Foods, Health and Disease, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Could Broccoli Prevent Prostate and Other Cancers

broccoli-prevent-prostate-cancer-IG

 

Could Broccoli Prevent Prostate Cancer?

 

 

Using food to prevent prostate cancer sounds too easy, doesn’t it?  Research published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute confirmed that it really can be as simple as that.

 

Broccoli, cauliflower, rutabaga, arugula, radish, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, bok choy, greens, watercress, turnips, and kale are members of the cruciferous vegetable family.  Scientifically, they are called Brassicaceae, which translates to “cabbage.”  They are readily available in most markets, inexpensive, and offer a fantastic array of health benefits.

 

Researchers with Cancer Care Ontario evaluated more than 1,300 male patients based on diet and found that cruciferous vegetables in particular lowered risk for an aggressive form of prostate cancer.

 

Of 137 foods on the questionnaire, broccoli and cauliflower seemed to have the greatest impact on overall risk but all the leafy greens showed significant ability to prevent prostate cancer.

 

Authors with the study stated, “Aggressive prostate cancer is biologically virulent and associated with poor prognosis.  Therefore, if the association that we observed is ultimately found to be causal, a possible means to reduce the burden of this disease may be primary prevention through increased consumption of broccoli, cauliflower, and possibly spinach.”

 

Incredible Health Benefits of Cruciferous Vegetables

 

This vegetable family has even more to offer!  They are excellent raw or cooked, useful in all manner of meals, and easy to prepare.

 

5 Benefits of Leafy Greens

 

  1. Weight Control: They are packed with powerful nutrients such as vitamins A, Bs, and C, folic acid, and fiber. They are low in calories so they are an ideal nutrient-dense food if you’re looking to lose weight or maintain a healthy body weight.

 

  1. Antioxidant Bioavailability: Your body loves these veggies and absorbs most of the nutrients they offer. This is especially important in regards to their vitamin C, manganese, beta-carotene, and lutein.  Your digestive tract uses it all so you get the full impact.

 

  1. Cancer Fighter: Aside from preventing prostate cancer, there are many studies linking cruciferous veggies with a lower risk of breast, uterine, lung, liver, colorectal, and cervix cancer. In fact, 70% of the scientific community’s research on cruciferous veggies mention the link to lower cancer risk.

 

broccoli prevent prostate cancer IG

 

  1. Obliterates Oxidation: With the amount of nutrients found in this vegetable family, it is no surprise that 1-2 cups per day drastically reduced patient oxidation by 22% overall. In a comparison to multivitamin impact on oxidation, researchers saw less than one-half of 1% reduction in oxidation for those taking a supplement.  These vegetables are better than any vitamin.

 

  1. Heart Health: If you want to steadily lower the heat of body wide inflammation, the vitamin K and omega-3s in cruciferous vegetables is definitely the way to go. Chronic inflammation due to diet, stress, and poor lifestyle habits is a major bio-marker for heart disease and every other major condition.  These foods can help to cool down inflammation and fight the free radicals that lead to heart attack and stroke.

 

There are so many other great benefits of cruciferous vegetables such as the fiber that helps keep your digestive system healthy and moving properly.  They are abundant in vitamin A which is excellent news for preserving your vision as you age.  The heavy nutrient content in general is a good way to boost your immune system to help you fight illness from the inside out.

 

If you are looking for foods that taste great, don’t cost a small fortune, and are available just about everywhere, look no further than broccoli and the rest of the cousins in the cruciferous veggie family.

 

Their ability to prevent prostate cancer is just the beginning.

 

Please feel free to share with family and loved ones.  Please call us with any questions.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-Well

 

 

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Foods, Health and Disease

Keep Away Colds

buttonmushrooms

White button mushrooms keep away colds
If you dread cold and flu season, reach for white
Button mushroom. The Journal of Nutrition reports
That these supermarket staples have the power to rev
Your immune system by generating more virus
Destroying T-cells in your bloodstream.

Also: Eating cabbage coleslaw, lowers your risk
Of catching a cold weather bug. That is because
Cabbage is rich in glutamine, an amino acid that
alerts the immune system faster to invading viruses.

Health and Wellness Associates

P. Carrothers

Archived Article

Foods

Korean Kimchi Recipe

koreankimchi

Kimchi is a famous fermented vegetable dish from Korea. Usually served as a side dish, there are more than 300 different varieties of kimchi, depending on the main vegetable ingredient used and the region or season in which they’re made.

Nowadays, you’ll see a lot of ready-to-eat kimchi brands in supermarkets, but no matter how convenient they seem to be, many of these products are often loaded with artificial flavorings, toxic fillers, and harmful additives, and have also gone through excessive processing that may have eliminated any living organism in them.

To make sure that you get the quality, the freshness, and all the health perks that you’re after, I encourage you to make your own kimchi at home using this recipe:

Ingredients

  • 4 cups of water
  • 4 tablespoons sea salt
  • 1 head cabbage, shredded
  • 1 cup daikon radish grated or 1 cup asparagus cut into one-inch pieces
  • 2 scallions, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons fresh ginger, minced
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper

Directions:

    1. In a large bowl, mix a brine of the water and salt. Mix well to thoroughly dissolve salt. Add the cabbage and daikon radish. Cover with a plate or other weight to keep the vegetables submerged. Soak for 12 hours.
    2. Drain the brine from the vegetables, reserving the brine. Taste the vegetables for saltiness. If they are too salty, you can rinse the vegetables. If they are not salty enough, sprinkle with a little more salt (one quarter teaspoon at a time).
    3. Combine the asparagus, green beans, scallions, garlic, ginger, and cayenne pepper. Add to the cabbage mixture.
    4. Put the whole mix into a jar or crock. Pour the soaking liquid over the vegetables, making sure that they are completely submerged in liquid.
    5. Cover loosely with a clean cloth and set aside for three to seven days. The ideal room temperature to help with the fermentation is around 70 degrees Fahrenheit. If it is colder, the fermentation takes longer.
    6. Check the kimchi daily. Make sure the vegetables stay covered in brine. After three to seven days, the kimchi will taste ripe. Once this happens, place in glass jar in the refrigerator. It will keep for months.

(From Healthy Recipes for Your Nutritional Type)

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

312-972-WELL

Foods

Grilled Chicken Burgers

chickenburgers

Grilled Chicken Burgers

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon butter, cut into pieces
  • 1 small red onion, 1/2 finely chopped, 1/2 thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce, eyeball it
  • 1 tablespoon hot sauce, eyeball it
  • 1 1/4 pounds ground chicken
  • 1 tablespoons grill seasoning (recommended: McCormick brand) a palm full
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 2 tablespoons honey, eyeball it
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 3 rounded tablespoons sweet pickle relish
  • 2 cups shredded cabbage mix
  • Salt and pepper
  • 4 cornmeal Kaiser rolls, split

Directions

In a small skillet over medium heat, melt butter. Add chopped onions, garlic and tomato paste and sweat them for 5 minutes to soften and sweeten. Sprinkle in sugar and remove from heat. Cool in a bowl, 5 minutes. Add tomato paste mixture, Worcestershire, hot sauce to bowl and combine. Add chicken to the bowl then grill seasoning and combine the burgers well to evenly distribute the flavors and form 4 patties. Wash up.

Heat 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, a turn of the pan, in a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Cook patties 6 minutes on each side.

Combine the honey, lemon juice, and remaining extra-virgin olive oil in a bowl. Add relish, cabbage mix and sliced onions and season with salt and pepper. Toss the slaw to coat and reserve.

Serve burgers on bun bottoms topped with slaw and bun tops.
Health and WEllness Associates

312-972-WELL

Foods

Stuffed Cabbage

stuffedcabbage

Many of us have had these and we need to keep eating them.  They are filled with many many of the nutrients that we have lost with “quick” foods.  For the men in your family, use canned whole tomatoes in your sauce, that is what is best for them.  You also might want to skip the honey, especially if you have children.

Savory Stuffed Cabbage Rolls

Adapted from The Green Thumb Cookbook, page 63

1 medium head cabbage

1 pound ground beef

1/2 cup chopped onion

3 T uncooked brown rice

2 T chopped fresh parsley (2 t dried)

2 t salt

1/2 t pepper

1 egg

1 3/4 cups plain tomato sauce

1 cup canned tomato chunks

2 T honey

1/2 cup grated Colby cheese, optional

Put the head of cabbage in a pot. Cover with water. Remove the cabbage and bring the water to a boil. Turn off the heat. Submerge the whole head of cabbage in the boiling water and cover. Let sit for 15-20 minutes.

Meanwhile, brown the beef and onion. Turn off the heat. Add the rice, parsley, salt, pepper, and egg.

When the cabbage is done “cooking”, remove it from the water onto a cookie sheet with sides (to catch any remaining water). Very carefully, remove 12 leaves. Cut the thickest part of center rib out of each leaf, about 1 or 2 inches. There will be a little V in the middle of each leave. Divide the meat filling between the leaves and roll up jelly roll fashion, but tucking in the ends so the filling stays put. Place the rolls in a deep casserole dish.

Pour the tomato sauce, tomato chunks, and honey over the rolls. Cover and bake at 350 for about an hour and a half. Remove the lid, sprinkle with cheese, and bake another 5 minutes or until cheese is melted. Let set a few minutes before serving.

Serves: 4 – 6

Foods

Cabbage prevents cancer, and, and, and, …..

cabbage

Cabbage is a cruciferous vegetable: it is closely related to other superfoods like broccoli and cauliflower and, unsurprisingly, has a similar nutrient profile. Its use as a medicine goes at least as far back as Roman times, when cabbage or cabbage juice was used as a treatment for constipation — and considering how high in dietary fiber cabbage is, this treatment was likely very effective! Apart from providing fiber, cabbage is also rich in nutrients and this makes it useful in the control and prevention of a number of diseases, including cancer and diabetes. The specific properties of cabbage which make it so useful for these conditions are discussed below.

Phytonutrients All cabbages, white or red, are rich in phytonutrients, which are compounds naturally found in plants that include polyphenols and glucosinolates. These compounds have been studied for their role in fighting cancer and inflammatory conditions. A 2013 study published in the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention found that these antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties could contribute to the “prevention of chronic diseases…such as cancer and coronary artery disease”.

Anti-diabetic Compounds Cabbage is increasingly being studied as a source of possible treatment for those suffering from diabetes. In a 2008 publication in the journal Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, a study which supplemented the diets of diabetic rats with red cabbage extract for 60 days found that, set against the control group, the supplemented rats displayed lower blood sugar levels, improved kidney function and improved weight loss. Researchers believe that this is likely due to the antioxidant and antihyperglycemic properties of cabbage, as well as to the high fiber content that helps to regulate blood sugar levels.

Vitamin C and K A single serving of cabbage can provide 47% of the recommended daily allowance of Vitamin C and 102% of the recommended daily allowance of Vitamin K. Both of these nutrients are important in disease prevention. Vitamin C, like the phytonutrients already mentioned, is also a powerful antioxidant and has been linked to a strong immune system and a defense against pathogens in the body. Vitamin K aids in the formation of blood clots and is also essential to maintain strong and healthy bones.

Weight Loss Properties Weight loss reduces one’s chances of developing diabetes and many forms of cancer and cabbage has a number of properties which make it an ideal weight loss food. It is low in calories, fat and carbohydrates, high in dietary fiber and is considered to have a low glycemic index, meaning that it will not cause a sharp rise in blood sugar as it is digested. It is also a versatile vegetable to use while dieting as it can be easily added to a number of soups, stews, casseroles and crockpot dinners.

In summary, cabbage is high in fiber, rich in antioxidants and other phytonutrients and an excellent aid for weight loss. All of these properties make it an ideal food both to treat conditions like cancer or diabetes and to prevent them from happening in the first place.