Lifestyle, Uncategorized

It is Time!!

Many of us are between 65 and death, i.e. old. My friend sent me this excellent list for aging . . . and I have to agree it’s good advice to follow. The guy who sent this hi-lighted #19.
Hope you enjoy this.
Ronald Steiger

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1. It’s time to use the money you saved up. Use it and enjoy it. Don’t just keep it for those who may have no notion of the sacrifices you made to get it. Remember there is nothing more dangerous than a son or daughter-in-law with big ideas for your hard-earned capital. Warning: This is also a bad time for investments, even if it seems wonderful or fool-proof. They only bring problems and worries. This is a time for you to enjoy some peace and quiet. 🐴

2. Stop worrying about the financial situation of your children and grandchildren, and don’t feel bad spending your money on yourself. You’ve taken care of them for many years, and you’ve taught them what you could. You gave them an education, food, shelter and support. The responsibility is now theirs to earn their own money.🐴

3. Keep a healthy life, without great physical effort. Do moderate exercise (like walking every day), eat well and get your sleep. It’s easy to become sick, and it gets harder to remain healthy. That is why you need to keep yourself in good shape and be aware of your medical and physical needs. Keep in touch with your doctor, do tests even when you’re feeling well. Stay informed.🐴

4. Always buy the best, most beautiful items for your significant other. The key goal is to enjoy your money with your partner. One day one of you will miss the other, and the money will not provide any comfort then, enjoy it together🐴

5. Don’t stress over the little things. Like paying a little extra on price quotes. You’ve already overcome so much in your life.You have good memories and bad ones, but the important thing is the present. Don’t let the past drag you down and don’t let the future frighten you. Feel good in the now. Small issues will soon be forgotten.🐴

6. Regardless of age, always keep love alive. Love your partner, love life, love your family, love your neighbor and remember: “A man is not old as long as he has intelligence and affection.”🐴

7. Be proud, both inside and out. Don’t stop going to your hair salon or barber, do your nails, go to the dermatologist and the dentist, keep your perfumes and creams well stocked. When you are well-maintained on the outside, it seeps in, making you feel proud and strong.🐴

8. Don’t lose sight of fashion trends for your age, but keep your own sense of style. There’s nothing worse than an older person trying to wear the current fashion among youngsters. You’ve developed your own sense of what looks good on you – keep it and be proud of it. It’s part of who you are.🐴

9. ALWAYS stay up-to-date. Read newspapers, watch the news. Go online and read what people are saying. Make sure you have an active email account and try to use some of those social networks. You’ll be surprised what old friends you’ll meet. Keeping in touch with what is going on and with the people you know is important at any age.🐴

10. Respect the younger generation and their opinions. They may not have the same ideals as you, but they are the future, and will take the world in their direction. Give advice, not criticism, and try to remind them that yesterday’s wisdom still applies today.🐴

11. Never use the phrase: “In my time.” Your time is now. As long as you’re alive, you are part of this time. You may have been younger, but you are still you now, having fun and enjoying life.🐴

12. Some people embrace their golden years, while others become bitter and surly. Life is too short to waste your days on the latter. Spend your time with positive, cheerful people, it’ll rub off on you and your days will seem that much better. Spending your time with bitter people will make you older and harder to be around.🐴

13. Do not surrender to the temptation of living with your children or grandchildren (if you have a financial choice, that is). Sure, being surrounded by family sounds great, but we all need our privacy. They need theirs and you need yours. If you’ve lost your partner (our deepest condolences), then find a person to move in with you and help out. Even then, do so only if you feel you really need the help or do not want to live alone.🐴

14. Don’t abandon your hobbies. If you don’t have any, make new ones. You can travel, hike, cook, read, dance. You can adopt a cat or a dog, grow a garden, play cards, checkers, chess, dominoes, golf. You can paint, volunteer or just collect certain items. Find something you like and spend some real time having fun with it.🐴

15. Even if you don’t feel like it, try to accept invitations. Baptisms, graduations, birthdays, weddings, conferences. Try to go. Get out of the house, meet people you haven’t seen in a while, experience something new (or something old). But don’t get upset when you’re not invited. Some events are limited by resources, and not everyone can be hosted. The important thing is to leave the house from time to time. Go to museums, go walk through a field. Get out there.🐴

16. Be a conversationalist. Talk less and listen more. Some people go on and on about the past, not caring if their listeners are really interested. That’s a great way of reducing their desire to speak with you. Listen first and answer questions, but don’t go off into long stories unless asked to. Speak in courteous tones and try not to complain or criticize too much unless you really need to. Try to accept situations as they are. Everyone is going through the same things, and people have a low tolerance for hearing complaints. Always find some good things to say as well.🐴

17. Pain and discomfort go hand in hand with getting older. Try not to dwell on them but accept them as a part of the cycle of life we’re all going through. Try to minimize them in your mind. They are not who you are, they are something that life added to you. If they become your entire focus, you lose sight of the person you used to be.🐴

18. If you’ve been offended by someone – forgive them. If you’ve offended someone – apologize. Don’t drag around resentment with you. It only serves to make you sad and bitter. It doesn’t matter who was right. Someone once said: “Holding a grudge is like taking poison and expecting the other person to die.” Don’t take that poison. Forgive, forget and move on with your life.🐴

19. If you have a strong belief, savor it. But don’t waste your time trying to convince others. They will make their own choices no matter what you tell them, and it will only bring you frustration. Live your faith and set an example. Live true to your beliefs and let that memory sway them.🐴

20. Laugh. Laugh A LOT. Laugh at everything. Remember, you are one of the lucky ones. You managed to have a life, a long one. Many never get to this age, never get to experience a full life. But you did. So what’s not to laugh about? Find the humor in your situation.🐴

21. Take no notice of what others say about you and even less notice of what they might be thinking. They’ll do it anyway, and you should have pride in yourself and what you’ve achieved. Let them talk and don’t worry. They have no idea about your history, your memories and the life you’ve lived so far. There’s still much to be written, so get busy writing and don’t waste time thinking about what others might think. Now is the time to be at rest, at peace and as happy as you can be!🐴

REMEMBER: “Life is too short to drink bad wine and warm beer.”
Enjoy and share
Ron

Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

An Entire Organ That Mainstream Medicine Missed?

An Entire Organ That Mainstream Medicine Missed?

 

Findings recently published in Scientific Reports have led to what many believe is the discovery of a previously unidentified organ in the human body. The “interstitium,” a layer of fluid-like compartments made of connective tissue lining the skin, muscles, digestive and urinary tracts, and parts of the cardiopulmonary system, now rivals the skin as the body’s largest organ.

A Chance Discovery

Up until recently, the technology necessary to view this organ in action didn’t exist. In 2015, two doctors at Beth Israel Medical Center were performing an endoscopy using a new laser-based technology for viewing living cells, searching for cancer in a patient’s bile duct. They found tissue in the submucosal level that they were unable to identify. Further investigation led to the finding of a systemic structure involving multiple organs bound by a previously undiscovered type of connective tissue. By removing the fluid from that tissue, researchers were able to isolate and view it under a microscope.

The body has long been known to contain a significant amount of “interstitial” fluid, but no one had been able to specifically isolate where that fluid actually circulated. These new findings show that a fine network made out of collagen and elastin not only houses interstitial fluid, but also circulates it throughout the body.

Body’s Most Important Organ… Just Discovered?

Researchers believe the interstitium may have multiple functions. On a basic level, the tissue works to protect organs from the stress of day-to-day movement. The fluid absorbs shock, and the mesh of strong and flexible connective tissue holding it creates the elasticity necessary to protect organs from tearing and other types of stress- and movement-related damage.

Even more importantly, the interstitium may play key roles in how the body ages, develops inflammatory diseases, and spreads cancer between organs. As research continues, more about this amazing “new” organ is likely to emerge.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/03/180327093954.htm

https://www.livescience.com/62128-interstitium-organ.html

 

Remember We Are In This Together!

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth
Reviewer : P Carrothers

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Foods, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

High Arsenic Levels in Two Brands of Bottled Water

High Arsenic Levels in Two Brands of Bottled Water

 

Arsenic in some bottled water. Plus, we identify the brands you may want to avoid—and those you can safely drink.

 

High levels of arsenic were found in two brands of bottled water sold at Whole Foods, Target and Walmart, the Center for Environmental Health in California says.

The nonprofit group found that the brands Penafiel, owned by Keurig Dr. Pepper, and Starkey, owned by Whole Foods, contain levels of arsenic that are higher than tap water and violate California guidelines, USA Today reported.

High levels of arsenic can cause reproductive damage and cancer, and products that violate recommended state levels of arsenic must carry a warning, according to California law.

Research also shows that arsenic can cause hormone disruption and organ damage, especially in children.

Earlier this year, Consumer Reports released findings that the same brands of bottle water contained nearly double the federal limit of arsenic in water, USA Today reported.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not recalled either brand of bottled water.

Whole Foods and Keurig Dr. Pepper did not respond to requests for comment from USA Today.

“Customers typically purchase bottled water at exorbitantly high costs with the assumption that it is safer and healthier to drink than tap water, unaware that they are ingesting an extremely toxic metal linked to birth defects and cancer,” Michael Green, CEO of the Center for Environmental Health, said in a statement.

 

Remember we are in this together!

Reviewed by P Carrothers

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

What Are the Most Dangerous Food Groups?

What Are the Most Dangerous Food Groups?

News Picture: What Are the Most Dangerous Food Groups?

Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and seeds — we hear a lot about the “best” food groups for health. But what about the worst ones? What foods should you be eliminating or at least cutting back on?

Research published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association looked at dietary intake and 318,000 deaths from diabetes, stroke and heart disease. In addition to not eating enough omega-3 rich seafood, nuts and seeds, two problematic factors stood out.

These deaths were associated with eating too much salt and too many processed meats. The two go hand-in-hand in sausages, hot dogs, corned beef, beef jerky, canned meat, meat sauces, lunch meats and bacon. Eating too much salty food was associated with nearly 10% of those deaths. Processed meats are a key source of salt, but so are snacks, prepared foods and even packaged vegetables, especially those canned in salt.

A separate study of 400,000 deaths related to heart and blood vessel diseases presented at an American Heart Association scientific meeting came to similar conclusions — finding 9% of these deaths were due to too much salt. The very unhealthy trans fats were also on the dangerous foods list.

Fortunately, these are being phased out of packaged foods.

But again, what you’re not eating makes a difference, too. These researchers also found that not getting enough whole grains, vegetables, and nuts and seeds was detrimental, with each missing food group being linked to between 10% and 11% of the deaths.

When planning your best diet, remember that eating healthy is a balancing act — you want to increase good foods and cut back on the bad ones to make sure that the scales tip in your favor.

 

Remember, we are in this together!

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Foods, Uncategorized

Shrimp Stuffing From the Bayou

Shrimp Stuffing From the Bayou

We're showing you how to make restaurant-quality Baked Stuffed Shrimp at home!
Ingredients
• 1 cup of coarsely crushed unsalted saltine
crackers (about 23 crackers)
• 1 tsp of cayenne pepper
• 1 tsp of garlic powder
• 1 tsp of onion powder
• 2 cups of cubed Italian bread
• 2 tbsp of chopped fresh thyme (or 1 tbsp dried)
• 2 tbsp of chopped parsley
• Half a tsp of black pepper
• Half a tsp of dried oregano
• Half a tsp of dried sage
• One-quarter of a cup of diced bell pepper
• One-quarter of a cup of diced celery
• One-quarter of a cup of diced onion
• One-quarter of a cup of unsalted butter
• Three-quarters of a cup of low-sodium chicken
stock
• Three-quarters of a lb of small raw shrimp (25
to 30), peeled and deveined

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 375˚F.
2. In large sauté pan, melt butter on mediumhigh heat. Add shrimp and cook for three to
five minutes or until slightly pink and slightly
raw in the middle. Remove shrimp from pan
and place on a plate to cool, then chop into
medium-sized pieces.
3. Put pan back on heat and add onion, celery,
and bell pepper, and cook while stirring until
soft—about three to five minutes.
4. In a small bowl, mix all dry spices, add to pan
and stir. Add chicken stock, cubed bread,
and crushed crackers, and stir until well
incorporated and bread is moistened. Turn heat

to low and add shrimp back to pan and stir for
an additional two to four minutes.
5. Turn off heat and serve. For a crispy top, bake
in a 4×7-inch casserole dish at 350˚F for
approximately 15 minutes or until top begins
to brown.
Serves four to six.
Nutrient Analysis Per Serving (3
ounces (oz))
Calories: 126, total fat: 6 g, saturated fat: 3 g, trans
fat: 0 g, cholesterol: 16 mg, total carbohydrates: 16
g, protein: 3 g, potassium: 108 mg, phosphorus: 38
mg, sodium: 155 mg.

 

Remember, we are in this together!

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Foods, Uncategorized

Chicken Tacos

 

Chicken Tacos

 

Fried Chicken Tacos | When done well there may not be a better comfort food than fried chicken. And it's versatile to boot. From sandwichesto tacos to ramen, click through ...

Chicken Tacos
Ingredients
• 1 tablespoons (tbsp) of chopped fresh garlic
• 1 teaspoon (tsp) of chili powder
• 1 tsp of cumin
• 1 tsp of smoked paprika
• 2 tbsp of unsalted butter
• 2 tbsp of chopped fresh scallions
• Half a cup of Mexican blend natural shredded
cheese*
• One package of eight taco shells**
• One-quarter of a cup of chopped fresh cilantro
leaves
• Three-quarters of a pound (lb) of ground chicken
* Make sure to choose a low-fat (less than 20%
M.F.) cheese. Also, choose natural cheeses compared
to processed cheeses. They tend to be lower in
sodium and phosphorus.
** Some shells can be close to 200 milligrams
(mg) for the two shells compared to only about 5 mg
for other brands.
Directions
1. Brown the ground chicken in butter on medium
heat along with the seasonings.
2. Fill two taco shells for each person with
meat mixture, cilantro, scallions, and cheese.
Measuring the cheese is the key! It should be
one-eighth of a cup per two tacos. Remember
to read the food labels, as shells can have quite
a bit of sodium.

Serves 4; one serving = half a cup of chicken
mixture and two taco shells.
Optional Serving Suggestions
Ingredients can also be served in a lettuce wrap,
pressed between flour tortillas to make a quesadilla,
or tossed with spaghetti or rice.
Nutrient Analysis: Chicken Mixture
Calories: 270, total fat: 20 grams (g), saturated fat:
7 g, trans fat: 0 g, cholesterol: 85 mg, sodium: 146
mg, protein: 19 g, carbohydrates: 2 g, potassium:
264 mg, phosphorus: 82 mg.
Nutrient Analysis: Two Taco Shells
Calories: 122, total fat: 6 g, saturated fat: 0.8 g,
trans fat: 0 g, cholesterol: 0 mg, sodium: 4 mg,
protein: 2 g, carbohydrates: 16 g, potassium: 46
mg, phosphorus: 64 mg

 

Remember, we are in this together!

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Your Top Five Kidney-Friendly Foods

Your Top Five Kidney-Friendly Foods

 

Are you looking to add some kidney-friendly foods
to your diet? Do you want to try a variety of tasty,
healthy, nutrient-rich foods? Try the following top
five foods that are friendly for those with kidney
disease (or at risk of developing it).

Produce of the Month Guide: Cranberries is an informative guide on cranberries and includes a round up of 35 fresh cranberry recipes!
1. Cranberries
If you have not heard it before, cranberries are
a great natural way to help prevent and treat
urinary-tract infections (UTIs). Cranberries contain
an abundance of proanthocyanidins (PACs), which
are a type of compound that prevents infectious
bacteria—especially E. coli—from sticking to your
urinary-tract lining. Fortunately, this prevents the
bacteria from populating and, therefore, prevents
infections from developing.
Cranberries are even thought to play a role in
maintaining good heart health by lowering your
bad cholesterol levels and increasing your good
cholesterol levels.
Cranberries can be found fresh in season between
October and December; however, it is likely that your
grocery store may be importing them from elsewhere
year round. Choose berries that are firm, plump, and
rich in red color. The deeper the red coloring, the
more anthocyanins are present. Cranberries can be
stored up to 20 days in your refrigerator—or for years,
if kept properly frozen. Discard any berries that end
up soft, discolored, or shriveled.
Cranberries are a rich source of manganese,
vitamin C, and fiber, as well as lots of phytonutrients.
Remember: the extra fiber can help manage those
blood-sugar levels, thus reducing your risk of kidney
disease.
You gain their maximum nutritional benefit
while enjoying them fresh, as many of their nutrients
are destroyed in high heats. Consider replacing

vinegar or lemon juice in recipes and incorporate
cranberries into your salad dressing. They can even
be added to your salads, with their tartness balanced
out by something sweet like mandarins. You could
also use dried cranberries in salads and trail mixes or
add them to hot or cold cereals.

Raw salmon fish fillet by karandaev. Raw salmon fish fillet with spices cooking on cutting board. Top view#fillet, #karandaev, #fish, #Raw
2. Fish
Fish that are rich sources of omega-3 fatty acids
(such as salmon, mackerel, rainbow trout, and
herring) are kidney-friendly protein sources. Their
healthy fats help reduce inflammation, lower blood
pressure, decrease bad cholesterol, and increase
good cholesterol. All of these are important factors
not only for improving your heart health but for
improving your kidney health, as well.

 

This is perfect garlic. Photo by DonnaTurner Ruhlman
3. Garlic
Garlic is an excellent way to add great aroma and
flavoring to many dishes. More so, it is a great way
to reduce your sodium intake by avoiding salt and
replacing it with garlic. Just make sure not to use garlic
salt. Since your kidneys are responsible for regulating
a healthy balance of minerals, including sodium,
this kidney-friendly alternative helps relieve some
pressure from your kidneys without compromising
any flavor.
Garlic is a good source of manganese, vitamin B6
,
and vitamin C. It may moderately reduce your blood
fats and your overall cholesterol levels. Furthermore,
it can help protect against oxidative stress and
inflammation, which are both responsible for causing
damage to your blood vessels. By incorporating garlic
into your diet, you can improve your heart health
and ensure that you are keeping your blood vessels in

top condition. You want them to be able to properly
filter your blood!
Garlic bulbs are available year round in your local
grocery store. You can store garlic uncovered in a
cool, dark place for about a month. Make sure that
when you are selecting bulbs, they are firm and free
from any mold or sprouting. You also want them to be
free from cracks. Avoid bulbs that appear shriveled
and feel soft.
Garlic can be easily added to many dishes—
especially when pureed. Add it to sauces, soups, or
mashed potatoes, or incorporate it into a hummus dip
in combination with chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, and
lemon juice. You can even sauté it along with steamed
spinach and a drop of lemon juice.

Putting Eggs On Your Face - DIY Beauty Remedies You Should NOT Try - Photos
4. Egg Whites
If you are looking for a pure protein source with all
of your essential amino acids, then look no further
than egg whites. They’re a great protein option that is
lower in phosphorus than other good-quality protein
sources such as egg yolks and meats. Remember that
phosphorus is one of those minerals that the kidneys
need to regulate in your blood. If you have kidney
disease, you want to account for food choices that
have higher levels of these minerals to help manage
your disease.

You can purchase egg whites in a carton or
separate the eggs on your own. Egg whites can be used
in omelets, mixed with veggies, enjoyed on their own,
or incorporated into a sandwich. You can also add
them to shakes or smoothies to increase their protein
content.
If you are using whole eggs, consider hard-boiling
them, removing the yolks, and adding them to your
favorite green salad.

Cabbage | eCurry - Soma.R - Soma Rathore
5. Cabbage
Cabbage is known to help reduce your cholesterol
levels. Upon consuming foods containing fats, your
liver releases bile into the small intestine to help
break down and digest the fats. Cabbage binds the
bile salts, which contain cholesterol, preventing
it from being reabsorbed by the small intestine.
Therefore, the cholesterol is eliminated through
your feces.
Cabbage is rich in many different types of
antioxidants, including phytonutrients, polyphenols,
and anthocyanins, as well as being a rich source of
vitamin C and manganese. These all help reduce
inflammation and oxidative stress, thus reducing
damage to your blood vessels, and play a protective
role for your kidneys.

 

Dr Victor Marchione

 

Remember, we are in this together!

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Love Your Kidneys!

Keep Calm & Love Your Kidneys during National Kidney Month! <3

 

It is National Kidney Month, which means
that it is time for you to understand the
importance of managing kidney disease and
how to achieve optimal kidney health so
that you can appreciate these wonderful
organs and keep them healthy.
Diet & Kidney Disease
Managing kidney disease—especially at the
beginning—is essential. You want to ensure
proper nutrition while minimizing stress
and maximizing kidney function. There is
no one special diet for everyone, though.
Your diet depends on your medical history,
lifestyle habits, and current kidney function.
Your diet may change over time, depending
on your kidney health. There are some
nutrients that you need to watch out for,
including protein, energy foods, sodium,
potassium, phosphorus, and fluids.
Protein
Foods such as meat, fish, poultry, soy, beans,
and lentils, for example, are rich protein
sources. When protein is broken down,
it creates the waste product urea. Your
body needs to eliminate urea, which must
be filtered through your kidneys. If you
consume high amounts of protein, you
can increase stress on the kidneys due to
increased levels of urea produced. If the urea
fails to be eliminated, it will cause increased

blood-urea levels. High amounts of urea
can lead to fatigue, headaches, nausea, and
a bad taste in your mouth. However, if you
do not eat enough protein, your body will
have a tough time fighting infections, you
will have low energy levels, and you will
lose muscle mass. The amount of protein
that you need to consume depends on your
disease state and treatment regimen. Speak
to your dietitian to review your specific
needs.
Energy Foods
Your energy foods are all the foods that
provide you with energy or calories. These
include carb choices such as fruits, starches,
grains, sugars, and vegetables, as well as fats
and oils. If you are restricting your energy
intake from protein, you need to make sure
to replace those calories from other sources
in order to keep up your energy levels and
maintain a healthy body weight.
Sodium
Since sodium affects your bodily fluids and
blood pressure, it is important to limit your
intake. Watch your intake of high-sodium
foods, including processed foods, deli meats,
canned foods, convenient foods, fast foods,
salty snacks, and so forth. Consider using
other ways to enhance flavors, such as
lemon, spices, and herbs.

Potassium
Potassium is important for your muscles and nerves
to function. Too much or too little potassium in your
blood can affect your heart beat. Whether you need
to limit your intake or even increase your intake
depends on your disease state, kidney function, and
treatment plan. Treatments like dialysis will affect the
amount that you should be consuming, as will certain
medications. Your doctor will let you know, and your
dietitian can work with you to create an appropriate
meal plan. Foods that are high in potassium include
sweet potatoes, squash, bananas, oranges, tomatoes,
and beans.
Phosphorus
Phosphorus plays an important role in keeping your
bones healthy and strong. However, as your kidney
function declines, the phosphate levels in your blood
will increase. This can result in itchiness and joint
pain, as well as loss of calcium in your bones. You
may need to limit your intake of foods that are high
in phosphorus, such as dairy products and protein
foods.
Make sure to speak with a dietitian to help you
develop a meal plan that includes some of these
foods in levels that are right for you, as these foods
contain many important nutrients that you still need
to consume. Also, make sure to read ingredient labels
for hidden sources of phosphorus. Some processed
foods such as deli meats and sodas may contain
phosphates, phosphoric acid, or sodium phosphate

Calcium & Vitamin D
These supplements are essential for good bone
health. Your bones are comprised mostly of calcium,
and you need vitamin D to help absorb it. However,
with diminished kidney function, your kidneys may
not be able to convert vitamin D into its active form.
Therefore, your doctor may recommend that you take
some active vitamin-D and calcium supplements.
Your doctor will be monitoring your blood-calcium
levels, though, so make sure to take these only as
prescribed.
Fluids
Your body needs fluids to survive, but if your kidneys
are not working properly, you may need to reduce
your intake. As your kidney function declines,
they produce less urine, leading to increased fluid
retention. This can cause swelling in your extremities
and face and may also increase your blood pressure
and cause difficulty breathing. However, limit your
intake only as advised by your doctor. Getting too
little fluids can damage your kidneys.
Optimal nutrition is important to prevent
malnutrition, have good energy levels throughout
the day for performing daily tasks, maintain a healthy
weight, and prevent muscle loss, as well as preventing
infection. These are all great reasons to manage and
reduce your risks of kidney disease.
Other ways of reducing your risk of developing
kidney disease are by decreasing your risk of

developing chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart
disease. We discussed a bit about managing diabetes
during Diabetes Awareness Month in November and
touched on Heart Health last month. Now, we will
discuss why it is important to ensure optimal health
and properly manage your kidney disease.
Diabetes
One of the most common causes of end-stage renal
disease or kidney disease is uncontrolled diabetes.
Firstly, you should understand a bit more about
how your kidneys act as a filtration system. Your
body requires a certain amount of protein each
day. After consuming the protein, your body digests
it and absorbs the essential components into the
blood stream, while needing to eliminate the waste
products. The components of the broken-down
protein get filtered through tiny capillaries and then
through even tinier holes called “nephrons.” The
blood flows through all these tiny filters, but the
essential protein components, red blood cells, and
other important substances that are too big to be
able to pass through do not get eliminated, so they
get filtered out. The waste products are able to flow
through the nephrons and therefore enter the urine
to be eliminated.
Unfortunately, uncontrolled diabetes complicates
this process. Whether your insulin is not working
properly or you just don’t have enough, having high
blood sugar puts a lot of stress on your kidneys. When
sugar levels in your blood are abundant, your kidneys
have to filter a lot more blood, making the filters
work much harder. Eventually, the kidneys begin
to leak from all the pressure, resulting in protein
leaking through into the urine. As long as bloodsugar levels are high, further stress and damage on
your kidneys’ filtering system continues. This leads
to further damage, loss in filtration ability, buildup
of waste products, and eventually kidney failure.
Unfortunately, at this point, your only options are a
kidney transplant or dialysis.
High Blood Pressure
Kidneys are made up of many blood vessels that
get smaller and smaller as you get deeper into
their filtering system. Because kidneys have a very
important role in filtering all of the blood, they

receive a high volume of blood flow regularly. Blood
is rich in many essential nutrients, including oxygen.
Over time, many factors such as smoking, poor
diet, lack of physical activity, and age contribute to
narrowing and hardening of the arteries. The high
blood volume passing through the filtration system
in combination with high blood pressure puts a lot
of pressure on these arteries, further weakening
them. These damaged vessels reduce blood flow to
the kidney’s tissues. They also prevent flow to the
smallest vessels, the nephrons.
Reduced blood flow or elimination of blood flow
altogether means that the tissues are failing to receive
essential nutrients and oxygen, and they lose their
ability to properly function. Therefore, they are no
longer able to efficiently filter blood, fluids, and other
nutrients or regulate hormones—especially those
that are necessary for controlling blood pressure.
When the kidneys are so damaged that they are
no longer able to efficiently regulate blood pressure
in combination with chronic blood pressure, this
leads to dire consequences. Further damages can
occur, and more arteries become blocked, leading to
eventual kidney failure.
So, be aware of your kidneys and appreciate
all that they do for you. Take good care of them by
staying fit, eating well, and being healthy!

 
Why Should You Take Care of
Your Kidneys?
Kidneys are essential for your well-being. It is true
that you can survive with only one viable kidney,
but you want to do everything possible to keep
them both healthy and working. Your kidneys have
several important functions, but their main role is
to filter your blood and remove waste products and
excess fluid from your body and eliminate them
through your urine. While they are filtering out the
waste, they are also reabsorbing many important
nutrients so that your body can reuse them.
Still unconvinced of their importance? Your
kidneys are also responsible for eliminating excess
drugs from your body. They help balance your
body’s fluids by regulating the amount of sodium,
potassium phosphorus, and acid levels in the body.
They also control the production of red blood cells

and produce an active form of vitamin D that helps
control calcium metabolism and promotes strong and
healthy bones. More so, your kidneys release certain
hormones that are responsible for helping regulate
blood pressure.
Keeping your kidneys healthy is extremely
important. If you don’t, they will fail to perform all
the essential aforementioned roles, which will have
debilitating consequences. Unhealthy kidneys lead to
kidney disease and can also cause heart disease and
associated risks such as high blood pressure, stroke,
heart attacks, and death. Kidney disease can also
lead to weakened bones, osteoporosis, anemia, nerve
damage, and complete kidney failure.
Reduce Your Risk of Developing
Kidney Disease
Get Fit
Engage in regular physical activity. Aim for at least 30
minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity five
times a week (or any combination for a total of 150
minutes per week at least every other day in bouts of
at least 10 minutes). Also, include some stretching
and strength training at least three times per week.
A combination of both will improve your heart
health and blood flow and strengthen your bones and
muscles.
Control Your Weight
Maintain a healthy weight with a body-mass index
(BMI) of between 18.5 and 24.9. Monitor your weight
regularly (without obsessing). Don’t weigh yourself
more than once per week, but take note of any
drastic changes. If you notice your weight starting to
slowly creep upward, consider re-evaluating your diet
and physical-activity regime or speak to a registered
dietitian for tips to manage your weight.
Eat a Balanced Diet
Avoid any trendy fad diets, and stick to a regular,
consistent meal plan. Aim for three meals per day with
snacks in between. Avoid going longer than three or
four hours without eating anything. A balanced meal
should consist of half of your plate filled with at least
two different types of colorful vegetables. A quarter
of your plate should be a lean protein choice, such as
fish or chicken, and a quarter of your plate should be
a whole grain like brown rice or quinoa.

Healthy snacks include a carbohydrate or a
vegetable and a protein. Snack ideas such as celery
and a tablespoon of peanut butter or a medium-sized
apple with a small handful of nuts are good options.
Drink in Moderation
Limit your alcohol intake to no more than one glass a
day for women and maximum of two glasses per day
for men.
Don’t Smoke
This should go without saying.
Stay Hydrated
Drink six to eight glasses of water per day. Water is
calorie-free and is your best option. Avoid high-sugar
beverages, as they only add unnecessary calories and
often replace nutrient-dense choices.
Monitor Your Meds
Take all of your medications as prescribed by
your doctor. Also, be cautious when taking some
over-the-counter medications such as aspirin,
naxoproxin, and ibuprofen, which may cause harm
to your kidneys. Always check with your family
doctor.
Stay on Top of Your Health
Know your family history, as this is a good indicator
of any increased risk. Make sure to visit your
family physician annually to keep your health in
check. Your physical should include regular blood
tests to monitor your cholesterol levels and check
your creatinine levels and glomerular-filtration
rate (GFR) for evaluating your kidney function.
You should also check your blood-pressure levels.
Ideally, your blood pressure should be 120/80;
however, as you get older (as long as you don’t have
a history of kidney disease), your blood pressure
should be below 140/90.
As you can see, whether you’re reducing your
risk of developing kidney disease or trying to
manage it, it is vital to make healthy lifestyle
choices.

Dr. Victor Marchione

 

Remember, We Are In This Together!

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

The Drink That is Killing Your Night Vision

The Drink That Is KILLING

Your Night Vision

People Share The Scariest Thing They've Seen Driving At Night - Odometer.com

Driving at night can be downright scary.

You could see halos around every light…

Passing headlights can blind you…

And, sometimes, you just can’t see cars, pedestrians, or other objects in the road.

This can be pretty serious and could signal that your night vision is getting worse – and not better.

And although aging does lend a hand in poor night vision, there is something else – a common drink – that could make it much harder for you to see at night.

And that one drink is…

Alcohol!

Of course you know that you should never get behind the wheel when you have had too much to drink…

It’s just common sense.

However, sometimes you have a drink or two and head home to your family.

But here is the problem…

Alcohol interferes with your normal tear development and the size of your pupil.

This could make it much harder for you to see in general – let alone see at night while you’re driving.

This just adds another layer to the harmful impacts of alcohol and your health.

Now, if you want to improve your night vision, then you should limit your intake of alcohol…

 

Remember, we are in this together!

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Foods, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

How To Make Your Thanksgiving Menu Healthier with Recipes

How To Make Your Thanksgiving Menu Healthier with Recipes

 

 

Preparing a traditional Thanksgiving dinner that’s lower in fat and calories but still thrills the crowd isn’t hard. All it takes is a few ingredient substitutions and some clever fat-busting techniques. Let’s take a look at how to make a delicious, healthier Thanksgiving meal.

The Turkey

If you’re hosting a small gathering, buy a turkey breast rather than the whole bird, as breast meat is lower in calories than dark meat.

Slow Cooker Turkey Breast

“This is simple and delicious, and certainly not rocket science,”  “No need to really add anything or change anything other than the cooking time — mine was done perfectly at 5-1/2 hours. The meat is tender, juicy, and delicately seasoned.”

Slow Cooker Turkey Breast
Photo by Lori

 

 

Cranberry Stuffed Turkey Breasts

Ingredients

 

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Prepare stuffing mix according to package directions. Set aside to cool.
  2. With a sharp knife, butterfly breasts open to lay flat. Place each breast between two sheets of waxed paper, and flatten with a mallet. Spread the prepared stuffing to within 1/4 inch of the edge of each breast. Sprinkle each one with chopped pecans and dried cranberries, reserving some of the cranberries for garnish. Roll up tightly in a jellyroll style, starting with the long end. Tuck in ends, and tie in sections with string, about 4 sections around the middle and one running the length of the roll to secure the ends.
  3. Heat olive oil in a large cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Carefully brown rolls on all sides.
  4. Place skillet in oven, uncovered. Bake in a preheated 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) oven for 1 hour, or until the internal temperature is at 170 degrees F (78 degrees C) when taken with a meat thermometer. Do not let these get overly dry.
  5. Allow rolls to set for 15 minutes before removing string, and slicing into 1/2 to 3/4 inch circles. Leave one roll whole, and slice the other for presentation. Stuffing will be spiraled into meat. Present on your prettiest platter on a bed of curly lettuce, and garnish by sprinkling with the remaining 1/2 cup pecan halves and the reserved dried cranberries.

“This one is a keeper,” “I make it every thanksgiving instead of the whole turkey — it turns out beautifully every time! Very pretty presentation, too!”

Cranberry Stuffed Turkey Breasts
Photo by lutzflcat

 

If you do buy a whole turkey, avoid “self-basting” turkeys, as they often contain added fat. And, it goes without saying, stay away from the deep fryer this year, and roast or smoke the turkey. Stuff the turkey cavity with whole or halved onions, halved lemons or apples, and sprigs of fresh herbs such as sage, marjoram, thyme, and/or rosemary. Rather than rubbing the skin with butter or oil, spray it with an oil spray and season it with salt and pepper.

Guilt-Free Gravy

Gravy is one of the biggest calorie culprits on the table. Use vegetable oil rather than turkey drippings when making the gravy — it’s still fat, but vegetable oil is lower in saturated fat and is cholesterol-free.

If you use turkey drippings to add flavor, use a gravy separator. Pour the gravy into a separator and allow it to sit for a few minutes. Some of the fat in the gravy will rise to the top of the glass where you can skim it off easily. Better yet, make a low-fat broth-based gravy or a vegetarian gravy instead.

Lightning Gravy

Ingredients

Directions

  1. In a microwave safe dish heat water and bouillon on high, stirring occasionally until just boiling.
  2. In a small bowl combine the cornstarch and cold water and mix together; stir into the hot broth and cook on medium for about 1 minute, or until thick, stirring at 30 second intervals.

“This is awesome because it’s low fat, low cal, (for gravy!) and quick,” “I added a black pepper and a small pinch of ground sage.”

Lightning Gravy
Photo by Marianne

 

Slimmed-Down Sides

Instead of loading up your mashed potatoes with lots of butter and cream, add some of the starchy water you used to boil the potatoes. The starchy water will give your mashers a low-cal creamy texture and help cut back on fat.

You can also add turkey or chicken broth, evaporated skim milk, or fat-free sour cream to your mashed potatoes. For extra flavor, stir in roasted garlic and herbs. For added nutrition, add pureed cooked cauliflower, parsnips, or turnips — or replace the potatoes entirely with Mashed Parsnips or Mashed Turnips.

Slow Cooker Mashed Potatoes and Cauliflower

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Combine potatoes and chicken broth in a slow cooker.
  2. Cook potatoes on Low for 3 hours. Add cauliflower and continue cooking on Low another 3 hours.
  3. Stir milk, butter, sour cream, black pepper, garlic powder, paprika, and salt into the potato mixture. Mash with a potato masher or blend with an immersion blender to desired consistency.
  4. Continue cooking until hot, about 10 minutes more.

 

“This was good and a great way of adding extra veggies into a meal,”  I had mine along side some corn and stuffing. It was the perfect accompaniment and easy to make.”

Slow Cooker Mashed Potatoes and Cauliflower
Photo by bd.weld

Cndied sweet potato casseroles in favor of a low-fat, naturally-sweetened sweet potatoes. Try a cranberry relish or cut down on the amount of sugar in your cranberry sauce by adding fruit juices or apple sauce.

Twice Baked Sweet Potatoes with Ricotta Cheese

 

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Pierce potatoes with a fork and bake until soft, about 1 hour. Remove from oven and cool until potatoes can be handled, about 20 minutes.
  2. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease a large baking sheet.
  3. Meanwhile, place olive oil in small skillet over medium heat. Add shallots and cook and stir until softened and beginning to brown, about 10 minutes. Set aside.
  4. Cut potatoes in half lengthwise and scoop out pulp, leaving a thin shell. Set shells aside. Place pulp into a blender or food processor and blend until smooth. Add ricotta, salt, pepper, ginger, and sugar to the blender; blend until smooth.
  5. Return potato mixture to a bowl; stir in shallots, Parmesan cheese, and sage. Spoon mixture back into potato skins. Place potatoes on prepared baking sheet.
  6. Bake until heated through, about 30 minutes.

“These were absolutely fabulous,” says “We aren’t fond of sweet potato dishes that have a lot of added sugar, so this was really to our taste.”

Twice Baked Sweet Potatoes with Ricotta Cheese
Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes with Ricotta Cheese

y, where it absorbs fat from the turkey as it bakes. It’s hard to slim down a stuffing recipe, so take a small serving if it’s your Thanksgiving favorite. If you can avoid recipes using too much sausage or bacon; wild rice and grains are more nutritious than bread stuffings.

Cranberry, Sausage and Apple Stuffing

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Cook and stir sausage in a large skillet over medium heat, crumbling coarsely, for about 10 minutes. Remove sausage to a large bowl with a slotted spoon. Empty pan of grease.
  2. Into the same pan melt the butter. Add the leeks or onions, apples, celery and poultry seasoning; cook until softened, about 10 minutes. Add the rosemary, dried cranberries and cooked sausage. Mix all with the dried bread cubes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Moisten with the chicken stock.
  3. Stuff turkey with about 5 cups for a 14 pound turkey. Add additional chicken stock to moisten stuffing if needed. Remaining stuffing can be baked in a covered buttered casserole at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for about 45 minutes. Uncover and bake for another 15 minutes to brown top.

 

LivinOurLuvSong. “I left out the sausage and used veggie broth. I baked it in a pan and it was perfect.”

Cranberry, Sausage and Apple Stuffing
Photo by alexandra5

Crustless Pumpkin Pie

Most of the fat in a pie comes from the crust. Try a crust-free pumpkin pie recipe or a reduced-fat graham cracker crust.

Pumpkin Pie Squares

Ingredients

 

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  2. In a medium bowl, cream together butter and brown sugar. Mix in flour. Fold in oats. Press into a 9×13 inch baking dish.
  3. Bake in preheated oven 15 minutes, until set.
  4. In a large bowl, beat eggs with white sugar. Beat in pumpkin and evaporated milk. Mix in salt, cinnamon, ginger and cloves. Pour over baked crust.
  5. Bake in preheated oven 20 minutes, until set. Let cool before cutting into squares.

 

“This is a great recipe,” raves LAURA J JOHNSON. “It makes homemade pumpkin pie much easier and it tastes great.”

Pumpkin Pie Squares
Photo by CC
Remember, We Are In This Together!
-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/