Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Weighted Blankets for Mental Health

Weighted Blanks for Mental Health

 

Image may contain: cat

 

A weighted blanket is a blanket filled with hypoallergenic, non-toxic polypropylene pellets. The pellets are sewn into self-contained small pockets that are evenly distributed throughout the blanket. These pellets give the blanket its weight, which should generally be around 10 percent of the user’s body weight, give or take a few pounds depending on the individual’s needs and preferences.

Created to mimic the benefits of deep touch pressure therapy, weighted blankets have been shown to help ease anxiety, increase oxytocin in the brain and help individuals with sensory processing disorders feel more relaxed. DTP, as shown in the Journal of Medical and Biological Engineering, is about gently applying pressure to the body, which releases a calming chemical in the brain called serotonin to relax the nervous system.

Weighted blankets are perhaps most closely associated with sensory processing disorder and related conditions like autism, anxiety and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, weighted blankets may help with a wide variety of other health issues.

One study found that 63% of patients reported lower anxiety after use and 78% preferred the weighted blanket as a calming modality. A study from the Journal of Sleep Medicine and Disorders found it easier to settle with increased sleep duration, decreased movements and more “refreshed” feeling afterwards.

Researchers at Temple University found that 95 percent of participants with ADHD in a study improved when they received sensory intervention. The interventions offered included deep pressure touch therapy and a variety of strenuous exercise. As one researcher stated, “We found significant improvement in sensory avoiding behaviours, tactile sensitivity, and visual auditory sensitivity in the group that received treatment.”

Myofascial release, which involves the application of firm but gentle pressure over the fibromyalgia pain points can help sufferers find some relief from their pain. Weighted blankets can mimic this pressure, which may help fibromyalgia sufferers experience a reduction in symptoms.

 

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Is it ADHD or Trauma (PTSD)

boyincorner

Is it really ADHD or is it Trauma (PTSD)

 

Dr. Nicole Brown’s quest to understand her misbehaving pediatric patients began with a hunch.

Brown was completing her residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, when she realized that many of her low-income patients had been diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

These children lived in households and neighborhoods where violence and relentless stress prevailed. Their parents found them hard to manage and teachers described them as disruptive or inattentive. Brown knew these behaviors as classic symptoms of ADHD, a brain disorder characterized by impulsivity, hyperactivity, and an inability to focus.

When Brown looked closely, though, she saw something else: trauma. Hyper-vigilance and dissociation, for example, could be mistaken for inattention. Impulsivity might be brought on by a stress response in overdrive.

“Despite our best efforts in referring them to behavioral therapy and starting them on stimulants, it was hard to get the symptoms under control,” she said of treating her patients according to guidelines for ADHD. “I began hypothesizing that perhaps a lot of what we were seeing was more externalizing behavior as a result of family dysfunction or other traumatic experience.”

Inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive behavior may mirror the effects of adversity, and many doctors don’t know how—or don’t have time—to tell the difference.

Considered a heritable brain disorder, one in nine U.S. children—or 6.4 million youth—currently have a diagnosis of ADHD. In recent years, parents and experts have questioned whether the growing prevalence of ADHD has to do with hasty medical evaluations, a flood of advertising for ADHD drugs, and increased pressure on teachers to cultivate high-performing students. Now Brown and other researchers are drawing attention to a compelling possibility: Inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive behavior may in fact mirror the effects of adversity, and many pediatricians, psychiatrists, and psychologists don’t know how—or don’t have the time—to tell the difference.

Though ADHD has been aggressively studied, few researchers have explored the overlap between its symptoms and the effects of chronic stress or experiencing trauma like maltreatment, abuse and violence. To test her hypothesis beyond Baltimore, Brown analyzed the results of a national survey about the health and well-being of more than 65,000 children.

Brown’s findings, which she presented in May at an annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies, revealed that children diagnosed with ADHD also experienced markedly higher levels of poverty, divorce, violence, and family substance abuse. Those who endured four or more adverse childhood events were three times more likely to use ADHD medication.

Interpreting these results is tricky. All of the children may have been correctly diagnosed with ADHD, though that is unlikely. Some researchers argue that the difficulty of parenting a child with behavioral issues might lead to economic hardship, divorce, and even physical abuse. This is particularly true for parents who themselves have ADHD, similar impulsive behavior or their own history of childhood maltreatment. There is also no convincing evidence that trauma or chronic stress lead to the development of ADHD.

For Brown, who is now a pediatrician at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, the data are cautionary. It’s not evident how trauma influences ADHD diagnosis and management, but it’s clear that some misbehaving children might be experiencing harm that no stimulant can fix. These children may also legitimately have ADHD, but unless prior or ongoing emotional damage is treated, it may be difficult to see dramatic improvement in the child’s behavior.

“We need to think more carefully about screening for trauma and designing a more trauma-informed treatment plan,” Brown says.

Dr. Kate Szymanski came to the same conclusion a few years ago. An associate professor at Adelphi University’s Derner Institute and an expert in trauma, Szymanski analyzed data from a children’s psychiatric hospital in New York. A majority of the 63 patients in her sample had been physically abused and lived in foster homes. On average, they reported three traumas in their short lives. Yet, only eight percent of the children had received a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder while a third had ADHD.

“I was struck by the confusion or over-eagerness–or both–to take one diagnosis over another,” Szymanski says. “To get a picture of trauma from a child is much harder than looking at behavior like impulsivity, hyperactivity. And if they cluster in a certain way, then it’s easy to go to a conclusion that it’s ADHD.”

A previous edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders urged clinicians to distinguish between ADHD symptoms and difficulty with goal-directed behavior in children from “inadequate, disorganized or chaotic environments,” but that caveat does not appear in the latest version. Unearthing details about a child’s home life can also be challenging, Szymanski says.

It’s not clear how many children are misdiagnosed with ADHD annually, but the number could be nearly 1 million.

A child may withhold abuse or neglect to protect his family or, having normalized that experience, never mention it all. Clinicians may also underestimate the prevalence of adversity. The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study, a years-long survey of more than 17,000 adults, found that two-thirds of participants reported at least one of 10 types of abuse, neglect, or household dysfunction. Twelve percent reported four or more. That list isn’t exhaustive, either. The study didn’t include homelessness and foster care placement, for example, and the DSM doesn’t easily classify those events as “traumatic.”

It’s not clear how many children are misdiagnosed with ADHD annually, but a study published in 2010 estimated the number could be nearly 1 million. That research compared the diagnosis rate amongst 12,000 of the youngest and oldest children in a kindergarten sample and found that the less mature students were 60 percent more likely to receive an ADHD diagnosis.

Though ADHD is thought to be a genetic condition, or perhaps associated with lead or prenatal alcohol and cigarette exposure, there is no brain scan or DNA test that can give a definitive diagnosis. Instead, clinicians are supposed to follow exhaustive guidelines set forth by professional organizations, using personal and reported observations of a child’s behavior to make a diagnosis. Yet, under financial pressure to keep appointments brief and billable, pediatricians and therapists aren’t always thorough.

“In our 15-minute visits—maybe 30 minutes at the most—we don’t really have the time to go deeper,” Brown says. If she suspects ADHD or a psychological condition, Brown will refer her patient to a mental health professional for a comprehensive evaluation. “You may have had this social history that you took in the beginning, but unless the parent opens up and shares more about what’s going on in the home, we often don’t have the opportunity or think to connect the two.”

 

Caelan Kuban, a psychologist and director of the Michigan-based National Institute for Trauma and Loss in Children, knows the perils of this gap well. Four years ago she began offering a course designed to teach educators, social service workers and other professionals how to distinguish the signs of trauma from those of ADHD.

 

“It’s very overwhelming, very frustrating,” she says. “When I train, the first thing I tell people is you may walk away being more confused than you are right now.”

In the daylong seminar, Kuban describes how traumatized children often find it difficult to control their behavior and rapidly shift from one mood to the next. They might drift into a dissociative state while reliving a horrifying memory or lose focus while anticipating the next violation of their safety. To a well-meaning teacher or clinician, this distracted and sometimes disruptive behavior can look a lot like ADHD.

Kuban urges students in her course to abandon the persona of the “all-knowing clinician” and instead adopt the perspective of the “really curious practitioner.”

Rather than ask what is wrong with a child, Kuban suggests inquiring about what happened in his or her life, probing for life-altering events.

Jean West, a social worker employed by the school district in Joseph, Missouri, took Kuban’s course a few years ago. She noticed that pregnant teen mothers and homeless students participating in district programs were frequently diagnosed with ADHD. This isn’t entirely unexpected: Studies have shown that ADHD can be more prevalent among low-income youth, and that children and adolescents with the disorder are more prone to high-risk behavior. Yet, West felt the students’ experiences might also explain conduct easily mistaken for ADHD.

Kuban’s course convinced West to first consider the role of trauma in a student’s life. “What has been the impact? What kind of family and societal support have they had?” West asks. “If we can work on that level and truly know their story, there’s so much power in that.”

As a school official, West sometimes refers troubled students to a pediatrician or psychiatrist for diagnosis, and meets with parents to describe how and why adversity might shape their child’s behavior. In her private practice, West regularly assesses patients for post-traumatic stress disorder instead of, or in addition to, ADHD.

 

Though stimulant medications help ADHD patients by increasing levels of neurotransmitters in the brain associated with pleasure, movement, and attention, some clinicians worry about how they affect a child with PTSD, or a similar anxiety disorder, who already feels hyper-vigilant or agitated. The available behavioral therapies for ADHD focus on time management and organizational skills, and aren’t designed to treat emotional and psychological turmoil.

Instead, West teaches a traumatized child how to cope with and defuse fear and anxiety. She also recommends training and therapy for parents who may be contributing to or compounding their child’s unhealthy behavior. Such programs can help parents reduce their use of harsh or abusive discipline while improving trust and communication, and have been shown to decrease disruptive child behavior.

Szymanski uses a similar approach with patients and their parents. “I think any traumatized child needs individual therapy but also family therapy,” she says. “Trauma is a family experience; it never occurs in a vacuum.”

Yet finding a provider who is familiar with such therapy can be difficult for pediatricians and psychiatrists, Szymanski says. Though some hospitals have centers for childhood trauma, there isn’t a well-defined referral network. Even then, insurance companies, including the federal Medicaid program, may not always pay for the group sessions commonly used in parent training programs.

Faced with such complicated choices, Szymanski says it’s no surprise when clinicians overlook the role of trauma in a child’s behavior and focus on ADHD instead.

Inattentive and hyperactive behavior can be traced back to any number of conditions—just like chest pains don’t have the same origin in every patient.

While there are few recommendations now for clinicians, that will likely change in the coming years. The American Academy of Pediatrics is currently developing new guidance on ADHD that will include a section on assessing trauma in patients, though it won’t be completed until 2016.

Dr. Heather Forkey, a pediatrician at University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, who specializes in treating foster children, is assisting the AAP. Her goal is to remind doctors that inattentive and hyperactive behavior can be traced back to any number of conditions—just like chest pains don’t have the same origin in every patient. Ideally, the AAP will offer pediatricians recommendations for screening tools that efficiently gauge adversity in a child’s life. That practice, she says, should come before any diagnosis of ADHD.

When speaking to traumatized children inappropriately diagnosed with ADHD, she offers them a reassuring explanation of their behavior. The body’s stress system, she says, developed long ago in response to life-or-death threats like a predatory tiger. The part of the brain that controls impulses, for example, shuts off so that survival instincts can prevail.

 

“What does that look like when you put that kid in a classroom?” Forkey asks.

“When people don’t understand there’s been a tiger in your life, it looks a lot like ADHD to them.”

signs

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Uncategorized

Acetaminophen and Asthma

acetaandasthma

Acetaminophen and Asthma

 

As the title says, there is a link between Acetaminophen and Asthma.  Read on to find out about Acetaminophen and ADHD, cancer in boys, and should you give your children acetaminophen when vaccinated.

 

Acetaminophen (brand name Tylenol) is one of the most widely used pain relievers, including among pregnant women.

 

Research published in the journal American Family Physician even called acetaminophen “the pain reliever of choice during pregnancy,”1 and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data suggest 65 percent of pregnant women use the drug.2

 

Acetaminophen was most commonly used to treat pain, fever and flu symptoms among pregnant women in a recent study led by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Oslo.3

 

However, it’s generally best to avoid any medications during pregnancy, including acetaminophen, unless they’re absolutely necessary.

 

When used during pregnancy, even this “safe” over-the-counter (OTC) drug, researchers found, may be associated with an increased risk of asthma in children.

 

Prenatal Acetaminophen Exposure Linked to Asthma

 

Researchers analyzed data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, which includes 114,500 mother/child pairs. Both prenatal acetaminophen exposure and use of acetaminophen during infancy were associated with an increased risk of asthma at ages 3 and 7.

 

Children whose mothers had used acetaminophen during pregnancy were 13 percent more likely to develop asthma by age 3, and the more acetaminophen used by the mother, the greater the risk became.

 

The study also looked into whether the reasons behind acetaminophen use (pain, fever and flu) could be causing the asthma link, but the association remained even after accounting for these factors.

 

Women who reported using acetaminophen for more than one reason during pregnancy had children with the greatest risk of asthma at age 3.4

 

The researchers did not recommend that pregnant women or infants stop using acetaminophen, even though past research has also suggested an asthma connection.

 

For instance research published in Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety in February 2016 also found acetaminophen use during pregnancy was associated with a modest increased risk for offspring asthma.5

 

Are Pain Relievers Safe During Pregnancy?

 

The findings raise questions about whether this widely-used OTC medicine is actually as safe during pregnancy as women are being told.

 

Due to recent reports questioning the safety of prescription and OTC medicines when used during pregnancy, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently looked into the issue.6 They looked into data regarding three widely used types of pain medications and potential associated side effects:

 

Prescription nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the risk of miscarriage

Opioids and the potential risk of birth defects of the brain, spine or spinal cord

Acetaminophen and the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

The FDA ruled that available data “prevented us from drawing reliable conclusions,” and they decided to keep their recommendations on how pain medicines are used during pregnancy the same at this time. However, it’s best to err on the side of caution when possible.

 

Acetaminophen Use During Pregnancy Linked to ADHD in Children

 

The potential link between prenatal acetaminophen exposure and ADHD came to light in 2014 after a study was published in JAMA Pediatrics.7

 

It included data from more than 64,000 mothers and children in the Danish National Birth Cohort. Over 50 percent of the women reported taking acetaminophen while pregnant, which was found to be linked to:

 

A 30 percent increased risk for ADHD in the child during the first seven years of life

A 37 percent increased risk of being diagnosed with hyperkinetic disorder (HKD), a severe form of ADHD

Behavioral effects appeared to be dose dependent. The more frequent the use of acetaminophen during pregnancy, the higher the offspring’s chances of being diagnosed with ADHD-related problems.

 

Children of women who used the drug for 20 or more weeks during pregnancy had nearly double the risk of getting an HKD diagnosis. They also had a 50 percent greater chance of being prescribed an ADHD medication.

 

The researchers noted that “[research data suggest that acetaminophen is a hormone disruptor, and abnormal hormonal exposures in pregnancy may influence fetal brain development.”8 As further reported by Forbes:9

 

“Acetaminophen can cross the placenta, making its way to the fetus and its delicate developing nervous system. The drug is a known endocrine (hormone) disrupter, and has previously been linked to undescended testes in male infants.10

 

Since the maternal hormone environment plays a critical role in the development of the fetus, the authors say that it’s ‘possible that acetaminophen may interrupt brain development by interfering with maternal hormones or via neurotoxicity such as the induction of oxidative stress that can cause neuronal death.'”

 

Prenatal Acetaminophen Exposure May Be Linked to Fertility Problems, Cancer in Boys

 

Along with asthma and ADHD, prenatal acetaminophen exposure appears to cut levels of testosterone in the womb, at least according to a study in mice. The animals were given doses of acetaminophen equivalent to a human dose.

 

While treatment for just one day did not affect testosterone levels, treatment three times a day for seven days did, cutting testosterone levels in the mice nearly in half.11 The finding is concerning, since most common male reproductive disorders are linked to lower testosterone exposure in fetal life.

 

It’s thought that acetaminophen’s interference with the development of the male reproductive system could not only lead to genital birth defects but also to infertility and testicular cancer.12

 

Unlike the U.S. FDA, which has refused to warn pregnant women about potential risks, The Royal College of Midwives suggested pregnant women talk to their health care providers before taking acetaminophen.

 

The Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health said that prolonged use of the drug should be avoided by pregnant women. Carmel Lloyd of the Royal College of Midwives told the Daily Mail:13

 

“Ideally, women should avoid taking medicines when they are pregnant, particularly during the first three months … Minor conditions such as colds or minor aches and pains often do not need treating with medicines.”

 

While the mouse study suggested only male fertility may be affected, a separate study published in Scientific Reports revealed that acetaminophen (or NSAID) use in pregnancy could also potentially affect fertility of resulting daughters and granddaughters.14

 

Accidental Poisoning Is Another Major Mechanism of Harm

 

Acetaminophen was the medication involved in the most accidental poisonings according to calls to poison control centers across the U.S. related to infants younger than 6 months old.15

 

The drug accounted for 22,000 medication exposures and close to 5,000 general exposures.16 Acetaminophen is often recommended for infants instead of alternatives like ibuprofen.

 

In fact, acetaminophen is the most common pain reliever given to U.S. children, and it’s estimated that more than 11 percent of U.S. children take the drug during any given week.17 In adults, taking just a bit too much can have significant health risks, particularly for your liver.

 

Acetaminophen poisoning is responsible for nearly half of all acute liver failure cases in the U.S.18 Among adults, taking just 25 percent more than the daily recommended dose — the equivalent of just two extra strength pills per day — can cause liver damage after just a couple of weeks of daily use.19

 

Children metabolize acetaminophen differently than adults, and the risks of liver failure from too much acetaminophen are thought to be lower among children than adults.20 However, liver injury has been reported among children given repeated doses.21

 

N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) is an antidote for acetaminophen toxicity and is well worth knowing about if you ever use acetaminophen or keep it in your house. NAC is administered as part of standard care in cases of acetaminophen overdose.

 

While I generally do not recommend using acetaminophen-containing drugs for minor aches and pains, they are sometimes necessary to temporarily suppress severe pain, such as post-surgical pain. For those instances, I recommend taking it along with NAC.

 

If you have children and keep acetaminophen in your home, I strongly recommend keeping a bottle of NAC as well in case of accidental overdose. NAC therapy should be initiated within eight hours of an acute overdose for best results. If you suspect an overdose has occurred, seek medical help right away. If this isn’t an option, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the following protocol:22

 

“Oral administration is the preferred route for NAC therapy unless contraindications exist (e.g aspiration, persistent vomiting). The usual recommended loading dose is 140 mg/kg followed in 4 hours by a maintenance dose of 70 mg/kg orally given every 4 hours.

 

This dosing is commonly recommended to be continued for 72 hours; however more recent clinical experience supports tailoring the duration of therapy to the patient’s clinical condition.”

 

Vitamin D-Rich Foods During Pregnancy Decrease Risk of Allergies in Children

 

A higher intake of vitamin-D-rich foods during pregnancy has been linked to a lower risk of allergies in children. The study found for each 100 IUs per day of food-based vitamin D intake during the first and second trimesters (equivalent to the amount of vitamin D in an 8-ounce serving of milk) was associated with about a 20 percent lower risk of developing allergies by school age.23

 

In this case, the use of supplemental vitamin D was not associated with the benefit, although it’s unclear what type of supplemental vitamin D was studied. Other research suggests that vitamin D deficiency may be a primary underlying cause of asthma. Vitamin D will also help to upregulate your immune system, which may explain its potential role in allergies.

 

You can find some vitamin D in mushrooms, fish, eggs and dairy products, and there may be vitamin D in lesser-known food sources as well, like meat. However, when pregnant, you need a vitamin D level above 50 ng/ml to protect yourself and your baby from serious complications, such as premature delivery and preeclampsia.

 

You should have your levels tested and monitored during pregnancy and get appropriate sun exposure and take supplemental vitamin D3, if necessary, to reach optimal levels. I firmly believe optimizing your vitamin D during pregnancy is one of the most important things you can do for the health of your child. When a child is born deficient in vitamin D his or her health can be significantly affected in any number of ways.

 

Research confirms there is a lifelong impact of vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy ranging from not only childhood allergies and asthma but also colds and flu, dental cavities, diabetes, and even strokes and cardiovascular disease in later life.

 

Top Natural Acetaminophen Alternatives

 

Acetaminophen is so common that many people, including pregnant women, have become “blasé” about its use and its potential dangers.24 Before you reach for acetaminophen or any other pain-relieving drug, it makes sense to exhaust more natural options first — particularly for minor or tolerable pain. For instance, the Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) works very effectively for relieving pain and can be used safely for pregnant women and children.

 

No matter what your reason for taking acetaminophen, type it into the search box above and you’ll likely find a natural alternative. Even if chronic pain is your problem, the following options provide excellent pain relief without any of the health hazards that acetaminophen and other pain relievers carry. If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, consult with your health care provider before taking any medications, herbs or supplements.

 

Astaxanthin: One of the most effective oil-soluble antioxidants known. It has very potent anti-inflammatory properties and in many cases works far more effectively than many NSAIDs. Higher doses are typically required and one may need 8 mg or more per day to achieve this benefit.

Ginger: This herb is anti-inflammatory and offers pain relief and stomach-settling properties. Fresh ginger works well steeped in boiling water as a tea or grated into vegetable juice.

Curcumin: Curcumin is the primary therapeutic compound identified in the spice turmeric. In a study of osteoarthritis patients, those who added 200 mg of curcumin a day to their treatment plan had reduced pain and increased mobility.25 In fact, curcumin has been shown to have potent anti-inflammatory activity, as well as demonstrating the ability in four studies to reduce acetaminophen-associated adverse health effects.26

Boswellia: Also known as boswellin or “Indian frankincense,” this herb contains powerful anti-inflammatory properties, which have been prized for thousands of years. This is one of my personal favorites as I have seen it work well with many rheumatoid arthritis patients.

Bromelain: This protein-digesting enzyme, found in pineapples, is a natural anti-inflammatory. It can be taken in supplement form, but eating fresh pineapple may also be helpful.

Cetyl Myristoleate (CMO): This oil, found in fish and dairy butter, acts as a “joint lubricant” and an anti-inflammatory. I have used this for myself to relieve ganglion cysts and a mild annoying carpal tunnel syndrome that pops up when I type too much on non-ergonomic keyboards. I used a topical preparation for this.

Evening Primrose, Black Currant and Borage Oils: These contain the fatty acid gamma linolenic acid (GLA), which is useful for treating arthritic pain.

Cayenne Cream: Also called capsaicin cream, this spice comes from dried hot peppers. It alleviates pain by depleting the body’s supply of substance P, a chemical component of nerve cells that transmits pain signals to your brain.

Therapeutic modalities such as yoga, acupuncture, meditation, hot and cold packs, and even holding hands can also result in astonishing pain relief without any drugs.

 

If you take nothing away from this:  NEVER GIVE TYLENOL TO A CHILD WHO HAS BEEN VACCINATED OR EXPOSED TO ANOTHER CHILD THAT HAS BEEN VACINATED.

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P Carrothers

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Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Boys and ADHD

boysandadhd

Over 20% of our boys have been diagnosed with ADHD!

That is one out of every 5 teenage boys have been prescribed

a drug for ADHD.  42% of boys between the ages of 4 and 17.

Most children diagnosed with ADHD, are showing signs of hyperactivity

from food intake, yet psychiatrist continue to prescribe.

More boys on Medicaid or Children’s Health Aid, are diagnosed

53% more than children with private health care.

Don’t let this happen to someone you know.

 

You may not know this but, when you apply for a job, the new insurance

Company can do what they call a peer review, and they will determine if

Your son, or daughter is a good candidate to be hired.  If they see that they

Have taken any ADHD drugs, they might have a harder time finding a job.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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Health and Disease

Do You Have Leaky Gut Syndrome

leakygut

You may not know this, but there’s a really high chance that you might have

Leaky Gut Syndrome.
It’s one of the MOST overlooked health issues today.
If you have any of these:

* Thyroid problems

* Issues with your adrenal gland

* Digestive issues

* Food sensitivities

* Even basic issues like gas and bloating…

If you have any sort of digestive issues,

IBS or autoimmune diseases, you

Have a greater chance of leaky gut syndrome.

Contact us with any questions, or help in healing healthy gut syndrome

Share this with your family and friends

Health and Wellness Associates

312-972-WELL