Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Danger! Replace these Houshold Items!

Danger

Danger! Replace These Household Items Now

 

Your home is your castle, and also your haven. But common household items may be turning your sanctuary into a hazard and increasing your risk for colds, viruses, and food poisoning as well as deadly diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and cancer.

 

Below are five common, but possibly dangerous, items you should consider replacing … now.

 

Aluminum pots and pans. Aluminum pots and pans may increase your risk for neurological diseases because small amounts of aluminum leach into foods, especially those containing acids. Experts have linked aluminum to Alzheimer’s disease as well as Parkinson’s disease, kidney and liver damage, weakened bones, and multiple sclerosis.

 

“Aluminum is cumulative, and even small doses over time become highly toxic,” board-certified neurosurgeon Dr. Russell Blaylock . “It’s a powerful neurotoxin. When aluminum combines with certain acids, such as those in orange juice, aluminum absorption is increased 11-fold,” he says. “If you’re cooking with fluoridated water, the aluminum and fluoride bind, so you’re producing aluminum fluoride, an extremely toxic compound.”

 

The worst scenario for a health disaster involving cookware is boiling water for tea in an aluminum kettle or pan, says Blaylock. “Black tea is already high in aluminum and fluoride, and you’d be getting very high levels of aluminum fluoride. Replace aluminum pots and pans with stainless, says Blaylock.

 

Scratched “non-stick” cookware. Manufacturers use the chemical PFOA (perfluororctanoic acid) when making Teflon (also known as polytetrafluoroethylene or PTFE), the “no stick” cookware. But the pots and pans that are so easy to clean could be increasing your risk for several conditions, including breast cancer, preeclampsia, thyroid disease, and ulcerative colitis.

 

Teflon and similar coatings, such as T-Fal and Silverstone, emit PFOAs when heated to a high temperature. The fumes can cause flu-like symptoms in people, nicknamed “Teflon flu.” A study by the Environmental Working Group found that heating a nonstick pan to 680 degrees on an ordinary electric stove released six toxic gasses including two that are known to cause cancer.

 

 

Studies have found that empty pans can reach 800 degrees in only five minutes, and some studies show that enough PFOAs are emitted to kill pet birds at temperatures as low as 325 degrees.

 

At high temperatures, Teflon also releases tetrafluoroethylene, a known carcinogen, and another chemical called monofluoroacetic acid, which can be fatal even in small amounts. When heated to 887 degrees, Teflon also emits perfluoroisobutene, a substance used in chemical warfare. When pans are scratched, the harmful chemicals are released at even lower temperatures.

 

Older cookware, scratched or not, is more likely to emit toxins, and many manufacturers have agreed to produce non-stick cookware that would not emit PFOAs. To be on the safe side, replace questionable pots and pans with stainless steel. Dr. Blaylock warns of one exception — don’t buy Chinese stainless. “It is usually extremely low-grade and it will degrade,” says Dr. Blaylock.

Kitchen sponges. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that food poisoning sickens 1 in 6 Americans every year (48 million). Of those, 128,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 die. Salmonella and E. coli, two of the most common, hide on kitchen surfaces and in sponges, which are usually wet and provide an ideal environment for germs to multiply.

 

To stay safe, replace sponges on a regular basis. Sanitize wet sponges by microwaving them for two minutes, washing in the dishwasher, or placing them in boiling water laced with a couple of tablespoons of vinegar for three or four minutes.

 

Fire extinguishers. You probably have at least one fire extinguisher in your home, but how long has it been since you’ve even given it a second look? Fire extinguishers can de-pressurize over time and be worthless in an emergency. Check the label to see how long yours should last — some are expected to work for only about five years.

The National Fire Protection Association recommends non-rechargeable units be replaced every 12 years and rechargeable ones tested and recharged every six years. If your home is humid, your extinguisher may need replacing more often.

 

Check the pressure gauge on your extinguisher every month to make sure it falls in the green area. If not, replace it immediately. Also check for corrosion, cracked hoses, and broken handles — all indicate your fire extinguisher needs to be replaced.

 

Plastic food containers. Bisphenol A (BPA) is used to make plastics used in food and beverage containers and is often used in the lining of metal cans. BPAs are proven endocrine disruptors and can increase the risk for breast and prostate cancer, heart disease, and obesity. “BPA actually disturbs the hormone production in our bodies,” Dr. Erika Schwartz, a leading expert on hormones tells Newsmax Health.

 

Avoid BPA by choosing fresh foods and those in glass containers instead of those in cans. Buy plastic containers with the recycling labels No. 1, No. 2, No. 4, and No. 5 on the bottom. Avoid those with No. 3, No. 7, or PC (polycarbonate). Cloudy or soft containers don’t contain BPA.

 

Call us for your healthcare concerns

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

DR G Carney

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

 

Health and Disease, Lifestyle

Kitchen Gadgets You Should Get Rid of

cuttingboards

Kitchen Gadgets You Should Get Rid of

Cooking at home is one of the best ways to lose weight, since you control what goes into your food. But sometimes, what’s in your kitchen is as important as what’s in your mouth. Using old or outdated tools can have a big impact on your health, from spreading germs to putting you at risk for cancer. Here are seven items that you need to replace in your kitchen right now.

Nonstick Pan

Nonstick pans are great for cooking eggs, but be careful how you use them –- heating nonstick pans higher than 500 degrees Fahrenheit can release toxic fumes that, while not deadly, can make you sick. And while 500 degrees is hotter than you will typically heat cookware, scratched and damaged pans will release these colorless, odorless fumes at a lower temperature. So if your nonstick pan is scratched, toss it and get a new one. “Newer pans produce much lower levels of these fumes,” says Albert Levy, an assistant clinical professor of medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. “If you have a nonstick pan produced before 2010, replace it.”

Grill Brush

Summertime is grilling season, but before you clean off the grill, you should think about tossing out your brush and getting a new one. Bristles can fall off old and heavily used brushes, end up in your food and cause severe damage. “When swallowed, these bristles can puncture your throat, stomach or intestines,” says Deborah Orlick Levy, a registered dietitian and consultant for the health food company Carrington Farms. “You should replace these brushes every two to three months, but check it frequently. If the bristles are coming loose, get rid of it and buy a new one.”

Plastic Food Containers

Older food storage containers often contain bisphenol A, better known as BPA, a compound used in plastic manufacturing that has been linked to a host of health problems, including cancer, heart disease, obesity and more -– so if you haven’t bought new containers in a while, now’s the time. “BPA can seep into your food and drink and cause all kinds of nasty health effects,” Orlick Levy says. “Thankfully, more and more companies are phasing it out of their products, so it’s easy to find BPA-free containers.”

Cutting Board

Cutting boards, whether they’re wood or plastic, need to be replaced regularly. While soap and water will clean any bacteria on the surface, your knives leave gouges and cuts that can harbor bacteria and make it difficult to disinfect. “Cutting boards are cheap and replaceable,” Levy says. “As soon as you see deep cuts or scratches in your board, get rid of it. They’re not worth getting sick over.”

Sponge

Sponges are porous and damp, making them cozy bacteria traps. While rinsing your sponge with hot water and zapping it in the microwave for 30 seconds can help sanitize it, you should replace it regularly so you’re not spreading germs every time you clean your dishes. “Sponges are notoriously contaminated,” Levy says. “They can be among the dirtiest things in your kitchen. Once you’ve had it longer than two weeks, get rid of it.”

Dish Towel

Much like your kitchen sponges, dish towels can become a home to millions upon millions of bacteria -– and if you use the same towel to wipe your counters and your hands, you could be setting yourself up to get sick. Launder them frequently, but be sure to replace them often as well.

Fire Extinguisher

While it may not directly affect your health, it’s important to make sure your fire extinguisher is still working. Check out its gauge to see if the needle is still in the green. If it is? You’re set. If not, get a new one. You don’t want to wait until it’s too late.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

312-972-WELL