Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Your Top Five Kidney-Friendly Foods

Your Top Five Kidney-Friendly Foods

 

Are you looking to add some kidney-friendly foods
to your diet? Do you want to try a variety of tasty,
healthy, nutrient-rich foods? Try the following top
five foods that are friendly for those with kidney
disease (or at risk of developing it).

Produce of the Month Guide: Cranberries is an informative guide on cranberries and includes a round up of 35 fresh cranberry recipes!
1. Cranberries
If you have not heard it before, cranberries are
a great natural way to help prevent and treat
urinary-tract infections (UTIs). Cranberries contain
an abundance of proanthocyanidins (PACs), which
are a type of compound that prevents infectious
bacteria—especially E. coli—from sticking to your
urinary-tract lining. Fortunately, this prevents the
bacteria from populating and, therefore, prevents
infections from developing.
Cranberries are even thought to play a role in
maintaining good heart health by lowering your
bad cholesterol levels and increasing your good
cholesterol levels.
Cranberries can be found fresh in season between
October and December; however, it is likely that your
grocery store may be importing them from elsewhere
year round. Choose berries that are firm, plump, and
rich in red color. The deeper the red coloring, the
more anthocyanins are present. Cranberries can be
stored up to 20 days in your refrigerator—or for years,
if kept properly frozen. Discard any berries that end
up soft, discolored, or shriveled.
Cranberries are a rich source of manganese,
vitamin C, and fiber, as well as lots of phytonutrients.
Remember: the extra fiber can help manage those
blood-sugar levels, thus reducing your risk of kidney
disease.
You gain their maximum nutritional benefit
while enjoying them fresh, as many of their nutrients
are destroyed in high heats. Consider replacing

vinegar or lemon juice in recipes and incorporate
cranberries into your salad dressing. They can even
be added to your salads, with their tartness balanced
out by something sweet like mandarins. You could
also use dried cranberries in salads and trail mixes or
add them to hot or cold cereals.

Raw salmon fish fillet by karandaev. Raw salmon fish fillet with spices cooking on cutting board. Top view#fillet, #karandaev, #fish, #Raw
2. Fish
Fish that are rich sources of omega-3 fatty acids
(such as salmon, mackerel, rainbow trout, and
herring) are kidney-friendly protein sources. Their
healthy fats help reduce inflammation, lower blood
pressure, decrease bad cholesterol, and increase
good cholesterol. All of these are important factors
not only for improving your heart health but for
improving your kidney health, as well.

 

This is perfect garlic. Photo by DonnaTurner Ruhlman
3. Garlic
Garlic is an excellent way to add great aroma and
flavoring to many dishes. More so, it is a great way
to reduce your sodium intake by avoiding salt and
replacing it with garlic. Just make sure not to use garlic
salt. Since your kidneys are responsible for regulating
a healthy balance of minerals, including sodium,
this kidney-friendly alternative helps relieve some
pressure from your kidneys without compromising
any flavor.
Garlic is a good source of manganese, vitamin B6
,
and vitamin C. It may moderately reduce your blood
fats and your overall cholesterol levels. Furthermore,
it can help protect against oxidative stress and
inflammation, which are both responsible for causing
damage to your blood vessels. By incorporating garlic
into your diet, you can improve your heart health
and ensure that you are keeping your blood vessels in

top condition. You want them to be able to properly
filter your blood!
Garlic bulbs are available year round in your local
grocery store. You can store garlic uncovered in a
cool, dark place for about a month. Make sure that
when you are selecting bulbs, they are firm and free
from any mold or sprouting. You also want them to be
free from cracks. Avoid bulbs that appear shriveled
and feel soft.
Garlic can be easily added to many dishes—
especially when pureed. Add it to sauces, soups, or
mashed potatoes, or incorporate it into a hummus dip
in combination with chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, and
lemon juice. You can even sauté it along with steamed
spinach and a drop of lemon juice.

Putting Eggs On Your Face - DIY Beauty Remedies You Should NOT Try - Photos
4. Egg Whites
If you are looking for a pure protein source with all
of your essential amino acids, then look no further
than egg whites. They’re a great protein option that is
lower in phosphorus than other good-quality protein
sources such as egg yolks and meats. Remember that
phosphorus is one of those minerals that the kidneys
need to regulate in your blood. If you have kidney
disease, you want to account for food choices that
have higher levels of these minerals to help manage
your disease.

You can purchase egg whites in a carton or
separate the eggs on your own. Egg whites can be used
in omelets, mixed with veggies, enjoyed on their own,
or incorporated into a sandwich. You can also add
them to shakes or smoothies to increase their protein
content.
If you are using whole eggs, consider hard-boiling
them, removing the yolks, and adding them to your
favorite green salad.

Cabbage | eCurry - Soma.R - Soma Rathore
5. Cabbage
Cabbage is known to help reduce your cholesterol
levels. Upon consuming foods containing fats, your
liver releases bile into the small intestine to help
break down and digest the fats. Cabbage binds the
bile salts, which contain cholesterol, preventing
it from being reabsorbed by the small intestine.
Therefore, the cholesterol is eliminated through
your feces.
Cabbage is rich in many different types of
antioxidants, including phytonutrients, polyphenols,
and anthocyanins, as well as being a rich source of
vitamin C and manganese. These all help reduce
inflammation and oxidative stress, thus reducing
damage to your blood vessels, and play a protective
role for your kidneys.

 

Dr Victor Marchione

 

Remember, we are in this together!

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
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Foods, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

How To Make Your Thanksgiving Menu Healthier with Recipes

How To Make Your Thanksgiving Menu Healthier with Recipes

 

 

Preparing a traditional Thanksgiving dinner that’s lower in fat and calories but still thrills the crowd isn’t hard. All it takes is a few ingredient substitutions and some clever fat-busting techniques. Let’s take a look at how to make a delicious, healthier Thanksgiving meal.

The Turkey

If you’re hosting a small gathering, buy a turkey breast rather than the whole bird, as breast meat is lower in calories than dark meat.

Slow Cooker Turkey Breast

“This is simple and delicious, and certainly not rocket science,”  “No need to really add anything or change anything other than the cooking time — mine was done perfectly at 5-1/2 hours. The meat is tender, juicy, and delicately seasoned.”

Slow Cooker Turkey Breast
Photo by Lori

 

 

Cranberry Stuffed Turkey Breasts

Ingredients

 

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Prepare stuffing mix according to package directions. Set aside to cool.
  2. With a sharp knife, butterfly breasts open to lay flat. Place each breast between two sheets of waxed paper, and flatten with a mallet. Spread the prepared stuffing to within 1/4 inch of the edge of each breast. Sprinkle each one with chopped pecans and dried cranberries, reserving some of the cranberries for garnish. Roll up tightly in a jellyroll style, starting with the long end. Tuck in ends, and tie in sections with string, about 4 sections around the middle and one running the length of the roll to secure the ends.
  3. Heat olive oil in a large cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Carefully brown rolls on all sides.
  4. Place skillet in oven, uncovered. Bake in a preheated 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) oven for 1 hour, or until the internal temperature is at 170 degrees F (78 degrees C) when taken with a meat thermometer. Do not let these get overly dry.
  5. Allow rolls to set for 15 minutes before removing string, and slicing into 1/2 to 3/4 inch circles. Leave one roll whole, and slice the other for presentation. Stuffing will be spiraled into meat. Present on your prettiest platter on a bed of curly lettuce, and garnish by sprinkling with the remaining 1/2 cup pecan halves and the reserved dried cranberries.

“This one is a keeper,” “I make it every thanksgiving instead of the whole turkey — it turns out beautifully every time! Very pretty presentation, too!”

Cranberry Stuffed Turkey Breasts
Photo by lutzflcat

 

If you do buy a whole turkey, avoid “self-basting” turkeys, as they often contain added fat. And, it goes without saying, stay away from the deep fryer this year, and roast or smoke the turkey. Stuff the turkey cavity with whole or halved onions, halved lemons or apples, and sprigs of fresh herbs such as sage, marjoram, thyme, and/or rosemary. Rather than rubbing the skin with butter or oil, spray it with an oil spray and season it with salt and pepper.

Guilt-Free Gravy

Gravy is one of the biggest calorie culprits on the table. Use vegetable oil rather than turkey drippings when making the gravy — it’s still fat, but vegetable oil is lower in saturated fat and is cholesterol-free.

If you use turkey drippings to add flavor, use a gravy separator. Pour the gravy into a separator and allow it to sit for a few minutes. Some of the fat in the gravy will rise to the top of the glass where you can skim it off easily. Better yet, make a low-fat broth-based gravy or a vegetarian gravy instead.

Lightning Gravy

Ingredients

Directions

  1. In a microwave safe dish heat water and bouillon on high, stirring occasionally until just boiling.
  2. In a small bowl combine the cornstarch and cold water and mix together; stir into the hot broth and cook on medium for about 1 minute, or until thick, stirring at 30 second intervals.

“This is awesome because it’s low fat, low cal, (for gravy!) and quick,” “I added a black pepper and a small pinch of ground sage.”

Lightning Gravy
Photo by Marianne

 

Slimmed-Down Sides

Instead of loading up your mashed potatoes with lots of butter and cream, add some of the starchy water you used to boil the potatoes. The starchy water will give your mashers a low-cal creamy texture and help cut back on fat.

You can also add turkey or chicken broth, evaporated skim milk, or fat-free sour cream to your mashed potatoes. For extra flavor, stir in roasted garlic and herbs. For added nutrition, add pureed cooked cauliflower, parsnips, or turnips — or replace the potatoes entirely with Mashed Parsnips or Mashed Turnips.

Slow Cooker Mashed Potatoes and Cauliflower

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Combine potatoes and chicken broth in a slow cooker.
  2. Cook potatoes on Low for 3 hours. Add cauliflower and continue cooking on Low another 3 hours.
  3. Stir milk, butter, sour cream, black pepper, garlic powder, paprika, and salt into the potato mixture. Mash with a potato masher or blend with an immersion blender to desired consistency.
  4. Continue cooking until hot, about 10 minutes more.

 

“This was good and a great way of adding extra veggies into a meal,”  I had mine along side some corn and stuffing. It was the perfect accompaniment and easy to make.”

Slow Cooker Mashed Potatoes and Cauliflower
Photo by bd.weld

Cndied sweet potato casseroles in favor of a low-fat, naturally-sweetened sweet potatoes. Try a cranberry relish or cut down on the amount of sugar in your cranberry sauce by adding fruit juices or apple sauce.

Twice Baked Sweet Potatoes with Ricotta Cheese

 

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Pierce potatoes with a fork and bake until soft, about 1 hour. Remove from oven and cool until potatoes can be handled, about 20 minutes.
  2. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease a large baking sheet.
  3. Meanwhile, place olive oil in small skillet over medium heat. Add shallots and cook and stir until softened and beginning to brown, about 10 minutes. Set aside.
  4. Cut potatoes in half lengthwise and scoop out pulp, leaving a thin shell. Set shells aside. Place pulp into a blender or food processor and blend until smooth. Add ricotta, salt, pepper, ginger, and sugar to the blender; blend until smooth.
  5. Return potato mixture to a bowl; stir in shallots, Parmesan cheese, and sage. Spoon mixture back into potato skins. Place potatoes on prepared baking sheet.
  6. Bake until heated through, about 30 minutes.

“These were absolutely fabulous,” says “We aren’t fond of sweet potato dishes that have a lot of added sugar, so this was really to our taste.”

Twice Baked Sweet Potatoes with Ricotta Cheese
Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes with Ricotta Cheese

y, where it absorbs fat from the turkey as it bakes. It’s hard to slim down a stuffing recipe, so take a small serving if it’s your Thanksgiving favorite. If you can avoid recipes using too much sausage or bacon; wild rice and grains are more nutritious than bread stuffings.

Cranberry, Sausage and Apple Stuffing

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Cook and stir sausage in a large skillet over medium heat, crumbling coarsely, for about 10 minutes. Remove sausage to a large bowl with a slotted spoon. Empty pan of grease.
  2. Into the same pan melt the butter. Add the leeks or onions, apples, celery and poultry seasoning; cook until softened, about 10 minutes. Add the rosemary, dried cranberries and cooked sausage. Mix all with the dried bread cubes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Moisten with the chicken stock.
  3. Stuff turkey with about 5 cups for a 14 pound turkey. Add additional chicken stock to moisten stuffing if needed. Remaining stuffing can be baked in a covered buttered casserole at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for about 45 minutes. Uncover and bake for another 15 minutes to brown top.

 

LivinOurLuvSong. “I left out the sausage and used veggie broth. I baked it in a pan and it was perfect.”

Cranberry, Sausage and Apple Stuffing
Photo by alexandra5

Crustless Pumpkin Pie

Most of the fat in a pie comes from the crust. Try a crust-free pumpkin pie recipe or a reduced-fat graham cracker crust.

Pumpkin Pie Squares

Ingredients

 

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  2. In a medium bowl, cream together butter and brown sugar. Mix in flour. Fold in oats. Press into a 9×13 inch baking dish.
  3. Bake in preheated oven 15 minutes, until set.
  4. In a large bowl, beat eggs with white sugar. Beat in pumpkin and evaporated milk. Mix in salt, cinnamon, ginger and cloves. Pour over baked crust.
  5. Bake in preheated oven 20 minutes, until set. Let cool before cutting into squares.

 

“This is a great recipe,” raves LAURA J JOHNSON. “It makes homemade pumpkin pie much easier and it tastes great.”

Pumpkin Pie Squares
Photo by CC
Remember, We Are In This Together!
-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Berries You Should Be Eating

Beautiful Berries You Should Be Eating

 

Picking or eating berries is a special summertime treat. They’re so delicious and beautiful – think about rich red strawberries, juicy blueberries, and tangy cranberries. Mmm… so good.

 

Berries should also be a part of your diet because they’re loaded with vitamins, minerals, and fiber, plus they’re rich in antioxidants that can protect your cells from free-radical damage. And best of all, they’re low in calories, so they’re perfect for weight-watching diets.

 

Beautiful, delicious, and good for you. Read on to learn more about these perfect nutritional gems.

 

2  Strawberries

strawberries

Strawberries are luscious berries that are easy to find in every grocery store year round. They’re also inexpensive and loaded with good nutrition.

 

One cup of strawberries contains over 100 milligrams of vitamin C, almost as much as a cup of orange juice. Strawberries also have calcium, magnesium, folate, and potassium. And they’re low in calories – one cup of strawberries has only 53 calories.

 

Keep them healthy by keeping them simple. Serve sliced berries with a dab of whipped cream and almond slivers. Dip large strawberries in chocolate for a nutritious snack that feels totally decadent.

3  Raspberries

raspberries

Raspberries are beautiful berries that are best during the summer months when they’re at their peak and most affordable. They’re delicate and don’t keep very long, so use them quickly. Most raspberries are red, but you might find gold or black raspberries, too.

Nutrition wise, raspberries are rich in calcium, magnesium, and vitamin C. Plus, they’re low in calories – one cup of raspberries has 64 calories.

 

4  Blueberries

blueberries

Blueberries seem to make it to the top of almost every superfoods list. Probably because they’re chock full of antioxidants. Blueberries are available year-round, but they’re at their best during the summer months.

They’re also good for plenty of nutrients – one cup of blueberries has lots of potassium and almost 4 grams of fiber. You’ll also get a good dose of vitamin C and only 83 calories.

 

 

5  Currants

currants

Fresh red or black currants may not be easy to find fresh, but you can find dried currants year-round. Probably the best way to get a hold of fresh currants is to visit farmers markets in late spring.

Currants are high in potassium, calcium, and vitamin C, and they’re rich in fiber. One cup of fresh raw currants has around 60 calories.

If you find fresh currants, buy plenty and freeze them.

 

6  Blackberries

blackberries

Blackberries look like large black raspberries, and they have a tangier flavor. They’re quite good for you because they’re high in calcium, vitamin C, and potassium, plus one cup of blackberries has over 7 grams of fiber about 60 calories. And like all berries, they’re loaded with antioxidants.

Blackberries are delicious in smoothies or served with a bit of creme fraiche.

 

7  Lingonberries

ligonberries

Tart but tasty lingonberries are best known in Scandinavian recipes and are often used to make preserves and juices. Lingonberry jam isn’t too hard to find but look for frozen lingonberries online.

Lingonberries are low in calories (although they usually need some sugar to overcome the tartness). They’re also high in vitamin C, magnesium, and fiber.

Try some lingonberry jam and brunost (brown cheese) on a slice of pumpernickel bread.

 

8  Bilberries

bilberries

Bilberries look a lot like blueberries, but they’re not. Bilberries are wild berries that come from the British Isles, so they’re most common in British recipes. Bilberries are also prized for their health benefits due to their antioxidant content.

Fresh bilberries may be difficult to find, but you can find dried bilberries online that make a tasty and healthy snack.

 

9  Cranberries

cranberries

Cranberries are native to North America and they’re most commonly served during the holidays. It’s fairly easy to find fresh or frozen cranberries in most grocery stores, plus there are lots of brands of cranberry juice.

As far as nutrition and health, cranberries are high in vitamin C and they have lots of antioxidants. They also contain compounds that may help prevent bladder infections.

Cranberries are very tart so most recipes call for some sugar but there are some savory recipes available.

 

10  Elderberries

elderberries

Elderberries are good for you.

Elderberries are small deep purple berries and quite tasty. They’re probably most associated with elderberry wine and elderberry syrup that’s used in cough syrups and cold tonics. It’s not easy to find elderberries in stores, but they may show up at local farmers markets. Or you might grow your own elderberries.

Elderberries are high in vitamin C, calcium, and potassium, and very high in vitamin A and fiber.

 

11  What About Cherries?

cherries

Cherries are good for your diet.

Technically, cherries aren’t berries because they have inedible pits, but these little red fruits are used in a similar fashion.

Cherries contain several nutrients and antioxidants, and dark cherries are an excellent source of melatonin – similar to the hormone that increases in your body as you get sleepy. In fact, nibbling on a small bowlful of cherries before bedtime just might help you sleep better.

Serve pitted cherries with plain Greek yogurt or a tart frozen yogurt. Or add cherries to a smoothie with bananas, strawberries, or other fruits.

 

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Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Chicken with Cranberries and Red Wine

chickenwithcranberriesandredwine

 

Chicken with Cranberries and Red Wine

 

I like to use chicken thigh meat for this dish because I think it stands up to this intensely-flavored sauce, but you can certainly use chicken breasts, or pork. It’s quicker to do this boneless version, but if you have bone-in meat, just brown it on the stove and finish it in the oven at 350 F. with the sauce. If I’m pressed for time, I do the sauce in a separate pan.

If you have leftover chicken, turkey, or pork that’s already cooked, you can make the sauce and alone and pour it over the reheated meat.

Ingredients

  • 1 to 1and 1/2 lbs boneless skinless chicken, thigh meat preferred
  • 1/4 C minced onion
  • 1 cup dry red wine
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen cranberries
  • 2 T grated fresh ginger
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/2 T Chinese Five Spice Powder (if you don’t have it, use 1/2 t cinnamon and 1/2 t allspice)
  • Sweetener to taste
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 T butter
  • 1 T olive oil

Preparation

1) Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the oil. Put salt and pepper on chicken.

2) When the oil is hot,  brown the chicken on both sides.

3) Remove the chicken from the pan and cover it with foil to it keep warm. Pour out excess oil if there’s much more than you started with.

4) Saute’ the onion for 2-3 minutes.

5) Add the ginger and cook for another minute or so.

6) Add the wine and the bay leaf.

Scrape the pan to dissolve brown bits on pan (deglaze the pan). Bring mixture to a boil.

7) Add the cranberries, and cook until they are pop, which will take 5 minutes or so. Add some sweetener – I like to start with the equivalent of a 1/4 cup of sugar. The exact amount is going to depend upon the acidity and sweetness of the other ingredients, mainly the wine (and taste, of course). Ideally, you’ll find a balance where the tartness is relieved just enough to be tasty, but before it goes over into “jammy”. If  the sauce gets too thick, add a little chicken stock or water.

8) Adjust the seasonings, adding salt if necessary.

9) At the end, swirl in one tablespoon cold butter – this will thicken the sauce slightly and “round out the corners” taste-wise.

10) Serve the chicken with the sauce poured over the top.

Heads Up: I once cut the chicken into bite-sized pieces and cooked it in the sauce. We had chicken that was entirely purple for dinner.

Not very appetizing!

With 1.5 lbs chicken, this makes about 5 servings.

Nutritional Information: Each serving has 3.5 grams effective carbohydrate plus 1.5 grams fiber, 28 grams protein, and 250 calories.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived: L. Winters

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Foods

Updated Waldorf Salad

waldorf-1540260-x

Updated Waldorf Salad

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons low-fat mayonnaise (Hellmans Mayo is best)
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 2 small (Gala or Fuji) apples, cubed
  • 1 cup seedless red grapes, halved
  • 1/3 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped walnuts
  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced celery (about 1 stalk)
  • 8 Boston or Bibb lettuce leaves

Preparation

  1. Combine mayonnaise and lemon juice in a medium bowl. Add apples, grapes, and cranberries; mix well.
  2. Add the walnuts and celery, and mix well. Serve it on a bed of 2 lettuce leaves. The salad can be refrigerated up to 2 hours before serving.