Health and Disease, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

What to Eat to Strengthen Those Arteries and Veins

butchersbroom

What to Eat to Strengthen Those Arteries and Veins

 

Butcher’s Broom?

Butcher’s broom is a low-growing common evergreen shrub. It is widely distributed, from Iran to the Mediterranean and the southern United States. The plant develops edible shoots that are similar to asparagus in form. Butcher’s broom has tough, erect, striated stems with false thorny leaves. The name of this plant should not be confused with broom (Cytisus scoparius) or Spanish broom (Spartium junceum).

 

What is it used for?

Traditional/Ethnobotanical uses

  1. aculeatus was given its common name, butcher’s broom, because its stiff twigs were bound together and used by butchers in Europe to keep their cutting boards clean. The plant has a long history of use. More than 2000 years ago, it was noted as a laxative, diuretic, and a phlebotherapeutic (beneficial to veins) agent. Extracts, decoctions, and poultices have been used throughout the ages, but the medicinal use of this plant did not become common until the last century. Early investigations during the 1950s indicated that extracts of butcher’s broom could induce vasoconstriction and therefore might have use in the treatment of circulatory diseases. The increasing popularity of natural and herbal remedies in Europe in the 1970s reaffirmed its position in modern medicine. Novel uses for this plant have included its use as an anti-inflammatory agent and to prevent atherosclerosis.

 

Venous conditions

A variety of compounds have been isolated from butcher’s broom. The 2 primary active saponin compounds are ruscogenin and neoruscogenin. Butcher’s broom is the active component in several produce formulations and topical treatments for venous diseases and venous insufficiency, such as varicose veins and hemorrhoids. Limited results showing some promise from clinical trials are available. The German Commission E approves oral use for supportive therapy for discomforts of chronic venous insufficiency and complaints of hemorrhoids. Butcher’s broom also may be useful for orthostatic hypotension, although data is limited.

 

Other uses

Novel modern uses for this plant have included its use as an anti-inflammatory agent and to prevent atherosclerosis. The discovery of new pharmacological activity of butcher’s broom, particularly as a cytotoxic agent, demonstrate the need for continued research on butcher’s broom.

 

What is the recommended dosage?

Extracts have been dosed at 16 mg daily for chronic phlebopathy, while a topical cream formulation was used to apply 64 to 96 mg of extract daily.

Pregnancy/nursing

Information regarding safety and efficacy in pregnancy and lactation is lacking. Avoid use.

Cup of tea, teapot and branch of clover on wooden background

Butchers Broom Tea

Preparation Methods & Dosage: To make a tea from chopped root, place 1 teaspoon of the herb in a cup of boiling water and allow to steep in a closed teapot for 10 minutes.

 

Orange Peels

Yes, add those orange peels to any tea and it will help with strengthening the veins.  Orange peels can be put into desserts and when cooking meat, and get all the same health benefits for your veins,.

 

Grapes

If you have vein and or artery issues, or have had a heart attack, grapes with seeds is the route to go.  Try never to buy grapes without seeds, for there are too many hidden chemicals in those grapes.

 

Just a few things to help you out!

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

 

 

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Rx to Wellness

All About Resveratrol

wineandgrapes

All About Resveratrol

We have received many questions about Resveratrol lately and thought we would address them in this manner.

Resveratrol Health Benefits

Why do the French eat more fat, sugar, rich foods, wine and have less heart health issues? It’s called the French Paradox and it is believed to be due to a phytonutrient called Resveratrol, found naturally in wine, cocoa and other berries. It is a powerful antioxidant that regenerates the body at the cellular level.

Medical Research out of the Journal of Circulation 2005 found that resveratrol found in red wine decreases the risk of heart disease.  Along with helping build a healthy heart, resveratrol has many other health benefits.

What is Resveratrol?

Resveratrol is an important ingredient found in cocoa, red grapes and dark berries such as lingonberries, blueberries, mulberries and bilberries. It is a polyphonic bioflavonoid antioxidant that is produced by these plants as a response to stress, injury and fungal infection.

Early research discovered that resveratrol increased the lifespan of yeast cells. Later studies confirmed its amazing benefits as fruit flies, fish, mice and nematode worms also had a longer lifespan when given this amazing bioactive compound.NutraIngredients reported that further studies showed resveratrol had “anti-cancer effects, anti-inflammatory effects, cardiovascular benefits, anti-diabetes potential, energy endurance enhancement and protection against Alzheimer’s.” Who would not want to benefit from this all-natural elixir?Recent studies by researchers at the Nutrition Research Center at Northunbria University in the UK showed that resveratrol noticeably increased blood flow to the brain, suggesting a considerable benefit to healthy brain function.

What is Resveratrol used for?

Resveratrol is a powerful antioxidant that neutralizes free radicals produced during everyday bodily functions such as eating and exercise. If left unchecked, these can damage cells and are thought to be a cause of life-threatening disease and sickness.

As a source of antioxidants, resveratrol is particularly unique as its antioxidants can cross the blood-brain barrier to protect the brain and the nervous system, unlike other antioxidants.

Resveratrol is more than just a powerful brain-booster, it has also been found to:

Provide powerful antioxidant support

Helps the body fight oxidative stress

Supports cell and tissue health

Promotes circulation and a healthy heart

Helps prevent premature aging

Supports a healthy digestive system and elimination

Regular travelers will also be very interested to know that resveratrol helps protect against the effects of radiation, which we are all exposed to, especially if you do not “Opt Out” of the scanners at the airport.

How Does Resveratrol Work?

Resveratrol works by modifying inflammation in the body. It limits the body’s ability to produce sphingosine kinase and phospholipase D, two molecules known to trigger inflammation. Although the body naturally produces inflammation to counter bacteria and viruses as part of the immune system, a state of chronic or constant inflammation is not a healthy state to live with.

Resveratrol has been found to lower insulin levels, which is key to staying young and fighting disease. In trials, Sirtris Pharmaceuticals found that those with diabetes who took resveratrol had lower glucose and insulin levels, making it a powerful aid to a healthy lifestyle.

Resveratrol deeply penetrates the nucleus of each cell, helping to repair any free radical damage to DNA. It keeps the circulation flowing smoothly, prevents arterial damage and is thought to protect the brain from Alzheimer’s disease. It may also prevent other disorders such as stroke, ischemia and Huntington’s disease.

Finally, as a potent antioxidant resveratrol is constantly fighting damage from free radicals and the effects of aging.

How do I take Resveratrol?

Now you know the benefits of resveratrol in your diet, you may be wondering what the best source of this compound is. Although we have mentioned that red wine, cocoa and berries are a good source of resveratrol, unfortunately a diet of dark chocolate and red wine may be decadent but ultimately very unhealthy if you overdo it! The best way to obtain the benefits of resveratrol in balance with a healthy diet and lifestyle is by taking it as a natural supplement.

If you have any questions as to whether you should add this to your health care plan, please call us and we will be happy to assist you.

Feel free to share this with family and friends

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

JM

  1. Carrothers

312-972-WELL

Health and Disease

Preventing Cervical Cancer

ladyslippergroup

Cervical Cancer

The good news is the number of cervical cancer cases is

falling yearly.  If you have a family history

of cervical cancer, including vulva and labia, then there are things you can do

to prevent it from happening.

Cutting your risk with grapes and berries

Eating one cup of grapes, strawberries or blueberries, or

drinking 4 oz. of pomegranate juice daily cuts your risk of ever getting

cervical cancer. Compounds in these fruits help stop abnormal growth from

spreading making it easier for your immune system to find and destroy them

quickly.
If you have any questions or concerns contact us at

Health and Wellness Associates

312-972-WELL

Picture:  Lady Slippers, taken in Northern Minnesota

Foods

Updated Waldorf Salad

waldorf-1540260-x

Updated Waldorf Salad

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons low-fat mayonnaise (Hellmans Mayo is best)
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 2 small (Gala or Fuji) apples, cubed
  • 1 cup seedless red grapes, halved
  • 1/3 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped walnuts
  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced celery (about 1 stalk)
  • 8 Boston or Bibb lettuce leaves

Preparation

  1. Combine mayonnaise and lemon juice in a medium bowl. Add apples, grapes, and cranberries; mix well.
  2. Add the walnuts and celery, and mix well. Serve it on a bed of 2 lettuce leaves. The salad can be refrigerated up to 2 hours before serving.