Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Gluten-Free Cinnamon Lemon Coconut Bliss Balls Recipe

Gluten-Free Cinnamon Lemon Coconut Bliss Balls Recipe

gluten free balls

Word of warning: these cinnamon lemon coconut bliss balls are ever so slightly addictive. But that’s alright because each one has just under 100 calories and only 3 grams of sugar, so you can use your own best judgment on when to indulge.

Want to know the key to keeping the sugar so low? The unusual but delicious pairing of cinnamon and lemon zest. If you love lemon and cinnamon and you’ve never tried this combo before, you’ll be hooked!

In addition to being low in sugar, they’re also a good source of heart-healthy mono and polyunsaturated fats. Plus, they’re super easy to make? The hardest part is zesting the lemon, but you can still be noshing in under 10 minutes flat—perfect when you’re craving a little something sweet!​

Ingredients

  • 2 cups fine almond flour
  • ¼ cup pure maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons almond oil
  • 2 teaspoons lemon zest, or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, or to taste
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt or table salt
  • ¼ cup shredded unsweetened coconut ​

Preparation

  1. Combine almond flour, maple syrup, almond oil, lemon zest, cinnamon, and salt in a food processor bowl. Process until mixture is well combined and slightly sticky.
  2. Line a large plate or small baking sheet with plastic wrap and divide dough into 20 pieces. Roll each piece into a ball.
  3. Place shredded coconut on a small plate and roll each ball in the coconut, then return to plate or baking sheet. May serve immediately or store covered in refrigerator until ready to eat

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

You may substitute the almond oil for any neutral tasting vegetable oil or liquid coconut oil. Feel free to add additional lemon zest and coconut if desired. Start with recommended amounts, then add more as needed.

Cooking and Serving Tips

You can make a big batch of these and store them in a well-sealed container in the freezer. Enjoy them frozen, or thaw them out a little in the refrigerator before serving. These bliss balls are perfect for dessert or an afternoon treat with a cup of tea.

 

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Skillet Peanut Butter Cinnamon Cookie, Low Carb

skillett

Skillet Peanut Butter Cinnamon Spice Cookie

 

Total Time 20 min

Prep 10 min, Cook 10 min

Yield 16 servings (129 calories each)

This decadent yet low-carb skillet peanut butter cinnamon spice cookie is the perfect treat for someone with diabetes. It takes less than ten minutes of prep time, has only five grams of sugar per serving, and is made with blood sugar lowering cinnamon. Most importantly, it’s delicious!

 

Ingredients

1 large egg

1 cup natural peanut butter

½ cup brown sugar

¼ cup almond meal

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon cinnamon

¼ teaspoon ground ginger

¼ teaspoon salt

Non-stick spray

2 tablespoons peanuts, optional, for garnish

Preparation

Preheat oven to 350 F.

In a large bowl, beat egg until slightly frothy. Whisk in the peanut butter, brown sugar, almond meal, vanilla extract, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, and salt until well combined.

Spray an ovenproof skillet lightly with nonstick spray. Pour batter into the skillet and spread evenly with a spatula. If desired, sprinkle the top with a few peanuts and press down slightly.

Place cookie on a rack set in the center of the oven and bake 10-12 minutes until puffed and golden around the edges. Let cook 10 minutes before cutting and serving.

 

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

This is one of my favorite treats to make because I always have the ingredients on hand! Whenever I’m craving something warm, gooey and sweet, I know this skillet cookie is only 20 minutes away.

 

Nut Butters

 

Even in your pantry is looking bare, this recipe is easy to adapt based on what you have on hand. You can use any type of nut butter—cashew butter and almond butter both work well. And if you’re in the unfortunate situation of running out of nut butter, you can make your own by blending a rounded cup of nuts with a tablespoon of oil in the food processor until if forms a creamy spread.

 

Sweeteners

 

I made these with brown sugar, which has a richer flavor than white sugar, although you could certainly substitute it in a pinch. You could also use pure maple syrup or honey, but be sure to reduce the oven temperature by 25 degrees and cook it a couple minutes longer to prevent burning.

 

Nut-Free Variation

 

If anyone in your household is nut free, you can still make this cookie—just swap in sesame butter and leave out the almond meal. Made with sunflower seeds, it’s perfect for those with tree nut allergies.

 

Vegan Variation

 

For a vegan version, use a chia seed egg. Mix 1 tablespoon chia seeds with 3 tablespoons water and let it sit to gel for about 10 minutes before mixing in the other ingredients.

 

 

This trick is a perfect one to remember next time you run out of eggs.

 

More Add-Ins

 

If you’re feeling extra decadent, load this cookie up with lots of healthy add-ins. In the mood for something chocolatey? Swap the almond flour for ¼ cup cocoa powder, or stir in ½ cup chopped dark chocolate, which is rich in antioxidant polyphenols and flavanols. Want something fruity? Stir in a handful of frozen berries. This recipe is especially delicious with frozen wild blueberries.

 

Make an extra nutty cookie with different kinds of nuts and seeds, like walnuts, sunflower seeds, and almonds. Add a handful or two of dried fruit along with those nuts to make a granola inspired cookie. My favorite way to enjoy this cookie is with a handful of shredded dried coconut and dark chocolate chips.

 

Cooking and Serving Tips

This cookie is best when it’s slightly undercooked. The center might not look fully done when you take it out, but it will continue cooking as it cools.

 

Be sure to use a nonstick or well seasoned cast iron skillet to prevent sticking.

 

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Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Cinnamon

cinnamon

Cinnamon

 

There are some scents that remind us about the comfort of home and can soothe our bodies in the process. Case in point: the sweet and warm smell of cinnamon.

 

This spice is derived from the stems of the cinnamomum tree. The inner bark is then extracted, and the woody parts are removed and left to dry. This results in the formation of strips that eventually curl into the cinnamon sticks known today.

 

These strips can also then be ground to form cinnamon powder. The spice is native to the Caribbean, South America and Southeast Asia.

 

There are two known types of cinnamon: Ceylon cinnamon and cassia cinnamon. Also known as Cinnamomum verum, Ceylon cinnamon is considered to be “true cinnamon,” and is produced in Sri Lanka, India, Madagascar, Brazil and the Caribbean.

 

Cassia cinnamon or Cinnamomum aromaticum, on the other hand, is the variety that’s more commonly used nowadays because it is less expensive compared to the former. This type of cinnamon is grown in China, Vietnam and Indonesia.

 

The first recorded use of cinnamon dates back to circa 2800 BCE by Emperor Shen Nung, known as the Father of Chinese Medicine. Cinnamon was also utilized in ancient Egyptian society to mummify the dead.

 

This spice became highly prized, and since cinnamon was rare and valuable, it was regarded as a gift fit for kings In medieval times, doctors used cinnamon to treat ailments such as coughs, sore throat and arthritis.

 

Nowadays, cinnamon is ranked as the second most popular spice in the U.S. next to black pepper. Even more important, recent research has proven that cinnamon is loaded with nutrients that your body will greatly benefit from.

 

Choose Cinnamon for Its Amazing Health Benefits

 

There is more to this spice than its comforting smell. Cinnamon has high amounts of calcium, fiber and manganese, as well as antibacterial, antifungal, antimicrobial, antiviral and antioxidant properties. It’s highly useful for:

 

Enhancing antioxidant defenses: polyphenols in cinnamon can help protect the body from damage caused by free radicals.

Exhibiting anti-inflammatory properties: cinnamaldehyde, an oily compound responsible for cinnamon’s aroma and flavor, can help alleviate inflammation.

 

A study revealed that cinnamon can target inflammatory pathways and assist in preventing neurodegenerative illnesses.

Enhancing cognitive function: one study proved that the smell of cinnamon worked better than peppermint and jasmine in boosting cognitive function.

 

Study participants reported better scores on tasks that involved attentional processes, virtual recognition memory, working memory and visual-motor response speed after they smelled cinnamon or chewed cinnamon-flavored gum.

Improving brain health: two compounds in cinnamon, cinnamaldehyde and epicatechin, were shown to inhibit the aggregation of a protein called tau.

 

Tau plays a big role in the structure and function of neurons.

 

Although this protein is normal in cell structures, if tau accumulates, it can develop “neurofibrillary tangles,” a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Cinnamaldehyde and epicatechin were proven to protect tau from oxidative damage that can lead to dysfunction.

Supporting weight loss: cinnamon was proven to be effective in regulating postprandial glucose response, or the amount of blood sugar found in your blood after a meal.

Helping soothe sore throat and/or coughs: a water-soluble fiber called mucilage is created when you soak cinnamon sticks in water.

 

Mucilage then coats and soothes the throat when you drink this infusion. The antibacterial properties of the spice also help treat these ailments.

 

Increased blood flow and blood oxygen levels (that can assist in fighting infections) could also occur because of cinnamon’s warming properties.

Keeping cancer at bay: cinnamaldehyde was proven to thwart colon cancer cells and may be effective versus human liver cancer cells.

Preventing heart disease: not only does cinnamon help stabilize HDL cholesterol levels, but it can reduce total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels as well.

Alleviating ADHD symptoms: research has shown that cinnamon was able to help enhance motivation and performance and reduce anxiety and frustration while driving.

 

Further, the spice assists in counteracting oxidative stress’ effects that typically manifest in kids with ADHD.

Helping diabetes patients: cinnamon helps lower blood sugar levels, boost insulin sensitivity and slow down the emptying of the stomach to reduce sharp blood sugar rises after a meal.

 

Cinnamon was also proven to improve glycemic status, especially in the levels of fasting blood glucose among type 2 diabetes patients.

 

The body’s glucose metabolism is also increased by about 20 times, helping enhance the body’s ability to regulate blood sugar.

 

Lastly, cinnamon exhibited potential in becoming an insulin substitute for type 2 diabetes patients because of the presence of a bioactive component with insulin-like effects.

How Is Cinnamon Typically Used?

 

Most people know cinnamon because it’s a popular ingredient in pastry.Did you know, however, that cinnamon can be utilized for medicinal purposes as well?

 

This spice is known to help in treating muscle spasms, vomiting, diarrhea, infections, appetite loss, erectile dysfunctions and colds, as well as help prevent ailments such as urinary tract infections, tooth decay and gum disease. Here are other brilliant ways to use cinnamon:

 

Athlete’s foot solution: soaking your feet in cinnamon tea aids in killing athlete’s foot-causing fungus.

 

Mother Earth Living suggests boiling water first and then adding a few cinnamon sticks after.

 

Once the mixture is ready, soak your feet in the warm water for a few minutes per night.

Nausea relief: when ingested, cinnamon tea works well in helping relieve nausea because of the catechins in the spice.

 

Boil 1 teaspoon of cinnamon bark in a cup of water for about 10 minutes, strain the liquid and drink.

 

However, if you’re pregnant, do not drink this mixture.

Hair mask: if you want to help avoid hair loss and promote hair growth, a hair mask mixed with cinnamon can lessen your worries.

 

Start by warming half a cup of olive oil in a bowl. Add 1 teaspoon of both cinnamon powder and honey, and stir.

 

Work this mixture onto your scalp, leave on for 15 minutes and wash hair.

 

Make sure to consult your physician first before applying this hair mask, especially if you’re already treating this problem.

Natural bronzer: ditch the typical bronzers that are loaded with harsh chemicals — you can make your own with three ingredients only.

 

Combine cinnamon powder, cocoa powder and cornstarch until the color suits your skin.

 

Simply add more cocoa powder if you want a darker hue or more cornstarch if you want a lighter shade.

 

Once you get the color you wanted, mix it with plain and unscented lotion and store in a clean jar with a lid.

Massage or baths: combine ½ teaspoon of ground cinnamon, ½ cup of almond or sesame oil and ½ teaspoon of pure vanilla extract. Before using, shake the oil gently.

Ant repellent: if ants have become a recurring problem in your home, sprinkle powdered cinnamon along the windowsills to help prevent these insects from coming in, as they have an aversion to cinnamon.

 

Just be sure to replace the powder when they get wet.

Holiday home décor: should you feel like your home needs extra decorating, especially during the holidays, you can use cinnamon sticks to make a wreath.

 

You will need about 80 to 120 cinnamon sticks and a wooden wreath ring from a local craft store.

 

Using a hot glue gun, stick the cinnamon sticks onto the frame.

 

Finish off the wreath by attaching a seasonal ribbon or other embellishments.

 

Grow Cinnamon in Your Garden

 

While cinnamon isn’t typically grown in home settings, it can be easy to grow. Cinnamon typically blooms during spring to summer. It grows best when the soil is kept slightly dry, since it allows the plant to thrive for years in a pot without special care. A well-drained and acidic potting mix works best. Cinnamon plants need full to partial sun, a minimum indoor temperature of 60 degrees Fahrenheit and adequate protection from frost.

 

Last but not the least, you will need cinnamon seeds. According to Laurelynn and Byron Martin, authors of the book “Growing Tasty Tropical Plants in Any Home, Anywhere,” Ceylon cinnamon can be grown from either seeds, vegetative cuttings or grafts, but it’s more difficult to propagate vegetatively than Cassia cinnamon.

 

Cinnamon plants, on some occasions, also produce seeds that can be picked and planted. Just make sure to get seeds when they’re ripe and black in color and plant them as soon as possible.

 

To ensure proper growth, fertilize the plants either weekly or biweekly only during active growth in the late winter until fall. These plants stay as small as 3 feet if you prune them regularly, but you can allow them to reach up to 8 feet tall when you repot the plant over time into a 12- to 14-inch pot.

 

To know when the plant has developed, check the leaves. Matured leaves often appear green or light green (when kept in high light). The cinnamon plant also allows the development of small white flowers, as well as purplish and black berries, although they are inedible.

 

Delicious Cinnamon Recipes

 

Although the two cinnamon types look and smell almost the same, this does not guarantee that you’ll be getting the health benefits the spice has to offer.

As noted by Authority Nutrition, the commonly used Cassia cinnamon contains high amounts of a compound called coumarin. Large doses of coumarin could be harmful and may lead to a higher risk of liver damage, loss of appetite, nausea, diarrhea or blurred vision, to name a few.

You’re better off using Ceylon cinnamon. Studies have shown that this type of cinnamon has lower coumarin content. If you want to tell Ceylon cinnamon apart from Cassia cinnamon, take note of these pointers, especially if you want to buy the spice in stick form:

Ceylon cinnamon           

More expensive, as the price may spike 10 times more than Cassia cinnamon

Tan brown color

Thin and paper-like textured bark that forms multiple layers when rolled up

Fragile and easily broken

Delicate and sweet scent with subtle notes of clove

 

Cassia cinnamon ( United States Cinnamon)

Commonly available and very cheap

Reddish, dark brown color

Uneven and thick bark that forms only a few layers when rolled up

Tough, difficult and if not, impossible to grind to a powder, ground into sawdust

Pungent and full-bodied taste, flavored with oils

 

You always want to buy cinnamon from Thailand, Saigon, or Ceylon

To maintain the spice’s freshness and taste, store it in a glass container in a cool and dark place. Ground cinnamon will last for about six months, while cinnamon sticks remain fresh for at least one year. You can also extend the shelf life by storing it in the refrigerator.

 

Cinnamon can also enhance the taste of savory dishes. Examples include these Almond Crusted Salmon with Steamed Broccoli and Sweet Potato Hash Brown Recipe, Flavorful Butternut Squash Breakfast Bowl Recipe and Healthy, Creamy Eggplant Moussaka Recipe. Feel free to sprinkle cinnamon on raw, grass-fed yogurt or kefir too, or add to hot water to make a potent but delicious tea.

 

Try Cinnamon Essential Oil Too

 

Apart from utilizing cinnamon in either stick or powdered form, you can also make use of cinnamon leaf oil or cinnamon essential oil. This is typically extracted from the leaves of the Ceylon cinnamon tree via steam distillation46 and can be used for the following purposes:47

 

Soap additive

Flavoring for seasonings

Ingredient in products such as creams, lotions or shampoos

Aromatherapy (try mixing 20 to 25 drops of this essential oil with ¼ cup of almond or olive oil and place the finished blend in a glass container with a narrow opening)

Disinfectant to clean surfaces like kitchen counters, toilets and chopping boards, appliances such as microwaves and refrigerators and even sneakers

Odor eliminator by combining with a few drops of water

There are a variety of ways that you can benefit from cinnamon essential oil. If you’re feeling stressed or drowsy, or need an energy boost or pick-me-up, sniff this oil. You can also help soothe sore muscles and joints, or relieve pain from muscular aches, sprains, rheumatism and arthritis. The warm and antispasmodic capability of the oil is responsible for this feat.

 

This essential oil also has medicinal benefits. It aids in preventing viral infections such as coughs and colds from spreading and in fighting staph infection-causing bacteria and germs in the gallbladder. Respiratory conditions such as chest congestion and bronchitis can also be relieved using this essential oil, especially when diffused in a vaporizer or burner.

 

Lastly, cinnamon essential oil was found to help enhance your blood by helping remove impurities and improving blood circulation. This ensures that the body’s cells get enough oxygen,48 assists in promoting metabolic activity and helps lower risk for heart attacks.

 

Although food with ground cinnamon or cinnamon infusions can be consumed, the same cannot be said for cinnamon essential oil. Never take this oil internally. Instead, blend with a safe carrier oil, such as coconut, olive or almond oil, or other spice oils such as black pepper, cardamom clove and ginger oils and use topically only.

 

Before using this essential oil, consult your physician first and take a skin patch test to see if the oil triggers allergies. Generally, cinnamon essential oil is not advised for pregnant women, since it has emmenagogue effects that can cause menstruation. It is recommended that young children avoid using this essential oil too.

 

Once you get the go signal to use cinnamon essential oil, always remember to properly dilute it and use in moderation. Convulsions may occur if you ingest high amounts of the oil. Cinnamon essential oil has also been linked to:

 

Skin irritation

Mouth sores

Dizziness

Vomiting

Diarrhea

 

Irritation in the urinary tract, intestines and stomach lining (when taken internally)

 

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Diets and Weight Loss, Uncategorized

Ten Spices for Weight Loss

10spicesforweight

Top 10 Herbs and Spices to Help You Lose Weight

 

  1. Ginseng

 

Ginseng is valued for its ability to boost energy levels and speed metabolism. Panax ginseng, in particular, has been linked to weight loss benefits, with one study showing obese, diabetic mice given panax ginseng extracts not only had improvements in insulin sensitivity, but also lost a significant amount of weight after 12 days.1

 

  1. Cayenne Pepper

 

Capsaicin, the compound that gives peppers their heat, may help fight obesity by decreasing calorie intake, shrinking fat tissue, and lowering blood fat levels, as well as fight fat buildup by triggering beneficial protein changes in your body.2

 

Part of the benefit may be due to capsaicin’s heat potential, as it is a thermogenic substance that may temporarily increase thermogenesis in your body, where your body burns fuel such as fat to create heat, with beneficial impacts on metabolism and fat storage. Research suggests that consuming thermogenic ingredients may boost your metabolism by up to 5 percent, and increase fat burning by up to 16 percent.3 It may even help counteract the decrease in metabolic rate that often occurs during weight loss.

 

  1. Cinnamon

 

This spice may help to boost your metabolism, and it also has impressive benefits for blood sugar regulation, making it an ideal seasoning for people with diabetes or pre-diabetes. Cinnamon has been found to significantly reduce blood sugar levels, triglycerides, LDL (bad) cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes, as well as increase glucose metabolism by about 20 times, which would significantly improve your ability to regulate blood sugar.4

 

  1. Black Pepper

 

Black pepper contains a substance called piperine, which not only gives it its pungent flavor, but also blocks the formation of new fat cells.5 When combined with capsaicin and other substances, black pepper was also found to burn as many calories as taking a 20-minute walk.6 As an aside, black pepper also increases the bioavailability of just about all other foods — herbs and other compounds – making it a healthy choice for virtually any meal.

 

  1. Dandelions

 

Every part of the dandelion is edible and full of nutrition. And because they help slow your digestion, they can make you feel full longer, helping you maintain a healthy weight. Dandelions have antioxidant properties and contain bitter crystalline compounds called Taraxacin and Taracerin, along with inulin and levulin, compounds thought to explain some of its therapeutic properties. Along with being full of dietary fiber, dandelions also contain beta carotene, vitamin K1, vitamins and minerals, and are known for being beneficial for normalizing blood sugar and cholesterol, as well as cleansing your liver.

 

  1. Mustard

 

The mustard plant is actually in the cruciferous family of vegetables (along with broccoli, cabbage and Brussels sprouts, for instance). Mustard seeds have been shown to boost metabolic rate by 25 percent, which means you’ll burn calories more efficiently. In fact, just 3/5 teaspoon of mustard seeds daily may help you burn an extra 45 calories an hour.7

 

  1. Turmeric

 

If you’re a fan of curry, you’re probably also a fan of turmeric, as this is the yellow-orange spice that makes the foundation of many curry dishes. Curcumin, one of turmeric’s most thoroughly studied active ingredients, reduces the formation of fat tissue by suppressing the blood vessels needed to form it, and therefore may contribute to lower body fat and body weight gain.8

 

Curcumin may also be useful for the treatment and prevention of obesity-related chronic diseases, as the interactions of curcumin with several key signal transduction pathways in the body result in improvements in insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and other inflammatory symptoms associated with obesity and metabolic disorders.9

 

  1. Ginger

 

Ginger is another warming spice that has anti-inflammatory properties and is known to help soothe and relax your intestinal tract. Research also suggests that ginger may have thermogenic properties that help boost your metabolism, as well as have an appetite-suppressant effect when consumed, suggesting a “potential role of ginger in weight management.”10

 

  1. Cardamom

 

Cardamom, an aromatic spice with a spicy-sweet flavor, is another thermogenic herb that helps boost your metabolism and may boost your body’s ability to burn fat. Cardamom is a popular herb used in Ayurveda, an ancient holistic system of medicine and natural healing from India. It is also used to lift the blues.  Many of our Scandinavian countries have been using it for years for Seasonal Depression.

 

  1. Cumin

 

Cumin is useful for digestion and energy production, and may improve glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes. The spice has a long history of medicinal use, and has also been found to enhance memory and provide potent anti-stress benefits.

 

What Else are Spices Good For?

 

Far more than you might imagine …Herbs and spices are actually some of the most potent antioxidants in your food supply; in many instances surpassing other more well-known sources of antioxidants. For example, spices such as cloves and cinnamon have phenol levels that are 30 percent and 18 percent of dry weight, respectively. Compare that to blueberries, which are widely touted for their antioxidant capabilities; they contain roughly 5 percent phenol by dry weight…

 

Another example is oregano, which has 42 times more antioxidant activity than apples, 30 times more than potatoes, 12 times more than oranges, and four times more than blueberries! One tablespoon of fresh oregano contains the same antioxidant activity as one medium-sized apple.

 

While each spice has a unique set of health benefits to offer, one study, published in the Journal of Medicinal Foods,11 found a direct correlation between the antioxidant phenol content and the spice’s ability to inhibit glycation and the formation of toxic advanced glycation end products, making them potent preventers of heart disease and premature aging. According to this study, the top 10 most potent herbs and spices are:

 

  1. Cloves (ground) 2.   Cinnamon (ground)Saigon or Thailand only
  2. Jamaican allspice (ground) 4.   Apple pie spice (mixture)
  3. Oregano (ground) 6.   Pumpkin pie spice (mixture)
  4. Marjoram 8.   Sage
  5. Thyme 10. Gourmet Italian spice

Rounding Out Your Comprehensive Weight Loss Plan

 

Always remember to buy certified organic spices, as most conventional ones are irradiated, resulting in the formation of harmful radiolytic byproducts, including formaldehyde. For most people, simply adding spices to your meals will not be enough to trigger significant weight loss, although this will certainly support and help you achieve your weight loss goals. If you are serious about losing weight, you’ll need a more comprehensive plan that includes:

 

Eliminating or strictly limiting fructose in your diet, and following the healthy eating program in my comprehensive nutrition plan. You can also use intermittent fasting strategically with this program to greatly boost your body’s fat-burning potential.

Engaging in high-intensity Peak Fitness exercise to burn fat and increase muscle mass (a natural fat burner).

Addressing the emotional component of eating. For this I highly recommend the Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), which helps eliminate your food cravings naturally.

 

If you are having problems with your weight loss plan, or you notice weight gain in certain areas, it is usually not how much you are eating, but what you are eating.

Please share with family and loved ones.  Call us for an appointment to help in all your healthcare plans.

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Foods, Uncategorized

Pumpkin Cinnamon Mouse

pumpkincinnamonmouse

Pumpkin Cinnamon Mousse

If you need something sweet to end your day, look no further

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup pumpkin puree
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened coconut milk
  • 1 tsp ginger
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon

Garnish with berries and nuts

Directions

Combine ingredients and enjoy!

Notes: Remember to use real cinnamon, it must say Vietnamese or Saigon cinnamon on the label. Cinnamon made in the United States and elsewhere is only saw dust with cinnamon oil.

Feel free to share this with family and friends

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Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Apple Cinnamon Dutch Oven Pancakes

applecinnamon

Apple Cinnamon Dutch Oven Pancakes

What you’ll need:
6 eggs, beaten
½ cup whole milk
2 scoops chocolate protein powder
½ tsp baking powder
¼ cup flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
Pinch of salt
2 Tbsp clarified butter
2 apples, peeled, cored, and sliced

How to make it: 
1. Preheat your oven to 350°F. In a medium-sized bowl, combine the eggs, milk, protein powder, baking powder, flour, sugar, cinnamon and salt. Mix until smooth and set aside.
2. In an oven-safe nonstick or a cast-iron skillet over medium heat, melt the clarified butter. Add the apples and cook, stirring frequently, until lightly caramelized, 8 to 10 minutes.
3. Pour the batter over the apples and bake in the oven until puffed and cooked through, 30 to 40 minutes. Serve immediately. Makes 2 servings. 

663 calories, 43g protein, 53g carbs (4g fiber), 31g fat

 

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Foods

Caramelized Spiced Pears

spicedpears

Caramelized Spiced Pears
Ingredients 3 ripe but firm pears (about 1 1/2 pounds), cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 tablespoon lemon juice 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 3 tablespoons granulated or light brown sugar 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves Pinch of salt
Directions 1. Serve these caramelized pear slices over ice cream, stir into plain yogurt or enjoy as a topping for pancakes or waffles. Brown-skinned Bosc pears hold their shape during cooking, but any variety of pears tastes delicious.
2. Toss pears with lemon juice in a medium bowl. Melt butter in a large deep skillet or Dutch oven over medium heat; stir in the pears. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and cook, stirring once halfway through, for 10 minutes.
3. Meanwhile combine sugar, cinnamon, ginger, cloves and salt in a small bowl. After 10 minutes, stir the sugar mixture into the pears. Increase the heat to medium and cook, stirring often, until the pears are tender and glazed, 4 to 6 minutes, depending on the type and firmness of the pears. Serve warm.
Nutritional Facts Servings6108 calories4 g fat (2 g sat1 g mono)10 mg cholesterol20 g carbohydrate6 g added sugars0 g protein3 g fiber26 mg sodium107 mg potassium
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Foods, Health and Disease

Lower Your Cholesterol

cinnamon

To Lower Your Cholesterol…..
Seasoning with 1/2 tsp. of cinnamon to your daily food intake,

could cut your total cholesterol levels 12% plus lower your artery

clogging LDL’s 7% or more, says yet another study done at the

Marylands Beltville Human Nutrition Research Center.
Please remember that those wonderful cinnamon sticks are

just rolled cardboard with a bit of cinnamon oil on them, and cinnamon

made in the United States is saw dust with cinnamon oil on it.  Please get

Vietnamese Cinnamon or Saigon Cinnamon.

So,please go to a reputable spice store to get your cinnamon.

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Foods

Wild Apple Crunch

applecrunch

Wild Apple Crunch

6 apples, peeled and sliced

3/4 cup chopped walnuts

8 dates, chopped

1 cup currants or raisins

3/4 cup water

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

juice of 1 orange

Preheat oven to 375 degrees

Combine all ingredients except the orange juice.  Place in

a baking pana nd drizzle the orange juice on top.

Cover and bake for about one hour until all ingredients are]

soft., stirring occasionally.

Picture shows heavy cream on top,.

NOTE:  I simmer this on top of the stove

Calories 207, Protien 5 g., carbohydrates 37g., total fat 7g.,

saturated fat .7g., sodium 4 mg.

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Foods

Wild Apple Crunch

wildapplecrunch

Wild Apple Crunch

6 apples, peeled and sliced

3/4 cup chopped walnuts

8 dates, chopped

1 cup currants or raisins

3/4 cup water

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

juice of 1 orange

Preheat oven to 375 degrees

Combine all ingredients except the orange juice.  Place in

a baking pana nd drizzle the orange juice on top.

Cover and bake for about one hour until all ingredients are]

soft., stirring occasionally.

NOTE:  I simmer this on top of the stove

Calories 207, Protien 5 g., carbohydrates 37g., total fat 7g.,

saturated fat .7g., sodium 4 mg.