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Seven Common Signs Of Cancer

 

Talking to Your Doctor About Biologics for RA | Everyday Health

 

Seven Common Signs of Cancers

 

When it comes to diagnosing a health concern, paying attention to your body can be just as important as getting regular check-ups and screenings – especially when it comes to cancer. Use this information to better understand the symptoms of some types of cancer (some of which are applicable to both men and women):

  1. Men with Difficulty Urinating. Along with changes in flow (such as difficulties in starting and stopping, or weak flow), this is a sign of prostate cancer. Pain during urination can also be a symptom of benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), which is not cancer – see a doctor to determine what the root of the issue is.
  2. Unexplained Stomach Aches. People who have had colon, pancreatic and liver cancers have described stomachaches and pains as a common, early symptom. Request an evaluation if you have if you have a persistent stomachache that you can’t attribute to a previously diagnosed and benign digestive problem.
  3. Unexplained Weight Loss. An early sign of colon and other digestive cancers, weight loss that is not attributed to exercise or diet should be addressed with your physician.
  4. Shortness of Breath. Along with wheezing, this is a classic symptom of lung cancer. It’s also a classic symptom associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Consider a prompt evaluation, especially if you have a history of cigarette smoke exposure.
  5. Swollen Lymph Nodes Or Lumps. If found in the neck, underarm and groin areas, these lumps and enlargements may signal various cancers. Swelling during and shortly after acute infections is expected, concern should arise when they remain swollen for several weeks or there is no infection.
  6. Bloody Stools. Any blood found in the toilet, whether in the stool, water or on the toilet paper, should be addressed with your physician, as it can be a symptom of colorectal cancer (as well as hemorrhoids). Most of the time, a small amount of bright red blood is benign. Despite that, it always makes sense to get it checked, and if you are over 50 it is a good reason to make sure you are adequately screened for colon cancer.
  7. Frequent Heartburn. Along with a feeling of pain in the chest after eating, frequent heartburn may be a symptom of GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease), which in some instances can lead to esophageal cancer if left untreated.

 

If you dont find the cause of heartburn or Gerd, you will get cancer.  Antacids are the number one way to get stomach and esophageal cancer.

Asthma is a level 4 allergy.  Again, finding the cause of this allergy will alleviate any chance of getting cancer or COPD.

BPH and difficulty urinating definitely needs the cause to be found, not finding the right prescription.

Please do not rush to the doctor when you first find blood in your stool or toilet.   You will be making decisions in haste and filled with fear and emotion.  Everyone has polyps in their intestines, and they sloth off naturally.  When you eat something hard, or are not having soft stools, the polyp may come off ahead of schedule and you will see blood.  When you want to go to the doctor is when you have a large amount of bleeding and it lasts three days or longer.

 

If you have any questions please contact us at healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

 

Health Wellness Associates

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

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Foods, Uncategorized

Two Quick Tips For Weight Loss : Roasted Vegetable Soup Recipe

 

Two Quick Tips For Weight Loss

 

Overweight? Eat More Of These

 

Losing weight can be difficult, especially if you always feel hungry due to limited calories. But consuming more calories than you burn leads to being overweight and, eventually, obesity. To help get to a healthy weight, make daily exercise a priority and try these two steps that will cut calories:

Betty's really going for it

  1. Avoid foods that are high in sugar and flour, and that carry a high glycemic load. This means most crackers, breads, and snack foods. Don’t forget to eliminate sweetened beverages, an easy source of empty calories. Opt instead for unsweetened tea or sparkling water and snack on lightly toasted nuts in moderate amounts.
  2. Eat more vegetables! Most vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories and high in fiber – a great way to fill your belly up on vitamins and nutrients without taking in too many calories. The dense nature of vegetables will also satisfy your hunger and naturally cut calorie intake. Try a variety of veggies prepared in different ways and use as substitutes for less healthy foods. Think raw cucumber slices instead of chips in guacamole, or roasted Brussels sprouts with olive oil and sea salt instead of a casserole laden with unhealthy fats.

 

Roasted Vegetable Soup

Ingredients

3 large carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped
3 stalks celery, coarsely chopped
1 large onion, coarsely chopped
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
8 cloves garlic, chopped
4 cups water
1/4 cup dried mushroom pieces (Italian porcini, if possible)
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
Salt, and black or red pepper to taste

Instructions

1. Preheat oven to 500 degrees. Place the carrots, celery and onion in a small (8×8-inch) nonstick pan or dish with the olive oil. Toss to coat the vegetables. Bake for 10 minutes.

2. Remove pan from oven, add the garlic, and toss again. Bake for another 10-15 minutes until the vegetables are browned.

3. Remove pan from oven, add 1 cup of water and stir to loosen any vegetables that may be stuck. Pour this into a pot with the remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 30 minutes.

4. Season to taste with salt, and black or red pepper, and serve or use as the base for other soups, stews or pasta dishes.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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Foods, Uncategorized

Coq au Vin

Coq au Vin

Crockpot Low-Carb and Gluten-Free

Chicken in Wine and Mushroom Sauce

This tasty crockpot or stovetop coq au vin (chicken in red wine) recipe is low in carbohydrates and high in protein. It is a gluten-free and dairy-free dish that can be a one-pot meal, served with a green salad or steamed or roasted vegetables.

This is an excellent recipe through the winter months, starting it in the slow cooker in the morning so it is ready when you return home for dinner. It pairs well with sides of winter vegetables such as Brussels sprouts and broccoli. But if you are eating very low-carb, be sure to select the vegetables that are lower in carbohydrates. Carrot is often included in classic coq au vin, but is eliminated here because it is a root vegetable that is higher in carbohydrates.

If you are eliminating gluten, be sure to check that the chicken broth you use is gluten-free. Some brands may add gluten-containing ingredients such as wheat, but many are labeled as gluten-free for your convenience. Use real bacon bits or make your own crumbled bacon. If you use imitation bacon bits made from soy protein, ensure that they are labeled as gluten-free.

Cornstarch contributes most of the carbohydrate grams in this recipes. Most brands of cornstarch, including Argo and Clabber Girl, are gluten-free. Cornstarch is a common thickening agent used in gluten-free and dairy-free cooking.

Nutrition: Approximately 200 calories per serving, 34 grams protein, 2 grams fat, 3 grams carbohydrate.

Makes 6 servings

 

Ingredients

  • 6 (5-ounce) boneless skinless chicken breasts (or equivalent amount of boneless skinless chicken tenders)
  • 1 1/2 cup chicken broth (fat-free and gluten free)
  • 3/4 cup red wine
  • 4 ounces mushrooms (sliced)
  • 8 pearl onions (or 1 cup of chopped green onions)
  • 1/2 teaspoon bacon bits (or artificial bacon bits)
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoons cold water
  • salt and pepper to taste

Preparation

  • Crockpot method: Place the chicken, chicken broth, wine, mushrooms, bacon bits, and thyme in a crockpot on low for 4 to 8 hours.
  • Stovetop method: In a large, deep saucepan, pot, or dutch oven, place the chicken, chicken broth, wine, mushrooms, bacon bits, and thyme and bring to a boil and then simmer for 15 to 20 minutes until the chicken is cooked through but still tender.
  • Remove the chicken, potatoes, and most of the mushrooms, keeping the liquid in the pan or crockpot. If using a crockpot, turn the crockpot up to high.
  • In a cup, mix the cornstarch and cold water, then add it to the reserved liquid and stir.
  • Bring to a boil with stirring and cook the sauce until thickened. Season with salt and pepper as desired.
  • Serve each breast with one-sixth of the sauce.

Serving Suggestions and Notes

Serve with sides of steamed or roasted vegetables. Green vegetables such as broccoli, roasted Brussels sprouts, or snow peas make a colorful and appealing plate. If you prefer to serve it with a fresh salad, that makes a nice change of textures through the meal.

What you serve with this dish is very accommodating of different dietary needs. If you are eating gluten-free and are less concerned about carbs, you can enjoy this dish with rice or a potato to sop up the tasty sauce. Guests who are not concerned with gluten or carbs may enjoy this dish with a dinner roll as well.

Refrigerate any leftovers. You can enjoy leftovers for lunch or dinner the next day. Reheat them in the microwave for one minute or more per serving, until hot. The sauce may remain gel-shaped and less appealing in appearance, so it’s best for personal enjoyment rather than serving to guests or picky eaters.

You can freeze leftovers for later use, with the same caveat that the sauce may not be visually appealing once reheated.

 

Variations

If you are not aiming to reduce carbs, you can add 1 pound baby potatoes or potatoes cut into 1-inch cubes. Cook these with the chicken and other ingredients. This adds carbohydrates and calories but makes it into more of a traditional complete meal.

If you or your family or guests have an onion food allergy, you can leave them out. Fennel is a good substitute.

If you are using frozen chicken breasts or tenders, allow them to thaw in the refrigerator before adding them, especially if using the crockpot method. The frozen chicken might keep the temperature lower in the crockpot for long enough for bacteria to grow.

 

Put Well in Your New Years

Health and Wellness Associates

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Uncategorized

Cheesy Cauliflower Cakes

Cheesy Cauliflower Cakes

 

Want to eat more cauliflower but just not sure what to do with it? These tasty cakes are a must-try recipe even if you’re thinking cauliflower isn’t for you.

Boil, steam, saute or roast the cauliflower ahead of time for extra fast meal prep and serve the cakes with salad or a piece of fish for a light and satisfying meal. Cauliflower and lower-fat Parmesan cheese are usually well tolerated by those who experience heartburn since they are baked instead of fried. There’s no extra grease, either.

 

Cauliflower Cakes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups cauliflower (cooked)
  • 1 egg (beaten)
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese (grated)
  • 1 cup panko breadcrumbs

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 375 F.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  3. In a large bowl combine cauliflower, egg, cheese, and breadcrumbs.
  4. Mash ingredients with a fork until well mixed.
  5. Using clean hands form into 8 cakes.
  6. Place cakes on prepared baking sheet and spray the tops with cooking spray cooking.
  7. Bake for 20 minutes until golden.
  8. Allow to cool slightly before serving.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

If you can’t find fresh cauliflower at your local market, use frozen as it is just as nutritious as fresh.

If you do use frozen, simply thaw in the microwave on high for 2 to 3 minutes. Drain well to remove any excess liquid and then allow to cool slightly before mixing with other ingredients.

These cakes are tremendously flavorful as they are but you can add an extra dimension of flavor by mixing in a handful fresh herbs like parsley, basil, or chives.

Cooking and Serving Tips

To make the tops of these cakes extra crispy, broil for 2 to 3 minutes before removing from the oven. If you do choose to broil, keep a close eye on them to be sure they don’t burn. Serve over a bed of fresh greens for a vegetarian lunch or as a side dish with a piece of lean meat or fish.

Health and Wellness Associates

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Uncategorized

Vermont-Style Chicken Pot Pie

Vermont-Style Chicken Pot Pie

Low Carb and Gluten Free

 

Who doesn’t love a pot pie on a cold winter’s night? A creamy filling chock-full of chicken and vegetables bubbling under a golden crust. This pot pie is considered “Vermont-style” because it is made with biscuits on the top instead of a pie or pastry crust. The almond meal drop biscuits make this recipe gluten-free, and add a nice dose of protein and nutrition to the dish. Gluten-free flour or other thickener can also be used to thicken the sauce but this is completely up to you.

low-carb chicken pot pie

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter or olive oil
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 1/2 cup chopped green or red bell pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons gluten-free flour (optional)
  • 2/3 cup unsweetened soy milk or other unsweetened milk
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 3 cups cooked chicken, cubed
  • 16-ounce bag frozen green beans
  • 1 recipe gluten-free biscuit dough

this is completely up to you.

 

 

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 400F.
  2. Melt butter in large saucepan over medium heat. Cook onion in butter until it begins to soften.
  3. Add chopped pepper and black pepper, and let it cook for 1 minute. Add the gluten-free flour here if using; let it cook for 1 minute.
  4. Add the milk, cream, and broth. If you are using guar or xanthan gum, or other specialty product, add it here. Add the chicken and then green beans. Some water will come out of the beans during cooking, so the sauce should be a little on the thick side at this point. Season to taste with salt. While the mixture heats back up, make the biscuit dough.

5. When the biscuit dough is made and the pot pie mixture is bubbling hot, pour the pot pie filling into a 2-quart casserole dish.

6. Drop spoonfuls of biscuit dough onto the top, leaving room for expansion. (If you have extra dough, you can drop spoonfuls onto a piece of aluminum foil to cook alongside the pot pie.)

Bake about 10 minutes until biscuits are golden brown.

Ingredient Substitutions and Cooking Tips

Using a thickener in this dish is optional, and there are many ingredient options when it comes to thickening a sauce. If you don’t use gluten-free flour, you can go for more specialty products, such as bean flour or rice flour along with guar gum or Carb Counters ThickItUp.

Whether you use milk, cream, or unsweetened soy or almond milk is really up to you and the specific diet you are on. For the fewest carbs, combine unsweetened soy (or almond) milk with cream for richness.

For a more “chickeny” flavor, instead of the chicken broth you can use Better than Bouillion soup base; make it about double the concentration the package calls for, and don’t add any salt to the filling.

And feel free to swap turkey for the chicken if you have some leftover in the fridge. And if you don’t care for green beans in your pot pie try carrots and peas.

 

Keep the Well in Wellness

Health and Wellness Associates

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Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Metallic Taste in Your Mouth?

Metallic Taste in Your Mouth?

 

I’ve heard that a metal taste in the mouth means something about health, but I can’t remember what it was. Can you help?

Metallic Taste in Your Mouth? | Metal Taste | Andrew Weil, M.D.

A metallic taste in the mouth is a common complaint and can be due to a variety of causes – from medication you may be taking to dental problems. In the absence of other symptoms, it is unlikely that a metallic taste in your mouth indicates serious disease. But if you haven’t had a thorough general checkup recently, I would suggest seeing your doctor to rule out any health problems such as issues with your liver and kidneys, hyperparathyroidism, or undiagnosed diabetes.

 

You also might consider visiting your dentist, because the funny metallic taste in your mouth could be a symptom of gum disease. Even if you don’t have gum problems, poor oral hygiene can affect taste. Be sure to brush your teeth carefully at least twice a day and use a tongue scraper to remove the bacteria and debris that can collect on your tongue. Dental work done in the past can break down and alter taste, so your dentist will probably look at that as well.

Not drinking enough water can also contribute to problems with this strange taste in your mouth. Increase your intake and see if it helps. While you don’t necessarily have to drink the standard recommendation of eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day, my rule of thumb is to drink as much of that amount as you can comfortably consume and more than you think you need.

Among the drugs that can cause a metallic or coppery taste in your mouth are antibiotics like Biaxin (clarithromycin); Flagyl (metronidazole) , used to treat a wide variety of infections; drugs used to treat an overactive thyroid; captopril, used to treat high blood pressure ; griseofulvin, used to treat skin infections; lithium, used in bipolar disorder; penicillamine, used for rheumatoid arthritis or to prevent kidney stones; and some drugs used in cancer treatment.

Ayurvedic supplements from India have been found to exceed acceptable amounts of metal such as mercury, lead, or arsenic and I would be cautious about purchasing them online. Multivitamins containing copper, zinc, or chromium, as well as iron or calcium supplements might cause a temporary taste of metal, but typically subside as it’s being processed by your digestive system. This taste can be symptomatic of a vitamin D overdose , but with most of the population being vitamin D deficient and extremely high dosages (over 10,000 IUs) required, I doubt this is of any great concern. A metal taste is actually more commonly associated with a deficiency of vitamin B12, D, or zinc.

While a metallic taste can be a symptom of acute metal poisoning, it’s rare since our bodies are quite efficient at sequestering and neutralizing the contaminants that it’s not able to expel through the skin, liver, and kidneys. Heavy metal poisoning such as having too much lead or copper in the body due to conditions such as Wilson’s Disease, being around fungicides containing copper sulfate, or contaminated drinking water require intervention such as chelation therapy, so consider possible exposures when speaking with your physician.

Metal on metal (MoM) hip replacements have been known to cause metal poisoning. If you have had a MoM hip replacement and you develop symptoms of metallic taste in your mouth I recommend you see your primary or orthopedic physician.

A taste disorder called dysgeusia could potentially be at the root of phantom flavors as well. When taste cells are stimulated, messages are sent through three specialized nerves to the brain to identify.

Sometimes these wires get crossed in cases of dementia, head injury, or as the result of radiation therapy. Pregnancy hormones can also cause temporary bouts of dysgeusia, especially in the first trimester. Eating citrus fruits or vinegar-marinated foods will help counteract the taste and activate salivation to dilute the unsavory taste of metal. With such a strong tie between the sense of smell and taste, respiratory infections such as sinusitis can also throw your taste buds for a loop and give you the false perception of a metallic taste.

If you rule out all of these possible causes, have been medically evaluated, and still have the metallic taste in your mouth, it might be worthwhile to consult with a practitioner of Chinese medicine. That system might have an answer for you.

Health and Wellness Associates

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Lifestyle, Uncategorized

New Male Contraceptive?

New Male Contraceptive?

 

The Myths (And Truths) About What Two People In Love Looks Like | Mercury #romanticdatingtipsforguys

I’ve heard there’s a new male contraceptive in the works. Can you tell me when it is likely to become available?
A number of male contraceptive methods are under development, but the one that has gotten the most attention lately is a birth control pill that appears to be safe when taken daily. Called DMAU (short for dimethandrolone undecanoate), it is being developed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health at the University of Washington in Seattle and the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, CA.

The pill already has been tested in 83 men ages 18 to 50 in three doses: 100, 200 and 400 milligrams in two different formulations. The men who participated received either DMAU or a placebo, which they took once a day with food. The researchers reported that the 400 mg dose led to “marked suppression” of testosterone and reduced levels of two other hormones required for sperm production. Study leader Stephanie Page, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of medicine at the University of Washington, reported that very few of the men participating described symptoms consistent with testosterone deficiency or excess, and none of them developed serious side effects. Dr. Page noted that the men taking DMAU gained some weight and that their HDL (“good”) cholesterol declined, although she described both these changes as “mild.”

Dr. Page wrote that many men say they would prefer a daily pill as a reversible contraceptive, instead of long-acting injections or topical gels, which are also in development. She added that longer-term studies of DMAU are underway to confirm that taken daily, the drug blocks sperm production.

Development of a reliable birth control pill for men hasn’t been easy. Earlier studies found that some forms of oral testosterone delivered in a single pill can damage the liver or that the pills clear the body too quickly to be useful. DMAU contains a long-chain fatty acid that helps keep the contraceptive in the body longer.

In the works elsewhere is a gel called Nestorone-Testosterone that must be applied to the arms and shoulders daily. The hormone progestin in the gel shuts down hormones that stimulate testosterone production. An international study with 420 couples reportedly is testing whether the gel is safe and effective at preventing conception.

Another approach being investigated in India is temporary, nonsurgical vasectomy. It involves injecting a gel into sperm-carrying tubes in the scrotum. The gel damages sperm, leading to infertility. This treatment, called RISUG for “reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance,” can be undone with a second shot that breaks down the gel. I’ve read that some 540 men in India have received the treatment and that it has continued to prevent pregnancy in their partners for more than 13 years.

Despite these developments, it’s unlikely that a male contraceptive in pill or gel form will become available any time soon. For now, men should continue to use condoms, undergo vasectomy, or rely on women’s contraceptive use to prevent unwanted pregnancies.

Health and Wellness Associates

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

Uncategorized

Santa Hat Crispy-Treat Cheesecake Squares

Health and WEllness Associates

 

Santa Hat Crispy-Treat Cheesecake Squares

cheesecake

Crunchy and gooey rice cereal marshmallow treats are an unexpected yet delightful crust for a creamy cheesecake topping. Fresh strawberries on top form cute Santa hats and also provide a burst of bright acidity to cut through all of the richness.

Ingredients

Cheesecake Squares:

Cooking spray

3 tablespoons unsalted butter

5 ounces mini marshmallows (about 1 cup tightly packed)

2 teaspoons honey

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Kosher salt

4 cups crispy rice cereal

One 1/4-ounce package unflavored powdered gelatin

Two 8-ounce packages cream cheese, at room temperature

1 cup sour cream

1 cup confectioners’ sugar

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

25 medium strawberries, hulled

Frosting:

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature

2 tablespoons cream cheese, at room temperature

1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar, sifted

1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

 

Special equipment:

a piping bag or a resealable plastic bag

  1. Line a 9-inch square pan with foil, leaving a 2-inch overhang on two sides. Lightly coat the foil and a wooden spoon with cooking spray.
  2. For the cheesecake squares: Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the marshmallows, honey, 1/2 teaspoon vanilla and a pinch of salt, and stir with the wooden spoon until the marshmallows have completely melted, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the rice cereal, and stir until the mixture is fully combined. Transfer the mixture to the prepared pan, and press into an even layer while warm. Let sit at room temperature until firm, about 20 minutes.
  3. Combine the gelatin with 2 tablespoons water in a small microwave-safe bowl, and set aside to soften, about 5 minutes. Beat the cream cheese on medium-high speed with an electric mixer until completely smooth, about 1 minute. Scrape down the sides of the bowl. Add the the sour cream, sugar, lemon juice, remaining 1/2 teaspoon vanilla and a pinch of salt, and beat on medium-high speed until smooth, about 1 minute.
  4. Microwave the gelatin in 10-second increments, stirring as needed, until it dissolves, 30 to 50 seconds. Pour the gelatin into the cream cheese mixture, and beat on medium-high speed until incorporated, about 30 seconds.
  5. Pour the cream cheese mixture over the cooled crispy treat layer, and spread out evenly with an offset spatula or butter knife. Wrap the pan loosely with plastic wrap, and refrigerate until the cheesecake layer is set, about 2 hours or up to overnight.
  6. For the frosting: Whisk together the butter and cream cheese by hand in a medium bowl. Add the sugar and vanilla and whisk until smooth and creamy.
  7. Cut the cheesecake bites into twenty-five 1 3/4-inch squares. Transfer the frosting to a piping bag or resealable plastic bag. Cut a 1/4-inch hole in the corner of the piping bag. Pipe a circle of frosting on the top of each square, about the diameter of the base of a strawberry. Place a strawberry cut side-down on top of each frosting circle, pushing down gently so that the frosting comes up around the bottom of the strawberry and resembles the base of a Santa hat. Pipe a ball of frosting on the tip of each strawberry for a pom-pom.

Health and WEllness Associates

Dr Gail Bohannan Gray

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

Foods, Uncategorized

Pasta With Prosciutto, Edamame, and Carrots Recipe

Health and Wellness Associates

Pasta With Prosciutto, Edamame, and Carrots Recipe

 

pasta

Very Similar to Pasta Carbonara

 

This colorful pasta dish bursting with veggies is reminiscent of pasta carbonara, but with a healthier nutrition profile and lighter taste. Aside from the carrot ribbons, which could be prepared earlier in the day, it is not a make-ahead dish, so it may be best suited for gatherings which revolve around the kitchen.

Ingredients

  • 2 large carrots
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • ½ cup water
  • 2 cups lactose-free whole milk
  • ¼ cup heavy cream
  • 4 ounces sliced prosciutto
  • 4 teaspoons garlic-infused olive oil, divided
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon zest
  • ½ teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 ¼ cup frozen shelled edamame
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 10 ounces uncooked low-FODMAP
  • pasta, short shapes like penne or rotini
  • 5 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Preparation

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Cover the pot, and turn heat down to hold water at a simmer.
  2. Peel the carrots and trim off the root ends. Hold a carrot firmly at one end and lay it on a cutting board. Place your vegetable peeler midway down the carrot and with very firm pressure, make a single long stroke down the carrot to the end to make a thin ribbon. Repeat, turning and rotating the carrot as needed until the entire carrot is turned into ribbons. Repeat with the second carrot. Set ribbons aside
  1. Place cornstarch in a medium bowl and add water. Whisk until no lumps remain. Whisk in milk and cream and set aside.
  2. Prepare the prosciutto by cutting the sliced meat into ribbons, lengthwise, then crosswise into 1/4-inch pieces. In a large 10- to 12-inch skillet or sauté pan, heat 1 teaspoon oil on medium-high. Add the sliced prosciutto and stir until it is ​crisp, 3 to 4 minutes. Remove the prosciutto to a plate and set aside.
  3. Turn heat under the skillet to medium, add the remaining oil and tilt to coat the pan. Whisk the milk mixture again to re-mix cornstarch, and pour in about 1 cup. Whisk until milk starts to thicken, just below the boiling point. Whisk remaining milk mixture again and add to the skillet.
  4. Stir in the lemon zest, basil, edamame, salt, and pepper and continue to heat with occasional stirring until milk simmers and thickens; do not boil. Continue to simmer, stirring frequently for 2 to 3 minutes, reducing heat if needed.
  1. Add carrot ribbons to the sauce, stirring to separate them from each other. Adjust heat to hold the skillet at a low simmer.
  2. While the edamame is cooking, add the pasta to the boiling water in the large pot and cook it to just under al dente (it will cook some more in the next step).
  3. Combine the drained pasta and the sauce in the larger of the two vessels, and simmer on medium-low, stirring occasionally until sauce is reduced and the pasta is tender, 2 to 4 minutes more. Stir 2/3 of the prosciutto into the pasta. Divide pasta evenly onto 4 plates and garnish each serving with the remaining prosciutto. Top each serving with Parmesan cheese.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

Pancetta can be substituted for prosciutto. Since this can be purchased already diced, it saves a step.

To make this recipe gluten-free, use gluten-free pasta.

Cooking and Serving Tips

Making the carrot ribbons requires a little practice but is a fun way to add pretty shapes and color to dishes. Once mastered, they can be used in all kinds of dishes, from salads to grain pilafs.

Pasta is considered “al dente” when it is tender on the outside but firmer (but not hard) at its core. Al dente pasta is somewhat chewy.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Dr Gail Bohannan Gray

healthwellnessassocites@gmail.com

Lifestyle, Uncategorized

How to Cope with Loneliness During the Holiday Season

Health and Wellness Associates

How to Cope with Loneliness During the Holiday Season

loneliness2

Tips to make your holidays brighter when you feel alone

Christmas evokes images of green and red for many. But for those suffering from loneliness, the holiday blues are also a very real thing.

Loneliness is common during the holidays. When we feel there is an expectation is to experience extreme joy or happiness, feelings of sadness and loneliness can strike even harder.

Whether you’re feeling alone or you want to be there for those around you, understanding what causes loneliness, as well as how to minimize it, can make your holidays much more joyful.

Understanding loneliness

Feeling lonely doesn’t mean you don’t have friends, family or loved ones who care. In fact, it’s very possible to feel lonely while having a loving support system in tow.

Some studies have called loneliness a disease, and others have called it a “hidden killer” of the elderly. While there are many studies on loneliness, there is no exact definition.

Loneliness is a subjective feeling. It can refer to a state of solitude, as well as the perception of feeling alone. While loneliness is a universal human emotion, it amplifies is different ways. Lonely people often dread the holidays, because of the perception that everyone around them is experiencing human connection in a way that they are not.

Examples of groups that tend to experience this more than others include those who are recently single, divorced or widowed, those who live far from family, and those who stay emotionally distant from others. Studies have shown that adults under age 30 tend to experience significantly higher levels of loneliness than other age groups, though those ages 80 and older can experience high levels as well.

How to beat loneliness during the holidays

One thing that is agreed upon is that there are ways to overcome loneliness. However, because these ways tend to involve emotional risk, many are slow to adopt them. Whether you’re feeling alone or you are in solitude, here are some tips to use this holiday season:

Tips to overcome loneliness when you feel alone

  • Practice self-care. While you may be thinking about giving gifts to others this season, don’t hesitate to give yourself the gift of a spa treatment, invest in a hobby, or other activities that will get you to socialize and enjoy the season. Taking your focus off feeling alone can help curb the feeling.
  • Choose the right people to surround yourself with. When you’re lonely, it may be tempting to call up your friend who loves to co-commiserate. But because loneliness is contagious, you won’t be doing yourself any favors. Choose to surround yourself with positive people.
  • Pursue gratitude. Whether you prefer journaling, meditation or prayer, taking the time to write or say what you’re thankful for can shift your attention away from what you don’t have, and spotlight what you do have. Always remember that thankfulness is a choice.

Tips to overcome loneliness when you are alone

  • Be vulnerable. If you’re waiting for your neighbor to be the first to say hello, take the risk and say hi first. Call a friend you haven’t spoken with in a while, or learn more about that person you always take a fitness class next to. Remembering that we’re all seeking human connection can take the pressure off the situation.
  • Give back. Helping others who have less than we do often reminds us of all we have to be thankful for. Bonus: you may meet some volunteers who have similar interests to you, and are open to helping others.
  • Release your expectations. In the age of social media, it’s easy to think the holidays are supposed to look as perfect as a Christmas card. Rethinking your expectations can stop you from playing the comparison game, at which point you may realize you have plenty to be thankful for.

 

Stepping out of your comfort zone is never convenient or easy, but it may be just the thing you need this holiday season.

Health and Wellness Associates

Dr Mark Williams

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com