Health and Disease

ADD GUM DISEASE TO THE LIST OF RISK FACTORS FOR COVID 19

ADD GUM DISEASE TO THE LIST OF RISK FACTORS FOR COVID 19

images (9)Keep flossing: A new study finds that gum disease may raise the chances of hospitalization or death if COVID-19 strikes.

The reason? Gum disease can be a sign of inflammation throughout the body.

“It is well-established that systemic inflammation is not only linked with periodontal disease, but to several other respiratory diseases as well,” explained Dr. James Wilson, president of the American Academy of Periodontology.

“Therefore, maintaining healthy teeth and gums in an effort to avoid developing or worsening periodontal disease is absolutely crucial in the midst of a global pandemic like COVID-19, which is also known to trigger an inflammatory response,” Wilson said in an academy news release.

News Picture: Add Gum Disease to List of Risk Factors for Severe COVID-19

In the study, researchers compared COVID-19 patients in Qatar who had severe complications — including assisted ventilation, admission to intensive care and death — and those without severe complications.

Of the 568 patients, those with periodontitis — the most severe form of gum disease — were at least three times more likely to have severe COVID-19 complications.

The researchers also found that COVID-19 patients with periodontitis had increased levels of biomarkers (including white blood cell levels, D-dimer, and C-reactive protein) associated with worse COVID-19 outcomes.

The study, by Nadya Marouf of the Oral Health Institute, Hamad Medical Corporation in Doha, Qatar, and colleagues was published online Feb. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology.

Systemic inflammation is a symptom of COVID-19, and can also be a symptom of gum disease, the researchers noted.

The findings show the importance of good oral care during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the academy.

Gum disease can cause bleeding gums, bad breath and, if untreated, can lead to tooth loss. Up to half of U.S. adults aged 30 and older have some form of gum disease, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Previous research has linked gum disease to serious conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

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More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health explains how to prevent gum disease.

SOURCE: American Academy of Periodontology, news release, Feb. 3, 2021

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Promote Healthy Teeth and Gums

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Promote Healthy Teeth And Gums 

 

There is more than dental health at stake if you fail to brush and floss. Research suggests that the bacteria that cause gum infections can also lead to or worsen atherosclerosis, the arterial disease that contributes to heart attacks and strokes. Start practicing these good oral habits if you don’t already:

Use dental floss at least once a day (such as immediately after you brush in the morning or evening). I suggest using unwaxed dental floss if possible, and get it under the gum line to scrape the tooth surface. If you have the opportunity, ask a dental hygienist to teach you how to floss effectively.

Whenever you have a chance, wash your hands and massage your gums with your fingertips. You can also stimulate your gums by running the end of a round wooden toothpick under the gum line.

If your gums are sore, mix hydrogen peroxide and baking soda to a paste and work this mixture into and under your gums with a toothbrush. Leave the mixture on for a few minutes, then rinse.

Use a goldenseal mouth rinse.

Have your teeth and gums cleaned by a dental hygienist twice a year, and get treatment for any signs of infection that are discovered.

You may also consider toothbrushes incorporating ultrasound – they have been clinically shown to treat gingivitis more effectively than regular toothbrushes. Ask your dentist about them.

There are several causes of gingivitis, and we can help you determine how to cure this problem. Treating the symptoms is important, and finding the cause of this condition lifesaving.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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Dir P Carrothers

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Preventative and Restorative Medicine

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