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Red Meat Raises Bowel Problems for Men

redmeatmen

Red Meat Raises Bowel Problems for Men

 

A new study suggests that men who eat lots of red meat are much more likely to have bowel problems, pain and nausea than their peers who stick mainly with chicken or fish.

 

Researchers examined more than two decades of data on more than 46,000 men and found frequent red meat eaters were 58 percent more likely to be diagnosed with diverticulitis, a common bowel condition that occurs when small pockets or bulges lining the intestines become inflamed.

 

“Previous studies have shown that a high fiber diet is associated with a lower risk of diverticulitis, however, the role of other dietary factors in influencing risk of diverticulitis was not well studied,” said senior study author Andrew Chan, a researcher at Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

“Our result show that diets high in red meat may be associated with a higher risk of diverticulitis,” Chan added by email.

 

Diverticulitis is common, resulting in more than 200,000 hospitalizations a year in the U.S. at a cost of more than $2 billion, Chan and colleagues note in the journal Gut.

 

New cases are on the rise, and the exact causes are unknown, although the condition has been linked to smoking, obesity and the use of certain nonprescription painkillers known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

 

While diverticulitis can often be treated with a liquid or low-fiber diet, severe cases may require hospitalization and surgery to fix complications like perforations in the gut wall.

 

Researchers examined data collected on men who were aged 40 to 75 when they joined the study between 1986 and 2012. Every four years men were asked how often, on average, they ate red meat, poultry and fish over the preceding year.

 

 

They were given nine options, ranging from ‘never’ or ‘less than once a month,’ to ‘six or more times a day.’

 

During the study period, 764 men developed diverticulitis.

 

Men who ate the most red meat were also more likely to smoke, more likely to regularly take NSAIDs, and less likely to eat foods with fiber or get intense exercise.

 

By contrast, men who ate more chicken and fish were less likely to smoke or take NSAIDs and more likely to get vigorous exercise.

 

After accounting for these other factors that can influence the risk of diverticulitis, red meat was still associated with higher odds of developing the bowel disorder.

 

Each daily serving of red meat was associated with an 18 percent increased risk, the study found.

 

Unprocessed meats like beef, pork and lamb were associated with a greater risk than processed meats like bacon or sausage.

 

It’s possible the higher cooking temperatures typically used to prepare unprocessed meats may influence the composition of bacteria in the gut or inflammatory activity, though the exact reason for the increased risk tied to these foods is unknown, the researchers note.

 

Swapping one daily serving of red meat for chicken or fish was associated with a 20 percent reduction in the risk of this bowel disorder, the study also found.

 

The study is observational, and doesn’t prove red meat causes diverticulitis.

 

Other limitations of the study include its reliance on men to accurately recall and report how much meat they ate and the possibility that the results may not apply to women, the authors point out.

 

Even so, the findings should offer yet another reason to consider cutting back on red meat, said Samantha Heller, a nutritionist at New York University Langone Medical Center in New York City who wasn’t involved in the study.

 

Diets high in red and processed meats have been linked with increased risks of inflammatory bowel diseases, so the link found in this study “is not surprising,” Heller said by email.

 

“Focusing on a more plant based, higher fiber diet that includes legumes, whole grains, nuts, vegetables and fruits, replete with appropriate fluid intake, may go a long way in helping reduce of inflammatory bowel diseases, diverticulitis, and other chronic diseases,” Heller added.

 

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Dr P Carrothers

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Natural Compounds in Ordinary Food Beat Prostate Cancer

naturalcompunds

 

Natural Compounds in Ordinary Foods Beat Prostate Cancer

 

Adding common foods to your diet can help you beat — or even avoid developing — prostate cancer, hints a study conducted at The University of Texas at Austin. Researchers discovered that several natural compounds found in foods starve cancerous tumors of the nutrition they need to thrive and spread.

 

For instance, a main dish of curry, which contains the spice turmeric, topped off with baked apples, whose skins contain ursolic acid, provides essential nutrients effective in fighting cancer.

 

Researchers used a unique method to analyze plant-based chemicals and discover specific combinations that shrink prostate tumors.

 

They first tested 142 natural compounds on mouse and human cell lines to see which inhibited prostate cancer cell growth when administered alone or in combination with another nutrient. The most promising active ingredients were then tested on model animals: ursolic acid, a waxy natural chemical found in apple peels and rosemary; curcumin, the bright yellow plant compound in turmeric; and resveratrol, found in red grapes and berries.

 

The found that when combined with either curcumin or resveratrol, ursolic acid prevented the uptake of glutamine, a nutrient necessary for cancer growth.

 

“These nutrients have potential anti-cancer properties and are readily available,” says Stafano Tiziani. Combinations of the nutrients, he says, “have a better effect on prostate cancer than existing drugs.

 

“The beauty of this study is that we were able to inhibit tumor growth in mice without toxicity,” Tiziani said.

 

The study was published in Precision Oncology.

 

Other studies have also found potential cancer therapies in foods, including turmeric, apple peels, and green tea.

 

Italian researchers at the University of Parma studied men with a pre-malignant form of prostate cancer called prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and found that those who took three 200 milligram capsules of green tea extract daily slashed their risk of developing prostate cancer by 90 percent when compared to men taking a placebo.

 

Previous studies have found that lycopene, the pigment that gives tomatoes and watermelons their bright red color, can decrease the risk of prostate cancer by up to 35 percent. One study found that men with precancerous changes in their prostates who took 4 milligrams of lycopene twice daily lowered the risk of their condition progressing to cancer.

A study at Britain’s University of Portsmouth found that lycopene in tomatoes becomes even more biologically active when cooked with a small amount of oil.

 

A study from the University of Missouri found that resveratrol can make chemotherapy and radiation more effective in men who have aggressive prostate cancer.

 

Researcher Michael Nicholl found that the combination of resveratrol and radiation treatment killed 97 percent of tumor cells. “It’s important to note that this killed all types of prostate tumor cells, including aggressive tumor cells,” he said.

 

An Italian study found that men who drank three cups of Italian-style coffee every day reduced their risk of prostate cancer by 53 percent. “Italian Style” coffee is prepared using high pressure, very high water temperature, and no filters. The benefit is probably due to the caffeine, but scientists say that the method of preparation could lead to a higher concentration of the helpful bioactive substances.

 

 

A high-fiber diet may be able to inhibit early-stage prostate cancer by stopping tumors from growing, said a study published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research. Scientists fed one group of mice inositol hexaphosphate (IP6), a natural type of carbohydrate that’s found in large amounts in high-fiber diets. A second group of mice didn’t get the supplement. MRIs were used to monitor the progression of prostate cancer.

 

“The study’s results were really rather profound,” said researcher Komal Raina. “We saw dramatically reduced tumor volumes.” IP6 kept prostate tumors from making new blood vessels needed to make the cancer grow and metastasize.

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Dr P Carrothers

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Lower Cholesterol with Foods, not Drugs

lower

Lower Cholesterol With Food, Not Drugs

 

Do you or someone you love have high cholesterol? You are not alone. It is estimated that half of all adults in the United States have high total cholesterol and more than 25 percent have high LDL or ‘bad’ cholesterol1  . I urge anyone who has been troubled by the news that their cholesterol is high to stop focusing on a number. Your cholesterol level is only one of many risk factors for heart disease. If you are truly concerned about cardiovascular disease, here’s what should be drawing your attention:

 

Achieving a normal body fat percentage

Achieving a normal blood pressure without the use of medication

Achieving a normal blood glucose without medication

Achieving a favorable cholesterol level without medication

Engage in aerobic exercise and strength training

The most dramatic protection from heart disease results from maintaining a normal weight, cholesterol and blood pressure with diet and exercise, so that you do not require medications. Medications cannot produce comparable results.

 

Your First Course of Action

 

Being well means removing risk factors for heart disease. Since diet is usually the cause of heart disease,2, 3 taking a drug will do little to stop the progression of the disease as long as a patient’s diet – the cause of the disease – remains the same..

 

If you have elevated cholesterol, dietary and lifestyle modifications should be your first course of action. For most people who commit to change their unhealthy habits, medication will prove unnecessary. Fuel your body with nutrients by eating a healthy diet rich in antioxidants and gradually increase your exercise tolerance.

 

In my medical practice, I have coached thousands of patients to successfully lower their cholesterol through a Nutritarian diet. People drop their blood pressure, lower their blood glucose, lower their weight and improve their exercise tolerance.

 

Dramatic Change with Diet, Not Pills

 

In a 2001 study, a high-fiber, high nutrient diet focusing on vegetables, fruit and nuts was found to reduce cholesterol by 33 percent within two weeks.4  A 2015 study surveying participants who followed the same nutrient-dense, plant rich diet reported an average 42 mg/dl decrease in LDL cholesterol in those with at least 80 percent adherence to that diet. In addition, those who started out obese lost an average of 50 pounds for the entire three year period. Those who started with hypertension reduced their systolic blood pressure by an average of 26 mm Hg Case studies accompanied this data, and documenting reversal of atherosclerosis and resolution of heart problems.5 Previous studies on similar diet and lifestyle changes have been shown to cause regression of atherosclerotic heart disease.6, 7 Living healthfully produces such dramatic changes because it doesn’t address just one risk factor; it makes your entire body healthier. It is for those who want real protection, without the side effects of drugs.

 

Unlike taking a cholesterol lowering statin drug while continuing a disease-causing style of eating, a and lifestyle does more than address one or two heart disease risk factors. You don’t just lower your cholesterol, you become more resistant to diabetes and cancer, and improve your immune function.

 

Achieve Overall Protection

 

No medication can cover up a poor diet, and no single medication can significantly reduce multiple risk factors. Unlike drugs, the Nutritarian diet does significantly reduce multiple risk factors, including lowering body weight and blood pressure, reducing intravascular inflammation, and benefiting intravascular elasticity. A superior diet delivers benefits that protect overall, and almost immediately. For patients fighting cardiovascular disease, a diet of can offer many benefits in addition to cholesterol- lowering:

 

Lower blood pressure8-16

Lower intravascular inflammation17-21

Lower blood glucose and triglyceride levels22

Lower inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein

and white blood cell count23-30

Increased tissue antioxidant content31

Improved exercise tolerance and oxygen efficiency16

Larger LDL particle size (smaller particles are more heart disease-promoting) and and  lower particle number Prevents LDL from becoming oxidized, (a more damaging form of cholesterol)32-34

The Side Effects are Side Benefits

 

Prescribing statins is counterproductive. Encouraging a patient to take a statin drug downplays the urgency needed for lifestyle and dietary changes. Changes that I know would drastically improve the health, life expectancy and quality of life of dangerously unhealthy individuals. I always say a prescription pad is like a permission slip. You can choose to remove the cause or treat the symptom; treating the symptom with drugs does not reverse heart disease and carries the risk of significant adverse effects. Almost all of my patients prefer a more effective approach, one that not only reduces cholesterol and restores the health of arteries but also reduces blood pressure and reverses heart disease much more effectively than any medication.

My new book, The End of Heart Disease (April 2016) explains the risk of drugs and medical procedures and details the most effective way to protect your heart and your life.

 

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Sweet and Sour Meatballs

sweetandsoaurmeatballs

Sweet and Sour Meatballs

 

Ingredients

 

  • 1 20-ounce can pineapple chunks
  • 3 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons ketchup
  • 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 medium carrot, shredded
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped scallion whites
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons Chinese five-spice powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 8 ounces ground turkey breast
  • 8 ounces ground pork
  • 2 teaspoons canola oil
  • 1 large red bell pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1/2 cup sliced scallion greens

 

 

 

 

Preparation

1.Preheat oven to 450°F. Line a baking sheet with foil and coat with cooking spray.

2.Drain pineapple juice into a small bowl. Whisk in vinegar, ketchup, soy sauce, brown sugar, cornstarch and crushed red pepper. Set aside.

3.Finely chop enough pineapple to yield 1/2 cup. Press out excess moisture with paper towels. Reserve the remaining pineapple chunks for the sauce.

4.Lightly beat egg in a large bowl. Stir in carrot, scallion whites, ginger, five-spice powder, salt and the finely chopped pineapple. Add turkey and pork; gently mix to combine (do not overmix). Using a scant 1 tablespoon each, make 36 small meatballs. Bake on the prepared baking sheet until just cooked through, about 15 minutes.

5.Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add bell pepper and cook for 1 minute. Whisk the reserved juice mixture and add to the pan. Bring to a boil and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Stir in the remaining pineapple and the cooked meatballs.

6.To serve, thread a meatball and a piece of pineapple and/or pepper onto a small skewer or toothpick. Transfer to a platter, drizzle with sauce and sprinkle with scallion greens.

 

Tips & Notes

  • Make Ahead Tip: Freeze cooked meatballs in sauce airtight for up to 3 months. Defrost before reheating. Equipment: 36 short skewers or toothpicks

 

Nutrition

 

Per serving: 37 calories; 1 g fat (0 g sat, 0 g mono); 12 mg cholesterol; 4 g carbohydrates; 1 g added sugars; 3 g protein; 0 g fiber; 101 mg sodium; 76 mg potassium.

 

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Mexican Garden Scramble

mexican

 

Mexican Garden Scramble

 

Increasing your fruit and vegetable intake is one of the best ways to control your blood pressure. Fruit and vegetables provide essential vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants, but especially valuable are the potassium, magnesium, and even calcium that they provide. One way to ensure you are getting enough vegetables is to start your day with a serving!

 

This Mexican garden scramble includes flavorful peppers and onions, cilantro, and tomatoes folded into fluffy, protein-rich scrambled eggs. Topped with a bit of shredded cheese and creamy, potassium-rich avocado, this breakfast is a delicious and satisfying way to start your day.

 

Ingredients

3 large eggs + 1 egg white

1/4 cup onion, diced

1/4 cup bell pepper, diced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 tablespoon fresh jalapeno, diced

1/4 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped

1/4 cup tomato, diced

1/2 small avocado, sliced

2 tablespoons shredded colby jack or cheddar cheese

salsa or hot sauce

Preparation

In a small bowl, whisk eggs and white until combined and fluffy. Set aside.

Heat a small non-stick skillet over medium-low heat. Spray with oil and add onion, bell pepper, garlic, and jalapeno. Cook, stirring, until soft, about 3 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside.

 

Turn heat to low, spray again, and add eggs. Cook over low heat, pushing eggs from outside of pan to the center with a rubber spatula, until almost done. Add cooked veggies and 2 tablespoons cilantro to the eggs and continue cooking until eggs are set.

 

 

To assemble, divide eggs between two bowls. Add tomato, avocado, cheese, and remaining cilantro. Top with your favorite salsa or hot sauce. Enjoy!

 

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

If you have other veggies on hand that need to be used up, feel free to throw them into the pan with the peppers and onions. Breakfast scrambles are a great way to use up vegetables that are about to go bad. Mushrooms, corn, and spinach would all be great additions.

 

To keep the calories, fat and sodium under control, be sure to stick to the small portion of cheese and avocado listed in the recipe. While nutritious, these foods are also calorie-dense.

 

If you need to watch your cholesterol, you can use all egg whites in place of whole eggs.

 

Cooking and Serving Tips

When making scrambled eggs, keep the heat on low and slowly stir from the outside edges inward for the best results.

 

Serve with a warmed whole grain corn or whole wheat tortilla and a serving of fresh fruit to round out the meal.

 

If you are having concerns about your food intake, please make an appointment with us and we can work on a personal health care plan.

 

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Skillet Peanut Butter Cinnamon Cookie, Low Carb

skillett

Skillet Peanut Butter Cinnamon Spice Cookie

 

Total Time 20 min

Prep 10 min, Cook 10 min

Yield 16 servings (129 calories each)

This decadent yet low-carb skillet peanut butter cinnamon spice cookie is the perfect treat for someone with diabetes. It takes less than ten minutes of prep time, has only five grams of sugar per serving, and is made with blood sugar lowering cinnamon. Most importantly, it’s delicious!

 

Ingredients

1 large egg

1 cup natural peanut butter

½ cup brown sugar

¼ cup almond meal

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon cinnamon

¼ teaspoon ground ginger

¼ teaspoon salt

Non-stick spray

2 tablespoons peanuts, optional, for garnish

Preparation

Preheat oven to 350 F.

In a large bowl, beat egg until slightly frothy. Whisk in the peanut butter, brown sugar, almond meal, vanilla extract, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, and salt until well combined.

Spray an ovenproof skillet lightly with nonstick spray. Pour batter into the skillet and spread evenly with a spatula. If desired, sprinkle the top with a few peanuts and press down slightly.

Place cookie on a rack set in the center of the oven and bake 10-12 minutes until puffed and golden around the edges. Let cook 10 minutes before cutting and serving.

 

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

This is one of my favorite treats to make because I always have the ingredients on hand! Whenever I’m craving something warm, gooey and sweet, I know this skillet cookie is only 20 minutes away.

 

Nut Butters

 

Even in your pantry is looking bare, this recipe is easy to adapt based on what you have on hand. You can use any type of nut butter—cashew butter and almond butter both work well. And if you’re in the unfortunate situation of running out of nut butter, you can make your own by blending a rounded cup of nuts with a tablespoon of oil in the food processor until if forms a creamy spread.

 

Sweeteners

 

I made these with brown sugar, which has a richer flavor than white sugar, although you could certainly substitute it in a pinch. You could also use pure maple syrup or honey, but be sure to reduce the oven temperature by 25 degrees and cook it a couple minutes longer to prevent burning.

 

Nut-Free Variation

 

If anyone in your household is nut free, you can still make this cookie—just swap in sesame butter and leave out the almond meal. Made with sunflower seeds, it’s perfect for those with tree nut allergies.

 

Vegan Variation

 

For a vegan version, use a chia seed egg. Mix 1 tablespoon chia seeds with 3 tablespoons water and let it sit to gel for about 10 minutes before mixing in the other ingredients.

 

 

This trick is a perfect one to remember next time you run out of eggs.

 

More Add-Ins

 

If you’re feeling extra decadent, load this cookie up with lots of healthy add-ins. In the mood for something chocolatey? Swap the almond flour for ¼ cup cocoa powder, or stir in ½ cup chopped dark chocolate, which is rich in antioxidant polyphenols and flavanols. Want something fruity? Stir in a handful of frozen berries. This recipe is especially delicious with frozen wild blueberries.

 

Make an extra nutty cookie with different kinds of nuts and seeds, like walnuts, sunflower seeds, and almonds. Add a handful or two of dried fruit along with those nuts to make a granola inspired cookie. My favorite way to enjoy this cookie is with a handful of shredded dried coconut and dark chocolate chips.

 

Cooking and Serving Tips

This cookie is best when it’s slightly undercooked. The center might not look fully done when you take it out, but it will continue cooking as it cools.

 

Be sure to use a nonstick or well seasoned cast iron skillet to prevent sticking.

 

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V is for Vegetables and Unique Recipes

vegetables

 

V is for Vegetables

When you look at a basket of garden-fresh vegetables, is your imagination inspired by the endless culinary possibilities these fresh-picked beauties represent? Do you feel excitement and a sense of adventure as you take in their distinctive colors, shapes, and weights?

 

One of my goals as a chef, cook-book writer, and father is to help people discover the joys of fresh, locally grown, seasonal vegetables. I want people to be filled with fascination when they see coils of garlic scapes or lacy fronds of fennel.

 

The following recipes from my latest cookbook, V Is for Vegetables, will show you how to perform edible transformations, turning what may seem scraggly, rooty, and earthy into delicious, attractive dishes. You don’t need sophisticated cooking skills — just an appetite for new flavors and textures, and a willingness to explore the possibilities.

 

GARLIC-SCAPE OMELET

Garlic scapes are the tender shoots of the garlic plant that grow up and out of the stem, curling their way toward the sky. Most commercial growers remove the scapes to preserve the energy of the garlic bulbs and increase yield. For home cooks, though, they’re a real treat. Look for scapes at farmers’ markets in early summer. You can chop and prepare them like green beans or slice them thinly and sauté to bring out their delicate aroma. Scapes have a far milder taste than mature garlic.

Garlic-Scape-Omelet

Garlic Scape Omelet

 

Makes one serving

Prep time: five minutes

Cook time: 10 minutes

 

2 tbs. butter

1 clove garlic, smashed

2 garlic scapes, thinly sliced on the diagonal

3 eggs

Salt and pepper to taste

Heat 1 tablespoon of the butter in a small skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic clove, scapes, salt, and pepper and cook until the scapes begin to soften, about two minutes. Remove the garlic clove and discard; transfer the scapes to a bowl.

 

Wipe the skillet clean, and then melt the remaining tablespoon of butter in the skillet over medium heat.

 

Beat the eggs well in a small bowl, and add salt and pepper. Pour the eggs into the pan and stir vigorously to create small, fine curds. As you work, scrape down the sides of the pan so the eggs cook evenly.

 

Sprinkle one-third of the cooked scapes onto the eggs just before the eggs firm up. When the top is evenly set and not runny, tilt the pan away from you and fold the omelet in half with a spatula. The lip of the pan will help form the shape of the omelet as it continues to cook gently.

 

Turn out the omelet onto a plate and serve topped with the remaining garlic scapes.

 

WARM WILTED PEA SHOOTS

Think beyond the pea pod. Succulent pea shoots have long been a staple in Chinese cooking, and some U.S. farmers are now growing peas especially for their shoots and leaves. Look for pea shoots in late spring, and enjoy them in any dish as a replacement for greens like spinach, Swiss chard, or kale. You can add raw pea shoots to salads for an extra kick, but wilting them really brings out their flavor.

peashoots

Warm Wilted Pea shoots

 

Makes four servings

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: three minutes

 

2 tbs. olive oil

1 tbs. sesame oil

1 clove garlic, smashed

4 large handfuls pea shoots

Handful snow pea pods, blanched

Salt and pepper to taste

Heat the olive and sesame oils in a large skillet over medium-high heat.

 

Add the garlic, pea shoots, snow pea pods, salt, and pepper.

 

Cook, stirring often, until the pea shoots are just wilted, about a minute. Serve warm.

 

BRAISED RADISHES WITH HONEY AND BLACK PEPPER

Braising softens radish roots and tempers their spicy rawness. The sweet honey and aromatic black pepper in this recipe complement, rather than detract from, the character of the radishes, and the browned edges of the radishes themselves add a flavorful touch.

Braised-Radishes-With-Honey-and-Black-Pepper

Braised Radishes With Honey and Black Pepper

 

Makes four servings

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 10 minutes

 

2 tbs. olive oil

1 lb. radishes, halved

1 clove garlic, smashed

2 tbs. honey

1 tsp. coarsely cracked black pepper

2 tbs. cider vinegar

Salt to taste

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Add half the radishes and all the garlic, and cook until radishes are lightly browned, about five minutes.

 

Add the honey and pepper, and allow the honey to caramelize, about one minute.

 

Add the vinegar, the remaining radishes, and salt. Cook until the second batch of radishes is just warmed but not soft. Serve warm.

 

WARM ZUCCHINI SALAD

Zucchini is more than a ubiquitous plant that grows out of control in summer. Along with other summer squashes like yellow crookneck and pattypan, it’s a symbol of Mediterranean cooking. The tender textures and light flavors are inextricably linked to summer and sun.

Warm-Zucchini-Salad

Warm Zucchini Salad

 

Makes four servings

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: eight minutes

 

2 tbs. olive oil

1 clove garlic, smashed

1 lb. zucchini and other summer squashes, cut into wedges

Pinch crushed red-pepper flakes

Pinch dried oregano

Pinch dried basil

Salt and pepper to taste

1/2 cup fava or any shell beans, blanched, peeled, and rinsed

4 oz. goat cheese, crumbled

Handful fresh basil, roughly chopped

Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the garlic, zucchini, red-pepper flakes, oregano, basil, salt, and pepper. Cook until the zucchini is tender, about five minutes.

 

Add the favas, goat cheese, and basil. Toss and serve warm. (Also delicious cooled.)

 

Why No Numbers? Readers sometimes ask us why we don’t publish nutrition information with our recipes. We believe that (barring specific medical advice to the contrary) if you’re eating primarily whole, healthy foods — an array of sustainably raised vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, legumes, meats, fish, eggs, whole-kernel grains, and healthy fats and oils — you probably don’t need to stress about the numbers. We prefer to focus on food quality and trust our bodies to tell us what we need.  — The Editors

 

Call us if you have any concerns or questions about your healthcare.  If you don’t know what you are doing , it is better to ask.  Sometimes there are no do-overs.

 

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The Healthiest Super Veggies

Vegetables_Bad_For_Health_Asparagus

The Healthiest Super-Veggies

 

 

Healthiest of the Super- Veggies

 

Call me crazy, but I’ve never had an issue with eating vegetables. Even at a young age I was accustomed to eating all kinds of veggies, and they never phased me. In fact, I consider myself extremely open to eating most foods, there’s not much that I don’t like the taste of.

 

After working extensively at a fully organic produce section of a health foods store, I’ve collected quite a bit of knowledge about some of the healthiest foods to eat.

 

The book and related website, World’s Healthiest Foods, is an awesome resource for anyone trying to pinpoint the healthiest foods to eat. A big shout out to WHF for cataloging  this useful information in such a fantastic way.

 

While there is a relevant time and place for Western medicine practices, it often overlooks one major thing: preventative care. This type of mindset involves thinking in terms of a long-term approach for maintaining a healthy life. And it all starts with a health-conscious diet.

After all, we’ve all heard the adage: “we are what we eat.” Well, if you eat the following vegetables you are probably very healthy!

 

Eggplant

These purple wonders are high in fiber, and extremely low in calories and fat. Eggplant contains heart healthy properties because it contains potassium and powerful antioxidants.

 

Beets And Their Greens

Beets are a great example of all around beneficial health food. When you eat beets, your heart will thank you, your blood sugar will remain level, and your digestive system will be in tip top shape. Many people don’t realize that the greens of beets actually contain more essential nutrients than the root does. So rethink tossing beet greens in the garbage, instead wash beet greens and sautee them with your favorite foods.

 

Brussels Sprouts

Why does everyone seem to hate the taste of brussels sprouts? I think the answer is simple, they haven’t prepared them in a tasty enough way! While cabbage is also healthy to eat, the miniature version, brussels sprouts, actually contain more than twice as much of vitamins A through K, as well as double the amount of calcium, iron, potassium, and protein.

 

Broccoli

While all dark green vegetables provide many vital vitamins and minerals, broccoli is especially good at preventing Type 2 Diabetes, and stomach, rectal, and lung cancers.

Sweet Potatoes

While technically related, sweet potatoes are actually only distant relatives to their more starchy cousins. Sweet potatoes are nutrient dense and contain more complex carbohydrates, protein, and fiber than a lot of vegetables.

 

Bell Peppers

While all sweet bell peppers are tasty and full of vitamin C, the red variations are actually the most healthy of all. This is due to a high amount of lycopene in the shiny red ones. Keep in mind, lycopene content is actually increased when foods like red bell peppers and tomatoes are cooked instead of eaten raw.

Kale

While it might get a bad rap as being a bourgeois health food, kale is extremely rich in vitamin K and many other vitamins and minerals. Kale is more easily digested by your body when it is cooked. Reach for kale chips as a go to snack, or braised kale rather than raw kale salads.

 

Asparagus

Why does the asparagus stigma exist? It shouldn’t, because it strips your body of toxins. Ever wonder why urine smells so bad after you eat asparagus? It’s not a random occurrence, it has to do with the chemical found in asparagus, mercaptan, being broken down in your body. This combined with the toxins that are released from your body equate in slightly pungent pee. But aren’t you happy it’s gone?

 

 

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Sweet Potato Bread

sweetpotatoebread

Sweet Potato Bread

 

Ready in: 1 hour and 10 minutes Serves: 1 (9- by 5-inch) loaf

 

■ 2 tablespoons coconut oil

■ 2 large sweet potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced ■ 1⁄2 cup coconut flour

■ 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

■ 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

■ 1⁄2 teaspoon ground mace

■ 1 teaspoon baking soda

■ 1 teaspoon baking powder

■ 1/8 teaspoon sea salt

■ 4 large eggs

■ 1⁄2 cup almond butter

■ 4 tablespoons unsalted, grass-fed butter, melted ■ 1 teaspoon organic almond extract

 

Step 1: Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease a 9- by 5-inch loaf pan with the coconut oil. Cut a piece of parchment paper to fit in the bottom of the pan and lay the parchment in the pan.

 

Step 2: Place the sweet potato slices in a medium saucepan and cover with about 1 inch filtered water. Bring to a boil over high heat and cook until tender, about 5 minutes. Drain the potatoes in a colander, then return the slices to the saucepan. Using a potato masher, mash the potatoes until smooth and allow to cool to room temperature.

Step 3: In a bowl, combine the coconut flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, mace, baking soda, baking powder, and salt.

 

Step 4: In a large bowl, whisk the eggs until combined. Add the mashed sweet potatoes and the almond butter, melted butter, and almond extract and whisk gently until well combined. Add the coconut flour mixture and mix with a rubber spatula until evenly moistened. Pour the batter into the prepared loaf pan and bake until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, 50 to 60 minutes.

 

Step 5: Invert the bread out of the pan onto a wire rack and allow to cool completely. Cut the loaf into 1-inch slices and serve. Store tightly wrapped in plastic wrap at room temperature for up to 4 days.

 

Nutritional analysis per serving (1 slice): Calories: 405, Fat: 19 g, Saturated Fat: 7 g, Cholesterol: 95 mg, Fiber: 43 g, Protein: 9 g, Carbohydrates: 70 g, Sodium: 323 mg

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Dr Anna Killarney

 

 

The Importance of Cucumbers!

cucumbers

The Importance of Cucumbers !

 

Cucumbers contain bioactive compounds that help fight cancer, heart disease and more

From adding a crunch to your summer salad, to fighting cancer and heart disease, the humble cucumber is a great ally in your quest for optimal health. This wonderful low-calorie fruit (yes you read that right, cucumber is not a vegetable but a fruit) has so much more to offer than electrolytes and water.

 

It is the fourth most cultivated vegetable in the world, and has been around for ages. Originally grown in northern India around 4,000 years ago, cucumbers are part of the squash, melon and gourd family.

Cucumbers as medicine

 

As reported by The Old Farmer’s Almanac, in ancient times cucumbers were used as a medicine, rather than as food, to treat nearly everything. Recently, cucumbers have come to the attention of many modern laboratories for their potential medicinal purposes.

 

While cucumbers do not house impressive amounts of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals, they thank their superfood status to high levels of bioactive phytochemicals such as cucurbitacins, lignans and flavonoids.

 

Many of these compounds have anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-diabetic, antibacterial, anti-fungal, painkilling, wound-healing and laxative properties, making cucumbers an ideal cure-all.

Cancer-fighting cucurbitacins

 

Scientists found that cucurbitacins could block the signaling pathways that are essential for cancer cell growth and survival. According to a 2010 research review published in Scientific World Journal, these findings may lead to the possibility of cucurbitacin being used as a future anticancer drug.

 

Another study, published in the Journal of Cancer Research, found that cucurbitacin B inhibits the growth of pancreatic cancer cells by up to 81 percent.

 

According to the researchers, unpurified cucurbitacins have been used for centuries as folk medicine in Asian countries such as China and India. Pancreatic cancer is poorly treated by conventional therapies. Cucurbitacin B’s ability to inhibit tumor growth and induce cancer cell apoptosis may lead to new and efficient cancer treatments to fight pancreatic cancer.

Disease-fighting lignans

 

Lignans are a unique type of polyphenols found and extensively studied in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cabbage. Recent research, however, has found that other vegetables, including cucumbers, are a good source of different types of lignans too.

 

Cucumbers contain lariciresinol, pinoresinol and secoisolariciresino – three lignans associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease as well as several types of cancer. These include breast, uterine, ovarian and prostate cancers.

 

A 2010 study, published in Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, found that these three compounds could protect your heart by lowering vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

 

Furthermore, cucumbers consist of 96 percent water, which is more than any other fruit or vegetable on our planet, making it an excellent food to keep you hydrated all day long. According to The Old Farmer’s Almanac, an average-sized cucumber contains the equivalent of a 10-ounce glass of water, and only adds 16 calories per cup.

 

In addition, cucumbers are well known for their ability to soothe sunburns, reduce puffy eyes and freshen the breath.

 

What are you waiting for? Start growing fresh, organic cucumbers in your own backyard or on your balcony. It’s easy, fun, chemical-free and super cheap.

 

Cucumbers are so important in reversing so many diseases and conditions.  Please call us if you have any questions or concerns, or possibly need help with a condition you or your family have.,

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

Dr. Anna Killarney

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

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