Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Health and Disease, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Health Benefits of Cherries

Health Benefits of Cherries

 

Cherries for gout

100g of cherries has 50 caloriesCherries are especially useful for treating gout.  Gout is a kind of arthritis linked to an unusually high amount of uric acid in the bloodstream. Uric acid is made in the liver and sometimes too much uric acid is made. Needle-like crystals form as uric acid levels increase, and these crystals build up in the joints over time, resulting in the pain and inflammation typical of gout.

Bing cherries have antioxidant as well as anti-inflammatory properties, in particular a compound known as cyanidin, which has been found to inhibit the activity of the enzyme involved in the making of uric acid. Research has revealed that eating the equivalent of a pound of fresh cherries each day is highly effective for lowering uric acid levels.

One study demonstrated that healthy people who ate Bing cherries for 28 days had reduced inflammation markers and they stayed low for days despite discontinuation of cherry consumption.

Another study has also shown that eating cherries may lower risk of gout attacks. Gout sufferers consuming cherries for a 2 day period had a 35 % reduced risk of gout attacks when compared with those not eating cherries. The risk of gout flare continued decreasing with the increase of cherry intake, up to 3 servings over 2 days. It was found that additional cherry intake did not provide any extra benefit.[3]

Nutritional value of cherries (red) per 100g:

  •     How many calories in cherries – 50
  •     How much protein in cherries – 1g
  •     How many carbs in cherries – 12g
  •     What is the fat content of cherries – 0.3g

Nutrients in cherries

Cherries are a very good source of vitamins C and A. They are a good source of copper, calcium, iron, potassium and manganese.

 

Cherries and blood pressure

Cherries and blood pressure

Montmorency tart cherry juice lowers blood pressure

Consuming tart cherry juice is as effective for reducing high blood pressure as blood pressure lowering medications. Participants of a 2016 study who had early signs of hypertension experienced a blood pressure reduction of 7% three hours after consuming a Montmorency tart cherry concentrate and water mixture.[4]

The blood pressure readings of the 15 participants was least 130/90 mmHg, which means they had a higher risk of having cardiovascular related problems. They consumed either 60ml of tart cherry juice concentrate or 60ml of a commercial fruit-flavored drink.

Blood pressure was taken before consuming the Montmorency cherry concentrate and was measured thereafter on an hourly basis. The participants consuming the Montmorency cherry concentrate experienced a blood pressure reduction of 7 mmHg in the 3 hours after consumption.

The greatest systolic blood pressure improvement occurred when vanillic and protocatechuic, the cherry concentrate’s phenolic acids, reached peak plasma levels. The reduction in blood pressure from the consumption of the Montmorency cherry concentrate was comparable to the reduction achieved by blood pressure lowering medication.

A 2018 study found that consuming Montmorency tart cherry juice reduced systolic blood pressure in individuals between the ages of 65 and 80. The 34 study participants in this 12-week randomized controlled trial were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups.[5]

The 1st group drank 240ml of Montmorency tart cherry juice in the morning and 240ml in the evening every day for the 12 weeks. The 2nd group drank the equivalent amount of a cherry flavored placebo drink devoid of tart cherries. Blood pressure as well as blood sugar, insulin, weight and cholesterol were measured when the study began and again when it ended.

The Montmorency tart cherry juice group had a significant reduction (4.1 mmHg) in systolic blood pressure in comparison to the drink placebo drink group.

How much tart cherry juice should you drink a day to lower blood pressure?

The participants in the 2016 study drank 60ml of tart cherry juice concentrate, which is estimated to be equivalent to about 500g of whole tart cherries.

The participants in the 2018 study drank 480 ml tart cherry juice, which was prepared from 68ml Montmorency tart cherry juice concentrate diluted with 412ml water.

Health Benefits of Cherries

Tart cherry juice for sleep
Melatonin in cherries

Montmorency tart cherries have been found to contain substantial amounts of the sleep hormone melatonin, which helps in regulating the sleep-wake cycle. Although some other foods also have melatonin, the quantity is too low to be effective, but, according to research, Montmorency cherries have 0.1 to 0.3 milligram of melatonin a serving,[6] and contain about 6 times more melatonin compared to Balaton cherries. At this dosage melatonin has been proven to be an efficient sleep inducer.

 

A 2014 study concluded that Montmorency tart cherry juice helps in improving the quality and duration of sleep, as well as help in reducing insomnia severity.[7] The 7 study participants who suffered from insomnia that consumed the cherry juice in the morning as well as at night slept over an hour longer each night.

Besides Montmorency tart cherries being a good source of melatonin, tart cherry juice also helps in increasing the availability of the essential amino acid tryptophan, a precursor to serotonin which helps with sleep.  The tart cherry juice inhibits a tryptophan degrading enzyme and degradation of tryptophan is a predictor of insomnia. The researchers suggest the melatonin and tryptophan combination in Montmorency tart cherries is likely contributing to the benefits of tart cherries for sleep.

Cherries for weight loss

The Chemistry of Cherries

A 2008 animal study has suggested that tart cherries have significant potential for reducing belly fat. Obese rats that were given tart cherry powder combined with a high-fat diet gained less weight than rats that were not given cherries. After 12 weeks, the rats that were given the tart cherry powder had 54% body fat in comparison to 63% for rats that were fed a “Western diet”. The difference in weight gain was particularly pronounced in fat around the waist area, the rats that were given the cherry powder gained less belly fat.

The rats were given either a high fat and moderate carbohydrate diet,  or a low fat and high carbohydrate diet, both of which came either with or without tart cherry powder. The cherry enriched diet rats experienced a total cholesterol level reduction of approximately 11%.The TNF-alpha inflammation marker was reduced by 40% and interleukin 6 (IL-6) was reduced by 31%.

Health Benefits of Cherries

Cherries and cancer

Cherries have quite high levels of anthocyanins (the flavonoids giving cherries their intense red color), which give them anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and chemopreventative properties. Tart cherries contain the natural compound perillyl alcohol, which seems to be very effective in reducing the incidence of all kinds of cancer.  Perillyl alcohol has tested well for treating advanced prostate, breast and ovary cancers.[9] Research suggests that substances in tart cherries can reduce the formation of the carcinogenic chemicals (HCAAs) that develop from the charring of meat.

Cherries for colon cancer

Two of the anthocyanidins present in cherries, quercetin and isoquerxitrin, have been found to prevent the growth of colon cancer.

Cherries for breast cancer

Cyandin-3-glucoside, another anthocyanin found in cherries and other fruits, has antioxidative and anti‐inflammatory properties and also induces the death of  breast cancer cells. Cyandin-3-glucoside inhibits the cytokine VEGF, which plays a key role in tumor angiogenesis. Angiogenesis (new blood vessel formation) plays a major role in breast cancer progression by providing cancer cells with nutrients, oxygen, and blood vessels for cancer cells to spread.

Delphinidin is another  anthocyanin found in cherries and other brightly colored fruits and veggies, and is also found in certain dietary supplements used as complementary cancer treatment. Delphinidin induces cell death in HER2+ breast cancer cells. Delphinidin also inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in breast cancer cells.

Cherries and muscle soreness

Tart cherry juice benefits for exercise

Tart cherry juice improves exercise recovery

Cherries help to alleviate muscle soreness after exercising. A cup of tart cherry juice can help in reducing the soreness and inflammation of the muscles that is experienced after strenuous exercise. Marathon runners consuming tart cherry juice twice a day for 7 days before a race experienced less post race pain compared to runners not consuming cherry juice.

A 2011 study revealed that men who had tart cherry juice after weight training exercises experienced less muscle pain as well as less strength loss.

A 2019 study found that active women consuming tart cherry concentrate twice a day for eight days experienced reduced muscle soreness after exercising.

Tart cherry juice improves exercise performance

A 2019 study concluded that Montmorency cherry supplementation improves cycling performance. Eight trained cyclists supplementing Montmorency tart cherry for 7 days improved cycling time-trial performance. The exercise performance improvement was accompanied by muscle oxygenation enhancement which suggests that the cherry polyphenols’ vasoactive properties could be supporting the performance improvement effects.

Cherries and osteoarthritis

Tart cherry juice for arthritis

Commonly used pain medication for osteoarthritis doesn’t actually reduce inflammation and has  unwanted side effects such as kidney or liver damage. The pain relieving properties of tart cherries have been show to be effective for the relief of pain associated with osteoarthritis without the side effects of conventional treatments.

A 2007 study revealed that pain and function improved significantly in osteoarthritis of the knee patients when they were given tart cherries in supplement form for 8 weeks.

Cherry juice for inflammation

In a 2012 double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, 20 patients suffering from inflammatory osteoarthritis had significant reductions in inflammation markers after consuming tart cherry juice twice daily for 3 weeks.

The study participants included twenty  40 to 70 year old women experiencing at least moderate osteoarthritis pain. They consumed 10.5-ounces of tart cherry juice or a placebo cherry drink twice daily for 3 weeks. There was a statistically significant reduction in inflammation among those individuals who consumed the tart cherry juice, which was indicated by reduced C-reactive protein levels. The reduction in inflammation was greatest for individuals who had shown the highest levels of inflammation at the beginning of the study.

Cherry juice for pain relief

Cherries are a natural pain reliever. Researchers have found that anthocyanidins from cherries have the ability to block both COX-1 and COX-2, enzymes considered to cause pain. Of all the fruits which were tested, cherries had the highest amounts of key anthocyanidins. The COX-inhibitory activities of the anthocyanidins in cherries were even found to be comparable to those of naproxen and ibuprofen.

Cherries and heart health

Tart cherries and cholesterol

Elevated LDL cholesterol levels are a risk factor for atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. The standard medical approach to help reduce LDL cholesterol levels to a safer range is to prescribe statins to reduce blood lipid levels. However, some patients encounter Statins are however not without side effects such as muscle pain to liver dysfunction.

A 2011 study reported a 26% reduction in cholesterol levels in mice fed tart cherry powder. A  reduction in early death of 65% was also reported, which was believed to be as a result of an improvement in cardiovascular health.

Another 2011 study in humans reported a reduction in of triglycerides levels of more than 17% on average after consuming 8-ounces of tart cherry juice daily for 4 weeks.[21]

A 2018 study reported a significant reduction in LDL cholesterol levels after participants drank Montmorency tart cherry juice made from concentrate. Study participants drinking 480ml of Montmorency tart cherry juice daily for 12 weeks experienced a reduction in LDL cholesterol levels as well as lower levels of total cholesterol.

How to Freeze Cherries

Benefits of cherries for skin

What is oxidative stress?

Oxidative stress when the body has an imbalance of antioxidants and free radicals. Free radicals are produced by the cells of the body during normal metabolic processes, and free radical neutralizing antioxidants are also produced by the cells. The body usually maintains a balance between free radicals and antioxidants.

Oxidative stress plays an important part in the aging process, especially in the skin. Aging results in the thinning of the epidermal (outer) as well as dermal (under) layers of the skin. This leads to fine wrinkles as a result of reduction of elastic fibers, collagen, and hyaluronic acid.

What are antioxidants?

Free radicals are unstable molecules which can cause damage in the body, and antioxidants neutralize free radicals by giving the free radical an electron. Antioxidants are produced naturally by the body and can also come from food such as fruit and veggies.

Several human studies have shown that sweet as well as tart cherries reduce oxidative stress. Melatonin, carotenoids, anthocyanins, polyphenols,  and vitamins C and E are all contributors to the antioxidant properties of cherries.

Cherries are an excellent source of anthocyanins, the flavonoid pigment that gives the cherry it’s color, and which has the greatest antioxidant capacity of any of the flavonoids. Tart cherries have more anthocyanins in comparison to sweet cherries. Scientific evidence has suggested that anthocyanins could possibly delay the appearance of signs of skin aging.

Health Benefits of Cherry Juice

Cherry juice and diabetes

There is some evidence to suggest that consumption of cherries could help in promoting healthy glucose regulation and reducing diabetes risk.

The enzymes dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and α glucosidase which are involved in the promotion of diabetes are inhibited by chlorogenic acid, one the main polyphenols of tart cherry juice.

Study results suggest that blood glucose could be reduced from anthocyanins by slowing the production of glucose from complex carbohydrates. The production of glucagon by pancreatic α cells could also be reduced, and hepatic glucose uptake and production of insulin by pancreatic β cells increased.

A 2008 study revealed a significant decrease in hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) after diabetic women supplemented 40 mL of concentrated tart cherry juice day for 6 weeks. Fasting blood glucose was also decreased by 8%.

History of cherries

Cherries were named after the ancient Turkish town of Cerasus and go as far back to at least 300 B.C.

Cherries were among the first fruits the early settlers brought to America. The first cherry orchard was planted in northern Michigan in the 1600s. The 1st commercial tart cherry orchards in Michigan were planted in 1893.

The ultimate celebration of cherries is the National Cherry Festival, which is held each year in July in Traverse City, Michigan.

Cherry trees have played a part in American folklore since George Washington chopped down his father’s cherry tree, then couldn’t tell a lie and told his father what he’d done.

Sweet cherries are cultivated throughout North America and Europe. France, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Germany and Russia are big producers in Europe. Sour cherries are cultivated in Eastern Europe, Germany, Russia, and the United States. Germany tops the world in cherry production, followed by the United States.

Remember We Are In This Together!
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth
Article reviewed by Dr Patricia Carrothers, Regenerative and Preventative Medicine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Cooking with MCT Oil

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

 

Cooking with MCT Oil

mayo

How to Use MCT Oil in Recipes

Some people are firm believers in taking MCT oil daily just like a supplement, straight from the spoon or mixed into drinks. MCT oil has no taste or smell, so this is an option if you’re really looking to increase your intake quickly. But be careful — a little goes a long way. People should start off with half a teaspoon and work their way up to one tablespoon.

 

How can you use MCT oil creatively at home without needing to simply drink “Bulletproof coffee” every morning? Some clever ways to get more MCT oil into your diet include:

 

Making homemade mayonnaise in a blender (using MCT oil, an egg yolk, extra virgin olive oil, lime juice and salt)

Whisking together a salad dressing (using MCT oil, raw honey, Dijon mustard and your favorite herbs)

Adding some MCT oil to smoothies, shakes or yogurt (which stabilizes your blood sugar since it helps slow down the rate that glucose and fructose sugar molecules are absorbed)

Using MCT oil in homemade baked goods instead of coconut oil (sub out about 1/3 of the coconut oil for MCT oil instead)

Don’t forget that just like with coconut oil being used for your hair, MCT oil is great for your skin and hair. MCT oil can be used in homemade teeth whitening treatments, moisturizer, lip balm, sunscreen, shaving cream, conditioner, facial masks, salt scrubs and essential oil blends.

 

Final Thoughts

The difference between MCT oil and coconut oil is that MCT oil is more concentrated and contains different proportions of MCTs. While coconut oil certainly has MCTs in it, concentrated MCT oil is almost entirely MCTs.

Scientifically proven benefits of MCT oil include its ability to help with weight loss or maintenance, heart health protection, improved energy levels and mood, and digestion and nutrient absorption support. In addition, MCT oil has antibacerial, antiviral and antifungal properties, and it can withstand high-heat cooking.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dir P Carrothers

Dir Personalized Healthcare

Preventative and Restorative Medicine

312-972-9355

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Foods, Uncategorized

Turmeric Latte Recipe

 

tumericlatte

Turmeric Latte Recipe

 

This creamy, rich latte is packed with anti-inflammatory and thyroid-supporting nutrients.

 

More than just adding a beautiful yellow to this latte, turmeric is one of the most potent anti-inflammatory agents we know. It also has been shown to counter the proliferative effect of estrogen on cancer cells. The cashews are rich in vitamins B6, E, and K and minerals copper, zinc, and selenium, which support the thyroid.

 

That’s why I recommend this turmeric latte. It’s creamy and rich, and full of savory flavors. Because of the cashews and coconut oil, this latte will help keep you full longer and stabilize blood sugar, preventing you from wanting to snack excessively. The boldness of the turmeric mixed with cinnamon and a pinch of clove is totally scrumptious.

 

TURMERIC LATTE

4 tbs. raw cashews

4 tbs. shredded unsweetened coconut

1 cup water

1 tsp. coconut oil

1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1 tsp. turmeric

Pinch of clove

Pinch of coarse sea salt

Blend the cashews, shredded coconut, and water till creamy. Strain through a nut-milk bag and discard the pulp (you now have cashew milk). Put the liquid back in the blender with the rest of the ingredients and give it a quick whiz. Transfer to a pot on the stove, bring to a boil (or heat gently until warm to the touch), remove from heat, and serve warm with a dusting of cinnamon.

 

NOTE: You may also like to try using coconut milk in place of the cashew milk.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

 

Archived

 

Dr P Carrothers

 

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

What You Should and Should Not Eat When You Have Rheumatoid Arthritis

ra

What You Should & Shouldn’t Eat to Reduce Your Risk for Rheumatoid Arthritis

 

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating disease that affects your joints and their functioning. It can include swelling and a lot of pain, specifically in your hands and feet. RA is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease affecting approximately one percent of the population. It mostly affects the small joints, slowly eroding the cartilage and bone, and leading to permanent deformity. It can actually lead to moderate disabilities within two years of diagnosis. Unfortunately, 10 years after being diagnosed, about 50% of people are unable to work. It also lowers your life expectancy by up to 18 years and leaves the majority of sufferers permanently disabled after 20 years. It is a progressive disease caused by both cultural and environmental factors, and it affects women two to three times more often than men. Most people are diagnosed between the ages of 30 and 55, so it is never too early to start preventative action.

Many foods provide health benefits against RA, but your overall weight status is also an important factor. Those who are overweight or obese put added pressure on weight-bearing joints. Since more than 50% of adults are overweight or obese, RA can seriously impede their quality of life. On the other hand, as you age, it becomes more difficult to maintain your weight, as your appetite is poor, so your weight may drop. Having a body-mass index (BMI) that is too low can lead to a poorer functional status. This means if you are too thin, Arthritis will get worse faster!

While dietary recommendations can help prevent or alleviate symptoms, there is conclusive evidence demonstrating that diet can play a modifiable role in the outcome.

When you put the wrong type of gas in your car, it will not run correctly.

 If you put the wrong foods in your body, it will not move correctly.

The following are recommendations of the best foods to consume or avoid that are likely to play role in helping prevent the negative effects that RA may have on quality of life. Of course, it is always in your best interest to consume a healthy diet, which will also help reduce your risk of disease.

Recommended Foods to Eat

Apples

You have probably heard that an apple a day keeps the doctor away. Apples are richin many different types of antioxidants, including one called “anthocyanin.” This compound has been shown to have powerful anti-inflammatory properties that can aid in preventing arthritic flare-ups and painful side effects. Apples are rich in many nutrients, including vitaminC. While studies have yet to conclude whether high amounts of fruits (and specifically antioxidant compounds) decrease your risk of RA, they have been known to lower overall levels of inflammation.

Cherries

Cherries are similar to apples in that they also contain an abundance of excellent nutrients and antioxidants. Their RA-fighting power may help reduce the pain and swelling that result from inflammation. Some studies have shown relationships associating lower risks of RA and inflammation with increased consumption of fruits, like cherries, that are rich in antioxidants and vitamin C. In fact, cherries have been shown to reduce inflammatory markers such as your C-reactive protein (CRP) level. However, not all results are significant for each person.  Your body may have other needs than the person next to you.

 

Oats

What a hearty way to start off your day: a bowl of oatmeal with some cherries on top! Oatmeal is a heart-healthy ingredient in many delectable dishes, such as cereal, cookies, muffins, and even chicken breading. This is because it is a whole grain that is rich in many nutrients, including fiber. Fiber has been shown to play a role in reducing CRP levels in your blood. Furthermore, it may help reduce other inflammatory biomarkers. It is definitely recommended that a diet include at least 25 grams (g) of fiber for women aged 19 to 50, 21 g for women over 50, 38 g for men 19 to 50, and 30 g for men over 50.

We are talking Steel Oats, not Quaker Oats.

 

Yogurt & Milk Products

Most dairy products, such as yogurt and milk, are artificially fortified with vitamin D, which should decrease the development of several autoimmune diseases and even reduce the risk of RA. But they are not talking about the commercial milk that you buy at a grocery store in most of the United States and Canada.  They are talking grass fed cows.  Which is what is only sold in European countries.

For instance, a prospective study following 41,000 women aged 55 to 69 found that those with increased vitamin-D intake had a lower risk of RA. Taking vitamin D is a better option for some, but you cannot take vitamin D alone, and there are many different kinds of Vitamin D to take.  So, if you need help, call us!

Further, an observational study of 957 Irish adults over 60 evaluated vitamin-D levels and inflammatory biomarkers. It was found that those who were vitamin-D deficient had a higher level of these inflammatory biomarkers and were at increased risk of heart disease and RA.

Fatty Fish

Fatty fish, such as salmon, mackerel, and herring, are rich in omega-3 fatty acids and play a protective role against several chronic diseases, such as heart disease and cancer. One of the enzymes that is responsible for inflammation and pain is called “COX-2.” Omega-3 fatty acids play a role in reducing COX-2 enzymes from being active and thus help decrease overall inflammation—especially among inflammatory compounds that are involved in RA development.

Omega-3 fatty acids help prevent an inflammatory response leading to inflamed joints and, as a result, reduce the swelling and pain.

In a review of several studies, it was found that omega-3 fatty acids may have a beneficial role for those with RA. Most studies showed improved clinical symptoms of patients, including number of tender joints, the duration of morning stiffness, and overall decreased pain. There have been mixed results in studies of whether a combination of omega fatty acids is beneficial. However, research shows that long-term consumption can help reduce overall risk for RA, as well as other chronic diseases, such as heart disease. Consume two servings per week of omega-3-rich fish to help keep your heart, brain, and joints healthy!

Not only do fish have an abundance of omega-3 fatty acids, they are also a great source of vitamin B6, which plays a role in breaking down homocysteine. If you have high levels of homocysteine, you put yourself at a much higher risk for heart disease. Vitamin B6 is necessary to keep levels of inflammatory markers down. Low vitamin B6 is associated with increased levels of CRP, and thus, increased inflammation. Unfortunately, low levels are not a result of poor intake or lack of nutrient supplements. In fact, they may not even be due to an unusually high breakdown of the vitamin (catabolism). Its mechanism is not 100% clear, but it is understood that low levels are a result of the overall state of inflammation. Therefore, in order to reduce the risk of chronic inflammation, boosting your B6 levels by increasing your intake may be beneficial. Besides fish, you can find vitamin B6 in foods such as meat, poultry, legumes, non-citrus fruits, fortified cereals, and soy products.

Cooking Oil

Olive oil, coconut oil, sesame oil are a few of the cooking oils that have been shown to have similar effects as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are more commonly known as aspirin or ibuprofen. These work on the COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes and reduce their production in or order to reduce inflammation and overall pain. About 3.5 tablespoons (tbsp) of a good cooking oil can have the equivalent effect of 200 milligrams (mg) of ibuprofen.

While studies have shown inconclusive results on olive oil itself, consuming olive oil in place of other unhealthy fats, such as saturated fats or fats that are abundant in omega-6 fatty acids, can reap many health benefits. Olive oil is rich in antioxidants and monounsaturated fats. It has already been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects in other diseases, such as cancer and heart disease, and it may even have a protective role in reducing the risk of RA.

A study done at Standford University has shown that there are no real olive oils in the United States.  They are all fake olive oils.

 

Red Wine

While I am not one to endorse regular alcohol consumption, drinking in moderation may have several health benefits. You may have heard that red wine is abundant in some great nutrients, such as antioxidants, which include resveratrol. Enjoying just one glass of wine can help you clear your mind and relax you, since it has been shown to lower the production of enzymes that are responsible for increasing inflammation. In other words, extensive research has been performed on the effects of alcohol, and it has been found that by reducing inflammation, it reduces your risk of developing RA.

A research study found that those with a low to moderate consumption have a reduced risk of RA, but the protective effects were not found in those with high consumption. It is safe to consume about 15 g of alcohol per day, which is equivalent to one standard alcoholic beverage.

Recommended Foods to Avoid

Vegetable Oil, Corn Oil & Canola Oil

One study evaluating the beneficial effects of omega-3 supplementation recommended that people minimize their intake of omega-6 fatty acids. While symptoms such as joint pain were not shown to be reduced, inflammatory markers were lowered.

Unfortunately, omega-6 is a major component of vegetable oils. Omega-6 has been associated with increased activity of the COX-2 enzymes. This means that there will be more joint inflammation leading to increased joint pain and swelling—something you definitely want to avoid. While a modest amount (a couple of tablespoons) may promote good health, excessive amounts may be detrimental—especially if you are suffering from RA.

Vegetable oils are still recommended as the better option for cooking over saturated fats such as butter. However, try to limit your intake of foods that are abundant in omega-6 fatty acids, such as cooking oils, processed foods, and fried foods. Long-term effects of limiting omega-6 fatty acids may be beneficial—especially for other health ailments, such as heart disease.

Red Meat

Limiting your servings of red meat may be beneficial in reducing symptoms of RA. We already know that having reduced amounts of red meat decreases your risk for diseases such as cancer and heart disease, but it may also help reduce risks for inflammatory diseases, such as arthritis.

One study evaluating over 25,000 individuals between the ages of 45 and 75 found that those who developed RA ate more red meat compared to those with no arthritis who ate less red meat. Red meat is also a very good protein source.

It is not certain whether high-protein diets may have debilitating effects on symptoms, and current evidence has been shown to be inconsistent. Some studies have shown that high levels of protein intake significantly increase inflammation, which can lead to increased joint pain. One study found that those consuming lower amounts of calories from protein compared to overall calorie intake showed a lower risk of RA. However, the protein source was not significant.

While red meat is an excellent source of protein, it is also a great source of iron. While iron is a significantly essential mineral, too much of it has been shown to increase inflammation. Since the research is limited in this area, you should consider other sources of protein and iron in order to protect your joints and your heart and avoid inflammation.

 

Coffee

Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages worldwide. It is also quite the controversial drink as to whether it is detrimental, beneficial, or has no bearing whatsoever on your health. Three studies performed in the U.S. found that coffee was not detrimental for those at risk for RA, whereas a Finnish prospective study found that those consuming four or more cups of coffee daily compared to those consuming three or fewer had a higher risk of RA.

While the verdict is still out as to whether caffeine has a negative impact on your risk for RA, researchers

found that consuming caffeine may intervene in the effectiveness of methotrexate, which is a drug that is used to manage RA symptoms. Israeli researchers investigated 39 individuals over a three-month period and analyzed their symptoms and diets, including caffeine intake. It was found that those consuming the highest amount of caffeine had the least improvement in morning stiffness and joint pain compared to those with the lowest intake. It was determined that consuming 180 mg of caffeine can impede the effects of the drug.

For regular coffee drinkers, moderation is key. One cup per day, which contains about 120 mg, likely will not cause any harm. Research is still very scarce in this area, and unfortunately, there is no strong conclusive evidence supporting the role of dietary interventions.

Furthermore, those with RA are at an increased risk of death as a result of an increased risk of heart disease. It is not well understood why this may be, since some risk factors, such as high cholesterol levels, have been found to be lower in those with rheumatoid arthritis compared to healthy individuals.

Of course, it is always best to take preventative actions, even if there is a limited chance that it may be beneficial, because there is no downside to incorporating healthy, nutrient-rich foods in your diet.

You have only been given one body, that is unique, and different than anyone else’s.  So, what works for you may not work for another.  Please call us or write to us and let us help you work out a personalized health care plan just for you.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

  1. Carrothers

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssocaites@gmail.com

Health and Wellness Associates on Facebook.

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

The Anti-Inflammatory Drink You Do Not Want to Be Without.

theantiinflammatorywinterdrink

The Anti-Inflammatory Winter Tonic You Can’t Live Without

‘Tis the season of cool days and warm drinks! This comforting and healing golden milk is a recipe centuries old, but tweaked for today’s market.  This recipe not only taste great, but are also good for you. This turmeric tonic is the perfect beverage to sip on when you have a cold or if you are looking for an anti-inflammatory boost.

I know what you are saying, “Here she goes again with another Tumeric solution”   Yes, I am!

Now ask the question, “Why should be drinking this?”   Everyone!

 

If you do not like this drink, sprinkle a small amount of turmeric in your coffee, or hot chocolate made with almond milk.

 

 

INGREDIENTS

 

3 cups unsweetened almond milk

1 inch piece turmeric, grated

1 inch piece ginger, grated

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 dropper of stevia or powder form to taste

Step 1

 

Add all of the ingredients into a medium saucepan and warm over low heat for about 15 minutes or until warmed through, stirring occasionally.

 

Step 2

 

Strain and enjoy with friends!

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Tuesday Tip! Lysol

lysol

Please Dont Use Lysol!

You may find that a strange thing for a healthcare professional to say, but at this time of the year I need to remind people that if you have babies, small children, animals, that lysol products will do a lot of harm to babies, children, animals, elderly, people with inflamation diseases, lupes, RA, MS, and cancer patients.  Even if your cancer is in remission it is advisable not to use Lysol products.

Easiest way to explain it; Lysol is meant to kill live cells.  Well a live cell or organism on the floor, or in the air, is the same live cells that we are made up of.

It has become the cause of many chronic respiratory problems in your children, cancer patients, puppies, small dogs, and so on.

So, Lysol kills live cells and anything living!

Lifestyle

Stave off Aging

acai berries

Acai berries look a lot like blueberries, which are also very beneficial for your health.

These deep purple berries have more antioxidants than any other food packing 10 times

the anti-aging actives of red wine and more fatty acids than avocado and olive oil.

Chock full of anti inflammatory compounds, youth preserving polyphenols and omega-3,

acai berries tackles redness and roughness around your face and hands,

while tightening skin and smoothing fine lines.

It also improves immunity and boost energy, so you will feel as young and radiant as you look.

Find acai juice and capsules at natural food stores,

or add a scoop of freeze dried acai powder to smoothies, cocktails, baked goods and puddings.

Health and Wellness Associates

312-972-WELL

Foods

Health Benefits of Rosemary

rosemary2

Rosemary has had the reputation for miracles for thousands of years. It has been used as an antiseptic, antidepressant, analgesic, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, disinfectant, aphrodisiac, and expectorant. Rosemary has earned praise for alleviating nerve-related conditions, boosting the immune system, fighting off bacterial and viral infections, aiding respiratory ailments, strengthening digestion and improving circulation. Rosemary contains both caffeic acid and rosmarinic acid which act as a powerful anti-inflammatory making it ideal for those who suffer with auto-immune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and fibromyalgia. It also contains properties and volatile oils that work similarly to anti-histamines and make it very useful to treat conditions such as asthma and chronic migraines. Rosemary’s diuretic properties have been known to help relieve gout, edema, and kidney stones. Rosemary has the ability to stimulate memory, improve concentration, and help overcome mental fatigue by increasing the blood flow to the head and brain. It is also known to alleviate depression and sadness and can decrease anxiety brought on by stress. Rosemary oil is often added to hair and skin care products due to its ability to cleanse and nourish the scalp and heal and repair the skin. Essential oil of rosemary can also be used through a steam vaporizer to disinfect the air in your home &/or office which is especially beneficial during cold and flu season. Rosemary can be taken as a tea, supplement, or simply added to fresh guacamole, salads, soups, or any of your home cooked meals. It is a potent and effective herb that can provide a myriad of health benefits.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

312-972-9355