Foods, Uncategorized

Tartar Sauce Recipe

Homemade Tartar Sauce Recipe

There are a lot of reasons to love tartar sauce. If you’re a a big fan of seafood, it may already be one of your favorite condiments, but have you ever had homemade tartar sauce? With the perfect balance of creamy, salty, tangy and sweet, this tartar sauce recipe can be used on much more than a piece of fried fish.

What is tartar sauce? It is a condiment or dip that starts out with a base of mayonnaise or aioli and then has other ingredients added to it. Tartar sauce recipes can vary slightly, but most will add relish, onion, herbs and lemon juice.

Like other condiments, tartar sauce is only as good or as healthy as its ingredients, which pretty much always include mayonnaise and sweet relish or pickles. As you may already know, a lot of mayonnaise and pickle brands include unwanted preservatives, flavorings and coloring. Plus, sweet relish or pickles are usually loaded with refined sugar.

This recipe for tartar sauce includes homemade mayonnaise and probiotic-rich homemade dill pickles, which really takes the taste of this sauce to another level. It’s also a paleo-friendly recipe. Before you keep reading, don’t worry, how to make tartar sauce is not hard, and it’s so worth the effort because homemade tartar sauce always has that freshness and flavor that you just can’t get in any pre-made version.

 

Tartar sauce recipe - Dr. Axe

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup paleo mayo or 1 cup Coconut Oil Mayonnaise
  • 1 cup Homemade Dill Pickles
  • 1 tablespoon fresh dill
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon maple sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons onion, finely chopped
  • 2–3 garlic cloves

 

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Place everything in a food processor or high-powered blender, blending until well-combined.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

The Benefits of Ginger

Ginger: A Natural Anti-Inflammatory Spice For Nausea And Motion Sickness

Ginger: A Natural Anti-Inflammatory Spice For Nausea and Motion Sickness

If minor aches and pains are an issue for you, try ginger, a natural anti-inflammatory agent that is useful for relieving symptoms associated with arthritis, bursitis, motion sickness, nausea and more. Ginger is commonly available in forms ranging from whole fresh root, crystallized ginger and honey-based ginger syrups to capsules containing powdered extracts. Look for products made with only 100 percent pure ginger. For inflammatory conditions, take 1,000 to 2,000mg (or 1 to 2 grams) of powdered ginger a day; for nausea and prevention of motion sickness, take 1,000 mg as a preventive, following that with 500 mg every four hours as needed. (You may also try eating two pieces of crystallized ginger, taking a spoonful of ginger syrup or sipping ginger tea.)

 

To prevent high doses from causing stomach irritation, take ginger with food. Ginger may also act as a blood thinner, so curbing daily use at least two weeks before surgery is advisable. If you are pregnant, use ginger to address morning sickness with some caution – I would not recommend using more 1,000 to 1,500 mg per day divided into two to four doses throughout, particularly during the early stages of pregnancy.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

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Foods, Uncategorized

NAME-THAT-TUNA CASSEROLE

NAME-THAT-TUNA CASSEROLE

 

Name-That-Tuna Casserole

 

Ingredients

4 cup uncooked high-fibre rotini pasta

1 cup frozen green peas

1 Tbsp butter

¾ cup diced yellow onions

½ cup diced celery

1 tsp minced garlic

½ tsp dried tarragon

1 can reduced-sodium chicken broth, undiluted (10 oz/284 mL)

1 can 2% evaporated milk (13 oz/370 mL)

2 Tbsp all-purpose flour

1 tsp Dijon mustard

Grated zest of 1 lemon

¼ tsp each salt and freshly ground black pepper (or to taste)

¾ cup packed shredded light Monterey Jack cheese (3 oz/85 g)

½ cup packed shredded Parmesan cheese (2 oz/56 g)

1 Tbsp minced fresh dill

1 can wild salmon, well drained (6 oz/170 g)

1 can tuna, well drained (6 oz/170 g)

 

 

Directions

 

  1. It is best to have all ingredients ready to go before starting. Chop the onions and celery, grate the cheeses, drain the canned fish, etc.

2. In a large pot, cook pasta according to package directions, adding frozen green peas to pot during last 2 minutes of cooking time. Drain and keep warm.

3. Meanwhile, prepare sauce. Melt butter over medium heat in a large non-stick pot. Add onions, celery, and garlic. Cook and stir until vegetables are tender, about 4 minutes. Stir in tarragon and cook 30 more seconds. Add broth. Whisk together evaporated milk and flour until smooth. Add to pot. Cook and stir until sauce bubbles and begins to thicken.

4. Stir in mustard, lemon zest, salt, and pepper. Cook 1 more minute. Remove sauce from heat and stir in both cheeses until melted. Add drained tuna and salmon and mix well. Add drained noodles and peas and mix well. Serve hot with freshly ground black pepper on top. Enjoy!

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates
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Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Red Meat Raises Bowel Problems for Men

Red Meat Raises Bowel Problems for Men

redmeatmen

Red Meat Raises Bowel Problems for Men

 

A new study suggests that men who eat lots of red meat are much more likely to have bowel problems, pain and nausea than their peers who stick mainly with chicken or fish.

 

Researchers examined more than two decades of data on more than 46,000 men and found frequent red meat eaters were 58 percent more likely to be diagnosed with diverticulitis, a common bowel condition that occurs when small pockets or bulges lining the intestines become inflamed.

 

“Previous studies have shown that a high fiber diet is associated with a lower risk of diverticulitis, however, the role of other dietary factors in influencing risk of diverticulitis was not well studied,” said senior study author Andrew Chan, a researcher at Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

“Our result show that diets high in red meat may be associated with a higher risk of diverticulitis,” Chan added by email.

 

Diverticulitis is common, resulting in more than 200,000 hospitalizations a year in the U.S. at a cost of more than $2 billion, Chan and colleagues note in the journal Gut.

 

New cases are on the rise, and the exact causes are unknown, although the condition has been linked to smoking, obesity and the use of certain nonprescription painkillers known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

 

While diverticulitis can often be treated with a liquid or low-fiber diet, severe cases may require hospitalization and surgery to fix complications like perforations in the gut wall.

 

Researchers examined data collected on men who were aged 40 to 75 when they joined the study between 1986 and 2012. Every four years men were asked how often, on average, they ate red meat, poultry and fish over the preceding year.

 

 

They were given nine options, ranging from ‘never’ or ‘less than once a month,’ to ‘six or more times a day.’

 

During the study period, 764 men developed diverticulitis.

 

Men who ate the most red meat were also more likely to smoke, more likely to regularly take NSAIDs, and less likely to eat foods with fiber or get intense exercise.

 

By contrast, men who ate more chicken and fish were less likely to smoke or take NSAIDs and more likely to get vigorous exercise.

 

After accounting for these other factors that can influence the risk of diverticulitis, red meat was still associated with higher odds of developing the bowel disorder.

 

Each daily serving of red meat was associated with an 18 percent increased risk, the study found.

 

Unprocessed meats like beef, pork and lamb were associated with a greater risk than processed meats like bacon or sausage.

 

It’s possible the higher cooking temperatures typically used to prepare unprocessed meats may influence the composition of bacteria in the gut or inflammatory activity, though the exact reason for the increased risk tied to these foods is unknown, the researchers note.

 

Swapping one daily serving of red meat for chicken or fish was associated with a 20 percent reduction in the risk of this bowel disorder, the study also found.

 

The study is observational, and doesn’t prove red meat causes diverticulitis.

 

Other limitations of the study include its reliance on men to accurately recall and report how much meat they ate and the possibility that the results may not apply to women, the authors point out.

 

Even so, the findings should offer yet another reason to consider cutting back on red meat, said Samantha Heller, a nutritionist at New York University Langone Medical Center in New York City who wasn’t involved in the study.

 

Diets high in red and processed meats have been linked with increased risks of inflammatory bowel diseases, so the link found in this study “is not surprising,” Heller said by email.

 

“Focusing on a more plant based, higher fiber diet that includes legumes, whole grains, nuts, vegetables and fruits, replete with appropriate fluid intake, may go a long way in helping reduce of inflammatory bowel diseases, diverticulitis, and other chronic diseases,” Heller added.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Dr P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

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Diets and Weight Loss, Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Abdominal Fat

 

Excess Abdominal Fat is Not Only Ugly, but Extremely Dangerous to Your Health – This is More Than a Vanity Issue!

 

The difference between subcutaneous fat and the more deadly “visceral fat”… Plus the simple steps to REMOVE this fat permanently.

 

big stomach, visceral fat

 

Although this picture depicts an overweight man, this article applies to dangerous types of fat inside the bodies of both men and women … and this discussion also applies even if you only have a slight amount of excess stomach fat.

Did you know that the vast majority of people in this day and age have excess abdominal fat?  It’s true — as much as 70% of the population in some “westernized” countries such as the US and Australia are now considered either overweight or obese.  The first thing that most people think of is that their extra abdominal fat is simply ugly, is covering up their abs from being visible, and makes them self conscious about showing off their body.

However, what most people don’t realize is that excess abdominal fat in particular, is not only ugly, but is also a dangerous risk factor to your health. Scientific research has clearly determined that although it is unhealthy in general to have excess body fat throughout your body, it is also particularly dangerous to have excess abdominal fat.

There are two types of fat that you have in your abdominal area The first type that covers up your abs from being visible is called subcutaneous fat and lies directly beneath the skin and on top of the abdominal muscles.

The second type of fat that you have in your abdominal area is called visceral fat , and that lies deeper in the abdomen beneath your muscle and surrounding your organs. Visceral fat also plays a role in giving certain men that “beer belly” appearance where their abdomen protrudes excessively but at the same time, also feels sort of hard if you push on it.

Both subcutaneous fat and visceral fat in the abdominal area are serious health risk factors, but science has shown that having excessive visceral fat is even more dangerous than subcutaneous fat .  Both types of fat greatly increase your risk of developing heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, sleep apnea, various forms of cancer, and other degenerative diseases.

Part of the reason visceral fat is particularly dangerous is that studies show that it releases more inflammatory molecules into your system on a consistent basis.

One of the major reasons that some people accumulate more visceral fat than others can be from a high carbohydrate diet that leads to insulin resistance over time (years of bombarding your system with too much sugars and starches for your pancreas to properly handle the constant excess blood sugar) … and studies show that high fructose intake particularly from high-fructose corn syrup can be a major contributor to excess visceral fat.

So what gets rid of extra abdominal fat, including visceral fat? 

Both your food intake as well as your training program are important if you are to get this right and the good news is that I’ve spent over a decade researching this topic, analyzing the science, and applying it “in the trenches” with myself as well as thousands of my clients from all over the world to see what works to really stimulate abdominal fat loss.

I’ve actually even seen a particular study that divided thousands of participants into a diet-only group and an exercise & diet combined group. While both groups in this study made good progress, the diet-only group lost significantly LESS abdominal fat than the diet & exercise combined group .

From my research, two of the most important aspects to getting rid of visceral fat are:

1. The use of high intensity forms of exercise and full-body resistance training.  Low intensity cardio exercise simply isn’t as effective for removing visceral fat in particular.  High intensity exercise such as interval training, sprints (bike sprints or running sprints), AND full-body weight training are very effective at helping to improve your body’s ability to manage glucose and increases insulin sensitivity, a crucial step in removing visceral fat.


These types of high intensity exercise routines are also very effective at increasing your fat-burning hormones and creating a hormonal environment conducive to burning off abdominal fat, including visceral fat.

2.   In addition, it’s vitally important to get blood sugar under control to help restore insulin sensitivity through the right nutrition.  This means greatly reducing sugars and refined starches in your diet (including fully eliminating any use of harmful high fructose corn syrup!), and focusing more of your diet on healthy fats (such as avocados, nuts, seeds, coconut fat, olive oil, grass-fed butter, free-range eggs, fatty fish and fish oils, etc), as well as increasing protein and fiber intake.  The standard diet recommended by the government, which contains an unnaturally high grain intake is NOT conducive to controlling blood sugar and reducing visceral fat!

Reducing grain-based foods in your diet and getting more of your carbs from veggies and high fiber fruits such as berries can go a long way to helping to solve this problem.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

 

 

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Mike  Geary

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Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Spread Yourself Thin

Spread Yourself Thin : Recipe

 

It is incredible – and spreadable!

Did we mention that it is edible?

The only thing regrettable is that is wont last long.

Sea for Yourself!

 

Image result for spread yourself thin seafood dip

 

4 oz light cream cheese, softened

1/4 c up seafood cocktail sauce

1 tsp lemon juice

1/4 tsp each ground cumin and chili powder

8 oz chopped cooked shrimp

8 oz chopped lump crab meat

1/3 cup minced green onions, optional

 

In a large bowl, beat together cream cheese and cocktail sauce on high speed of electric mixer.  Beat until smooth.

 

Add lemon juice, cumin, and chili powder and beat until well blended

 

Stir in shrimp, crab meat and onions.  Mix well.  Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours before serving.

 

Serve seafood spead with low carb crackers, celery, or raw vegetables.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

 

 

 

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Foods to Prevent or Stop a UTI

Increasingly, first-line antibiotics for UTIs are failing, leaving people frustrated, in pain and at risk of serious infection-related complications. You’ve probably heard that cranberry juice can help prevent or treat UTIs, but did you know the active compound responsible for that is also found in abundance in these 20 foods? And some research suggests this compound may actually outperform antibiotics, drastically increasing the time between UTI recurrences.

D-Mannose: A Sugar to Prevent Recurrent UTIs?

You know how cranberry juice remains one of the most popular home remedies for UTIs? Well, it turns out that the high D-mannose content in cranberry explains its efficacy for UTI symptoms. D-mannose, a simple sugar that’s related to glucose, is a valued anti-infective agent that is able to block bacteria from adhering to cells and flush them out of the body.

You don’t usually think of a simple sugar as a protective agent, right? But studies show that mannose has promising therapeutic value, especially for women dealing with recurrent urinary tract infections. Plus, the simple sugar boosts the growth of healthy bacteria in your gut and improves bladder health — all without negatively affecting your blood sugar levels.

 

What Is D-Mannose?

Mannose is a simple sugar, called a monosaccharide, that’s produced in the human body from glucose or converted into glucose when it’s consumed in fruits and vegetables. “D-mannose” is the term used when the sugar is packaged as a nutritional supplement. Some other names for mannose include D-manosa, carubinose and seminose.

Scientifically speaking, mannose is the 2-epimer of glucose. It occurs in microbes, plants and animals, and it is found naturally in many fruits, including apples, oranges and peaches. D-mannose is considered a prebiotic because consuming it stimulates the growth of good bacteria in your gut.

Structurally, D-mannose is similar to glucose, but it’s absorbed at a slower rate in the gastrointestinal tract. It has a lower glycemic index than glucose, as after it’s consumed it needs to be converted into fructose and then glucose, thereby reducing the insulin response and impact on your blood sugar levels.

Mannose is also filtered out of the body by the kidneys, unlike glucose that’s stored in the liver. It doesn’t stay in your body for long periods of time, so it doesn’t act as fuel for your body like glucose. This also means that mannose can positively benefit the bladder, urinary tract and gut without affecting other areas of the body.


UTI Prevention + Other D-Mannose Uses and Benefits

1. Treats and Prevents Urinary Tract Infections

D-mannose is thought to prevent certain bacteria from sticking to the walls of the urinary tract. Mannose receptors are part of the protective layer that’s found on cells that line the urinary tract. These receptors are able to bind to E. coli and washed away during urination, thereby preventing both adhesion to and invasion of urothelial cells.

In a 2014 study published in the World Journal of Urology, 308 women with a history of recurrent UTI, who had already received initial antibiotic treatment, were divided into three groups. The first group received two grams of D-mannose powder in 200 milliliters of water daily for six months. The second group received 50 milligrams of Nitrofurantoin (an antibiotic) daily, and the third group did not receive any additional treatment.

Overall, 98 patients had recurrent UTI. Of those women, 15 were in the D-mannose group, 21 were in the Nitrofurantoin group and 62 were in the no treatment group. Of the patients in the two active groups, both modalities were well-tolerated. In all, 17.9 percent of patients reported mild side effects, and patients in the D-mannose group had a significantly lower risk of side effects compared to patients in the Nitrofurantoin group.

Researchers concluded that D-mannose powder significantly reduced the risk of recurrent UTI and may be useful for UTI prevention, although more studies are needed to validate these results.

In a randomized cross-over trial published in the Journal of Clinical Urology, female patients with acute symptomatic UTIs, and with three or more recurrent UTIs in the preceding 12-month period, were randomly assigned to either an antibiotic treatment group (using trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) or to a regime including one gram of oral D-mannose three times daily for two weeks, following one gram twice daily for 22 weeks.

At the end of the trial period, the mean time UTI recurrence was 52.7 days with the antibiotic treatment group and 200 days with the D-mannose group. Plus, mean scores for bladder pain, urinary urgency and 24-hour voidings decreased significantly. Researchers concluded that mannose appeared to be safe and effective for treating recurrent UTIs and displayed a significant difference in the proportion of women remaining infection-free compared to those in the antibiotic group.

Why might mannose be such an effective agent for preventing recurrent UTIs? It really comes down to microbial resistance to traditional antibiotics. This is an increasing problem, with one study showing that more than 40 percent of 200 female college students with UTI symptoms were resistant to first-line antibiotics.

The study, published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, concludes with this warning: “Given the frequency with which UTIs are treated empirically, compounded with the speed that E. coli acquires resistance, prudent use of antimicrobial agents remains crucial.”

2. May Suppress Type 1 Diabetes

Researchers were surprised to find that D-mannose may be able to prevent and suppress type 1 diabetes, a condition in which the body doesn’t produce insulin — a hormone that’s needed to get glucose from the bloodstream into the body’s cells. When D-mannose was administered orally in drinking water to non-obese diabetic mice, researchers found that the simple sugar was able to block the progress of this autoimmune diabetes.

Because of these findings, the study published in Cell & Bioscience concludes by suggesting that D-mannose be considered a “healthy or good” monosaccharide that could serve as a safe dietary supplement for promoting immune tolerance and preventing diseases associated with autoimmunity.

3. Works as a Prebiotic

Mannose is known to act as a prebiotic that stimulates the growth of good bacteria in your gut. Prebiotics help feed the probiotics in your gut and amplify their health-promoting properties.

Research shows that mannose expresses both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and has immunostimulating properties. When D-mannose was taken with probiotic preparations, combined they were able to restore the composition and numbers of indigenous microflora in mice.

4. Treats Carbohydrate-Deficient Glycoprotein Syndrome Type 1B

Evidence suggests that D-mannose is effective for treating a rare inherited disorder called carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome (CDGS) type 1b. This disease makes you lose protein through your intestines.

It’s believed that supplementing with the simple sugar may improve symptoms of the disorder, including poor liver function, protein loss, low blood pressure and issues with proper blood clotting.


D-Mannose Side Effects and Risks

Because mannose occurs naturally in many foods, it’s considered safe when consumed in appropriate amounts. However, supplementing with D-mannose and taking doses higher than what would be consumed naturally may, in some cases, cause stomach bloating, loose stools and diarrhea. It’s also believed that consuming very high doses of D-mannose can cause kidney damage. According to researchers at the Stanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute in California, “mannose can be therapeutic, but indiscriminate use can have adverse effects.”

People with type 2 diabetes should use caution before using D-mannose products because they may alter blood sugar levels, though typically mannose itself doesn’t negatively impact blood sugar. To be safe, speak to your doctor prior to beginning any new health regime.

There’s not enough evidence to support the safety of mannose for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. Based on the current research, there are no known drug interactions, but you should speak to your health care provider if you are taking any medications.


How to Get D-Mannose in Your Diet: Top 20 D-Mannose Foods

D-mannose naturally occurs in a number of foods, especially fruits. Here are some of the top D-mannose foods that you can easily add to your diet:

  1. Cranberries
  2. Oranges
  3. Apples
  4. Peaches
  5. Blueberries
  6. Mangos
  7. Gooseberries
  8. Black currants
  9. Red currants
  10. Tomatoes
  11. Seaweed
  12. Aloe vera
  13. Green beans
  14. Eggplant
  15. Broccoli
  16. Cabbage
  17. Fenugreek seeds
  18. Kidney beans
  19. Turnips
  20. Cayenne pepper

D-Mannose Supplements and Dosage Recommendations

It’s easy to find D-mannose supplements online and in some health food stores. They are available in capsule and powder forms. Each capsule is usually 500 milligrams, so you end up taking two to four capsules a day when treating a UTI. Powdered D-mannose is popular because you can control your dose, and it easily dissolves in water. With powders, read the label directions to determine how many teaspoons you need. It’s common for one teaspoon to provide two grams of D-mannose.

There is no standard D-mannose dosage, and the amount you should consume really depends on the condition you are trying to treat or prevent. There is evidence that taking two grams in powdered form, in 200 milliliters of water, every day for a six-month period is effective and safe for preventing recurrent urinary tract infections.

If you are treating an active urinary tract infection, the most commonly recommended dose is 1.5 grams twice daily for three days and then once daily for the next 10 days.

At this time, more research is needed to determine the optimal D-mannose dosage. For this reason, you should speak to your doctor before you begin using this simple sugar for the treatment of any health condition.


Final Thoughts

  • D-mannose is a simple sugar that’s produced from glucose or converted into glucose when ingested.
  • The sugar is found naturally in many fruits and vegetables, including apples, oranges, cranberries and tomatoes.
  • The most well-researched benefit of D-mannose is its ability to fight and prevent recurrent UTIs. It works by preventing certain bacteria (including E. coli) from sticking to the walls of the urinary tract.
  • Studies show that two grams of D-mannose daily is more effective than antibiotics for preventing recurrent urinary tract infections.

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth
Dr P Carrothers  : Preventative and Regenerative Medicine
Dr J Axe

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Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

The Rolling Scones

The Rolling Scones

Taste buds can’t get no satisfaction?

This old time, yet delicious, will get them rockin!

 

2 cups all-purpose flour (or use 2 cups Gluten-free baking mix)
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
1/3 cup almond paste
1/3 cup cold unsalted butter (or vegan margarine)
1/3 cup lingonberry jam (found at European grocery stores or use leftover cranberry sauce)
1/3 cup heavy cream (or vegan creamer)
1 large egg (or add ¼ cup more of vegan creamer)
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon almond extract
Sliced almonds to top
1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Rub the butter and almond paste into the dry ingredients until the mixture resembles small peas.

3. In a separate small bowl, whisk together the heavy cream, egg, and extracts. With a spatula, gradually stir the liquid ingredients until the mixture just starts to come together, reserving about 1 tablespoon of the liquid to brush the tops of the scones.

4. Divide the dough in half. Turn the both batches of dough out onto a lightly floured surface and very gently pat each into 8-inch rounds about ¾-inch thick.
5. Spread the lingonberry jam onto one round. Gently place the second round on top of the jam. Using a floured chef’s knife (or bench scraper), cut the dough round into 8 wedges. Transfer the wedges to the baking sheet, spacing the scones at least 1 inch apart. Lightly brush the tops of the scones with the reserved egg-cream mixture and sprinkle liberally with almonds.

5. Bake in the top third of the oven for 15 to 18 minutes or until the tops are golden. Transfer the scones to a wire rack to cool slightly, 3 to 4 minutes. Serve warm.

Yields: 8 scones

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Foods, Uncategorized

Salmon Cakes With Dill Aioli

Salmon Cakes With Dill Aioli

 

salmon cakes with aioli

 

Salmon has been ​canned in Europe since 1830 and in North American since the 1840s. Fish cakes or burgers made with canned salmon were undoubtedly not far behind. Although most of us now have access to fresh salmon year-round, canned salmon cannot be beaten as a source of non-dairy calcium.

The calcium-rich bones are left in the salmon during the canning process, and they are edible. You probably won’t notice them at all! We have revived the humble salmon cake, with oatmeal as a low FODMAP binder, accompanied by a simple and delicious lemon-dill aioli.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1 teaspoon garlic-infused olive oil
  • 1½ teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill, plus extra for garnish
  • 14.5-ounce can salmon, with bones, drained
  • 1 large egg
  • ¼ cup finely chopped celery
  • ¼ cup thinly sliced scallion greens
  • ½ cup quick oats
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • ¼ cup low-FODMAP bread crumbs (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 4 lemon wedges

Preparation

  1. For the aioli, in a small bowl, stir together the mayonnaise, garlic-infused oil, fresh lemon juice, and chopped dill. Cover and chill until just before serving.
  2. For the fish cakes, lightly mash the salmon and bones in a large mixing bowl. Stir in the egg, celery, scallion greens, oats, tomato paste, and black pepper. Cover and chill for about an hour to hydrate and soften the oatmeal. Using your hands, form the mixture into 6 patties and dust them on both sides with breadcrumbs, if using.
  1. In a heavy skillet, heat the oil over medium heat until shimmering and fragrant. Fry the cakes for 3 to 4 minutes on each side, until dark golden brown. Don’t try to flip them too soon, as they will stick to the pan unless a nice crust has formed on the bottom. They only need to be flipped once.
  2. Garnish the warm burgers with a dollop of sauce and some extra dill. Serve with lemon wedges.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

Canned tuna may be substituted for the salmon. Low-FODMAP breadcrumbs may be substituted for the oatmeal.

For a gluten-free salmon cake, purchase gluten-free oats and use gluten-free breadcrumbs or Panko for the optional crumb coating.

Garlic-infused oil may be omitted if you don’t have any on hand.

Cooking and Serving Tips

Tomato paste sold in toothpaste-like tubes is becoming more widely available. This form of packaging makes it easy to use just a small amount, as in this recipe, keeping the rest fresh for another time.

The sauce portion of the recipe doubles easily if you like extra sauce on your fish cakes.

Foods, Uncategorized

Greek Yogurt Almond Chicken Salad

Greek Yogurt Almond Chicken Salad

Greek Yogurt Almond Chicken Salad

Chicken salad is one of those foods that can boast a health halo, but in reality, it’s often loaded with saturated fat and sodium thanks to a generous amount of mayonnaise and sodium-based preservatives—especially if you’re getting it premade at the deli. Making your own chicken salad at home, with chicken breast, is not only a much healthier option, but it will save you time and money.

This Greek yogurt almond chicken salad is a great starting point if you’ve never made chicken salad before. It’s made with just a few simple ingredients and takes very little time to prepare. The dressing is made with plain nonfat Greek yogurt, Dijon mustard, and black pepper for a creamy, protein-packed sauce with less fat and sodium than the traditional mayonnaise base.

Ingredients

  • 1 (8-ounce) boneless, skinless chicken breast
  • 1 stalk celery, diced
  • 2 greens onion, chopped
  • 1/4 cup sliced almonds
  • 1/2 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • Freshly cracked black pepper

Preparation

  1. Heat oven to 350F. Season chicken with pepper and place in a baking dish. Cover with foil and bake 30-45 minutes or until chicken reaches an internal temperature of 165F. Remove from oven and let cool.
  2. Chop chicken into small pieces and add to a large bowl with celery, onion, and almonds. Add yogurt, mustard, and pepper to taste. Stir to combine.
  3. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

Add any diced vegetables or fruit that you like, such as red onion or apple.

You can also add dried fruit, like cranberries.

Feel free to substitute the almonds for any other nut or seed, such as walnuts or pepitas.

Cooking and Serving Tips

This recipe is great to make ahead for a week of healthy lunches.

Make your chicken salad even faster (and save money) by using leftover chicken.

Serve chicken salad in a whole wheat wrap, lettuce wrap, on whole grain bread, or with whole grain crackers.

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