Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Amlodipine or Norvasc

Amlodipine or Norvasc

 

Amlodipine is used alone or together with other medicines to treat angina (chest pain) and high blood pressure (hypertension). High blood pressure adds to the workload of the heart and arteries. If it continues for a long time, the heart and arteries may not function properly. This can damage the blood vessels of the brain, heart, and kidneys, resulting in a stroke, heart failure, or kidney failure. High blood pressure may also increase the risk of heart attacks. These problems may be less likely to occur if blood pressure is controlled.

Amlodipine is a calcium channel blocker. It affects the movement of calcium into the cells of the heart and blood vessels. As a result, amlodipine relaxes blood vessels and increases the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart while reducing its workload.

This medicine is available only with your doctor’s prescription.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Atazanavir
  • Ceritinib
  • Clarithromycin
  • Clopidogrel
  • Conivaptan
  • Cyclosporine
  • Dantrolene
  • Digoxin
  • Domperidone
  • Droperidol
  • Fosnetupitant
  • Lacosamide
  • Netupitant
  • Piperaquine
  • Rifampin
  • Ritonavir
  • Simvastatin
  • Tacrolimus
  • Tegafur
  • Telaprevir

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Indinavir

 

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Angina (chest pain) or
  • Heart attack, acute or
  • Heart or blood vessel disease (e.g., coronary artery disease) or
  • Hypotension (low blood pressure)—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Heart disease or other heart problems (e.g., aortic stenosis)—Use with caution. The blood pressure-lowering effects of this medicine may be increased.
  • Liver disease—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Proper Use

 

Take this medicine exactly as directed even if you feel well and do not notice any chest pain. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered. Do not miss any doses.

For patients taking this medicine for high blood pressure:

  • In addition to the use of the medicine, treatment for your high blood pressure may include weight control and a change in the types of food you eat, especially foods high in sodium (salt). Your doctor will tell you which of these are most important for you. You should check with your doctor before changing your diet.
  • Many patients who have high blood pressure will not notice any signs of the problem. In fact, many may feel normal. It is very important that you take your medicine exactly as directed and that you keep your appointments with your doctor even if you feel well.
  • Remember that this medicine will not cure your high blood pressure but it does help control it. Therefore, you must continue to take it as directed if you expect to lower your blood pressure and keep it down. You may have to take high blood pressure medicine for the rest of your life . If high blood pressure is not treated, it can cause serious problems such as heart failure, blood vessel disease, stroke, or kidney disease.

You may take this medicine with or without food.

Take this medicine at the same time each day.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For angina (chest pain):
      • Adults—5 to 10 milligrams (mg) once a day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For high blood pressure:
      • Adults—At first, 2.5 to 5 milligrams (mg) once a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 10 mg once a day.
      • Children 6 to 17 years of age—2.5 to 5 mg once a day.
      • Children younger than 6 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Do not take this medicine if it has been more than 12 hours since you missed your last dose.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Precautions

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting may also occur if you exercise or if the weather is hot. Heavy sweating can cause loss of too much water and result in low blood pressure. Use extra care during exercise or hot weather.

If you have been using this medicine regularly for several weeks, do not suddenly stop using it. Stopping suddenly may cause your chest pain or high blood pressure to come back or get worse. Check with your doctor for the best way to reduce gradually the amount you are taking before stopping completely.

Chest pain resulting from exercise or physical exertion is usually reduced or prevented by this medicine. This may tempt you to be too active. Make sure you discuss with your doctor a safe amount of exercise for your medical problem.

After taking a dose of this medicine you may get a headache that lasts for a short time. This should become less noticeable after you have taken this medicine for a while. If this effect continues, or if the headaches are severe, check with your doctor.

In some patients, tenderness, swelling, or bleeding of the gums may appear soon after treatment with this medicine is started. Brushing and flossing your teeth carefully and regularly and massaging your gums may help prevent this. See your dentist regularly to have your teeth cleaned. Check with your doctor or dentist if you have any questions about how to take care of your teeth and gums, or if you notice any tenderness, swelling, or bleeding of your gums.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes over-the-counter (nonprescription) medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems, since they may increase your blood pressure.

Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common

  1. Swelling of the ankles or feet

Less common

  1. Difficult or labored breathing
  2. dizziness
  3. fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse
  4. feeling of warmth
  5. redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest
  6. shortness of breath
  7. tightness in the chest
  8. wheezing

Rare

  1. Black, tarry stools
  2. bleeding gums
  3. blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
  4. blood in the urine or stools
  5. blurred vision
  6. burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, “pins and needles”, or tingling feelings
  7. chest pain or discomfort
  8. chills
  9. cold and clammy skin
  10. cold sweats
  11. confusion
  12. dark yellow urine
  13. cough
  14. diarrhea
  15. dilated neck veins
  16. dizziness or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position
  17. extra heartbeats
  18. extreme fatigue
  19. fainting
  20. fever
  21. itching of the skin
  22. joint or muscle pain
  23. large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs
  24. numbness and tingling of the face, fingers, or toes
  25. pain in the arms, legs, or lower back, especially pain in the calves or heels upon exertion
  26. painful or difficult urination
  27. pale, bluish-colored, or cold hands or feet
  28. pinpoint red or purple spots on the skin
  29. red, irritated eyes
  30. redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest
  31. redness, soreness or itching skin
  32. shakiness in the legs, arms, hands, or feet
  33. slow or irregular heartbeat
  34. sore throat
  35. sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth
  36. sores, welting, or blisters
  37. sudden sweating
  38. sweating
  39. swelling of the face, fingers, feet, or lower legs
  40. swollen glands
  41. trembling or shaking of the hands or feet
  42. unsteadiness or awkwardness
  43. unusual bleeding or bruising
  44. unusual tiredness or weakness
  45. weak or absent pulses in the legs
  46. weakness in the arms, hands, legs, or feet
  47. weight gain
  48. yellow eyes or skin

Incidence not known

  1. Abdominal or stomach pain
  2. clay-colored stools
  3. diarrhea
  4. headache
  5. loss of appetite
  6. nausea
  7. rash
  8. unpleasant breath odor
  9. vomiting of blood
  10. yellow eyes or skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common

  1. Acid or sour stomach
  2. belching
  3. heartburn
  4. indigestion
  5. lack or loss of strength
  6. muscle cramps
  7. sleepiness or unusual drowsiness
  8. stomach discomfort, upset, or pain

Rare

  1. Abnormal dreams
  2. anxiety
  3. back pain
  4. bad unusual or unpleasant (after) taste
  5. bleeding gums
  6. blistering, crusting, irritation, itching, or reddening of the skin
  7. bloating
  8. bloody nose
  9. burning feeling in the chest or stomach
  10. burning while urinating
  11. burning, dry, or itching eyes
  12. change in color of the treated skin
  13. change in sense of smell
  14. change in taste
  15. changes in vision
  16. constipation
  17. continuing ringing or buzzing or other unexplained noise in the ears
  18. cracked, dry, or scaly skin
  19. decreased sexual performance or desire
  20. depression
  21. difficulty with moving
  22. difficulty with swallowing
  23. discharge, excessive tearing
  24. double vision
  25. dry mouth
  26. dryness of the skin
  27. excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines
  28. excessive muscle tone
  29. eye pain
  30. feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings
  31. feeling of unreality
  32. feeling unusually cold
  33. flushed, dry skin
  34. fruit-like breath odor
  35. full feeling
  36. general feeling of discomfort or illness
  37. hair loss or thinning of the hair
  38. headache, severe and throbbing
  39. hearing loss
  40. hyperventilation
  41. increased appetite
  42. increased hunger
  43. increased sweating
  44. increased thirst
  45. increased urge to urinate during the night
  46. increased urination
  47. irritability
  48. irritation in the mouth
  49. lack of feeling or emotion
  50. loose stools
  51. loss of memory
  52. muscle pains or stiffness
  53. muscle tension or tightness
  54. muscle weakness
  55. nervousness
  56. pain
  57. pains in the stomach, side, or abdomen, possibly radiating to the back
  58. passing gas
  59. problems with memory
  60. redness and swelling of the gums
  61. redness, pain, or swelling of the eye, eyelid, or inner lining of the eyelid
  62. restlessness
  63. runny nose
  64. seeing double
  65. sensation of spinning
  66. sense of detachment from self or body
  67. shakiness and unsteady walk
  68. shivering
  69. sleeplessness
  70. sneezing
  71. stuffy nose
  72. sweating
  73. swollen joints
  74. tenderness in the stomach area
  75. thirst
  76. trouble in holding or releasing urine
  77. trouble sleeping
  78. twitching
  79. unable to sleep
  80. uncaring
  81. unexplained weight loss
  82. unsteadiness, trembling, or other problems with muscle control or coordination
  83. waking to urinate at night
  84. weight loss

Incidence not known

  1. Swelling of the breasts or breast soreness in both females and males

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

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Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Are You Taking Buspirone : Buspar or Vanspar

Buspirone (Oral Route)

 

Mayo Clinic: Opioid Prescribing Has Not Changed — Pain News Network

US Brand Name

  1. Buspar
  2. Buspar Dividose
  3. Vanspar

Descriptions

 

Buspirone is used to treat certain anxiety disorders or to relieve the symptoms of anxiety. However, buspirone usually is not used for anxiety or tension caused by the stress of everyday life.

It is not known exactly how buspirone works to relieve the symptoms of anxiety. Buspirone is thought to work by decreasing the amount and actions of a chemical known as serotonin in certain parts of the brain.

This medicine is available only with your doctor’s prescription.

 

Before Using

The Following Information was prepared by the Mayo Clinic, Rochester MN.

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

IBS, Celiac Disease, Hodgkins Lymphoma, Crohns Disease, Gastric ByPass Patients, and other digested conditions, taking it in tablet form my increase your symptoms.

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of buspirone have not been performed in the pediatric population. However, no pediatric-specific problems have been documented to date.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of buspirone in the elderly.

Pregnancy

Information about this buspirone-oral-route
Pregnancy Category Explanation
All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus.

Breastfeeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Do not eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice, orange juice, tomato juice, or other heavily citric juices while you are taking this medicine.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Isocarboxazid
  • Linezolid
  • Phenelzine
  • Tranylcypromine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Alfentanil
  • Almotriptan
  • Amitriptyline
  • Amoxapine
  • Amphetamine
  • Benzhydrocodone
  • Benzphetamine
  • Bromazepam
  • Bromopride
  • Buprenorphine
  • Butorphanol
  • Carbinoxamine
  • Ceritinib
  • Clorgyline
  • Clozapine
  • Cobicistat
  • Codeine
  • Conivaptan
  • Desvenlafaxine
  • Dextroamphetamine
  • Dihydrocodeine
  • Dolasetron
  • Doxylamine
  • Duvelisib
  • Escitalopram
  • Esketamine
  • Fentanyl
  • Flibanserin
  • Fosnetupitant
  • Granisetron
  • Hydrocodone
  • Hydromorphone
  • Hydroxytryptophan
  • Idelalisib
  • Iproniazid
  • Ivosidenib
  • Larotrectinib
  • Levomilnacipran
  • Levorphanol
  • Lisdexamfetamine
  • Lithium
  • Lofexidine
  • Lorcaserin
  • Lorlatinib
  • Loxapine
  • Lumacaftor
  • Meclizine
  • Meperidine
  • Metaxalone
  • Methadone
  • Methamphetamine
  • Methylene Blue
  • Metoclopramide
  • Midazolam
  • Mirtazapine
  • Moclobemide
  • Morphine
  • Morphine Sulfate Liposome
  • Nalbuphine
  • Netupitant
  • Nialamide
  • Oxycodone
  • Oxymorphone
  • Palonosetron
  • Pargyline
  • Pentazocine
  • Periciazine
  • Procarbazine
  • Remifentanil
  • Scopolamine
  • Selegiline
  • Sertraline
  • Sodium Oxybate
  • Sufentanil
  • Tapentadol
  • Toloxatone
  • Tramadol
  • Trazodone
  • Vilazodone
  • Vortioxetine
  • Ziprasidone
  • Zolpidem

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Diltiazem
  • Erythromycin
  • Fluoxetine
  • Ginkgo
  • Haloperidol
  • Itraconazole
  • Nefazodone
  • Rifampin
  • St John’s Wort
  • Verapamil

Other Interactions

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following may cause an increased risk of certain side effects but may be unavoidable in some cases. If used together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use this medicine, or give you special instructions about the use of food, alcohol, or tobacco.

  • Grapefruit Juice

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Kidney disease or
  • Liver disease—Effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

Take buspirone only as directed by your doctor. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered. To do so may increase the chance of unwanted effects.

This medicine comes with a patient information insert. Read and follow the instructions in the insert carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions.

You may take this medicine with or without food, but take it the same way each time.

Do not eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice, orange juice, tomato juice, or other heavily citric juices while you are taking this medicine.

After you begin taking buspirone, 1 to 2 weeks may pass before you begin to feel the effects of this medicine.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For anxiety:
      • Adults—At first, 7.5 mg two times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 60 mg a day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.   ( We always recommend calling the local Veterinarian Office to see if he can use it)

 

Precautions

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

If you will be using buspirone regularly for a long time, your doctor should check your progress at regular visits to make sure the medicine is working properly and does not cause unwanted effects.

Do not take buspirone if you are also taking a drug with monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor activity (e.g., isocarboxazid [Marplan®], phenelzine [Nardil®], selegiline [Eldepryl®], or tranylcypromine [Parnate®]). If you do, you may develop extremely high blood pressure.

This medicine will add to the effects of alcohol, ( so no alcohol ) and other CNS depressants (medicines that make you drowsy or less alert). Some examples of CNS depressants are antihistamines or medicine for hay fever, other allergies, or colds; sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicine; prescription pain medicine or narcotics; barbiturates; medicine for seizures; muscle relaxants; or anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics. Check with your medical doctor or dentist before taking any of the above while you are taking this medicine.

Buspirone may cause some people to become dizzy, lightheaded, drowsy, or less alert than they are normally. Make sure you know how you react to this medicine before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are dizzy or are not alert.

Avoid drinking alcoholic beverages while you are using this medicine.

Do not suddenly stop taking this medicine without checking first with your doctor. Your doctor may want you to gradually reduce the amount you are taking before stopping it completely. This is to decrease the chance of having withdrawal symptoms such as increased anxiety; burning or tingling feelings; confusion; dizziness; headache; irritability; nausea; nervousness; muscle cramps; sweating; trouble with sleeping; or unusual tiredness or weakness.

If you think you or someone else may have taken an overdose of buspirone, get emergency help at once. Symptoms of an overdose are dizziness or light headedness; severe drowsiness or loss of consciousness; stomach upset, including nausea or vomiting; or very small pupils of the eyes.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Side Effects

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Rare

  1. Chest pain
  2. confusion
  3. fast or pounding heartbeat
  4. fever
  5. incoordination
  6. mental depression
  7. muscle weakness
  8. numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness in the hands or feet
  9. skin rash or hives
  10. sore throat
  11. stiffness of the arms or legs
  12. uncontrolled movements of the body

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur:

Symptoms of overdose

  1. Dizziness or light headedness especially when getting up from a sitting or lying position suddenly
  2. drowsiness (severe)
  3. loss of consciousness
  4. nausea or vomiting
  5. stomach upset
  6. very small pupils of the eyes

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

  1. Restlessness, nervousness, or unusual excitement

Less common or rare

  1. Blurred vision
  2. clamminess or sweating
  3. decreased concentration
  4. diarrhea
  5. drowsiness
  6. dryness of the mouth
  7. muscle pain, spasms, cramps, or stiffness
  8. ringing in the ears
  9. trouble with sleeping, nightmares, or vivid dreams
  10. unusual tiredness or weakness

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

 

 

People Start to Heal, The Moment They Feel They are Heard

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Nexium, Prilosec and Prevacid : The Heartburn Meds That Are Bad For You

Smoking Gun for Stomach Drugs

 

Dangers of Proton Pump Inhibitors

 

Acid-Suppressing Medicine Can Deplete the Body of Needed Magnesium - The People's Pharmacy® #Lansoprazole #Magnesium #PPI #Prilosec #acidsuppressingdrugs #Prevacid #lansoprazoleomeprazole #heartburn #MedicationSideEffects #DrugSideEffectsProton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most widely used medications in the U.S. This class of drug is used to treat chronic heartburn. Although the pain often happens in the lower to mid chest area, it is not related to heart disease or a heart attack.

Instead, heartburn pain happens when acid refluxes up your esophagus, burning the tissue. The fluid in your stomach is highly acidic, necessary for digestion of your food, protection against bacteria and absorption of many nutrients.

A variety of different reasons can cause this acidic fluid to pass the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and burn your esophagus, but most cases of heartburn are due either to a hiatal hernia or Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection.

Occasional heartburn is best treated with simple lifestyle changes, such as drinking a bit of apple cider vinegar in water right before or after your meals. Unfortunately, when you experience chronic pain over many weeks, your physician may prescribe a daily medication. PPIs are one class of those medications.

The top selling PPIs include Nexium, Prilosec and Prevacid, all available both as a prescription and over-the-counter (OTC). However, your doctor’s orders may actually do more harm than good in this instance, as these drugs tend to make your situation worse rather than better.

Smoking Gun Points to PPIs

Important information if you are taking medications. Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec LawsuitYour cells use a proton pump to produce acid. PPI medications are designed to inhibit the proton pump and reduce the amount of acid produced. PPIs do not specifically target the cells in your stomach, and stomach acid is usually not the primary trigger behind chronic heartburn.

This class of drug is not specific, and instead will inhibit any cell with a proton pump producing acid, whether those cells are in your stomach or not. Researchers from Stanford University and Houston Methodist Hospital in Texas believe this is the smoking gun behind the variety of dangerous side effects linked to PPIs.1

The production of acid in your cells is associated with a specific cleanup process. The cells use acid to clean out end products and garbage from metabolism and cell function. When the acid is not present, there is a buildup of these toxins in the cells, which may lead to the development of a variety of significant health conditions.2

Excess stomach acid is not often the cause for your heartburn. Quite the opposite is true. Low amounts of stomach acid and the subsequent overgrowth of bacteria changes the digestion of carbohydrates, producing gas. The gas increases the pressure on the LES, releasing acid into the esophagus, creating heartburn.

While you may experience speedy relief of heartburn from immediate acting acid neutralizing medications such as TUMS, long-acting medications such as PPIs may increase your risk of heartburn over time.3

When Acid Levels Change, It Damages Your Body’s Ability to Function Properly

Proton pump inhibiting antacids such as omeprazole, lansoprazole, nexium and others can cause Alzheimer's... is the risk worth it?

 

When PPIs were first approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), they were designed to be taken for no more than six weeks. However, today it is not uncommon to find people who have been taking these drugs for more than 10 years.4 Long-term use has been associated with a number of different problems, including:

Bacterial Overgrowth

Long-term use of PPIs encourages overgrowth of bacteria in your digestive tract.5 Bacterial overgrowth leads to malabsorption of nutrients and has been linked to inflammation of the stomach wall.6

Reduced Absorption of Nutrients

One of the most common causes of impaired function of digestion and the absorption of nutrients is the reduction of stomach acid production.

This occurs in both the elderly and individuals on long-term antacid treatments, such as PPIs.7Acid breaks down proteins, activates hormones and enzymes and protects your gut against overgrowth of bacteria.

Lack of acid results in iron and mineral deficiencies and incomplete digestion of proteins. This may also lead to a vitamin B12 deficiency.8 PPIs are also linked to a reduced absorption of magnesium. Low magnesium levels may lead to muscle spasms, heart palpitations and convulsions.9

Low Stomach Acid

PPIs reduce the amount of stomach acid. Symptoms include heartburn, indigestion, bloating, diarrhea, burping, burning and flatulence.10

Decreased Resistance to Infection

Your mouth, esophagus and intestines are home to a healthy growth of bacteria, but your stomach is relatively sterile. Stomach acid kills most of the bacteria coming from your food or liquids, protecting your stomach and your intestinal tract from abnormal bacterial growth.11

At the same time, the acid prevents the bacteria growing in your intestines from moving into your stomach or esophagus.

Reducing stomach acid changes the pH of your stomach and allows external bacteria to grow. PPIs may reduce acid between 90 and 95 percent, increasing your risk of salmonella, c. difficile, giardia and listeria infections.12,13

Other studies have linked the use of acid-reducing drugs to the development of pneumonia, tuberculosis (TB) and typhoid.14,15,16

The distortion of the gut microbiome affects your immune system and may increase your overall risk of infection. In vitro studies, those done on cells in test tubes, have found PPIs damage the function of white blood cells, responsible for fighting infection.17

Increased Risk of Bone Fractures

Lowering stomach acid production may also reduce the amount of calcium absorption, which in turn may lead to osteoporosis.

Researchers have linked long-term, dose-dependent use of PPIs with increased risk of hip fracture. The longer you take the medication and the more you take, the higher your risk of fracture.18

Antacids and Aspirin

In addition to the side effects listed above, researchers are discovering other health conditions associated with the use of PPIs and other acid reducing drugs.

Even while on PPI medication, you may experience occasional heartburn. Immediate acting antacids used to neutralize the acid in your esophagus may offer relief. Just be aware that this is really only adding insult to injury.

What’s worse, some antacids also contain aspirin, which may heighten your risk of adverse effects. In 2009, the FDA issued a warning about severe bleeding associated with the use of aspirin.

Since that time, the FDA has recorded eight cases of severe bleeding resulting from using over-the-counter antacids to neutralize heartburn.19 In some of those cases, the individual required a blood transfusion to stabilize their condition.

In a statement, Dr. Karen Murry Mahoney, deputy director of the division of nonprescription drug products, said:

“Take a close look at the Drug Facts label, and if the product has aspirin, consider choosing something else for your stomach symptoms.

Unless people read the Drug Facts label when they’re looking for stomach symptom relief, they might not even think about the possibility that a stomach medicine could contain aspirin.”20

What Barrett’s Esophagus Means to You

Long-term gastric reflux and heartburn may lead to Barrett’s Esophagus. This is a change in the cellular structure of the lining of your esophagus in response to chronic exposure to acid. Risk factors for Barrett’s Esophagus include:

Males Older age Tobacco use
Obesity Alcohol use Caucasian or African-American

The risk of developing cancer of the esophagus is significantly higher when you have Barrett’s Esophagus. In past years, the more common form of skin cancer has been squamous cell carcinoma. However, researchers have now discovered if you have taken PPIs for an extended period of time and have developed Barrett’s Esophagus, you have an increased risk of a more aggressive form called adenocarcinoma.

As recently as 1975, 75 percent of the esophageal cancers diagnosed were squamous cell carcinomas. More amenable to treatment and less aggressive then adenocarcinoma, the numbers have radically shifted in the past 30 years.21 The rate of squamous cell carcinoma has declined slightly, but the number of diagnosed adenocarcinoma of the esophagus has risen dramatically.

In 1975, 4 people per million were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, and in 2001 it rose to 23 people per million, making it the fastest growing cancer in the U.S. according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI).22

Adenocarcinoma is now diagnosed in 80 percent of all esophageal cancers.23 Researchers theorized PPIs would protect people with Barrett’s Esophagus from adenocarcinoma, but found the reverse to be true. Not only did PPIs not protect the esophagus, but instead there was a dramatic increase in the risk of this deadly cancer, discovered in two separate studies.24,25

PPIs May Raise Your Risk for Dementia, Kidney Disease and Heart Attacks

PPIs affect all cells in your body, which may explain why they have been linked to such deadly conditions as kidney disease, heart attacks and dementia. In the past, PPIs were linked to acute interstitial nephritis, an inflammatory process in the kidneys. In a recent study of over 10,000 participants, researchers found another link to chronic kidney disease.26

The team found that those using PPIs to treat heartburn were more likely than other individuals on different heartburn medications to suffer chronic kidney disease or kidney failure over a five-year period.

Dr. Ziyad Al-Aly, one of the researchers and a kidney specialist with the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System, said the findings illuminated a significant point: “I think people see these medications at the drug store and assume they’re completely safe. But there’s growing evidence they’re not as safe as we’ve thought.

PPIs have also been linked to dementia in people over age 75. In a study evaluating over 73,000 people over age 75 without any signs of dementia at the outset of the study, researchers made a startling connection. Of the individuals who developed dementia in the following seven years, those who regularly used PPIs had a significantly higher risk of the condition.

A large data-mining study performed by researchers from Stanford University discovered PPIs were also associated with an increased risk of heart attack, while other long-term heartburn medications were not.

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Do You need to be taking Magnesium?

     Do You need to be taking Magnesium

 

mag

  • Magnesium is required for the healthy function of most cells, especially your heart, kidneys and muscles
  • Low magnesium is a powerful predictor of heart disease, and recent research shows even subclinical magnesium deficiency can compromise your cardiovascular health
  • Low magnesium will impede your cellular metabolic function and deteriorate mitochondrial function, and is a component necessary for the activation of vitamin D
  • Top reasons to optimize your magnesium level include optimization and regulation of vitamin D, preventing migraines and depression, improving brain plasticity and protecting your heart health
  • Magnesium is also important for the prevention of kidney and liver damage, bacterial and fungal infections, impotence, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, premenstrual syndrome, osteoporosis, muscle cramps, Type 2 diabetes and mortality from all causes

 

You are definitely deficient in Magnesium if  :

 

You suffer from Migraines

You take Vitamin D

Do You have Crohns, Celiac or any digestive inflammation?

Are you depressed, on anti-depressants, or just SAD?

Have burst of anger, aggression, or you snap?

Memory?

Cardiac Issues, including High or Low Blood Pressure

Stroke

Diabetes

 

Ask your healthcare worker how much is the correct dosage for your body and your concerns.  If they dont give you an exact amount, they do not know what they are doing.

Contact us if you need assistance;

Health and Wellness Associates

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

 

Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Metallic Taste in Your Mouth?

Metallic Taste in Your Mouth?

 

I’ve heard that a metal taste in the mouth means something about health, but I can’t remember what it was. Can you help?

Metallic Taste in Your Mouth? | Metal Taste | Andrew Weil, M.D.

A metallic taste in the mouth is a common complaint and can be due to a variety of causes – from medication you may be taking to dental problems. In the absence of other symptoms, it is unlikely that a metallic taste in your mouth indicates serious disease. But if you haven’t had a thorough general checkup recently, I would suggest seeing your doctor to rule out any health problems such as issues with your liver and kidneys, hyperparathyroidism, or undiagnosed diabetes.

 

You also might consider visiting your dentist, because the funny metallic taste in your mouth could be a symptom of gum disease. Even if you don’t have gum problems, poor oral hygiene can affect taste. Be sure to brush your teeth carefully at least twice a day and use a tongue scraper to remove the bacteria and debris that can collect on your tongue. Dental work done in the past can break down and alter taste, so your dentist will probably look at that as well.

Not drinking enough water can also contribute to problems with this strange taste in your mouth. Increase your intake and see if it helps. While you don’t necessarily have to drink the standard recommendation of eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day, my rule of thumb is to drink as much of that amount as you can comfortably consume and more than you think you need.

Among the drugs that can cause a metallic or coppery taste in your mouth are antibiotics like Biaxin (clarithromycin); Flagyl (metronidazole) , used to treat a wide variety of infections; drugs used to treat an overactive thyroid; captopril, used to treat high blood pressure ; griseofulvin, used to treat skin infections; lithium, used in bipolar disorder; penicillamine, used for rheumatoid arthritis or to prevent kidney stones; and some drugs used in cancer treatment.

Ayurvedic supplements from India have been found to exceed acceptable amounts of metal such as mercury, lead, or arsenic and I would be cautious about purchasing them online. Multivitamins containing copper, zinc, or chromium, as well as iron or calcium supplements might cause a temporary taste of metal, but typically subside as it’s being processed by your digestive system. This taste can be symptomatic of a vitamin D overdose , but with most of the population being vitamin D deficient and extremely high dosages (over 10,000 IUs) required, I doubt this is of any great concern. A metal taste is actually more commonly associated with a deficiency of vitamin B12, D, or zinc.

While a metallic taste can be a symptom of acute metal poisoning, it’s rare since our bodies are quite efficient at sequestering and neutralizing the contaminants that it’s not able to expel through the skin, liver, and kidneys. Heavy metal poisoning such as having too much lead or copper in the body due to conditions such as Wilson’s Disease, being around fungicides containing copper sulfate, or contaminated drinking water require intervention such as chelation therapy, so consider possible exposures when speaking with your physician.

Metal on metal (MoM) hip replacements have been known to cause metal poisoning. If you have had a MoM hip replacement and you develop symptoms of metallic taste in your mouth I recommend you see your primary or orthopedic physician.

A taste disorder called dysgeusia could potentially be at the root of phantom flavors as well. When taste cells are stimulated, messages are sent through three specialized nerves to the brain to identify.

Sometimes these wires get crossed in cases of dementia, head injury, or as the result of radiation therapy. Pregnancy hormones can also cause temporary bouts of dysgeusia, especially in the first trimester. Eating citrus fruits or vinegar-marinated foods will help counteract the taste and activate salivation to dilute the unsavory taste of metal. With such a strong tie between the sense of smell and taste, respiratory infections such as sinusitis can also throw your taste buds for a loop and give you the false perception of a metallic taste.

If you rule out all of these possible causes, have been medically evaluated, and still have the metallic taste in your mouth, it might be worthwhile to consult with a practitioner of Chinese medicine. That system might have an answer for you.

Health and Wellness Associates

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Vitamin D! Symptoms and more!

vitmaninDVitamin D is an essential fat-soluble vitamin that your body needs to regulate calcium absorption. Deficiency can result in weakened, brittle bones. Children who don’t get enough may end up with a disease called rickets, and adults with vitamin D deficiency are at a greater risk for osteoporosis.

The adequate daily intake of vitamin D is from 200 to 600 International Units (IU); however, some experts believe those numbers should be increased. Three ounces of salmon contains about 800 IU, a cup of milk has just over 100 IU, and one serving of fortified breakfast cereal usually has about 40 IU vitamin D.

Please know that milk also destroys some Vitamin D too,

Symptoms

People with vitamin D deficiency may experience bone pain and muscle weakness although the symptoms may be very mild at first.

Children who have rickets suffer from soft bones and skeletal deformities. Deficiency in adults will cause osteomalacia, which is a condition that makes your bones weak. Your health care provider can order tests that measure the levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D.

Insufficient levels of vitamin D in the blood have been associated with a variety of other health conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, multiple sclerosis and some forms of cancer. However, more research is needed to determine if vitamin D can prevent or treat any of these disorders.

Causes

Not eating foods that contain vitamin D and not getting enough sun exposure may lead to vitamin D deficiency. Breastfed infants, older adults, housebound individuals, and people with dark skin are at higher risk of vitamin D deficiency.

Individuals who have fat absorption problems due to conditions such as Crohn’s disease, cystic fibrosis, gastric bypass surgery, or have liver or kidney conditions may not get enough vitamin D from their diets.

You need sun exposure to make vitamin D, but it only takes 5 to 30 minutes of sun exposure on your face, arms, legs or back twice each week without sunscreen to stimulate sufficient vitamin D production. Excessive sun exposure increases your risk of skin cancer, so it’s important to use sunscreen and limit your use of tanning beds.

Vitamin D is not naturally present in many foods; however, oily fish and especially cod liver oil are rich in vitamin D. Beef liver, eggs, and cheese also contain small amounts. Vitamin D is added to some foods like milk and fortified breakfast cereals.

Can You Get too Much Vitamin D?

Your body stores fat-soluble vitamins such as vitamin D, but excessive sun exposure will not cause vitamin D toxicity. It would be tough to get too much vitamin D from foods—even fortified foods—unless you consume large amounts of cod liver oil.

Vitamin D is available as an over-the-counter supplement. But since your body stores fat-soluble vitamins for a long time, taking large amounts of vitamin D can lead to a toxicity that causes nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, constipation, weakness, and weight loss.

High blood levels of vitamin D may also raise your blood levels of calcium, possibly resulting in mental confusion and abnormal heart rhythms. So, if you have any health conditions, it’s important to speak with your doctor before taking vitamin D supplements. And follow the label directions unless your healthcare provider tells you differently.

 

Make an appointment with us, to help you follow a regiment of Vitamin that is RIGHT for you.  One thing to ask….  which Vitamin D do I take, and what do I take with it?  If you get the answer of anything on the shelf, or just the standard vitamin D and they do not tell you what to take with it, then they are so wrong.  And now you know it!

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Preventative and Restorative Medicine

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

 

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Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Pumpkin and a Pumpkin Smoothie!

It’s PUMPKIN time again!!

 

shutterstock_pumpkin-smoothie.jpg

 

Pumpkin coffee, pumpkin muffins, pumpkin ravioli, pumpkin pie, pumpkin pancakes, pumpkin beer, pumpkin potato chips and more!

While pumpkins are chock full of beta-carotene (the pre-cursor to vitamin A), and fiber, they are also low glycemic, meaning that pumpkin does not cause blood sugar levels to rise, helping you lose weight. Pumpkin is also great for your eyesight, beautiful smooth skin and has powerful disease-fighting capabilities.

However, keep in mind we are talking about pure pumpkin, not that pumpkin spice muffin you’re eating or your pumpkin spice mocha latte frappe! The sugar and refined flours cancel out the benefits of the pumpkin.

That beautiful bright orange color of pumpkins comes from the antioxidant, beta carotene, which not only turns to vitamin A in the body, but is a powerful antioxidant that protects against heart disease, cancer and diabetes. In fact, a recent study from Brazil showed that diabetic rats fed beta carotene reduced oxidation stress that helped prevent heart disease and disease processes caused by diabetes.

Beta-carotene is not the only diabetes-fighting nutrient in pumpkins. Two other compounds found in both pumpkins and fenugreek, trigonelline and nicotine acid, have been shown in studies to be effective in lowering blood sugar levels by improving insulin resistance, according to researchers in Japan.

Pumpkin’s high fiber helps you feel full longer, which is a great aid in weight loss. And it’s low glycemic properties also help to keep your body in fat-burning mode—not fat-storing mode. Pumpkin’s powerful antioxidants also help fight off cancer and boost the immune system. A pumpkin-protein smoothie can be the perfect post-workout recovery food—since pumpkin is also full of potassium, along with its vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals.

Pumpkin can be eaten roasted, baked or steamed, similar to sweet potatoes or squash. It is a delicious addition to curries and soups as well. Don’t  forget to eat the pumpkin seeds, too, which are best lightly roasted. Pumpkin seeds are known to boost levels of serotonin, the ‘feel-good’ brain chemical.

Try this amazing pumpkin smoothie!

Ingredients

1/2 cup (approximate) organic pumpkin, canned or fresh baked
1 small or 1/2 regular/large tart apple
Protein powder of choice (vanilla works best with this recipe)
1-2 teaspoons pure vanilla
1-2 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp turmeric
Handful of greens if you wish—baby kale, spinach, chard, etc.
Your milk of choice: real raw milk, coconut milk, almond milk, etc.
1 Tbsp of coconut oil

Directions

Mix in blender until smooth, add milk until desired consistency. Add a few ice cubes if you like it cold.

You should also know that this recipe is an almost perfect low-glycemic snack for Diabetics, due to it’s blend of fiber, healthy fats, antioxidants, and a reasonably low amount of sugars and carbs that impact blood sugar.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Preventative and Restorative Medicine

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

The Three Types of Supplements You Should Never Buy

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

The three types of supplements you should never buy

An expert on vitamins tells us what to avoid.

vegetables in a capsule

Catherine Price is the author of Vitamania: How Vitamins Revolutionized the Way We Think About Food. The book is a habit-altering romp through the seemingly banal topic of vitamins.

 

Price got the idea for her book when her husband asked her the question, “What’s a vitamin?” and Price found that she didn’t have an answer. Vitamins, to spare you the suspense, are organic compounds that we tend to come across in food—and without which we would die. There are 13 human vitamins: A, C, D, E, K and seven B vitamins (thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), pantothenic acid (B5), pyroxidine (B6), biotin (B7), folate (B9) and cobalamin (B12)). But if that was all Vitamania was about, it would have made for a short book. Instead Price explores how the discovery of vitamins has shaped our diet, and our perspective on health.

 

Although the book was published in 2015, it couldn’t feel more relevant today. From Gwyneth Paltrow to Alex Jones of Info Wars, it seems like everyone is promising that vitamins— and their creepy alter ego, supplements—can soothe what ails us. Supplements are now a multi-billion-dollar industry that many say will continue to grow. But we’re not getting any healthier. Last year, U.S. life expectancy declined for the first time since 1993. How did we become a vitamin and supplement obsessed society, and why isn’t that keeping us from getting sick?

 

Price has a few ideas—and a few warnings to keep in mind the next time you’re staring down an aisle of supplements.

 

The following Q&A has been edited for length and clarity.

 

How did vitamins become a dietary staple?

 

Vitamins have this healthy aura that feels mathematically precise. What do we really know about dosage?

The most definitive thing we know is how much you need not to die. I think some researchers would argue it’s more nuanced than that, but from a consumer perspective that’s really what it boils down to.

 

How does the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) that we see on labels fit into that?

The RDA is like the government trying to create a sweater that would fit 97 out of every 100 Americans. If you try to do that, you’d end up with a very large sweater that 97 out of 100 people could fit into. But that does not mean it’s the correct size for everyone. There’s 96 out of 100 people who could fit into a smaller sweater.

 

And, for the most part, the current recommendations are based on the highest recommendations from 1968. The FDA has not updated the recommendations that the daily values are based on. They’re supposed to be updated, but that’s probably going to get delayed until at least 2020.

 

For the next couple of years, when you look at the percent daily value for vitamins and minerals on the back of a food or a supplement, that is based off of very outdated recommendations. You shouldn’t be aiming for 100 percent.

 

How has the ability to make vitamins changed the American diet?

If it weren’t for synthetic vitamins, we would not be able to eat the way we today without getting horrible vitamin deficiencies. When were first able to synthesize vitamins in the 20s, 30s, and 40s, that really changed the kind of products that we were able to make. You had the processed food industry really start to take off, combined with this ability to put back nutrients that the processing had removed.

 

Breakfast cereal is one of the most egregious examples of this, because you’re essentially eating a multivitamin. They have vitamins incorporated into the dough, or, depending on what the vitamin is, some of them are actually sprayed on. It really is just like dust on top of your otherwise nutritionally vapid corn flake, and they call it a healthy start to your day.

 

What’s for breakfast? Vita-dusted corn flakes, anyone?

 

 

But is this necessarily a bad thing?

When you’ve got a houseplant and you know that it needs water to survive, you may pour a gallon of water on it thinking it will just use what it needs and the rest will just pour out of the bottom of the pot. But the houseplant’s roots can get rotten, or they could grow a fungus, or there could be some other harm that’s caused by the excess water.

 

People say Americans have the most expensive urine in the world, because we take all of these vitamins and it’s no problem—we’re just peeing them out. But a couple of years ago, a woman killed herself by drinking too much water. If you can kill yourself drinking water, that’s a warning that just because you need something in a certain amount doesn’t mean that you can keep taking it ad infinitum, or that it will do something good for you. It’s possible that we’re triggering diseases that take a long time to develop, but that are a result of being saturated with vitamins all of the time.

 

I think the poor feedback loop is also true for dietary supplements, which are not vitamins, because people take all sorts of crazy shit. There are more than 85,000 supplements on the market in America, and one may not do anything bad to you immediately. But it could be that you have a daily dietary supplement habit and over years some kind of side effect develops. And then 15 years later you have a health problem and you don’t know it’s because of this product you were taking.

 

A lot of people think regulations will protect us from dietary supplements. Is that true?

Supplements are regulated, but not in the way that you or I as consumers would ever think that they would be regulated. They’re regulated under The Dietary Supplement and Health Education Act, which the industry helped to get passed. The law forbade the FDA from requiring that supplement manufacturers have to prove that their products are safe or effective before selling them.

If you think about it, it’s totally nuts. You should have some assurance that what’s sold on the shelf as a health product isn’t going to hurt you, and ideally is going to do what it says it’s going to do.

 

Some products that are advertised as dietary supplements are clearly substances that the average consumer would think would be a food. Like, some teas are dietary supplements instead of a food. And the reason is because there was less regulation if it was a dietary supplement then if it was a food.

 

If you bought a loaf of bread and it turned out it was actually a dozen eggs inside the package you’d probably complain. But the equivalent can and does happen pretty frequently with dietary supplements. A consumer went to buy a multivitamin and the bottle had penne pasta in it, which is an extreme version of not being able to predict what you’ll get. But more often, pretty dangerous stuff is snuck into dietary supplements like illegal prescription drugs.

 

“And definitely stay clear of sexual enhancement, body building, and weight loss. Those are the three categories that are adulterated the most with truly dangerous substances.”

 

Is there any way to know what you’re getting?

It’s extremely difficult, if not impossible from a consumer’s perspective to know for sure what’s in their products. If you’re going to buy them, definitely do research on which brands have been tested, and stick with the bigger brands. And definitely stay clear of sexual enhancement, body building, and weight loss. Those are the three categories that are adulterated the most with truly dangerous substances.

 

Even with vitamins, there are issues where they put overages into the vitamins or more of a vitamin than they say is on the label. They want to make sure that by the time you buy it, it has the dose it says. But they’ve had issues where that’s resulted in there being too much vitamin A, which can be toxic.

 

The best I can say is go to one of several websites where they’re actually testing things. The best one, in my mind, is ConsumerLab.com, which requires a subscription. You get a really good breakdown of what the research is and what it does and doesn’t show, and has products pulled off the shelf that are tested—not paid for by industry.

 

But it’s kind of crazy that you have to send somebody to a subscription-based website to get a true answer as to whether or not the product that they just spent 50 dollars on actually is what it says it is.

 

Given that you have Type 1 diabetes, have you ever been tempted by supplements?

I never really did go down that route. But I have, as an experiment for the book, gone into a supplement shop and said, “I have diabetes, what can you give me?”

 

They aren’t supposed to give you advice, because that’s medical advice. But they always have a whole selection of these various herbs and concoctions that are supposed to be helpful for blood sugar, which is dangerous. If a supplement product makes your blood sugar go very low or interferes with any of your medication, you could die.

 

Some of these things probably do have an effect on your blood sugar, so it’s scary to think that there’s no scientific evidence of what dose does what. There’s no guarantee of concentration in what you’re buying. There’s no warning about how it can interact with anything.

 

If you have ever lived abroad for a while, one of the things I noticed is how less vitamin-obsessed people are overseas. Why do you think that is?

Something that we don’t recognize as consumers is how these 13 chemicals—and the way that they were marketed in the early part of the 20th century—completely revolutionized the way we think about food today.

 

They are miraculous because we need them to prevent diseases, but that was really taken advantage of by food marketers and the dietary supplement industry. Thy applied it to a much wider array of products—including not just pills, but also foods. I think you really start to see that in the 60s and the 70s with the natural food movement, and then when you fast forward to today you still see it in every single food trend that we have. It’s the way we think about food.

 

Michael Pollan (the author of Omnivore’s Dilemma) was the first person to really enunciate this in an eloquent way, but the reductionism that we use when we think about food is very remarkable and very, very, American. We don’t think, “is this bread delicious for my sandwich?” We think about how many nuts and seeds it has, and that flax seed has omega 3 fatty acids in it and omega 3 fatty acids are supposed to be healthy because they’re advertised on everything.

 

We basically break food down into components, and then we think about what effects those particular components are supposed to have on our health. We try to turn our meals into these nutritional math problems. And it leaves us so susceptible to things like the GOOP vitamins, or the idea that InfoWars is somehow going to be able to help our health.

 

Notice how this vintage Ovaltine label emphasizes that it’s a “protective” food with vitamins and other “essential” minerals.

 

Something else that blew my mind was the section about sourcing—where vitamins actually come from. Like the fact that Vitamin D often comes from the lanolin, or wool grease of Australian and New Zealand sheep, which is shipped to China, where it’s exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light, mimicking the process our skin uses to create vitamin D.

The main vitamin manufacturers didn’t really want to talk about where their production facilities are, but apart from like, a beta carotene manufacturer in Texas, there’s basically no vitamin manufacturing plants in America. When you say, “vitamin manufacturing” people think of the pills, and obviously, there’s thousands of places making vitamins in the states and hundreds of thousands around the world. But I’m talking about the raw ingredients for the pills and those are coming from other places in the world, particularly China.

 

Going back to what we were talking about before where it would be impossible for Americans to eat the way that we do without the help of synthetic vitamins, it’s interesting as a thought experiment to ask yourself, if someone really wanted to do a particularly clever kind of war against us, they could cut off or somehow adulterate the supply of synthetic vitamins coming in. It would probably take a while for people to figure out those diseases because we don’t see them very often.

 

What do you wish the public knew about vitamins?

The first question people often ask me is, “should I take a multivitamin?”

 

And I have no idea if you should take a multivitamin, I don’t know what your diet is like, I don’t know what medical conditions you have.

 

People want you to say yes or no, like it’s totally always a waste of time or its going to add years to your life. In reality, there’s cases where people probably should take a multivitamin, and there’s situations where someone is eating a lot of cereal and they’re essentially eating a multivitamin every day. They don’t need to take a multivitamin, but they could benefit by eating fewer processed foods. We want black and white answers, and there aren’t any. We have to learn to be more comfortable with nuance.

 

And you really should not be thinking about your food in terms of the numbers, or percent of vitamins and minerals that they have—because that information itself is wrong. When you recognize as a consumer that even the information on the package is not reliable, then you really have to rethink your approach towards eating and come at it at a more holistic way. Just ask, does this food naturally contain a lot of vitamins and minerals? Ok, then that’s probably a good way to get my vitamins and minerals. I’m not going to obsess about the particular number of milligrams that it has. I’m just going to eat the orange, or the red pepper.

 

I think the bottom line is it just points out that nutrition is not a math problem. At least not a math problem that we can solve at this point.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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Health and Disease, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Are You Really Convinced That Vaccines Are Safe

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS-Telehealth  

 

Are You Really Convinced That Vaccines Are Safe

coffin

 

If you’re convinced that vaccines are safe, you’re not listening to the people who’ve lost a child after a round of vaccines was administered. The U.S. government set up a special court to hear vaccine injury cases, with reparation for select victims but no accountability for vaccine makers. If you’re new to learning about vaccine risk, check out LearnTheRisk.org, ChildhoodShots.com and TheWorldMercuryProject, three of many places where the truth is being told.

 

As the truth comes forth, will you laugh in the faces of the victims who have been vaccine damaged? Sudden infant death syndrome, seizures, allergies, brain swelling, skin conditions, eating disorders and neurological development issues are all sad consequences of failed vaccine policy in the U.S. and around the world. Every vaccine on the market today, no matter what its intended use, will burden a body, especially small bodies with lower blood volume and weight.

 

Vaccines use adjuvants to inflame the immune system and force it to respond to pathogens. The most popular adjuvant used in vaccines are aluminum salts. As Dr. Chris Exley demonstrates, after a vaccine is administered, immune-responsive cells quickly travel to the injection site and load up their cytoplasm with the antigen and aluminum salts from the vaccine. The immune-responsive cells then travel throughout the body, taking aluminum cations to unpredictable places, including the brain. When the vesicles undergo acidification, they will dissolve the enclosed aluminum salt. Biologically reactive A13+ aluminum cations rupture the membrane, entering the cell cytoplasm and causing cell death.

This is the first problem with vaccines; the aluminum that augments an immune response is traveling throughout the body and causing cell death, inflammation, and aluminum toxicity throughout the person. If you’re convinced vaccines are safe, you don’t understand the toxicity of compounding aluminum cations at the cellular level and the potential damage that occurs to the brain and immune system when aluminum-based vaccines are injected.

 

Vaccines use preservatives. One of the preservatives in some vaccines is a form of inorganic mercury called thimerosal. Researchers have studied thimerosal exposure on mammalian brains. While thimerosal clears from the brain quicker than organic forms of mercury, it also concentrates there more rapidly, leading to harmful exposure amounts. A laboratory investigation of GlaxoSmithKline’s Flulaval flu vaccine found mercury at 51 ppm, or 25,000 times the legal maximum for drinking water regulated by the EPA. Mercury is one of the worst preservatives to directly inject into the body, bypassing the gastrointestinal filters, microbiome, and the gut wall. When this vaccine is recommended for pregnant women, is the fetus protected? Absolutely not. The developing infant can be poisoned for life due to the slightest exposure to mercury in the womb. If you’re convinced vaccines are safe, you do not understand the toxicity of mercury or the dangers of putting a brain-damaging element into the muscles and bloodstream without normal body filtration.

 

Texas researcher Dawn Richardson led a study at an Austin morgue investigating cases of sudden infant death syndrome. They found high concentrations of SIDS deaths at 2, 4, and 6 months, the same time the pediatricians schedule multiple vaccine doses for vulnerable infants. Will there be an investigation to see if these statistics replicate at morgues across the country? If so, is SIDS just a vague term to cover up the deaths of babies who are the victims of failed vaccine policy.

 

Even though polio vaccines are advertised as saving lives, the sad truth is that polio vaccines are causing deadly paralysis in the Middle East. Thirty-three children were crippled after receiving the polio vaccine in Syria. Despite the announcement in August 2017, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) called on more polio vaccines to stop what the vaccines started. If you are convinced vaccines are safe, don’t realize that an unpredictable number of children are sacrificed just so the remaining children can supposedly be “protected.”

 

Did you know a consortium of vaccines contain attenuated live viruses that can potentially revert back to infectious form, sickening the vaccine recipient with the disease the vaccine was supposed to prevent? Did you know that these viruses can shed for up to a month or longer, spreading to others, especially the immune-compromised? Viral shedding is a real issue caused by vaccines, especially in people who are malnourished from the start. If you’re convinced vaccines are safe, you don’t know how vaccines can cause the disease to form in the recipient and spread it to the most vulnerable among us.

 

This information is the tip of the iceberg. For more research, check out Vaccines.News.

 

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Lifestyle, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

You can loose Your Job/License if You are Taking Xanax

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

You can loose Your Job/License if You are Taking Xanax

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Anxiety affects millions of people every year, and anxiety disorders are considered to be the most prevalent of mental illnesses. Statistics show that in the United States, some 40 million adults grapple with an anxiety disorder every year — over 18 percent of the total adult population. It’s estimated that around 25 percent of children in the U.S. struggle with anxiety, too.

 

For many people, the first line of treatment provided to them by their doctor will be a prescription drug, as usual. But the truth is that there are many natural alternatives, which are just as effective and boast fewer side effects (if any).

 

The Xanax Controversy

Xanax and its generic counterparts are some of the most commonly prescribed prescription drugs and are part of the “benzodiazepine” class of drugs. Benzodiazepines are used to treat anxiety — but they come with some serious consequences. Even so, doctors write 44 million prescriptions for Xanax alone every year — and many of those prescription holders will find themselves in rehab, thanks to a budding benzodiazepine addiction.

 

Narconon reports that rehab admission rates for people with a benzodiazepine addiction nearly tripled between 1998 and 2008. This coincides with an increase in prescription rates as well: CDC data shows the number of adults using a benzodiazepine increased 67 percent over 18 years, from 8.1 million prescriptions in 1996 to 13.5 million in 2013.

 

Additionally, the researchers say that the quantity of filled prescriptions increased during the same time frame.

Employers and health insurance carriers are starting to watch employees who are on Xanax and re-evaluating their level of work.  Many states are also looking into licensed personnel and their use of Xanax, since it is an addictive drug.

 

The outlook for Xanax and its pharma cousins is even bleaker today: Studies show that the death toll from these drugs has been increasing over the last several years. Benzodiazepine addiction has been overshadowed by the devastating opioid addiction epidemic — yet, these pharmaceuticals are responsible for over 30 percent of prescription drug overdoses. In either case, Big Pharma is ultimately to blame — especially when it comes to Xanax.

 

Not only has Xanax been glamorized to an alarming extent, it is well-known that tolerance to Xanax builds up quickly. This means people need more of the drug to produce the same “effect” over time — sometimes, in just a matter of weeks.

 

The risk of addiction is so high that the National Institutes of Health has stated that Xanax shouldn’t be used in patients for more than a few months — yet many people end up on the drug long-term.

 

There are so many natural alternatives to help treat anxiety, prescribing addictive, potentially lethal drugs is downright criminal.

 

Natural methods for overcoming anxiety

There are many options for natural anxiety relief. Amino acids, in particular, are believed to be very useful in this regard: By bolstering production of neurotransmitter GABA, amino acids taurine and L-theanine both have the potential to reduce anxiety. Attenuating GABA, the “brain calming chemical,” is actually exactly how Xanax works.  Studies have shown that L-theanine can fight anxiety as well as the drug.

 

A number of vitamins and minerals are known to help reduce anxiety and promote overall mental health. These include B vitamins, vitamin C, magnesium and zinc.

 

Many herbs are known to help reduce anxiety. Chamomile, passionflower, valerian, and lemon balm all have a place in the plant-based medicine arsenal and are known for promoting relaxation. Recent studies suggest these herbs help support GABA production. But two of the most potent anxiety-relieving herbs are kava and and gotu kola.

 

Beyond supplements, there are a host of other tricks for relieving anxiety. Avoiding caffeine is a big one, as lots of people find it worsens anxiety. Getting plenty of sleep, frequent exercise and employing a regular meditation or yoga practice can also help quell feelings of anxiousness.

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