Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

HWA-KETO SNACK IDEAS

KETO SNACK IDEAS

 

GREAT SNACK IDEAS AS LONG AS YOU DO NOT EAT BREADS OR PASTAS DURING THE DAY

CARDIAC DIETS HAVE MANY REQUIREMENTS, SO PLEASE FOLLOW THOSE ALONG WITH DIABETICS.    KETO IS NOT A DIABETIC DIET.

 

 Pork Rind Nachos 2 Ways: Louisiana Hot Sauce Pork Rinds + Ranch + Shredded Cheese OR Plain Pork Rinds + Taco Seasoning + Shredded Cheese + Sour Cream + Microwave for 30 seconds

 Bacon & Guac: Bacon + Sabra Guac Singles

 Pepperoni Chips: Pepperoni + Paper Towel +  Microwave for 45 seconds + Pair with cheese of choice

Desk Drawer Soup: Boullion cube + Hot Sauce + 1 tsp Coconut Oil + Boiling Hot Water

 Dragon Balls: Hard Boiled Eggs + A rub of Salt, Pepper, Garlic, Cayenne Pepper, Smoked Paprika, and Cumin

Chocolate “Crackers” & Spread: Squares of Lily’s Dark Chocolate + Butter / Cream Cheese / Brie

 Ham Pin Wheels: Ham + Whipped Cream Cheese + Chopped Green Onions + Roll up & Slice

 Keto Cereal: Shredded Coconut + Sliced Almonds + Crushed Pecans + Chia Seeds + Flax Seeds + Pyure Packet + Cinnamon + Vanilla Extract + 1 tbsp MCT oil + Unsweetened Almond Milk + Heavy Cream

 Avocado Boats: Avocado + Frank’s Red Hot Sauce + Eat with spoon out of the skin

Quick Charcuterie: String Cheese Stick + Wrap in Prosciutto

 Keto Yogurt: Whole Milk Yogurt + Peanut Butter (one ingredient: peanuts) + Pyure Packet + Vanilla Extract

. Keto Muffins: 1 Egg + 2 tsp Coconut Flour + Pinch of Baking Soda + Pinch of Salt + Mix ingredients in mug + Microwave 1 minute

 Cheese chips: Sliced Cheese + Parchment Paper + Microwave until bubbling

 Keto Easy Egg Salad: Hard Boiled Eggs + Crush with a fork + Add mayo, mustard, salt and pepper + mix ingredients

Sweet & Spicy Snack Mix: Roast Pumpkin Seeds with Salt and Chipotle Chili Powder + Cacao Nibs

 Dog Dive: Hot Dogs + Salsa Verde

 Keto Smoothie: Avocado + Unsweetened Almond Milk + Ice Cubes + Pyure Packet + Frozen Strawberries + Kale

Spicy Keto Slaw: Wasabi Mayo + Bag of Coleslaw + Sliced Almonds

 Protein-Packed Chocolate Keto Ice Cream: Greek Yogurt + Vanilla Extract + Chocolate Protein Powder + Freeze for 15 minutes

 Bagel-less & Lox: Smoked Salmon + Cream Cheese + Capers

 Chocolate Mousse: Heavy Cream + Pyure Packet + Cocoa Powder + Whisk Together

 Easy Keto Breakfast: Fried Egg + Frank’s Red Hot Sauce + Bacon

Salmon Salad – canned salmon and Hellmans mayo

Keto Wrap: 3g net carbs Tortilla + Sriracha Mayo + Lettuce + Cheese + Ham

 Keto Trail Mix: Moon Cheese + Cello Whisps + Macadamia Nuts

 Crunchy Keto Salad: Chopped Purple Cabbage + Balsamic Vinegar + Pyure Packet

 

 

We are in this Together!

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS Telehealth

REVIEWED BY DR PATRICIA CARROTHERS

hwalogo

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

 

Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

HWA- FOODS TO AVOID FOR HEALING CHRONIC ILLNESS

images (10)FOODS TO AVOID FOR HEALING CHRONIC ILLNESS

 

“If you’re concerned about your health—if you have any sensitivities or conditions, if you’ve struggled with illness, or if you’re just concerned about prevention—then it’s critical to avoid as many triggers and instigators as possible, and this includes certain foods and ingredients. Your body needs every possible level of support so it can heal and then maintain optimal health.

By now, we’ve all heard of preservatives and artificial flavors—we know to avoid those, for very good reason. There are other problematic ingredients, though, which you should know to avoid. These ingredients can feed existing viral, bacterial, and fungal conditions, which can lead to inflammation—and can also wreak havoc with your digestive system, weaken and confuse your immune system, strain your glands and organs, hinder cells anywhere in your body, disrupt or destroy your brain’s neurons and neurotransmitters, make you anxious and/or depressed, set you up for strokes or heart attacks, and more. Health professionals are unlikely to warn you about most of these foods and additives, because it’s not common knowledge that they can substantially worsen already-existing illnesses, nor that they can trigger new health conditions. You deserve to have full knowledge of what you consume, and what effects it all has on your body.

Corn

Corn used to be one of the fundamental sources of nourishment on earth. Unfortunately, the technology of genetically modified organisms (GMO) has destroyed it as a viable food. Corn products and byproducts create substantial inflammation. It’s a food that can feed viruses, bacteria, mold, and fungus. Even if you see corn advertised as being non-GMO, the chances are high that it can still trigger any kind of health condition—and that it may still be GMO.

Try to avoid all corn and all products that have corn as an ingredient. These include foods such as corn chips, taco shells, popcorn, corn cereal, and anything that clearly incorporates corn syrup or corn oil. They also include less obvious products, such as soda, gum, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), toothpaste, gluten-free foods that use corn in place of wheat, and herbal tinctures that employ alcohol as a preservative. (It’s most likely corn grain alcohol. Buy the alcohol free versions of tinctures instead.) Try to read ingredient labels carefully and do the best you can. Staying away from corn products and byproducts can be a lot of work. For a treat in the summertime, it’s okay to enjoy a fresh, organic corn on the cob. For the sake of your health, it’s worth the effort of cutting out corn the rest of the time.

Soy

Soy has suffered a similar GMO fate as corn. Soy used to be a healthy food. However, you can now assume that any soy product you encounter could have some GMO contamination or contain added MSG. Be cautious when eating soybeans, edamame, miso, soymilk, soy nuts, soy sauce, textured vegetable protein (TVP), soy protein powder, artificial meat products made from soy, and much more. Try to stay away from soy the best you can. If you really enjoy soy and feel deprived without it, stick to the safest options: plain, organic tofu or tempeh, or the highest-quality nama shoyu.

Canola Oil

Canola oil is mostly GMO at this point in time. And regardless, canola oil creates a great deal of inflammation. It’s especially damaging to your digestive system, potentially scarring the linings of both your small and large intestines, and is a major cause of irritable bowel syndrome. Canola oil can feed viruses, bacteria, fungus, and mold. Beyond that, canola oil has an effect similar to battery acid on the inside of your arteries, creating significant vascular damage.

Canola oil is used in many restaurants and in thousands of products, often as a low-cost alternative to olive oil. Even reputable health food chains and restaurants use canola oil to keep prices down, sometimes advertising canola as a health food. Unfortunately, if canola oil is even a tiny part of an otherwise perfectly healthy dish of organic and all-natural ingredients, you should probably avoid that dish because of how destructive canola oil is. If you’re dealing with a mystery illness or a health condition, try to avoid canola oil at all costs.

Processed Beet Sugar

So far, GMO beets are mostly reserved for making processed beet sugar. You should therefore avoid products that contain processed beet sugar, which feeds cancers, viruses, and bacteria. This is different from grating fresh, organic beets over your salad, or juicing fresh beets. If you stick to organic, most whole beets that you buy in the produce section at your local natural market or at the farmers’ market are safe to consume.

Eggs

Humans have eaten eggs for thousands of years. They were once an amazing survival food for us to eat in areas of the planet where there were no other food options at certain times of year. That changed with the turn of the 20th century, though—when the autoimmune, viral, bacterial, and cancer epidemics began.

The average person eats over 350 eggs a year. That includes whole eggs and also all the foods with hidden egg ingredients. If you’re struggling with any illness, such as Lyme disease, lupus, chronic fatigue syndrome, migraines, or fibromyalgia, avoiding eggs can give your body the support it needs to get better. The biggest issue with eggs is that they’re a prime food for cancer and other cysts, fibroids, tumors, and nodules. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), breast cancer, or other cysts and tumors should avoid eggs altogether. Also, if you’re trying to prevent cancer, fight an existing cancer, or avoid a cancer relapse, steer clear.

Removing eggs from your diet completely will give you a powerful fighting chance to reverse disease and heal. Eggs also cause inflammation and allergies; feed viruses, bacteria, yeast, mold, Candida and other fungus; and trigger edema in the lymphatic system. People who are diagnosed with Candida or mycotoxins are often told that eggs are a good, safe protein that will starve the Candida and mycotoxins. Nothing could be further from the truth. I know how popular eggs are. There’s a growing trend that promotes them as a major health food. Plus they’re delicious and fun to eat. If eggs were good for us in the current day and age, though, I’d be promoting them as such.

nofoods (2)

Dairy

Milk, cheese, butter, cream, yogurt, and other such products contain a substantial amount of fat, which is a strain for your digestive system—and especially your liver—to process. Dairy contains lactose, and the combination of fat and sugar has negative effects on health, especially if you’re diabetic. Further, dairy fat in your bloodstream helps to breed viruses and bacteria. Dairy is also mucus producing, and a major cause of inflammation and allergies. Those are the issues that have always held true for dairy, even when it’s organic and free-range. And now, conventional, mainstream practice has made a problematic food into a toxic one by creating farm industry pressure to give hormones, antibiotics, GMO corn and soy, and gluten to cows, goats, and sheep. If you want a smooth healing process, it’s best not to eat dairy at all.

Pork

Avoid all forms of pork, including ham, bacon, processed pork products, lard, and so on. It’s difficult to heal any chronic illness while consuming any kind of pig product, due to these foods’ high fat content.

Farmed Fish

Farmed fish are often raised in small, enclosed spaces. This breeds algae, parasites, and other diseases—so the breeders often give the fish antibiotics and treat the water with toxic chemicals. This makes consuming farmed fish risky. The safest fish you can eat are wild ones, such as salmon, halibut, and haddock. No matter what type you select, beware of mercury— especially with larger fish such as swordfish and tuna.

Gluten

Gluten is a protein found in many grains. The forms of gluten to which people are especially sensitive are in wheat, barley, rye, and spelt (a type of wheat). (When it comes to oats, be aware that growing and processing sometimes cross-contaminates them with grains that contain gluten. Oats can be a very good food for people who are less sensitive, though. Look for those that are labeled gluten-free.) Grains that contain gluten also contain multiple allergens and proteins that can trigger any condition. They create disruption and inflammation, especially in your intestinal tract and bowels. They also confuse your immune system—which is your primary defense against disease— and often trigger celiac disease, Crohn’s, and colitis. Eating these grains makes it very difficult for your body to heal. If you’d like to recover from your illness as quickly as possible, minimize grains of any kind.

MSG

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a food additive that’s used in tens of thousands of products and restaurant dishes. MSG is a salt that occurs naturally in glutamic acid (a non-essential amino acid). But there’s nothing natural about the extreme damage it can do to you. MSG typically builds up in your brain, going deep into your brain tissue. It can then cause inflammation and swelling, kill thousands of your brain cells, disrupt electrical impulses, weaken neurotransmitters, burn out neurons, make you feel confused and anxious, and even lead to micro-strokes. It also weakens and injures your central nervous system. MSG is especially harmful if you have an illness that involves your brain or central nervous system. However, there are no circumstances under which it’s good for you. As a result, this is an additive you should always avoid. Because MSG is included in countless products, it’s essential to read food labels carefully. It’s also important to know what to look for. MSG is often “hidden” on labels because of its deservedly bad reputation. The following terms usually mean that MSG is an ingredient: glutamate, hydrolyzed, autolyzed, protease, carrageenan, maltodextrin, sodium caseinate, balsamic vinegar, barley malt, malt extract, yeast extract, brewer’s yeast, corn starch, wheat starch, modified food starch, gelatin, textured protein, whey protein, soy protein, soy sauce, broth, bouillon, stock, and seasoning.

Natural Flavors

Any ingredient with a name like natural flavoring is hidden MSG. Natural cherry flavor, natural orange flavor, natural lemon flavor, natural fruit flavor…they’re not just fruit extracts, and they’re not your friends. The same goes for smoke flavor, turkey flavor, beef flavor, natural peppermint flavor, natural maple flavor, natural chocolate flavor, Medical natural vanilla flavor, and all their “natural” and “flavor”-ful cousins. (Although pure vanilla extract is safe to use.) Each type of natural flavor potentially contains multiple biohazards and chemical compounds. Natural flavoring has slipped under the radar and been allowed into thousands of health food store products that are advertised as good, safe, and healthy for you and your children. Moms, take heed. Natural flavors are one of the newest and stealthiest now-you-see-it-now-you-don’t tricks for hiding MSG. Take care reading labels so you and your family can avoid this hidden ingredient.

Artificial Flavors

Artificial flavors can represent any of thousands of chemicals that were birthed in a lab. Don’t take risks by consuming them. As much as possible, the best you can, stay away from chemical additives.

Artificial Sweeteners

Most artificial sweeteners act as neurotoxins because they contain aspartame. This can disrupt your neurons and your central nervous system. Long-term, artificial sweeteners can cause neurological breakdowns and strokes in your brain. If you crave sweets, eat as much fruit as you like. Fruit fights disease and has powerful healing properties.

Citric Acid

Compared to the other additives in this chapter, citric acid isn’t so bad. That said, it’s very irritating to the linings of the stomach and the intestinal tract, so it can create a lot of inflammation and discomfort if you’re sensitive to it. Citric acid (the additive) is not the same thing as naturally occurring acid in citrus. Try not to confuse the two. Citrus itself is a healing food. The isolated ingredient citric acid, however, is often corn derived. Especially if you’re experiencing any kind of stomach pain, keep an eye out for citric acid on ingredient labels and consider skipping foods that include it.”

 

We are in this Together!

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS Telehealth

 

 

REVIEWED BY DR PATRICIA CARROTHERS

hwalogo

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

 

 

 

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Your Top Five Kidney-Friendly Foods

Your Top Five Kidney-Friendly Foods

 

Are you looking to add some kidney-friendly foods
to your diet? Do you want to try a variety of tasty,
healthy, nutrient-rich foods? Try the following top
five foods that are friendly for those with kidney
disease (or at risk of developing it).

Produce of the Month Guide: Cranberries is an informative guide on cranberries and includes a round up of 35 fresh cranberry recipes!
1. Cranberries
If you have not heard it before, cranberries are
a great natural way to help prevent and treat
urinary-tract infections (UTIs). Cranberries contain
an abundance of proanthocyanidins (PACs), which
are a type of compound that prevents infectious
bacteria—especially E. coli—from sticking to your
urinary-tract lining. Fortunately, this prevents the
bacteria from populating and, therefore, prevents
infections from developing.
Cranberries are even thought to play a role in
maintaining good heart health by lowering your
bad cholesterol levels and increasing your good
cholesterol levels.
Cranberries can be found fresh in season between
October and December; however, it is likely that your
grocery store may be importing them from elsewhere
year round. Choose berries that are firm, plump, and
rich in red color. The deeper the red coloring, the
more anthocyanins are present. Cranberries can be
stored up to 20 days in your refrigerator—or for years,
if kept properly frozen. Discard any berries that end
up soft, discolored, or shriveled.
Cranberries are a rich source of manganese,
vitamin C, and fiber, as well as lots of phytonutrients.
Remember: the extra fiber can help manage those
blood-sugar levels, thus reducing your risk of kidney
disease.
You gain their maximum nutritional benefit
while enjoying them fresh, as many of their nutrients
are destroyed in high heats. Consider replacing

vinegar or lemon juice in recipes and incorporate
cranberries into your salad dressing. They can even
be added to your salads, with their tartness balanced
out by something sweet like mandarins. You could
also use dried cranberries in salads and trail mixes or
add them to hot or cold cereals.

Raw salmon fish fillet by karandaev. Raw salmon fish fillet with spices cooking on cutting board. Top view#fillet, #karandaev, #fish, #Raw
2. Fish
Fish that are rich sources of omega-3 fatty acids
(such as salmon, mackerel, rainbow trout, and
herring) are kidney-friendly protein sources. Their
healthy fats help reduce inflammation, lower blood
pressure, decrease bad cholesterol, and increase
good cholesterol. All of these are important factors
not only for improving your heart health but for
improving your kidney health, as well.

 

This is perfect garlic. Photo by DonnaTurner Ruhlman
3. Garlic
Garlic is an excellent way to add great aroma and
flavoring to many dishes. More so, it is a great way
to reduce your sodium intake by avoiding salt and
replacing it with garlic. Just make sure not to use garlic
salt. Since your kidneys are responsible for regulating
a healthy balance of minerals, including sodium,
this kidney-friendly alternative helps relieve some
pressure from your kidneys without compromising
any flavor.
Garlic is a good source of manganese, vitamin B6
,
and vitamin C. It may moderately reduce your blood
fats and your overall cholesterol levels. Furthermore,
it can help protect against oxidative stress and
inflammation, which are both responsible for causing
damage to your blood vessels. By incorporating garlic
into your diet, you can improve your heart health
and ensure that you are keeping your blood vessels in

top condition. You want them to be able to properly
filter your blood!
Garlic bulbs are available year round in your local
grocery store. You can store garlic uncovered in a
cool, dark place for about a month. Make sure that
when you are selecting bulbs, they are firm and free
from any mold or sprouting. You also want them to be
free from cracks. Avoid bulbs that appear shriveled
and feel soft.
Garlic can be easily added to many dishes—
especially when pureed. Add it to sauces, soups, or
mashed potatoes, or incorporate it into a hummus dip
in combination with chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, and
lemon juice. You can even sauté it along with steamed
spinach and a drop of lemon juice.

Putting Eggs On Your Face - DIY Beauty Remedies You Should NOT Try - Photos
4. Egg Whites
If you are looking for a pure protein source with all
of your essential amino acids, then look no further
than egg whites. They’re a great protein option that is
lower in phosphorus than other good-quality protein
sources such as egg yolks and meats. Remember that
phosphorus is one of those minerals that the kidneys
need to regulate in your blood. If you have kidney
disease, you want to account for food choices that
have higher levels of these minerals to help manage
your disease.

You can purchase egg whites in a carton or
separate the eggs on your own. Egg whites can be used
in omelets, mixed with veggies, enjoyed on their own,
or incorporated into a sandwich. You can also add
them to shakes or smoothies to increase their protein
content.
If you are using whole eggs, consider hard-boiling
them, removing the yolks, and adding them to your
favorite green salad.

Cabbage | eCurry - Soma.R - Soma Rathore
5. Cabbage
Cabbage is known to help reduce your cholesterol
levels. Upon consuming foods containing fats, your
liver releases bile into the small intestine to help
break down and digest the fats. Cabbage binds the
bile salts, which contain cholesterol, preventing
it from being reabsorbed by the small intestine.
Therefore, the cholesterol is eliminated through
your feces.
Cabbage is rich in many different types of
antioxidants, including phytonutrients, polyphenols,
and anthocyanins, as well as being a rich source of
vitamin C and manganese. These all help reduce
inflammation and oxidative stress, thus reducing
damage to your blood vessels, and play a protective
role for your kidneys.

 

Dr Victor Marchione

 

Remember, we are in this together!

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Foods, Uncategorized

SPINACH FRITTATA

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

 

SPINACH FRITTATA

 

spinach-fritatta

This recipe goes heavy on the spinach, a nutrient-dense green rich in carotenoids and vitamin K, as well as magnesium, iron, and copper. A frittata travels and reheats well, making it handy for packed breakfasts, lunches, or on-the-go snacks. You can even make this recipe in muffin tins for extra portability. For a Mexican-inspired version, add seasoned, cooked ground beef, thinly sliced jalapeños, and cilantro.

 

 

 

Makes two servings

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 10 to 15 minutes

 

6 large eggs

¼ tsp. salt

¼ tsp. black pepper

2 tbs. ghee or clarified butter

½ onion, diced

1 cup diced, seeded tomato

4 or 5 tomato slices for topping the frittata

5 cups fresh baby spinach (approximately 9 oz.), roughly chopped

Grated zest and juice of ¼ lemon

Set oven to broil.

 

In a mixing bowl, whisk eggs with salt and pepper.

 

Heat a large, oven-safe skillet over medium heat. Add the ghee to the pan and swirl to coat the bottom. When the fat is hot, add onion and diced tomato and cook, stirring, for two to three minutes, until onion is soft. Add the spinach and let it wilt for 30 seconds.

 

Add the eggs to the skillet and fold them into the vegetables with a rubber spatula. Cook without stirring for about three to four minutes to let the eggs set on the bottom and sides of the pan. When the eggs are firm but still appear wet, lay a few tomato slices on top. Drizzle with lemon juice and sprinkle the lemon zest over the frittata.

 

Transfer the skillet to the oven and broil 4 to 6 inches from the heat for three to five minutes, until the top is golden brown. Cut into slices and serve hot.

 

If you prefer, you can finish your frittata by baking it rather than broiling: Simply preheat the oven to 500 degrees F, then cook it for three to five minutes.

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Dr Jay Jaranson

Dr Gail Gray

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Foods, Uncategorized

Grocery Stores Forced to Sell CAFO EGGS

eggs

Grocery Stores Forced to Carry CAFO Eggs

 

In the U.S., 94 percent of eggs produced come from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), or factory farms,1 where hens, so-called “caged layers,” spend their entire lives in small wire battery cages. Each hen gets a space that’s smaller than a standard sheet of paper where she’s unable to even spread her wings. This practice is undeniably cruel, with the hens suffering severe health problems as a result of their immobility, from spinal cord deterioration leading to paralysis to muscle and bone wasting.

 

Battery cages have already been banned in the European Union, and in the U.S. demand is growing for more humane — and healthier — cage-free options. In fact, about 100 grocery chains, 60 restaurant chains and other food businesses have said they plan to switch to cage-free eggs in the next 10 years, a move that would affect about 70 percent of the U.S. egg demand.2

 

This would require the majority of CAFO egg producers to rethink the cheap way they’re churning out eggs, so not surprisingly there’s been some resistance from the industry.

 

Among the most brazen is a bill introduced in Iowa that would require grocery stores in the state to always carry CAFO eggs.3 The pitch is that cage-free eggs can be more expensive, so the bill is supposed to protect consumers’ access to cheaper eggs and ensure “consumer choice,” but what it’s really about is protecting the interests of industrialized agriculture.

 

Clearly Big Ag is getting nervous; even Walmart has said it will eventually source its eggs from cage-free operations, but the bill, if it’s passed, would require them to still carry CAFO eggs in its Iowa stores.4

 

CAFO Chicken Producers Are Dirty Birds

In addition to eggs, CAFOs also supply the vast majority of chicken bought and consumed in the U.S., with similar concerns about animal welfare, public health and environmental pollution. Big Chicken, including big names such as Tyson Foods, Perdue Farms, Pilgrim’s Pride, Koch Farms and Sanderson Farm, has also been hit with a number of lawsuits recently alleging they engaged in a conspiracy to raise and fix prices over the last decade.

 

“Historically, broiler chicken was priced on a boom-and-bust cycle — when prices for chicken went up, so did supply; then, prices would fall,” WUWM reported.5 More recently, however, the price of broiler chickens has stabilized and risen, even as input costs, such as corn and soy for feed, have dropped. The game-changer appears to be Agri Stats, a software program that allows poultry companies to share data such as production numbers, bird sizes and financial returns.

 

“The database company gathers information from 95 percent of poultry processors and tracks 22 million birds a day. Companies can then use this information, according to farmers, retailers and distributors, to set a higher price for all their products,” according to WUWM.6

 

A Bloomberg report also revealed that profit margins at some leading chicken producers grew exponentially in recent years. For Tyson, profits rose from 1.6 percent to 11.9 percent from 2009 to 2016 and, for Pilgrim’s Pride, from 3.8 percent to nearly 13 percent between 2012 and 2015.7,8

 

In 2016, a lawsuit from Maplevale Farms, a food wholesaler, was filed against Tyson and Pilgrim’s alleging the companies were in collusion to increase broiler wholesale prices by nearly 50 percent from 2008, causing Maplevale to pay inflated prices. Another lawsuit, filed in 2017 by several farmers against Tyson, Pilgrim’s Pride, Perdue, Sanderson, Koch and others, alleges the companies formed a cartel to keep down farmers’ wages. WUWM continued:9

 

“In April 2017, Chicken Kitchen, a restaurant franchiser, brought a similar lawsuit against Tyson Foods, alleging that the company ‘conspired to fix, maintain and stabilize the price of Broilers by limiting production with the intent of increasing Broiler prices in the United States.’

 

On Jan. 12, the Southern supermarket chains Winn-Dixie and Bi-Lo filed suit against Koch Foods, Tyson, Pilgrim’s Pride, and others alleging that the processors restricted supply in order to keep prices high. US Foods and Sysco followed with separate lawsuits on Jan. 30.”

 

Many are also not aware that, in addition to allegedly trying to shortchange farmers’ wages, the industry pays its farmers via a tournament or “gladiator system,” which pits farmers against each other. Those ranked in the top half (producing the fattest chickens with the least amount of feed, for instance) receive a bonus payment while those at the bottom will get a penalty. That may mean the farmers at the bottom receive about half the pay for the same number of chickens.10

 

100 Percent Natural, Really?

Sanderson Farms is no stranger to lawsuits. In June 2017, the Organic Consumers Association (OCA), Friends of the Earth (FoE) and Center for Food Safety (CFS) filed a lawsuit against Sanderson Farms for falsely advertising their products as “100% Natural.” In reality, testing by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) National Residue Program revealed a battery of unnatural residues in the chicken, including:

 

Antibiotics for human use, including one prohibited for use in food animals

 

Ketamine, a drug that causes hallucinogenic effects that is not approved for use in poultry

 

Ketoprofren, an anti-inflammatory drug

 

Predisone, a steroid

 

Two growth hormones banned for use in poultry

 

Amoxicillin, a human antibiotic not approved for use in poultry

 

Penicillin residues

 

Pesticides

 

Out of 69 inspections of Sanderson Farms in various states from November 2015 to November 2016, 49 found residues that were far from “natural.”11 Although Sanderson’s claims their chicken is “nothing but chicken,” it actually contains a number of residues that are not disclosed on the label. Ronnie Cummins, OCA’s international director, told Sustainable Pulse:12

 

“Consumers should be alarmed that any food they eat contains steroids, recreational or anti-inflammatory drugs, or antibiotics prohibited for use in livestock — much less that these foods are falsely advertised and labeled ‘100% Natural’ … Sanderson’s advertising claims are egregiously misleading to consumers, and unfair to competitors.

 

The organic and free-range poultry sector would be growing much more rapidly if consumers knew the truth about Sanderson’s products and false advertising.”

 

Meanwhile, Sanderson is fighting back against the OCA’s suit; they filed a motion for sanctions in February 2018, and it remains a “buyer beware” market when it comes to these types of label claims. When sorting through “natural” and “antibiotic free” labels available, it’s important to be aware of the “fine print” in many cases. In Perdue’s No Antibiotics Ever program, for instance, it means just that.

 

However, if the label states only “responsible antibiotic use,” “veterinarian-approved antibiotic use,” “no antibiotic residue” or “100% natural,” antibiotics may have been used in the hatchery while the chick is in the egg. Even if a product is labeled organic, it could have had antibiotics used in the hatchery. The exception is if it is labeled organic and “raised without antibiotics.”

 

In this case, it means no antibiotics were used at any point. Other loopholes include stating “no human antibiotics,” but this means other animal antibiotics may be used.

 

Claims to watch out for include the “no growth-promoting antibiotics” label and the no “critically important” antibiotics label or claims. In the former case, it means antibiotics may still be used for disease prevention and in the latter, most critically important antibiotics aren’t used in poultry production anyway, so the “claim doesn’t translate to meaningful change in antibiotic use,” according to Consumer Reports.13

 

As for the USDA’s definition of “natural,” it only means a product contains “no artificial ingredient or added color and is only minimally processed. Minimal processing means that the product was processed in a manner that does not fundamentally alter the product.” Under this vague description, Bloomberg noted, “even chicken nuggets — that emblem of highly processed, additive-laden, junk food — have borne the ‘100% natural’ label.”14

 

Sanderson Says Not Enough Antibiotics Used

Sanderson Farms, the third-largest poultry producer in the U.S., which processes more than 10.6 million chickens every week, is the only large producer that has refused to commit to limiting antibiotics use.15 In February 2017, a Sanderson Farms shareholder proposal that requested the company phase out the use of medically important antibiotics even failed to pass.16

 

The company has stated that using antibiotics preventively in food animals is not dangerous to human health17 and, as of February 2018, they still state on their website FAQs section, “After deliberate and careful consideration, we do not plan to withdraw antibiotics from our program at this time.”18 Meanwhile, they’ve even gone so far as to claim that the U.S. is currently facing a surplus of antibiotic-free chicken.

 

In a regulatory filing, Sanderson said that while 40.5 percent of U.S. fresh chicken production was made up of antibiotic-free birds, only 6.4 percent of it was sold as antibiotic-free. While neglecting to identify the sources of the data, Sanderson also claimed that consumers mostly want antibiotic-free breast meat and chicken tenders, which means chicken producers must then sell the rest of the antibiotic-free meat at lower prices, even though it cost more to produce.19

 

In the filing, Sanderson claimed, “Industry data indicate that the supply of ABF [antibiotic-free] chicken is currently significantly greater than demand for the product, and that oversupply has increased.” They also continue to assert that using antibiotics is beneficial for both animal welfare and the company, telling Reuters, “It allows us to produce product at a more affordable price point.”20

 

Never mind that, as a result of the overuse of antibiotics, especially for purposes of growth promotion or providing low doses to prevent diseases that are likely to occur when animals are raised in dirty and overcrowded living conditions, the threat of antimicrobial resistance is increasing around the globe.21

 

Meanwhile, even some Sanderson shareholders support the end of antibiotic use. At the company’s annual meeting held February 15, 2018, 43 percent of Sanderson’s investors supported a proposal urging the company to stop its use of medically important antibiotics for disease prevention in healthy chickens — up from 30 percent who supported a similar proposal in 2017. Sanderson, however, had reportedly “urged investors to vote no on the proposal.”22

 

Why Is Government Entertaining the Idea of Protecting CAFOs?

As for the Iowa bill that would force stores to carry a certain product, namely CAFO eggs, it’s disturbing though not surprising given the government’s history of protecting industrialized agriculture. Consider Vande Bunte Eggs in Michigan, an egg-laying chicken CAFO that houses 1.6 million birds. With more than 200 state permit violations in the span of three years, you might think the facility would be in danger of being shut down.

 

Instead, it’s received more than $1 million in federal subsidies. The company’s Tim Vande Bunte also testified in support of Senate Bill 660, which was introduced in December 2017 and would push back the deadline for Michigan egg producers to provide cage-free chicken housing from 2020 to 2025.23

 

Vande Bunte’s many violations are but one example cited in a report compiled by the Environmentally Concerned Citizens of South Central Michigan.24,25 The report analyzed 272 CAFOs in Michigan and found they had collectively received more than $103 million in federal subsidies between 1995 and 2014, all while racking up 644 environmental permit violations by the end of 2016.

 

Meanwhile, in early 2017, 35 advocacy groups, including Food & Water Watch, called on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to close federal loopholes that are allowing CAFOs to continue polluting the planet. In a petition, the groups asked the EPA to require CAFOs housing a certain number of animals or using a certain kind of manure management system to obtain a permit. The EPA has said that up to 75 percent of CAFOs need permits but only 40 percent have them.

 

What’s the Best Source for Chicken and Eggs?

 

Choosing food that comes from small regenerative farms — not CAFOs — is crucial. While avoiding CAFO meats, look for antibiotic-free alternatives raised by organic and regenerative farmers. Unfortunately, loopholes abound, allowing CAFO-raised chickens and eggs to masquerade as “free-range” and “organic.”

 

The Cornucopia Institute addressed some of these issues their egg report and scorecard, which ranks egg producers according to 28 organic criteria. It can help you to make a more educated choice if you’re buying your eggs at the supermarket.

 

Ultimately, to find safer, more humane and environmentally friendly chicken and eggs, the best choice is to get to know a local farmer and get your meat and eggs there directly. Alternatively, you might consider raising your own backyard chickens, though requirements vary widely depending on your locale, with many limiting the number of chickens you can raise or requiring quarterly inspections (at a cost) and permits, so check with your city before taking the plunge.

 

If you don’t want to raise your own chickens but still want farm-fresh eggs, you have many options. Finding high-quality organic, pastured eggs locally is getting easier, as virtually every rural area has individuals with chickens. If you live in an urban area, visiting the local health food stores is typically the quickest route to finding high-quality local egg sources. Farmers markets and food co-ops are another great way to meet people producing food the right way.

 

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Protein Breakfast Bowl

protienbowl

Protein Breakfast Bowl

YIELD: 2 SERVINGS   CALORIES:437

Ingredients

1 small onion, sliced

6-8 medium mushrooms, sliced

5 oz grass-fed ground beef

1/2 tsp smoked paprika

2 eggs, lightly beaten

1 small avocado, diced

10-12 pitted black olives, sliced

salt

pepper

Directions

  1. In a heavy skillet over medium high heat, melt a little bit of coconut oil. When oil is hot, add onions, mushrooms, and salt and pepper. Cook for around 2 to 3 minutes, until the vegetables are fragrant and softened.
  2. Add ground beef and smoked paprika and continue cooking until the beef is no longer pink. Set the beef aside on a plate.
  3. Add eggs to the skillet and scramble them to your liking.
  4. Return beef to the pan. Add avocado and sliced olives.
  5. Continue cooking for about 45 seconds to a minute in order to slightly warm up the avocados and olives.
  6. Transfer to a bowl and garnish with parsley, if desired.

 

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Mexican Garden Scramble

mexican

 

Mexican Garden Scramble

 

Increasing your fruit and vegetable intake is one of the best ways to control your blood pressure. Fruit and vegetables provide essential vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants, but especially valuable are the potassium, magnesium, and even calcium that they provide. One way to ensure you are getting enough vegetables is to start your day with a serving!

 

This Mexican garden scramble includes flavorful peppers and onions, cilantro, and tomatoes folded into fluffy, protein-rich scrambled eggs. Topped with a bit of shredded cheese and creamy, potassium-rich avocado, this breakfast is a delicious and satisfying way to start your day.

 

Ingredients

3 large eggs + 1 egg white

1/4 cup onion, diced

1/4 cup bell pepper, diced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 tablespoon fresh jalapeno, diced

1/4 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped

1/4 cup tomato, diced

1/2 small avocado, sliced

2 tablespoons shredded colby jack or cheddar cheese

salsa or hot sauce

Preparation

In a small bowl, whisk eggs and white until combined and fluffy. Set aside.

Heat a small non-stick skillet over medium-low heat. Spray with oil and add onion, bell pepper, garlic, and jalapeno. Cook, stirring, until soft, about 3 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside.

 

Turn heat to low, spray again, and add eggs. Cook over low heat, pushing eggs from outside of pan to the center with a rubber spatula, until almost done. Add cooked veggies and 2 tablespoons cilantro to the eggs and continue cooking until eggs are set.

 

 

To assemble, divide eggs between two bowls. Add tomato, avocado, cheese, and remaining cilantro. Top with your favorite salsa or hot sauce. Enjoy!

 

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

If you have other veggies on hand that need to be used up, feel free to throw them into the pan with the peppers and onions. Breakfast scrambles are a great way to use up vegetables that are about to go bad. Mushrooms, corn, and spinach would all be great additions.

 

To keep the calories, fat and sodium under control, be sure to stick to the small portion of cheese and avocado listed in the recipe. While nutritious, these foods are also calorie-dense.

 

If you need to watch your cholesterol, you can use all egg whites in place of whole eggs.

 

Cooking and Serving Tips

When making scrambled eggs, keep the heat on low and slowly stir from the outside edges inward for the best results.

 

Serve with a warmed whole grain corn or whole wheat tortilla and a serving of fresh fruit to round out the meal.

 

If you are having concerns about your food intake, please make an appointment with us and we can work on a personal health care plan.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Shakshuka and Recipe

ahak

Shakshuka Recipe

 

Shakshuka: if you’re looking for new egg recipes for breakfast, this is one you have to try.

 

Sh…sh…what?

 

If you’re wondering what is shakshuka, the word actually means “a mixture” in certain Arab dialects, which makes sense. The traditional version is made from a mix of benefit-rich eggs, tomatoes, chili peppers and onions, but there are dozens of modern interpretations of it – from adding in other veggies like eggplant or spinach, to sneaking in cheese and meats.  We have talked earlier how beneficial having eggs with onions together are.  The enzymes together are so important.

 

Shakshuka’s Origins

 

Shakshuka’s background comes from North Africa, where it’s a staple in Tunisia, Libya and Egypt. It’s also extremely popular in Israel, where the egg dish arrived with a wave of North African immigration in the 1950s. It’s often eaten as a breakfast dish because it’s egg-based, but in Israel, it’s not uncommon to have it as a dinner meal, particularly once temperatures drop.

 

Traditional shakshuka is meat-free and uses pretty basic ingredients; this is part of the reason why it’s remained so popular, as it’s accessible to prepare even if you’re short on cash.

 

Is Shakshuka Healthy?

 

For a deliciously simple meal, shakshuka is super good for you. Because of the eggs, it’s a terrific source of protein. It also uses harissa, a Tunisian chili paste made form olive oil, garlic, chili peppers and spices. That means it packs a punch for your taste buds and your gut. My shakshuka recipe also incorporates yogurt and sauerkraut for an anti-inflammation, probiotic kick.

 

Best of all, it’s quite easy to cook up but makes an impressive dish. It’s naturally gluten-free, too. So if you’re ready to try a new egg recipe for breakfast, you have to try shakshuka.

 

sha1

 

Begin by heating a large cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Then add in the avocado oil, which is known for its healing properties, along with harissa, red peppers, garlic and spices. Cook, stirring the mixture occasionally, until it thickens.

 

sha2

 

Next, add in the fire-roasted tomatoes and cook the mix for another 10 minutes.

 

sha3

 

Add in a handful of fresh basil, stirring to mix in.

 

sha4

 

Then using the back of a wooden spatula, create four indents in the shakshuka mix for the eggs.

 

sha5

 

Add the eggs to the skillet and cook, uncovered, for another 10 minutes, or until the eggs are as runny or as cooked as you like them.

 

sha6

 

Serve the shakshuka with yogurt, saukerkraut and more fresh basil.

 

I hope you enjoy this healthy shakshuka recipe as much – and as often – as I do!

 

Shakshuka Recipe

Total Time: 25 minutesServes: 2–3

INGREDIENTS:

 

2 tablespoons avocado oil

1/4-1/2 cup harissa

3 tablespoons organic tomato paste

2 large red peppers, small diced

4 cloves garlic, crushed and minced

1 ½ teaspoon smoked paprika

1 ½ teaspoon chili powder

1-2 teaspoons sea salt

1-2 teaspoons pepper

1-2 teaspoon crushed red pepper

½ cup fire roasted tomatoes

2-3 very ripe tomatoes

4 pasture raised eggs

Plain grass fed yogurt

Sauerkraut

1-2 handfuls of fresh basil

DIRECTIONS:

 

In a large cast-iron skillet over medium heat, add in the avocado oil, harissa, red peppers, garlic and spices.

Cook, stirring occasionally, until mixture thickens.

Add in the fire roasted tomatoes and continue cooking for 10 minutes.

Using the back of a wooden spatula, form four shallow indents for the eggs.

Add in the eggs and cook, uncovered for an additional 10 minutes or until eggs are desired doneness.

Serve topped with yogurt, sauerkraut and basil.

 

Please share with family and loved ones

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Foods, Uncategorized

Homemade Mayonnaise

homemademayonnaise

How To Make Mayonnaise with an Immersion Blender

 

Makes 1 cup

What You Need

Ingredients

2 egg yolks

1 teaspoon lemon juice or vinegar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon dry mustard (optional)

1 cup canola oil, olive oil, or any other oil

 

Equipment

Measuring cups and spoons

Immersion blender

Immersion blender cup or wide-mouth canning jar

 

Instructions

Combine the yolks, lemon juice, salt, and mustard: Combine the yolks, lemon juice, salt, and mustard in the blender cup or canning jar. Pulse with the immersion blender a few times to break up the yolks. You may need to tilt the cup so the blender blade reaches the yolks.

Add 1/2 cup of the oil a little at a time: With the immersion blender running, add the first 1/2 cup of oil a few tablespoons at a time. Make sure each addition of oil is completely blended before adding the next. The mixture should start to thicken and lighten. (Once you’ve made this a few times and have a feel for it, you can try going more quickly, or even try pouring all the oil on top of the eggs and then blending all at once — going slowly at first is just an extra level of insurance.)

Add the remaining oil in a steady stream: Once the first half cup of oil has been added, you can add the rest more quickly. Add as much of the oil as needed to reach the consistency you prefer; the more oil you add, the thicker the mayo will become. You may not need to use all the oil. If the mayo becomes too thick and you’d like to thin it out, blend water, 1 teaspoon at a time, into the mayo until you reach your desired thickness.

Store the mayonnaise: Transfer any mayo not being used immediately to a storage container (or leave it in the canning jar and seal it with a lid). Homemade mayo will keep for about 1 week in the refrigerator.

 

Please share one of your homemade mayonnaise recipes with us.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Spinach Frittata

Spinach-Fritatta

SPINACH FRITTATA

 

This recipe goes heavy on the spinach, a nutrient-dense green rich in carotenoids and vitamin K, as well as magnesium, iron, and copper. A frittata travels and reheats well, making it handy for packed breakfasts, lunches, or on-the-go snacks. You can even make this recipe in muffin tins for extra portability. For a Mexican-inspired version, add seasoned, cooked ground beef, thinly sliced jalapeños, and cilantro.

 

Makes two servings
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 10 to 15 minutes

  • 6 large eggs
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • ¼ tsp. black pepper
  • 2 tbs. ghee or clarified butter
  • ½ onion, diced
  • 1 cup diced, seeded tomato
  • 4 or 5 tomato slices for topping the frittata
  • 5 cups fresh baby spinach (approximately 9 oz.), roughly chopped
  • Grated zest and juice of ¼ lemon

Set oven to broil.

In a mixing bowl, whisk eggs with salt and pepper.

Heat a large, oven-safe skillet over medium heat. Add the ghee to the pan and swirl to coat the bottom. When the fat is hot, add onion and diced tomato and cook, stirring, for two to three minutes, until onion is soft. Add the spinach and let it wilt for 30 seconds.

Add the eggs to the skillet and fold them into the vegetables with a rubber spatula. Cook without stirring for about three to four minutes to let the eggs set on the bottom and sides of the pan. When the eggs are firm but still appear wet, lay a few tomato slices on top. Drizzle with lemon juice and sprinkle the lemon zest over the frittata.

Transfer the skillet to the oven and broil 4 to 6 inches from the heat for three to five minutes, until the top is golden brown. Cut into slices and serve hot.

If you prefer, you can finish your frittata by baking it rather than broiling: Simply preheat the oven to 500 degrees F, then cook it for three to five minutes.