthy Eating Makes Children Happy

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Healthy Eating Makes Children Happy

healthykids.jpg

The healthier kids’ diets, the less likely they are to have emotional problems and the better their self-esteem is likely to be. These findings come from a Swedish study that looked at 7,675 children ages 2 to 9 living in eight European countries. Adhering to a healthy diet that contains fruits and vegetables and limits intake of refined sugars and fat was associated with fewer emotional problems, better relationships with other children and higher self-esteem, the researchers reported. Study leader Louise Arvidsson of Sweden’s University of Gothenburg noted that the findings suggest that adopting a healthy diet can improve wellbeing in children independent of the childrens’ socioeconomic status or body weight. When the study began, the researchers asked parents to report on how often each week their children consumed foods from a list of 43 items. The children’s wellbeing was assessed on the basis of parents’ reports on validated questionnaires regarding the youngsters’ self esteem, relationship with their parents, and emotional and peer problems. However, because the study was an observational one, it isn’t possible to conclude that the kids’ diet is what made them happy.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-9355 (WELL)

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Experts Are Urging People Not to Drink Apple Cider Vinegar

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Teleheatlh

 

Experts Are Urging People Not to Drink  Apple Cider Vinegar

 

 

applecidervinegar

When it comes to home remedies, few products are as revered or as misunderstood as apple cider vinegar. It’s been hailed as a “cure” for everything from hiccups to acne and is believed by many to hold the ultimate key to weight loss.

Nobody can deny the power of this famously tart fermented liquid. It’s packed with enzymes, probiotics, and has even been shown to help regulate blood sugar. Heck, we’ve even used it in our hair! But as ACV’s popularity grows, more and more experts are warning consumers of the harmful side effects associated with drinking it.

Apple cider vinegar is made by combining apples with yeast.

The yeast then converts the sugar in the apples into alcohol. Bacteria are then added to the mixture, which ferment the alcohol into acetic acid.

Acetic acid makes up about 5–6% of apple cider vinegar. It is classified as a “weak acid,” but still has fairly strong acidic properties.

In addition to acetic acid, vinegar contains water and trace amounts of other acids, vitamins and minerals.

Since ACV is made with yeast, as its most active ingredient, if you have intestinal issues, such as Leaky Gut, Crohns, Celiac disease, absorption issue as gluten or less than three bowel movements a day, then you should never take ACV.

 

Delayed Stomach Emptying

Apple cider vinegar helps prevent high blood sugar spikes by reducing the rate at which food leaves the stomach and enters the lower digestive tract. This slows down its absorption into the bloodstream.

However, this effect may worsen symptoms of gastroparesis, a common condition in people with type 1 diabetes.

In gastroparesis, the nerves in the stomach don’t work properly, so food stays in the stomach too long and is not emptied at a normal rate.

Symptoms of gastroparesis include heartburn, bloating and nausea. For type 1 diabetics who have gastroparesis, timing insulin with meals is very challenging because it’s hard to predict how long it will take food to be digested and absorbed.

One controlled study looked at 100 patients with type 1 diabetes and gastroparesis.

Drinking water with 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of apple cider vinegar significantly increased the amount of time that food stayed in the stomach, compared to drinking plain water.

 

Digestive Side Effects

Apple cider vinegar may cause unpleasant digestive symptoms in some people.

Human and animal studies have found that apple cider vinegar and acetic acid may decrease appetite and promote feelings of fullness, leading to a natural reduction in calorie intake.

However, one controlled study suggests that in some cases, appetite and food intake may decrease due to indigestion.

The people who consumed a drink containing 25 grams (0.88 oz) of apple cider vinegar reported less appetite but also significantly greater feelings of nausea, especially when the vinegar was part of a drink.

 

Low Potassium Levels and Bone Loss

There are no controlled studies on apple cider vinegar’s effects on blood potassium levels and bone health at this time.

However, there are cases reported of low blood potassium and bone loss that was attributed to doses of apple cider vinegar taken.

A 28-year-old woman consumed 8 oz (250 ml) of apple cider vinegar diluted in water on a daily basis.

She was admitted to the hospital with low potassium levels and other abnormalities in blood chemistry.

What’s more, the woman was diagnosed with osteoporosis, a condition of brittle bones that is rarely seen in young people.

Doctors who treated the woman believe the daily doses of apple cider vinegar led to minerals being leached from her bones to buffer the acidity of her blood.

They also noted that high acid levels can reduce the formation of new bone.

 

Erosion of Tooth Enamel

Acidic foods and beverages have been shown to damage tooth enamel.

Soft drinks and fruit juices have been more widely studied, but some research shows the acetic acid in vinegar may also damage tooth enamel.

In one lab study, enamel from wisdom teeth was immersed in different vinegars with pH levels ranging from 2.7–3.95. The vinegars led to a 1–20% loss of minerals from the teeth after four hours.

Nevertheless, there’s some evidence that large amounts of vinegar may cause dental erosion.

A case study also concluded that a 15-year-old girl’s severe dental decay was caused by consuming one cup (237 ml) of apple cider vinegar per day as a weight loss aid.

 

Throat Burns

Apple cider vinegar has the potential to cause esophageal (throat) burns.

A review of harmful liquids accidentally swallowed by children found acetic acid from vinegar was the most common acid that caused throat burns.

Researchers recommended vinegar be considered a “potent caustic substance” and kept in childproof containers.

However, one case report found that an apple cider vinegar tablet caused burns after becoming lodged in a woman’s throat. The woman said she experienced pain and difficulty swallowing for six months after the incident.

Esophageal throat burns can not be felt until it is too late to reverse the ulcerated area.  Usually the saliva in your mouth will coat the esophagus and small throat burns will not be detected.

 

Skin Burns

Due to its strongly acidic nature, apple cider vinegar may also cause burns when applied to the skin.

In one case, a 14-year-old girl developed erosions on her nose after applying several drops of apple cider vinegar to remove two moles, based on a protocol she’d seen on the internet.

In another, a 6-year-old boy with multiple health problems developed leg burns after his mother treated his leg infection with apple cider vinegar.

There are also several anecdotal reports online of burns caused by applying apple cider vinegar to the skin.

 

Drug Interactions

A few medications interact with apple cider vinegar:

Diabetes medication: People who take insulin or insulin-stimulating medications such as metformin or Glucophage and vinegar may experience dangerously low blood sugar or potassium levels.

Digoxin (Lanoxin),or any cardiac medication:  These medication lowers your blood potassium levels along with your magnesium levels causing problems with all your electrolytes.

Certain diuretic drugs: Some diuretic medications cause the body to excrete potassium. To prevent potassium levels from dropping too low, these drugs shouldn’t be consumed with AC vinegar.

Heartburn medications: Prilosec, Zantac, Nexium are just examples of some of the over the counter medications that will cause irreversible damage to your colon.

Supplements and Vitamins:  If you are taking any of these supplements of vitamins please stay away from ACV.  Vitamin C, all Vitamin Ds’, B vitamins and B complex.  Zinc, iodine, fish oil, vitamin E.  There may be a few more that in groupings will cause adverse reactions.

There are many more prescription drugs that could be put on this list.  Please always check with your health care provider before adding acid to your regiment.

As registered dietitian and Food Network personality Ellie Krieger advised in The Washington Post, beneficial or not, apple cider vinegar is still an acid, and you should handle it with care. “It is a potent acid that can be dangerous if aspirated, may cause burns to the tender tissue of the mouth and esophagus, and can lead to tooth erosion,” Krieger advised.

ACV can also cause nausea and other gastrointestinal symptoms in already sensitive stomachs, so use common sense. If you’re experiencing discomfort, it might be time to cut back.

If you still want to use it, cook with it.   Better yet, use it in your salad dressing!

“I say incorporate vinegars, like apple cider and red wine vinegar, into your diet by tossing them with veggies,” Keri Glassman, MS, RD, founder of Nutritious Life, told Woman’s Day.  “The fiber and water volume of the veggies will help keep you full and hydrated, which naturally aids in digestion and weight maintenance. Plus, vinegar contains close to zero calories—as opposed to creamy bottled salad dressings.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

Dir P Carrothers

Director of Personalized Healthcare

Preventative and Restorative Medicine

312-972-9355

Lifestyle, Uncategorized

How Does Alcohol Affect the Brain? (It’s Not Pretty)

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS Telehealth

 

How Does Alcohol Affect the Brain? (It’s Not Pretty)

alcoholnotpretty

Ever wonder, “What does alcohol do to your body?” Particularly, how does alcohol affect the brain? The truth is the damage goes far beyond a headache and brain fog you experience the morning after drinking too much. The effects of alcohol on the brain are profound, and heavy drinking can set you up for some of the most dreaded brain diseases. The long-term effects of alcohol can completely rewire your brain, too, increasing the risk of depression and other conditions.

 

The Link Between Alcohol & Dementia

How alcohol affects the brain is likely more complex than most people think. True, it’s well known that the chronic use of excessive alcohol can have detrimental effects on the body. Still, a surprising 2018 French study from shows a strong link between early onset dementia, in which an individual begins shows symptoms of dementia before the age of 65, and alcohol addiction.

 

The study states that heavy alcohol use, as well as other alcohol use disorders, are important risk factors for dementia which can shorten lives by up to 20 years, with dementia as the leading cause of death.

 

So how exactly are dementia, which up until now was mainly synonymous with Alzheimer’s disease, and alcohol-related?  To understand the link between the two, it is first helpful to understand the effects that alcohol has on the brain as a whole. (1, 2)

 

Alcoholism

 

Heavy drinking is considered three drinks a day for women and four to five drinks per day for men. (3) There are several factors that determine how alcohol affects the brain: (4)

 

How much and how often drinking occurs

Age when drinking first began

Prenatal alcohol exposure

Age, gender, genetic background/family history

Level of education

General health status

Symptoms of alcoholism are:

 

Physical

 

Poor coordination

Slurred speech

Slowed reaction times

Psychological

 

Impaired thinking

Memory loss

Behavioral

 

Engaging in risky behaviors

Addictive behavior

Depression

Withdrawal or abstinence of drinking results in sweating, nausea, shakiness, anxiety, and delirium tremens; which may include visual or auditory hallucinations. Immediate effects of alcohol are similar following a few drinks.

 

When you consume alcohol your liver breaks it down into nontoxic byproducts but with excessive consumption, your liver is unable to keep up with the demands required and the alcohol remains in the bloodstream. The effects of alcohol on the brain depends upon an individual’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC). (5)

 

How Does Alcohol Affect the Brain?

An increase in BAC interacts with the brain through the blood-brain barrier.  Once in the central nervous system, alcohol causes alterations in behavior by acting upon specific regions in the brain susceptible to chemical modifications.

 

Regions of the Brain Affected by Alcohol

Mesolimbic pathway

 

Alcohol stimulates the mesolimbic pathway, or the reward pathway, within the brain and releases dopamine causing a feeling of pleasure.

 

This pathway is the major pathway involved with addiction in which constant stimulation of the pathway requires more of a substance to create the same level of pleasure. Studies have shown that a pathway that is repeatedly activated, in this case by drinking, becomes covered by a mesh-like glue that makes it difficult to form new synapses or break old ones. This explains why addiction is so tough to overcome, the pattern is ingrained and held together that way in the brain. (6, 7)

Frontal Lobe & Prefrontal Cortex

 

This region is involved in decision making, motivation, planning, goal setting, judgment problem solving, social conduct and impulse inhibition.  Neuropathological studies have shown a large reduction in the number of neurons in the prefrontal cortex of alcoholics and overall reduced brain mass relative to controls (non-alcohol drinkers). (8, 9) Damage to the frontal lobe/prefrontal cortex results in emotional and personality changes.

 

Hippocampus

 

The hippocampus lies within the mesolimbic system and is involved in motivation, spatial navigation, emotion and crucial for the formation of memories. (10) There is evidence that the hippocampus may also play a role with fear and anxiety. (11) The hippocampus is also one of the few sites for neurogenesis in the adult brain.

 

Neurogenesis is the process of new brain cells being formed from stem cells (undifferentiated cells that can give rise to all different types of cells). Studies suggest that increasing doses of alcohol create a disruption in the growth of new cells, which leads to a deficit in specific areas such as the hippocampus which will lead to decreased learning and memory. (12) Hippocampal neurogenesis is resilient and has been shown to recover following 30 days of abstinence.  Though there appears to be increased vulnerability to relapse. (13)

 

Hypothalamus

 

Also a part of the limbic system, the hypothalamus has connections to many systems and is involved in learning and memory, regulatory functions, eating/drinking, temperature control, hormone regulation and emotion.  Long-term damage to the hypothalamus due to alcohol leads to memory deficits and amnesia can follow. (14)

 

Cerebellum

 

The cerebellum accounts for approximately 10 percent of the total weight of the brain but contains about half of the neurons. (15)  Small but mighty, the cerebellum coordinates voluntary movement, balance, eye movement and integrated into the circuitry for cognition and emotion.  Alcohol abuse leads to atrophy within the white matter of the cerebellum. (16)

 

Amygdala

 

Within the temporal lobe, the amygdala has connections to the prefrontal cortex, the hippocampus and the thalamus and mediates emotions (love, fear, rage, anxiety) and helps identify danger.

 

How Does Alcohol Affect the Brain: Alcohol & Neurotransmitters

Alcohol affects the brain chemistry by altering the levels of neurotransmitters within the above-mentioned regions.

 

Neurotransmitters are the chemical messengers within the brain that transmit signals within the central nervous system and extend out throughout the body.  The alterations of neurotransmitters within the specific regions cause changes in an individual’s behavior and motor functions.

 

Neurotransmitters are either excitatory and increase electrical activity in the brain or they are inhibitory or decrease electrical activity in the brain.

 

GABA and NMDA Receptors

 

Alcohol slows the brain down by binding to the inhibitory GABA  and NMDA receptors.  This slow down results in slurring of words, decreased memory and tiredness.  (17)

 

Dopamine

 

An excitatory neurotransmitter that is increased within the mesolimbic pathway, mediating the reward circuitry.

 

Norepinephrine

 

The release of norepinephrine in conjunction with the temporary increases adrenaline, cortisol and dopamine creates a stress-free, party feeling. (18)  Chronic alcohol abuse results in a decrease in these neurons that release norepinephrine, which leads to impaired attention, information processing and a negative effect on learning and memory. (19)

 

Glutamate

 

Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter but is blocked from binding to its NMDA receptor by alcohol.  The inability to bind to its receptor leads to overall depressant effects throughout the brain. (20)

 

Serotonin

 

Another excitatory neurotransmitter involved in the pleasure/reward effects of the mesolimbic pathway. Studies have shown a 50 percent reduction in serotonergic cells with chronic alcohol abuse, leading to alterations in mood, thinking, appetite, and sleep. (21)

 

Following the initial increase of the excitatory neurotransmitters, the stimulation wears off and there is a build-up of the inhibitory neurotransmitters; GABA and NMDA. This results in the depressed, subdued and tired “afterglow” of a night of binge drinking.

 

Alcohol-Related Syndromes

 

Following chronic excessive alcohol consumption studies have shown an overall decrease in neuronal density, regional blood flow volumes and glucose metabolism.  (22, 23, 24)

 

The decrease in glucose metabolism as a result of alcohol consumption is due to a decrease in thiamine.  Thiamine (also known as vitamin B1) is critical for all tissues in the body, especially the brain.  The brain needs thiamine because of its critical role in glucose metabolism and neurotransmitters synthesis. (25)

 

A decrease in thiamine can occur in two ways due to alcohol consumption.  One is a poor diet and the other is due to a decrease in thiamine absorption and activation. The body does have reserves of thiamine, but they become depleted during heavy drinking. If heavy drinking becomes chronic those reserves don’t have to ability to recoup and an individual starts to have a thiamine deficiency. Of the people with a thiamine deficiency due to alcohol consumption, 80 percent will go on to develop:

 

Wernicke Encephalopathy

 

A person with Wernicke Encephalopathy will suffer from mental confusion, oculomotor disturbances (disturbances with muscles that move the eyes), and difficulty with muscle coordination. (26)

 

Korsakoffs Psychosis

 

Effects 80 to 90 percent of individuals with Wernicke encephalopathy.  Individuals showing symptoms of Korsakoffs Psychosis have difficulty walking and severe problems with amnesia, particularly anterograde amnesia or forming new memories. (27)

 

Alcohol-Related Dementia

 

Research shows the risk of developing dementia is three times greater in heavy drinkers than other people.  Dementia due to alcohol encompasses both Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoffs psychosis. (28)

 

Other syndromes due to alcohol consumption are:

 

Hepatic Encephalopathy: Liver dysfunction occurs following chronic excessive alcohol abuse leading to changes in sleep patterns and mood, in addition to shaking hands and shortened attention span. (29)  The liver damage caused by alcohol results in an increase of ammonia in the blood which has a neurotoxic effect on the brain. (30)

Cerebellar Syndrome with Anterior Superior Vermal Atrophy: Patient presents symptoms of a broad-based gait, difficulty with eye movements and dysarthria (slowed or slurred speech). (31)

Final Thoughts on How Does Alcohol Affect the Brain

Excessive use of alcohol causes a variety of chemical and molecular alterations within the brain that forms the basis of several behavioral and physical manifestations.

The neurotoxic effects of alcohol lead to thiamine deficiency and global cell death within, particularly vulnerable areas within the brain.

This cell death results in a decrease in overall brain volume, specifically within the frontal lobe/prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus.

Due to neurogenesis, abstinence of alcohol over an extended period of time may see a restoration of cells within these areas.

Lastly, although the research illustrating a link between early onset dementia and alcohol is in its early stages, it is a strong warning of the ever-growing list of detrimental effects of excessive alcohol consumption.

If you need help with any of your personal healthcare needs, or you are suffering with a medical condition that you do not think is reversable, please give us a call.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr. Mark Williams D-Psych

Director of Personal Healthcare

Restorative and Preventative Medicine

312-972-9355

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Himalayan Salt for the Bath!

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Himalayan Salt for the Bath!

bath

 

The Himalayas, the world’s tallest mountains, extend approximately 2,500 kilometers across Asia, along the border between India and Tibet.

Two-hundred-fifty million years ago, when the planet was a pristine ecosystem, a primal sea existed where these iconic mountains now stand. The Himalayas formed approximately 40-50 million years ago when, due to plate movement, India collided with Eurasia.

 

As the plates clicked into place, the sea evaporated, and its life-sustaining minerals beautifully crystallized beneath the sun’s rays—forming what is known as Himalayan pink salt. Due to these unique conditions, the purest form of sea salt was produced.

 

Himalayan pink salt is believed to be one of the best sources of natural minerals on earth and gets its pink shade from the high mineral and iron content.

 

Himalayan salt is a natural mineral made up of two electrolytes, sodium and chloride. Natural salt is one of the fundamental components for life and all living creatures need a supply for survival.

 

When Himalayan salt dissolves in water, it creates a concentrated, electrically charged blend containing 84 trace minerals that match those found in our body. These traces are not found in commonly used refined, bleached and processed table salt.

 

The reason this ionic, mineral-rich solution is so nourishing is because the sole solution that is created makes the salt the right size to be easily absorbed and metabolized by the cells in the human body.

 

Many people indulge in this therapeutic salt for bathing to align with the phases of the moon. This is known as Moon Bathing or Moon Rhythm Bathing.

 

When the moon is full, our healing potential peaks and mineral absorption is optimized. During a new moon, cleansing is peaked, and the body’s potential to internally and externally cleanse and detoxify peaks.

 

Rejuvenating salt baths have been known for their therapeutic benefits for thousands of years. The first known account was between 460-370 B.C.E when Hippocrates, the “Father of Medicine,” noticed that seawater and salt water naturally cleansed, soothed, and healed the infections on fishermen’s rough, cracked, and swollen hands.

 

Soon after, Hippocrates began to advise his patients to bathe in warmed seawater and called the therapeutic treatment Thalassotherapy. It is common in thalassotherapy spas for several people to share the same bath, as salt is a disinfectant.

 

Simply by adding Himalayan salt to a bath, we can create a rejuvenating, detoxing, and relaxing in-home-spa experience.

 

There are many types of salt we can add to our bath water, however, I recommend Himalayan pink salt, as it is rich in vital minerals that our skin and body readily absorb including, bicarbonate, bromide, calcium, copper, iodine, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, sodium, sulphate, and zinc.

 

Taking a mineral bath is known as balneotherapy, and the process of absorbing minerals through the skin is known as “dermal absorption.” It is believed that the health benefits of soaking our skin in minerals are greater than if we were to orally consume the minerals.

 

Estimates suggest that every day we are exposed to anywhere between 700,000 and 2.1 million different toxic chemicals from our food, water, the air we breathe, clothing, and personal and household products.

 

Mixing mineral-based salt to water creates a unique ionic solution that helps to extract these toxins from our skin and tissues through a process known as reverse osmosis.

 

Himalayan salt not only pulls waste toxins out of the skin, which block pores and cause a dull complexion, but it also draws water out of the body, preventing water retention.

 

In a regular bath, moisture is extracted from the skin, as our body fluids are a salt solution rather than solely water. However, adding natural sea salt to our bathwater that contains 84 different nutrients that easily absorb into our skin is significantly less drying, and due to the minerals blend, the pH balance of the skin is restored.

 

After bathing, we will immediately notice that our skin feels soft, supple, and has a radiant, healthy glow as our pores and cells have been cleansed and purified from the inside out.

 

Salt has anti-fungal, antibacterial, and antiseptic qualities, which makes it the perfect antidote to skin

irritations, infections, and rashes. The high mineral content in Himalayan salt helps to lightly plump the outer skin and creates a protective barrier over it.

 

Himalayan salt reduces inflammation, therefore it can help us to wind down and relax after a stressful day, making it easier to achieve a restful sleep.

 

Due to the presence of magnesium and other trace minerals, salt baths can offer relief from cramped, tired, and aching muscles with studies finding that regular salt bathing can alleviate pain, reduce inflammation, and improve rheumatological diseases.

 

Salt air has anti-bacterial, ant-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties, so when we naturally inhale the salty water from the bath, the minute particles flow through our respiratory system. The lungs absorb these tiny particles, and this process can alleviate respiratory conditions such as hay fever, coughs, chest and sinus infections, asthma, and allergies.

 

The first and most obvious benefit we notice when soaking in a salt-water bath is that once we immerse ourselves in the bath our worries, anxiety, and stress quickly subside, and peace and harmony are restored.

 

To get the most benefit from this refreshing and energizing salt-water bath, shower and wash with your regular choice of shampoo and soaps prior to soaking in the bath.

 

Mixing elements, such as, air, fire, and water is known to be spiritually cleansing and healing, so open a window a little, light a few candles, and play some relaxing background music.

 

Dry brushing the skin, known as French bathing, removes toxins, loosens dead skin cells, increases circulation, reduces inflammation, increases muscle tone, and opens the pores to intensify the detox process.

 

To remain hydrated during the bath, regularly sip water, which also releases toxins.

 

The concentration of the salt bath should be around the same salt concentration in our body fluids, which is approximately 0.9 percent salt solution.

 

An average bath uses between 25-35 gallons of water, so to achieve a similar balance, mix approximately one ounce of salt per gallon of water, which will work out to around 1.5 to 2 pounds of salt.

 

Fill the bath about four inches deep with hot water, then add the Himalayan pink salt and stir the water until the flakes have dissolved. Then fill the rest of the tub with lukewarm water.

 

It is essential that the water temperature is not too hot or too cold, and it is advisable to bathe in water as close to body temperature as possible, which is approximately 37° Celsius or 97° Fahrenheit. This allows for maximum absorption of the minerals.

 

The salt bath resembles the temperature and ionic make up of the amniotic fluid we are submerged in when in the womb, which is one of the reasons it feels so safe, relaxing, and healing.

 

There is no need to adjust the water temperature once you are in it, as the bath will remain at a constant temperature because of the biophysical composition of the salt, which is so strong that it causes the molecules to move in a constant rhythm.

 

The body’s organ functions resonate with the natural rhythm of the molecules, which recharge the body and mind, reactivate the body’s regulatory mechanism, boosts metabolism, and triggers cellular healing.

 

At least once a week, at the end of the day, soak in a Himalayan salt bath for around 20-30 minutes—the experience is known to be similar to soaking in an ocean of energy.

 

Don’t rinse the skin in the shower at the end of the bath, just lightly towel dry to achieve the optimum benefits.

 

After this therapeutic body, mind, and soul experience, your muscles will be relaxed and may feel a little weaker than usual, so indulge in some well-earned rest, with a good book and a cup of warm herbal tea,

and relax for at least 30 minutes.

 

On regular bath days, you can cleanse and exfoliate the skin with a bar of Himalayan salt soap.

 

Disclaimer: While there are many benefits to taking these baths, to be on the safe side, if you are pregnant, have diabetes, low or high blood pressure, heart, kidney, or liver disease, any other circulation problems, recent or current illness or any other health concerns please consult a doctor or health professional for advice before bathing in salt water.

 

If you feel dizzy, sick, or unwell when taking your bath, slowly get out, rest until you recover—and if concerned, contact a health professional. Sipping on a glass of water may alleviate adverse reactions.

 

When purchasing Himalayan salt, it is advisable to choose an ethical company committed to sustainable sourcing, which entails mining by hand instead of blasting.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-9355

Dr. Mark Williams

Healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Study Shows Link Between Strong Muscles and a Strong Brain

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS Telehealth

 

Study Shows Link Between Strong Muscles and a Strong Brain

musclebrain

Science has linked the benefit of physical exercise to brain health for many years. In fact, compelling evidence suggests physical exercise not only helps build cognitive power1 but also helps the brain resist shrinkage by promoting neurogenesis,2 i.e., the ability to adapt and grow new brain cells. Unfortunately, forgetfulness and “senior moments” are considered by many medical professionals to be a normal and anticipated part of aging.

 

I disagree. In fact, I believe if you’ve noticed memory lapses you may want to seriously consider making immediate lifestyle changes to help reverse or at least minimize further deterioration. Your brain is actually quite adaptable and has the capacity to repair and regenerate, the medical term for which is neuroplasticity. A recent study has found a strong correlation between grip strength and brain health.3

 

Your Muscle and Cognitive Power Are Connected

Researchers from Western Sydney University have found muscle strength, which they measured using hand grip strength, may be a strong indicator of the health of your brain.4 An analysis of data collected from over 475,000 British participants revealed the stronger an individual’s hand grip, the better they performed across every brain function test the researchers used, supporting previous research from the same university.5

 

During the study, the researchers evaluated reaction speed, logical problem-solving and multiple tests analyzing memory. Interestingly, they also determined the data was consistently strong both in individuals younger than 55 and those over 55. The analysis accounted for age, gender, body weight and education prior to confirming those who were stronger indeed had better functioning brains.6

 

A comparison of the results between the general population and individuals who suffered from schizophrenia found strong similarities. Grip strength was strongly correlated to brain health, particularly in working memory and processing speed.7 The researchers theorize if grip strength could predict functional and physical health outcomes in individuals who suffered from schizophrenia, further interventions to improve muscle strength could impact cognitive and real-world functioning.8

 

Although the correlation between muscle strength and physical activity to better brain health and cognitive function in seniors has been demonstrated in previous studies, the results from this study also revealed a strong connection in those younger than 55. Joseph Firth, Ph.D., from the National Institute of Complementary Medicine at Western Sydney University, commented on the results:9

 

“These sorts of novel interventions, such as weight training, could be particularly beneficial for people with mental health conditions. Our research has shown that the connections between muscular strength and brain functioning also exist in people experiencing schizophrenia, major depression and bipolar disorder — all of which can interfere with regular brain functioning.

 

This raises the strong possibility that weight training exercises could actually improve both the physical and mental functioning of people with these conditions.”

 

Aerobic Exercise and Strength Training Affect Cognitive Ability

Previous studies have also linked physical activity with an improvement in cognitive functioning, even for a short time. While studies have found exercising for at least 20 minutes has a measurable effect on cognitive functioning, one study demonstrated exercising for just 10 minutes could have a limited effect on cognitive performance following the exercise,10 suggesting even short bouts of exercise at work may improve productivity.

 

Although the researchers cannot explain the immediate cause of the benefits, theories include an increase in blood flow to the brain or a release of specific proteins, which have demonstrated neuroprotective benefits and the stimulation of new neurons.11 Regular aerobic exercise also appears to increase the size of your hippocampus, the area of your brain involved in verbal memory and learning.

 

Research from the University of British Columbia found resistance training, balance and muscle toning exercises did not have the same results on the hippocampus as aerobic exercise.12 Aerobic exercise, which has the benefit of simultaneously building large muscle strength and engaging your cardiovascular system, was found to improve vocabulary learning in one study.13 Participants who exercised during their workday also increased their productivity by 23 percent.14

 

In one test, participants pedaled on a stationary bike for 30 minutes and were able to improve scores on memory, reasoning and planning.15 In another, after running on a treadmill, subjects improved their performance by 20 percent on memory tests and demonstrated a 20 percent improvement on problem-solving abilities.16 Compiled death statistics find the top three killers are heart disease, cancer and chronic lower respiratory diseases.17

 

It is not a secret that regular exercise and good nutrition will dramatically reduce your potential risk for these conditions, yet nearly 80 percent of American adults don’t get the recommended amount of exercise each week.18 While exercise is critical, the nutritional choices you make each day also contribute greatly to building strong muscles and a strong cardiovascular system.

 

Make Smart Meat Choices

Cracking the code to build stronger muscles means addressing your body’s dietary needs and not just your perceived need for protein. While protein does help develop strong muscles, cell growth requires more than just one primary nutrient. In fact, there are several reasons why you do not want to eat more protein than your body can immediately use, which I will discuss below.

 

When choosing protein, it is important to choose wisely. Most meat at the grocery store today, unless otherwise labeled, is raised on a processed diet in confined quarters and injected with antibiotics — and producing low quality nutrition. Instead, you want to seek out grass fed organically-raised beef and organic free-range dark meat chicken.

 

Choosing meat raised in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) may expose your gut microbiome to low-dose antibiotics, disturbing your gut flora, immune system and emotional health.19

 

Animals raised in CAFO systems also consume genetically engineered (GE) feed, like corn and soy, which are heavily contaminated with glyphosate, also patented as a very effective antibiotic against a large number of beneficial organisms. How your meat is labeled may help you find high quality meat. For instance, “Antibiotic-free,” “No antibiotic residues,” and “No antibiotic growth promotants,” have not been approved by the USDA and may be misleading, if not outright fraudulent.20

 

“Natural” or “All-Natural” is completely meaningless and has no bearing on whether or not the animal was raised according to organic principles. “Natural” meat and poultry products can by law receive antibiotics, hormones and GE grains, and can be raised in CAFOs. For the highest quality beef, seek out products certified by the American Grassfed Association (AGA).

Your second-best choice is meat labeled, “100% USDA Organic,” “No antibiotics administered” and “Grass-fed” coupled with the USDA Organic label.21 When it comes to salmon, I strongly recommend eating only wild-caught Alaskan salmon or sockeye salmon, which are not allowed to be farmed. While farm-raised salmon may be less expensive in the store, they often carry a high health risk as testing revealed no less than 13 persistent organic pollutants, including carcinogenic PCBs and dioxins in farm-raised salmon.22

 

PCB concentrations are so high in farmed salmon researchers say:23 “Risk analysis indicates that consumption of farmed Atlantic salmon may pose health risks that detract from the beneficial effects of fish consumption.” Many farmed fish are also genetically modified to grow faster and larger than wild-caught species.

 

Although larger, you trade high grade nutritionally packed omega-3 fats in wild-caught Alaskan salmon for high levels of inflammatory omega-6 fats in farmed salmon. You can tell if your salmon is wild-caught or farm raised by the color and fat content. The flesh of wild sockeye salmon is bright red, courtesy of natural astaxanthin content. The flesh is also lean, with thin white stripes. If the flesh is pale pink with wide fat marks, the salmon is farmed.

 

Nutritional Choices Help Build Strong Muscles

Your nutritional choices to grow strong muscles don’t end with your choice of meat. Here are four more foods you’ll want to include:

 

  • Macadamia nuts and pecans Macadamia nuts have the highest fat, and lowest carb and protein content of any nuts. Pecans are also high in fat and low in protein and carbs, with abundant antioxidants and minerals. Most Americans get more than enough protein each day and instead need a higher amount of fat for fuel with low carbohydrates. Macadamia nuts and pecans are the perfect snack choice or addition to your chicken or salad.

 

  • Organic broccoli and cauliflower These two vegetables contain essential nutrients to promote fat loss, muscle recovery and muscle growth. Broccoli and cauliflower contain the chemical I3C, aiding in DNA repair.24 Both are good sources of folate,25 necessary for the production of new cell growth.26

 

  • Organic blueberries Blueberries may speed muscle recovery when they are eaten before and after exercise.27 Packed with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, they can be grown in your garden so you can enjoy fresh blueberries throughout the growing season, and frozen to enjoy all year-round.

 

  • Organic celery Celery is a delicious, satisfying and crunchy snack, delivering high amounts of fiber and vitamins A, C, K, folate, potassium and manganese. Vitamin K supports the Gas6 protein, a cellular growth regulation factor necessary for the support of your heart, lungs, kidneys and cartilage.28 Vitamin K also regulates matrix γ-carboxylated glutamate (Gla) protein (MGP), found in cartilage and smooth muscle cells.29

 

Don’t Eat More Protein Than You Need

While protein is necessary to build strong muscles, too much can do more harm than good. There are adverse consequences to eating excessive protein, including the buildup of excess nitrogen waste products in your body, having a stimulating effect on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and adversely impacting the GCN2 pathway involved in the aging process.

 

The recommended dietary reference intake30 for protein is 0.8 grams per kilo per day of body weight or about 46 grams of protein per day for the average sedentary woman and 56 grams for the average sedentary man. However, the average American eats nearly double or more.31

 

For optimal health I believe most adults need 1 gram of protein per kilo of lean body mass, not total body weight; approximately 0.5 grams of protein per pound of lean body mass. You’ll find a simple method of calculating your current protein requirements in my previous article, “Are You Sabotaging Your Health and Longevity by Eating Too Much Protein?”

 

Foods and Other Lifestyle Choices Improve Brain Function

While there is a strong correlation between exercise and cognitive performance, as with other organs in your body, your brain requires fuel. Your brain can metabolize either carbohydrates or fats for energy, but there is significant evidence the metabolic product of fats — ketones — may help restore and renew neurons even after damage has begun.

 

Ketones are not the only nutrients with a neuroprotective effect reducing reactive oxygen species in your brain. While blueberries have anti-inflammatory effects on your muscles, they also may help prevent, and are potential treatment of, cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer’s disease.32 The combination of a ketogenic diet and the addition of blueberries may help improve memory.

 

In studies of participants who had mild cognitive impairment,33 both ketosis and blueberries helped improve memory in older adults.34 High levels of antioxidants in blueberries may also help reduce free radical damage, important for the prevention of DNA damage and diseases such as cancer.

 

Broccoli, cauliflower and celery have positive effects on muscle growth and recovery and are also associated with brain health. Celery is a rich source of luteolin, a plant compound with a calming influence on inflammation in your brain, which is a primary cause of neurodegeneration. Luteolin has also been linked with lower rates of age-related memory loss in mice.35

 

Older mice fed a luteolin-supplemented diet scored better on learning and memory tasks. In addition to celery, peppers and carrots are also good sources of luteolin.

 

Broccoli and cauliflower are also good sources of choline, one of the B vitamins known for a role in brain development. Choline intake during pregnancy “super-charged” the brain activity of animals in utero, indicating it may boost cognitive function, improve learning and memory, and may diminish age-related memory decline.36 Broccoli offers additional benefits as well, including the anti-inflammatory flavonoid kaempferol and three glucosinolate phytonutrients working together to support your body’s detoxification processes.37

 

Call for an appointment for your personalized healthcare plan.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr P Carrothers

Restorative and Preventative Medicine

312-972-9355

Healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Good Sleep is the Door to Good Health!

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS Telehealth

 

Good Sleep is the Door to Good Health!

sleepmercola

Sleep is one of the great mysteries of life. Like gravity or the quantum field, we still don’t understand exactly why we sleep—although we are learning more about it every day.

 

We do know, however, that good sleep is one of the cornerstones of health.

 

Six to eight hours per night seems to be the optimal amount of sleep for most adults, and too much or too little can have adverse effects on your health.

 

Sleep deprivation is such a chronic condition these days that you might not even realize you suffer from it. Science has now established that a sleep deficit can have serious, far reaching effects on your health.

 

For example, interrupted or impaired sleep can:

 

Dramatically weaken your immune system

Accelerate tumor growth—tumors grow two to three times faster in laboratory animals with severe sleep dysfunctions

Cause a pre-diabetic state, making you feel hungry even if you’ve already eaten, which can wreak havoc on your weight

Seriously impair your memory; even a single night of poor sleep—meaning sleeping only 4 to 6 hours—can impact your ability to think clearly the next day

Impair your performance on physical or mental tasks, and decrease your problem solving ability

When your circadian rhythms are disrupted, your body produces less melatonin (a hormone AND an antioxidant) and has less ability to fight cancer, since melatonin helps suppress free radicals that can lead to cancer. This is why tumors grow faster when you sleep poorly.

 

Impaired sleep can also increase stress-related disorders, including:

 

Heart disease

Stomach ulcers

Constipation

Mood disorders like depression

Diabetes

Auto-immune disorders

 

Sleep deprivation prematurely ages you by interfering with your growth hormone production, normally released by your pituitary gland during deep sleep (and during certain types of exercise, such as Peak Fitness Technique). Growth hormone helps you look and feel younger.

 

One study has even shown that people with chronic insomnia have a three times greater risk of dying from any cause. Lost sleep is lost forever, and persistent lack of sleep has a cumulative effect when it comes to disrupting your health. Poor sleep can make your life miserable, as most of you probably know.

 

The good news is, there are many natural techniques you can learn to restore your “sleep health.”

 

Whether you have difficulty falling asleep, waking up too often, or feeling inadequately rested when you wake up in the morning—or maybe you simply want to improve the quality of your sleep—you are bound to find some relief from my tips and tricks below.

 

Optimizing Your Sleep Sanctuary

  1. Sleep in complete darkness, or as close to it as possible. Even the tiniest bit of light in the room can disrupt your internal clock and your pineal gland’s production of melatonin and serotonin. Even the tiniest glow from your clock radio could be interfering with your sleep. This will help decrease your risk of cancer.

 

Close your bedroom door and get rid of night-lights. Refrain from turning on any light at all during the night, even when getting up to go to the bathroom. Cover up your clock radio. Cover your windows—I recommend using blackout shades or drapes.

 

All life evolved in response to predictable patterns of light and darkness, called circadian rhythms. Modern day electrical lighting has significantly betrayed your inner clock by disrupting your natural rhythms. Little bits of light pass directly through your optic nerve to your hypothalamus, which controls your biological clock. Light signals your brain that it’s time to wake up and starts preparing your body for ACTION.

 

  1. Keep the temperature in your bedroom no higher than 70 degrees F. Many people keep their homes and particularly their upstairs bedrooms too warm. Studies show that the optimal room temperature for sleep is quite cool, between 60 to 68 degrees. Keeping your room cooler or hotter can lead to restless sleep.

 

When you sleep, your body’s internal temperature drops to its lowest level, generally about four hours after you fall asleep. Scientists believe a cooler bedroom may therefore be most conducive to sleep, since it mimics your body’s natural temperature drop.

 

  1. Check your bedroom for electro-magnetic fields (EMFs). These can disrupt the pineal gland and the production of melatonin and serotonin and may have other negative effects as well. To do this, you need a gauss meter. You can find various models online, starting around $50 to $200. Some experts even recommend pulling your circuit breaker before bed to kill all power in your house.

 

  1. Move alarm clocks and other electrical devices away from your bed. If these devices must be used, keep them as far away from your bed as possible, preferably at least 3 feet. Remove the clock from view. It will only add to your worry when you stare at it all night… 2 a.m. …3 a.m. … 4:30 a.m.

 

  1. Avoid using loud alarm clocks. It is very stressful on your body to be suddenly jolted awake. If you are regularly getting enough sleep, an alarm may even be unnecessary. I gave up my alarm clock years ago and now use a sun alarm clock, an alarm that combines the features of a traditional alarm clock (digital display, AM/FM radio, beeper, snooze button, etc.) with a special built-in light that gradually increases in intensity, simulating sunrise.

 

  1. Reserve your bed for sleeping. If you are used to watching TV or doing work in bed, you may find it harder to relax and drift off to sleep, so avoid doing these activities in bed.

 

  1. Consider separate bedrooms. Recent studies suggest, for many people, sharing a bed with a partner (or pets) can significantly impair sleep, especially if the partner is a restless sleeper or snores. If bedfellows are consistently interfering with your sleep, you may want to consider a separate bedroom.

 

Preparing for Bed

  1. Get to bed as early as possible. Your body (particularly your adrenal system) does a majority of its recharging between the hours of 11 p.m. and 1 a.m. In addition, your gallbladder dumps toxins during this same period. If you are awake, the toxins back up into your liver, which can further disrupt your health. Prior to the widespread use of electricity, people would go to bed shortly after sundown, as most animals do, and which nature intended for humans as well.

 

  1. Don’t change your bedtime. You should go to bed and wake up at the same times each day, even on the weekends. This will help your body to get into a sleep rhythm and make it easier to fall asleep and get up in the morning.

 

  1. Establish a bedtime routine. This could include meditation, deep breathing, using aromatherapy or essential oils or indulging in a massage from your partner. The key is to find something that makes you feel relaxed, then repeat it each night to help you release the tensions of the day.

 

  1. Don’t drink any fluids within 2 hours of going to bed. This will reduce the likelihood of needing to get up and go to the bathroom, or at least minimize the frequency.

 

  1. Go to the bathroom right before bed. This will reduce the chances that you’ll wake up to go in the middle of the night.

 

  1. Eat a high-protein snack several hours before bed. This can provide the L-tryptophan needed for your melatonin and serotonin production.

 

  1. Also eat a small piece of fruit. This can help the tryptophan cross your blood-brain barrier.

 

  1. Avoid before-bed snacks, particularly grains and sugars. These will raise your blood sugar and delay sleep. Later, when blood sugar drops too low (hypoglycemia), you may wake up and be unable to fall back asleep.

 

  1. Take a hot bath, shower or sauna before bed. When your body temperature is raised in the late evening, it will fall at bedtime, facilitating slumber. The temperature drops from getting out of the bath signals your body it’s time for bed.

 

  1. Wear socks to bed. Feet often feel cold before the rest of the body because they have the poorest circulation. A study has shown that wearing socks to bed reduces night waking. As an alternative, you could place a hot water bottle near your feet at night.

 

  1. Wear an eye mask to block out light. As discussed earlier, it is very important to sleep in as close to complete darkness as possible. That said, it’s not always easy to block out every stream of light using curtains, blinds or drapes, particularly if you live in an urban area (or if your spouse has a different schedule than you do). In these cases, an eye mask can be helpful.

 

  1. Put your work away at least one hour before bed (preferably two hours or more). This will give your mind a chance to unwind so you can go to sleep feeling calm, not hyped up or anxious about tomorrow’s deadlines.

 

  1. No TV right before bed. Even better, get the TV out of the bedroom or even completely out of the house. It’s too stimulating to the brain, preventing you from falling asleep quickly. TV disrupts your pineal gland function.

 

  1. Listen to relaxation CDs. Some people find the sound of white noise or nature sounds, such as the ocean or forest, to be soothing for sleep. An excellent relaxation/meditation option to listen to before bed is the Insight audio CD.

 

Another favorite is the Sleep Harmony CD, which uses a combination of advanced vibrational technology and guided meditation to help you effortlessly fall into deep delta sleep within minutes. The CD works on the principle of “sleep wave entrainment” to assist your brain in gearing down for sleep.

 

  1. Read something spiritual or uplifting. This may help you relax. Don’t read anything stimulating, such as a mystery or suspense novel, which has the opposite effect. In addition, if you are really enjoying a suspenseful book, you might be tempted to go on reading for hours, instead of going to sleep!

 

  1. Journaling. If you often lay in bed with your mind racing, it might be helpful to keep a journal and write down your thoughts before bed. Personally, I have been doing this for 15 years, but prefer to do it in the morning when my brain is functioning at its peak and my cortisol levels are high.

 

Lifestyle Suggestions That Enhance Sleep

  1. Reduce or avoid as many drugs as possible. Many drugs, both prescription and over-the-counter, may adversely affect sleep. In most cases, the condition causing the drugs to be taken in the first place can be addressed by following guidelines elsewhere on my web site.

 

  1. Avoid caffeine. At least one study has shown that, in some people, caffeine is not metabolized efficiently, leaving you feeling its effects long after consumption. So, an afternoon cup of coffee or tea will keep some people from falling asleep at night. Be aware that some medications contain caffeine (for example, diet pills).

 

  1. Avoid alcohol. Although alcohol will make you drowsy, the effect is short lived and you will often wake up several hours later, unable to fall back asleep. Alcohol will also keep you from entering the deeper stages of sleep, where your body does most of its healing.

 

  1. Make certain you are exercising regularly. Exercising for at least 30 minutes per day can improve your sleep. However, don’t exercise too close to bedtime or it may keep you awake. Studies show exercising in the morning is the best if you can manage it.

 

  1. Lose excess weight. Being overweight can increase your risk of sleep apnea, which can seriously impair your sleep. Please refer to my nutrition plan for recommendations.

 

  1. Avoid foods you may be sensitive to. This is particularly true for sugar, grains, and pasteurized dairy. Sensitivity reactions can cause excess congestion, gastrointestinal upset, bloating and gas, and other problems.

 

  1. Have your adrenals checked by a good natural medicine clinician. Scientists have found that insomnia may be caused by adrenal stress.

 

  1. If you are menopausal or perimenopausal, get checked out by a good natural medicine physician. The hormonal changes at this time may cause sleep problems if not properly addressed.

 

If All Else Fails

  1. My current favorite fix for insomnia is Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT). Most people can learn the basics of this gentle tapping technique in a few minutes. EFT can help balance your body’s bioenergy system and resolve some of the emotional stresses that are contributing to your insomnia at a very deep level. The results are typically long lasting and improvement is remarkably rapid.

 

  1. Increase your melatonin. Ideally it is best to increase levels naturally with exposure to bright sunlight in the daytime (along with full spectrum fluorescent bulbs in the winter) and absolute complete darkness at night. If that isn’t possible, you may want to consider a melatonin supplement.

 

In scientific studies, melatonin has been shown to increase sleepiness, help you fall asleep more quickly and stay asleep, decrease restlessness, and reverse daytime fatigue. Melatonin is a completely natural substance, made by your body, and has many health benefits in addition to sleep.

 

As always Melatonin should not be used if you have a heart condition, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, fibromyalgia, any gastrointestinal inflammatory problems or pregnant.

 

Call your healthcare provider or give us a call for your personal healthcare needs.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr Gemma Carney

312-972-9355 (WELL)

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Lifestyle, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Home Blood Pressure Monitors Unreliable

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS Telehealth

 

Home Blood Pressure Monitors Unreliable

 

Why using a Sphygmomanometers with a stethoscope is the only correct way

 

 

Bill Murray’s rumored to have said: “Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. Fool me 350,000 times — you’re a weatherman.”

 

That’s a lack of accuracy we often joke about, but for some things, being that far off the mark is more disturbing.

 

According to a recent Canadian study from the University of Alberta, home blood pressure monitors are 100 percent accurate only about 30 percent of the time.

 

That’s not good, the researchers point out, because high blood pressure is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the world.

 

In the small but revealing study of 85 people with high blood pressure, researchers identified what causes the problems with the readings.

 

Occasionally, it’s a person’s inability to run the device properly. It also can be the one-size-fits-all design; the same cuff is used for both men and women, but in the study men’s readings were more accurate. Arm shape and size can make the difference. You have just learned that men should use a different at home machine than women.  People with larger arms, and people with smaller arms will not get accurate readings.   What about the machine that fits around your wrist.  This is the most inaccurate of all of them. ( Dr. Michael Rosen )

bpmachine

You will get a higher reading if you are reclined, one must be sitting up in a straight back chair.   Are your ankles or legs crossed?   Are you wearing steel toe boots?  The weight of the boot will cause for an inaccurate reading.

People with high blood pressure can NEVER take cold and cough medication, unless it states it is good for HBP.

 

Nonetheless, if you have high blood pressure, it’s important to keep track of how it’s doing.

 

So how can you check the accuracy of your device?

 

First, bring your at-home monitor with you to your next doctor’s visit and check it against the doc’s machine. If the person that is taking your blood pressure is not wearing a stethoscope to listen to your blood pressure, it will be inaccurate, I don’t care what they tell you!

bpmachinestethOnly a stethoscope can give an accurate reading.

Insist they use a manual blood pressure machine, and then they can tell what your pulse path is, whether you have an arrythmia and even A-fib.  There are many things they can detect using a stethoscope.  Insist that your doctor takes your blood pressure if need be.

 

Second, have your pharmacist instruct you in proper usage, and then try it out right there. Almost all pharmacies now have stations, or technicians, where you can check your blood pressure also, but remember they are not accurate either.  But if you use the same machine each time, you will be able to tell if YOUR blood pressure is going up or down.

Your blood pressure machine needs to be re-calibrated yearly also.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr. A Sulllivan D.O. FACO

312-972-9355 (WELL)

Healthaellnessassociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Lifestyle, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Sunscreen Lotions are Killing You and Your Family

Health and WEllness Associates

EHS Telehealth

 

Sunscreen Lotions are Killing You and Your Family

sunscreen

Compelling evidence: Slathering on toxic sunscreen and avoiding the sun could jeopardize your health and shorten your life

According to a June 2014 article featured in The Independent (UK), a major study conducted by researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden found that women who avoid sunbathing during the summer are twice as likely to die as those who sunbathe every day.

The epidemiological study followed 30,000 women for over 20 years and “showed that mortality was about double in women who avoided sun exposure compared to the highest exposure group.”

Researchers concluded that the conventional dogma, which advises avoiding the sun at all costs and slathering on sunscreen to minimize sun exposure, is doing more harm than actual good.

That’s because overall sun avoidance combined with wearing sunscreen effectively blocks the body’s ability to produce vitamin D3 from the sun’s UVB rays, which is by far the best form of vitamin D.

In the USA, vitamin D deficiency is at epidemic levels. Ironically, vitamin D deficiency can lead to aggressive forms of skin cancer. A ground-breaking 2011 study published in Cancer Prevention Research suggests that optimal blood levels of vitamin D offers protection against sunburn and skin cancer.

Additionally, vitamin D protects the body from diseases like multiple sclerosis, rickets (in the young), tuberculosis, inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjogren’s syndrome.

According to the Vitamin D Council, researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham recently reported that “lack of sun exposure may lead to cognitive decline over time.”

Please call us for using Vitamin D correctly for YOU.  Everyone of us is different than everyone else, and you need a personal healthcare approach to your healthcare,

A dissident dermatologist

Bernard Ackerman, MD, (deceased 2008) was one of the world’s foremost authorities on the subject of skin cancer and the sun, sunscreens and melanoma skin cancer risks.

Below are Ackerman’s views excerpted from an article in The New York Times (July 20, 2004), titled “I BEG TO DIFFER; A Dermatologist Who’s Not Afraid to Sit on the Beach”:

The link between melanoma and sun exposure (dermatology’s dogma) is unproven.There’s no conclusive evidence that sunburns lead to cancer.There is no real proof that sunscreens protect against melanoma.There’s no proof that increased exposure to the sun increases the risk of melanoma.

A 2000 Swedish study concluded that higher rates of melanoma occurred in those who used sunscreen versus those who did not.

Sunscreens: Cancer-Causing Biohazards

Elizabeth Plourde, PhD, is a California-based scientist who authored the book Sunscreens – Biohazard: Treat as Hazardous Waste, which extensively documents the serious life-threatening dangers of sunscreens not only to people but to the environment as well.

Dr. Plourde provides proof that malignant melanoma and all other skin cancers increased significantly with ubiquitous sunscreen use over a 30-year period. She emphasizes that many sunscreens contain chemicals that are known carcinogens and endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC).

Environmentally, she notes: “In areas where there has been much exposure to ED [endocrine disrupting] chemicals, coral and other sea populations have died off and the prevalence of dual-sexed fish has risen.”

Dr. Plourde’s research on mice and sunscreen exposure also showed increases in both pup and maternal mortality as well as reproductive issues in subsequent generations.  Meaning that the chemicals in sunscreens are damaging your DNA, and you are passing down this DNA break to your children.  Many children who use sunscreen are developing life threatening diseases, and life long medical problems by the age of 30.

Additionally, the book documents how sunscreen chemicals have polluted our water sources including oceans, rivers and municipal drinking water. Worse yet, testing revealed that 97% of Americans have sunscreen chemicals in their blood!

Please share with family and loved ones.  If you have concerns about your personal healthcare, please call us.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

Healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Lifestyle, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

How to Make Your Own Sunscreen

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS Telehealth

 

How To Make Your Own Sunscreen

Organic Lifestyle Magazine published an article exposing the ingredients commonly found in sunscreens, even going so far as to say that they have not found any ingredients in conventional sunscreens which they consider safe. Another of the dangers reported is that sunscreens give users a false sense of security by preventing sunburn – while actually doing little or nothing to prevent skin cancer or the accelerated aging of the skin caused by sunlight.

Sunburn usually occurs when the amount of UV rays exceeds the melanin’s ability to protect our skin. It is often characterized by symptoms like tender and red skin as well as blisters. The affected skin areas usually begin to peel a couple of days later. In severe cases, patients may suffer from nausea, chill, fever and rash. Constant exposure to the sun can cause skin damage which ranges from sunburn to cancer. Further research reveals that it may trigger the occurrence of many premature aging symptoms which include wrinkles and leathery appearance of the skin.

Did you know that some pure, natural ingredients have a natural SPF (sun protection factor) of up to 30? It’s true. These natural substances include raspberry seed oil, shea butter, carrot seed oil, wheat germ oil, peanut oil, avocado oil, soybean oil, coconut oil, sesame oil and hemp.

We have discovered an amazing homemade sunscreen recipe that is made using natural ingredients which are known for their SPF properties.

Note that the formula also uses zinc oxide – typically not a natural ingredient. Zinc oxide does occur naturally as the mineral zincite but most of the zinc oxide used in products is produced synthetically. [3] The formula avoids all the other chemicals often found in sunscreens. If you are opposed to the use of zinc oxide (somewhat controversial), you can simply omit it from the recipe but be aware that your safe time of exposure will be reduced.

Ingredients that Naturally Protect Us from the Sun

There are natural ingredients, some may be found in our kitchens, that work to protect us from over exposure to the sun. Many are oils that contain SPF properties such as:

  • Raspberry Seed Oil. The highest of all natural ingredients, contains an estimated SPF of 30-50.
  • Shea Butter. An excellent skin protectant with an SPF of approximately 6-10.
  • Carrot Seed Oil. Carrot seed oil is an essential oil and has been estimated to contain SPF levels of 30.
  • Wheat Germ Oil. While super nourishing for the skin, it too possesses a natural SPF of 20.
  • Sesame oil, Coconut Oil, Hemp oil, Avocado oil, Soybean, and Peanut Oil. All contain SPF levels between 4-10.

However, none of these ingredients are necessarily adequate on their own to provide us protection for an all day experience…say, out on the lake.

In order to make your own sunscreen you really should add the natural mineral zinc oxide (and possibly titanium oxide) to your recipe. This will give you real power to reflect the sun’s ray, with minimal negative effects.

 

Ingredients that Naturally Protect Us from the Sun

There are natural ingredients, some may be found in our kitchens, that work to protect us from over exposure to the sun. Many are oils that contain SPF properties such as:

  • Raspberry Seed Oil. The highest of all natural ingredients, contains an estimated SPF of 30-50.
  • Shea Butter. An excellent skin protectant with an SPF of approximately 6-10.
  • Carrot Seed Oil. Carrot seed oil is an essential oil and has been estimated to contain SPF levels of 30.
  • Wheat Germ Oil. While super nourishing for the skin, it too possesses a natural SPF of 20.
  • Sesame oil, Coconut Oil, Hemp oil, Avocado oil, Soybean, and Peanut Oil. All contain SPF levels between 4-10.

However, none of these ingredients are necessarily adequate on their own to provide us protection for an all day experience…say, out on the lake.

In order to make your own sunscreen you really should add the natural mineral zinc oxide (and possibly titanium oxide) to your recipe. This will give you real power to reflect the sun’s ray, with minimal negative effects.

Method

The Recipe

Ingredients
Customize this recipe based on your budget and what you have available.

-1 ounce oil blend (use any combination of the oils listed above)
-1 ounce beeswax (adds waterproof properties)
-1 ounce butter blend (i.e. Shea butter, mango butter, or cocoa butter)
-1 teaspoon vitamin E oil
-0.36 ounces zinc oxide powder
-30 drops essential oils, optional

1. Gather ingredients and kitchen tools. Note: Many of the oils listed above can be found in the grocery store or health food store.

2. In a double boiler, over low heat, melt the oils, beeswax, and butters.

3. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly prior to adding the vitamin E oil, zinc oxide powder, and essential oils. Note: Wear a mask when working with zinc oxide. Although it has not been proven harmful when used topically, inhaling the substance can be dangerous.

4. Stir until zinc oxide is dissolved.

5. Pour into a push-up or roll-up dispenser. This recipe will produce a product similar to a lotion bar or sunscreen stick. You could easily clean out and re-purpose a used deodorant or lip balm container.

6. Allow to cool and harden on the counter overnight and then you’re good to go! During times of heavy sun and swim exposure be sure to reapply often for the best coverage.

""
""

Ingredients for Recipe Two

1/3 cup coconut oil

1/4 cup sweet almond oil

  • 2 TB shea butter
  • 1/4 cup beeswax pellets
  • 4 TB zinc powder non-nano
  • 20-25 drops carrot seed essential oil

Instructions

  1. On the stove-top, add 1 cup of water to a small saucepan. Place a heat-resistant glass bowl on top of the saucepan. Bring the water in the saucepan to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. This creates a homemade double broiler to keep ingredients from over-heating.
  2. In the glass bowl add: coconut oil, shea butter, and beeswax. Melt the ingredients, stirring frequently.
  3. Remove the bowl from the heat, add to the coconut oil mixture: almond oil, carrot seed oil, and zinc powder. Stir.
  4. Once removed from the heat the beeswax will begin to set

The sunscreen will solidify after about five minutes. The final result will be a spreadable lotion

 

 

-Beneficial, sun protecting essential oils include lavender, myrrh, carrot seed oil, and peppermint.

Along with homemade sunscreen I also include foods in our summer diet which aid in sun protection, such as: dark leafy greens, berries, carrots, egg yolks, tomatoes, and sweet potatoes.

 

Don’t shun the sun completely! Our fear of the sun has precipitated a societal vitamin D deficiency that is unfortunately taking us by storm — potentially producing an increase rate of cancers, autism, asthma, heart disease, and mental illness, just to name a few.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archivned

Dr Gail Gray DPH

312-972-9355 ( Well)

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/