Health and Disease, Uncategorized, Vitamins and Supplements

K2 a MUST to Prevent Cardiac Problems

heart2

Without Vitamin K2, Vitamin D May Actually Encourage Heart Disease

 

Vitamin K2 is thought to reduce coronary calcification, thereby decreasing your risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies have reported inconsistent results — possibly because of the different effects of vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) and vitamin K2 (menaquinone or MK). Few studies have included both.

 

At least one study, however, has investigated the association of intake of phylloquinone and menaquinone with coronary calcification. The intake of both forms of the vitamin was estimated using a food-frequency questionnaire. It was found that K2 had an effect on coronary calcification, but K1 did not.

 

According to the study:

 

“This study shows that high dietary menaquinone [Ks] intake, but probably not phylloquinone [K1], is associated with reduced coronary calcification. Adequate menaquinone intakes could therefore be important to prevent cardiovascular disease.”

 

 

Vitamin K is an extremely important vitamin to have in your diet; it may very well be the next vitamin D in terms of the numerous health benefits it may provide. But, according to Dr. Cees Vermeer, one of the world’s top researchers in the field of vitamin K, nearly everyone is deficient in vitamin K — just like most are deficient in vitamin D.

 

Most people get enough vitamin K from their diets to maintain adequate blood clotting, but NOT enough to offer protection against health problems like arterial calcification and cardiovascular disease. Yet, as the study above showed, adequate amounts of the right type of vitamin K may offer immense benefits to your heart health, including reducing coronary calcification and thereby decreasing your risk of heart disease.

 

Which Type of Vitamin K May be Best for Your Heart?

Vitamin K comes in two forms — K1 or K2 — and it is important to understand the differences between them.

 

Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone): Found in green vegetables, K1 goes directly to your liver and helps you maintain a healthy blood clotting system. (This is the kind of vitamin K that infants are often given at birth to help prevent a serious bleeding disorder.) It is also vitamin K1 that keeps your own blood vessels from calcifying, and helps your bones retain calcium and develop the right crystalline structure.

Vitamin K2 (menaquinone, MK): Bacteria produce this type of vitamin K. It is present in high quantities in your gut, but unfortunately is not absorbed from there and passes out in your stool. K2 goes straight to vessel walls, bones, and tissues other than your liver. It is present in fermented foods, particularly cheese and the Japanese food natto, which is by far the richest source of K2.

Vitamin K3, or menadione, is a third form that is synthetic and manmade, which I do not recommend. Each type of vitamin K has different roles in your body, and emerging research is showing that vitamin K2, not K1, may be especially important. For instance, research published in Atherosclerosis found that high dietary intake of vitamin K2 is associated with reduced coronary calcification (hardening of the arteries), a result that should also lessen your risk of heart disease.

 

What made this study unique was that it compared dietary intakes of both vitamin K1 and K2, and only K2 showed a benefit. Vitamin K1 was NOT associated with reduced coronary calcification. This is consistent with separate research also showing superior health benefits from vitamin K2, including:

 

The Rotterdam Study, the first study demonstrating the beneficial effect of vitamin K2, showed that people who consume 45 mcg of K2 daily live seven years longer than people getting 12 mcg per day.

The Prospect Study, in which 16,000 people were followed for 10 years. Researchers found that each additional 10 mcg of K2 in the diet results in 9 percent fewer cardiac events, whereas vitamin K1 did not offer a significant heart benefit.

Why Might Vitamin K2 be so Beneficial for Your Heart?

Vitamin K engages in a delicate dance with vitamin D; whereas vitamin D provides improved bone development by helping you absorb calcium, there is new evidence that vitamin K2 directs the calcium to your skeleton, while preventing it from being deposited where you don’t want it — i.e., your organs, joint spaces, and arteries. A large part of arterial plaque consists of calcium deposits (atherosclerosis), hence the term “hardening of the arteries.”

 

Vitamin K2 activates a protein hormone called osteocalcin, produced by osteoblasts, which is needed to bind calcium into the matrix of your bone. Osteocalcin also appears to help prevent calcium from depositing into your arteries. In other words, without the help of vitamin K2, the calcium that your vitamin D so effectively lets in might be working AGAINST you — by building up your coronary arteries rather than your bones.

 

This is why if you take calcium and vitamin D but are deficient in vitamin K, you could be worse off than if you were not taking those supplements at all, as demonstrated by a recent meta-analysis linking calcium supplements to heart attacks.

 

This meta-analysis looked at studies involving people taking calcium in isolation, without complementary nutrients like magnesium, vitamin D and vitamin K, which help keep your body in balance. In the absence of those other important cofactors, calcium CAN have adverse effects, such as building up in coronary arteries and causing heart attacks, which is really what this analysis detected. So if you are going to take calcium, you need to be sure you have balanced it out with vitamin D and vitamin K.

 

Vitamin K2 Helps Produce Heart-Protective Protein MGP

Another route by which vitamin K offers heart-protective benefits is through the Matrix GLA Protein (or MGP), the protein responsible for protecting your blood vessels from calcification. When your body’s soft tissues are damaged, they respond with an inflammatory process that can result in the deposition of calcium into the damaged tissue. When this occurs in your blood vessels, you have the underlying mechanism of coronary artery disease — the buildup of plaque — that can lead you down the path to a heart attack.

 

Vitamin K and vitamin D again work together to increase MGP, which, in healthy arteries, congregates around the elastic fibers of your tunica media (arterial lining), guarding them against calcium crystal formation.

 

According to Professor Cees Vermeer:

 

“The only mechanism for arteries to protect themselves from calcification is via the vitamin K-dependent protein MGP. MPG is the most powerful inhibitor of soft tissue calcification presently known, but non-supplemented healthy adults are insufficient in vitamin K to a level that 30 percent of their MGP is synthesized in an inactive form. So, protection against cardiovascular calcification is only 70 percent in the young, healthy population, and this figure decreases at increasing age.”

 

Four More Reasons to Make Sure Your Diet Includes Vitamin K2

Vitamin K not only helps to prevent hardening of your arteries, which is a common factor in coronary artery disease and heart failure, it also offers several other important benefits to your health.

 

Fight Cancer …

 

Vitamin K has been found beneficial in the fight against non-Hodgkin lymphoma, liver, colon, stomach, prostate, nasopharynx, and oral cancers, and some studies have even suggested vitamin K may be used therapeutically in the treatment of patients with lung cancer, liver cancer, and leukemia.     Improve Bone Density …

 

Vitamin K is one of the most important nutritional interventions for improving bone density. It serves as the biological “glue” that helps plug the calcium into your bone matrix.

 

Studies have shown vitamin K to be equivalent to Fosamax-type osteoporosis drugs, with far fewer side effects.

Stave off Varicose Veins …

 

Inadequate levels of vitamin K may reduce the activity of the matrix GLA protein (MGP), which in turn has been identified as a key player in the development of varicosis, or varicose veins.               Lower Your Risk of Diabetes …

 

People with the highest intakes of vitamin K from their diet had a 20 percent lower risk of diabetes compared with those with the lowest intakes, according to the latest research from University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands. Past studies have also shown vitamin K to help reduce the progression of insulin resistance.

How Much Vitamin K2 do You Need?

How many people have adequate vitamin K2? Just about zero, according to Dr. Vermeer and other experts in the field. But at this time there is really no commercial test that can give you an accurate measure of your levels. Vitamin K measurements in blood plasma can be done accurately, but the results are really not helpful because they mainly reflect “what you ate yesterday,” according to Dr. Vermeer.

 

Dr. Vermeer and his team have developed and patented a very promising laboratory test to assess vitamin K levels indirectly by measuring circulating MGP. Their studies have indicated this to be a very reliable method to assess the risk for arterial calcification — hence cardiac risk. They are hoping to have this test available to the public within one to two years for a reasonable price, and several labs are already interested. They are also working on developing a home test that would be available at your neighborhood drug store.

 

In the meantime, since nearly 100 percent of people don’t get sufficient amounts of vitamin K2 from their diet to reap its health benefits, you can assume you need to bump up your vitamin K2 levels by modifying your diet or taking a high-quality supplement.

 

As for dietary sources, eating lots of green vegetables, especially kale, spinach, collard greens, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts, will increase your vitamin K1 levels naturally. For vitamin K2, cheese and especially cheese curd is an excellent source. The starter ferment for both regular cheese and curd cheese contains bacteria — lactococci and proprionic acids bacteria — which both produce K2.

 

You can also obtain all the K2 you’ll need (about 200 micrograms) by eating 15 grams of natto daily, which is half an ounce. It’s a small amount and very inexpensive, but many Westerners do not enjoy the taste and texture.

 

If you don’t care for the taste of natto, the next best thing is a high-quality K2 supplement. Remember you must always take your vitamin K supplement with fat since it is fat-soluble and won’t be absorbed without it.

 

Although the exact dosing is yet to be determined, Dr. Vermeer recommends between 45 mcg and 185 mcg daily for adults. You must use caution on the higher doses if you take anticoagulants, but if you are generally healthy and not on these types of medications, I suggest 150 mcg daily.

 

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Flu is in the Air! Prevention!

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Flu is in the Air!   Prevention!

In the midst of an especially tough flu season, here’s more bad news: Researchers say it may be possible to spread the virus simply by breathing.

Until now, it was thought that people picked up a flu virus when they touched contaminated surfaces or inhaled droplets in the air ejected by an infected person’s coughs or sneezes.

But the new study finds coughs and sneezes may not be necessary to saturate the air with flu virus.

In the study, researchers analyzed air around the exhaled breath of 142 people with the flu.

“We found that flu cases contaminated the air around them with infectious virus just by breathing, without coughing or sneezing,” said study author Dr. Donald Milton, a professor of environmental health at the University of Maryland.

“People with flu generate infectious aerosols [tiny droplets that stay suspended in the air for a long time] even when they are not coughing, and especially during the first days of illness,” he explained in a university news release. “So when someone is coming down with influenza, they should go home and not remain in the workplace and infect others.”

In fact, nearly half (48 percent) of the airborne samples captured in the air around flu patients who were just breathing — not coughing or sneezing — contained detectable influenza virus, the researchers noted.

What’s more, when patients did sneeze, that didn’t seem to add much to the viral count in the samples, Milton’s group added.

Of course certain steps — “keeping surfaces clean, washing our hands all the time, and avoiding people who are coughing,” can still help lower your odds of catching influenza, said Sheryl Ehrman, dean of the College of Engineering at San Jose State University, in California.

Helpful Hint:  Use Tilex routinely, even to spray on your hands, since this is the only product out there that kills all germs, even HIV.

But if an infected person’s breathing spreads flu virus, even those precautions do “not provide complete protection from getting the flu,” she added.

That means that if you are unlucky enough to get the flu, “staying home and out of public spaces could make a difference,” Ehrman said.

Historical Tip:   At the time of Spanish Influenza in the States, people who wore gloves and a “muff”, which covered their mouths, did not come down with the flu.

The researchers believe their findings could help improve mathematical models of the risk of airborne flu transmission and could also be used to develop better public health flu prevention measures.

For example, improvements could be made to ventilation systems in places such as offices, school classrooms and subway cars, to reduce the risk of flu transmission, the team said.

HINT:  Turn off the heat!  Open up a window, even for just 30 minutes.  Take your pillow outside in the cold and that will freeze off germs.  Sometimes washing a pillow in hot hot water first does help, but washing alone will not kill influenza germs.   Yes, you can put them in the freezer for awhile, but don’t heat them up in the dryer afterwards. 

 

The United States is in the middle of a particularly nasty flu season, with nearly all states reporting high levels of severe flu, and hospitals swamped with cases. Experts blame the severity of this year’s flu season on a particularly virulent strain of flu and prolonged periods of very cold weather. People who have had this years flu shot are more at risk of becoming sick this year.

 

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Lifestyle, Uncategorized

A Walk in The Woods

walkinthewoods

Do You Think There is No Time to Exercise?

 

You can’t fit in the 30 minutes of exercise five times weekly needed to lower your risk of heart disease?

Squeeze in two brisk 10-minute walks weekly instead, and you will lower your odds of heart problems,

stroke and blood clots by more than 20%, which is the same as if you have worked out longer.

 

Short bouts of activity that get your heart pumping are enough to strengthen your heart muscle and arteries research shows.

Boost your benefits with the foods you eat. Eating a Mediterranean type diet of fish, olives,

fresh produce, whole grains, beans and nuts cuts your risk of heart disease by another 47%.

 

Not eating, waiting too long to eat and skipping meals is the worse situation for a healthy heart, along with raising you blood sugar levels, and your blood pressure.

 

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Broccoli Mushroom Casserole

Broccoli Mushroom Casserole

Broccoli Mushroom Casserole

 

Serves: 5

 

Ingredients:

 

3 cups fresh or frozen broccoli florets

8 ounces mushrooms, cleaned and sliced

1 1/2 cups cooked kidney beans or 1 (15 ounce can) low sodium or no-salt-added kidney beans, drained

3 cups cooked brown rice or farro

1 (17.6 ounce) carton (about 2 cups) organic vegetable broth

Instructions:

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Thaw frozen broccoli or if using fresh, steam for 10 minutes or until crisp tender. Sauté mushrooms until tender and most of the liquid is cooked off. Combine all ingredients in a 2 quart casserole. Bake for 20 minutes or until heated through.

 

Try to eat three servings of greens a day, along with a daily serving of mushrooms and onions.

 

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Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Baked Chicken With Minted Chimichurri

Baked Chicken With Minted Chimichurri

Baked Chicken With Minted Chimichurri

 

Chicken is absolutely loaded with tryptophan, which can boost mood and help sleep come easier. It’s also high in vitamin B3 (a.k.a. niacin), which the Chicago Health and Aging Project found may slow cognitive decline. Here we take chicken thighs and jazz ’em up with a tantalizing minted chimichurri. The scent of mint has been shown to increase alertness, and the taste is perfect for waking up chicken and other meats.

For the Minted Chimichurri

Makes 1 1/2 cups

Prep time: 15 minutes

 

1 cup fresh mint, tightly packed

1 cup flat-leaf parsley, tightly packed

1/2 cup fresh oregano (or 3 tbs. dried)

6 cloves garlic, minced

3/4 tsp. red pepper flakes

3/4 tsp. sea salt

3 tsp. lemon zest

1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 cup extra-virgin olive oil

For the Baked Chicken

Makes four servings

Prep time: 20 minutes (plus up to two hours to marinate)

Cook time: 40 minutes

 

8 pasture-raised, bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs

11/2 cups minted chimichurri (at left)

1/2 tsp. sea salt

1/4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

Add all the minted chimichurri ingredients to a blender or food processor, and process until well combined.

 

Put the chicken in a large bowl with 6 tablespoons of the chimichurri and toss to coat. Cover with plastic wrap and marinate in the refrigerator for at least 45 minutes or up to two hours.

 

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Wipe the chicken with a paper towel to remove excess chimichurri; place the chicken on the prepared baking sheet skin side up and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 40 minutes or until the chicken juices run clear and an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of a thigh reaches 160 degrees F.

 

Transfer the chicken to a serving platter and drizzle a few tablespoons of the remaining chimichurri over it. Serve, with the rest of the chimichurri on the side.

 

Per Serving: Calories: 140; Total Fat: 7 g (2 g saturated, 0 g monounsaturated); Carbohydrates: 4.5 g; Protein: 14 g; Fiber: 0.5 g; Sodium: 426 mg

 

Storage: Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

SPICY BEEF & PEPPER STIR-FRY RECIPE

SPICY BEEF & PEPPER STIR-FRY RECIPE

SPICY BEEF & PEPPER STIR-FRY RECIPE

 

INGREDIENTS

1 pound beef top sirloin steak, cut into thin strips

1 tablespoon minced fresh gingerroot

3 garlic cloves, minced, divided

1/4 teaspoon pepper

3/4 teaspoon salt, divided

1 cup light coconut milk

2 tablespoons sugar

1 tablespoon Sriracha Asian hot chili sauce

1/2 teaspoon grated lime peel

2 tablespoons lime juice

2 tablespoons canola oil, divided

1 large sweet red pepper, cut into thin strips

1/2 medium red onion, thinly sliced

1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and thinly sliced

4 cups fresh baby spinach

2 green onions, thinly sliced

2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro

DIRECTIONS

In a large bowl, toss beef with ginger, 2 garlic cloves, pepper and 1/2 teaspoon salt; let stand 15 minutes. In a small bowl, whisk coconut milk, sugar, chili sauce, lime peel, lime juice and remaining salt until blended.

In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon oil over medium-high heat. Add beef; stir-fry 2-3 minutes or until no longer pink. Remove from pan.

Stir-fry red pepper, red onion, jalapeno and remaining garlic in remaining oil 2-3 minutes or just until vegetables are crisp-tender. Stir in coconut milk mixture; heat through. Add spinach and beef; cook until spinach is wilted and beef is heated through, stirring occasionally. Sprinkle with green onions and cilantro. Yield: 4 servings.

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Just Beets!

beets1

 

Just Beets

 

Beets….For a long time I was completely turned off of beets as I only thought of them at Christmas and Thanksgiving dinners and their sour, pickly taste that I despised so much as a kid. Now that I have finally given them another go, but this time in roasted, shredded or juiced format, I think that they are absolutely amazing and I am disappointed that I didn’t give them another chance sooner! Beets have a mildly sweet, extremely earthy taste to them and they are LOADED with antioxidants and many other nutrients that can be extremely beneficial to your health.

 

Beets come in many different varieties including the most popular: the red beet. This is the one that you would most often see at family dinners in their sour pickly form. Beets also come in other varieties such as: Golden, Yellow, Chioggia, Cylindra and the very popular beet, the sugar beet. You can find beets in practically any grocery store in their whole form (edible leaves included) or sliced and canned, or pickled and jarred. Beets may not be something you really think about eating very often, or-never, but once you have read about all of the amazing benefits these little vegetables contain, I’m sure you will consider finding ways to incorporate them into your diet more often.

 

1.Beets have no trans fats and no saturated fats, and are quite filling.

 

2.Beets contain a high source of folic acid, which is a b vitamin that helps the body to regenerate new cells.

 

3.Beets are very rich in carbohydrates, which can provide a lot of energy.

 

4.Studies have shown that consuming beets can protect against certain cancers, especially colon cancer.

 

5.Beets contain high sources of magnesium, sodium, potassium and vitamin C.

 

6.The leaves from beets are edible as well and contain many of the same benefits. Beet leaves also are known to combat ‘garlic breath.’

 

7.Studies have shown that beets are also capable of protecting against heart disease, the number one cause of death in the United States.

 

8.Beets contain high amounts of boron. Boron is related to the production of human sex hormones, which is why the ancient Romans consumed beets for the purpose of their aphrodisiac effect.

 

9.Beets cleanse the body and purify blood.

 

10.Beets contain the same chemical that is used to combat depression Trimethylglycine. If you’re feeling down why not treat yourself to a beet salad? It might just make you feel better.

 

How can you start to incorporate beets into your diet?

 

There are many ways that beets can be eaten: raw, shredded, sliced, pickled, roasted, boiled, steamed and juiced. Be careful when preparing them though, well at least the red ones, because their color is so strong that it will stain your hands, clothes and potentially your cutting board! To remove beet juice from your skin, just rub your hands with a little bit of lemon juice. Keep in mind that it is important to be purchasing organic beets, as beets along with all other root vegetables readily absorb the pesticides from the soil from which they are grown. Beets definitely deserve to get some more attention! Be sure to share some of these amazing benefits of beets with your friends and family!

 

 

Happy Holidays

 

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Lifestyle, Uncategorized

7 Signs You Should Get Pre-Marital Counseling.

7-signs-you-need-pre-marital-counseling

7 Signs You Should Get Pre-Marital Counseling Before Tying the Knot

 

Premarital counseling is one of those things that’s strongly encouraged—or even required—if you’re getting married in a religious ceremony. But what happens if you’re not getting married in that kind of setting? Is this still something you should look into?

 

Some experts say it’s super-helpful. Brandy Engler, Ph.D., a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in relationships, says counseling before you get hitched, preferably from a person who specializes in this stuff, like a couples therapist, can strengthen your bond for the long haul.

 

 

You see, Engler says, couples therapists know the skills it takes to create a happy, sustainable relationship beyond saying your vows. In your dating phase, your hot and heavy feelings for each other drive you to commit, but once you’re husband and wife you need to learn how you can continue to protect your bond.

 

Though most couples could benefit from premarital counseling, not everyone needs it, says Jane Greer, Ph.D., a New York-based marriage therapist and author of What About Me? Stop Selfishness From Ruining Your Relationship.

 

Not sure where you stand? Experts say these are the top signs you should schedule a premarital counseling session:

 

  1. You’re fighting over how big or small of a wedding to have, and you can’t reconcile this difference.

 

  1. You’re arguing over all the elements of the wedding, and you’re not on the same page.

 

  1. You or your partner doubt whether you’re making the right decision.

 

  1. You’re reluctant to plan anything at all, for fear you’re making the wrong choice.

 

  1. Your family doesn’t like your fiancé, or vice versa. “This can make potential wedding plans difficult and upsetting,” Greer says.

 

  1. You’re not on the same page about how much closeness and space you need. Counseling can help you address how you’ll tell each other when you need a little breathing room, Engler says.

 

7.You don’t agree on how much sex you should have or know how much sex your partner wants to have.

 

RELATED: DO THESE 7 THINGS AND YOU’LL NEVER NEED COUPLES’ THERAPY

But Greer says you can probably give premarital counseling a pass if you meet the following criteria:

 

  1. You’re on the same page about wedding plans, sex, and alone time.

 

 

  1. You’re able to balance your differences and work out compromises.

 

  1. There’s family harmony.

 

  1. Both of you feel secure and confident in your choice to marry each other.

 

As for who should counsel you, Greer says it’s ultimately up to you and your preference. While you can go with a marriage or family therapist, you can also opt for a priest from your church, a psychologist, a psychotherapist, or a social worker. “Anyone trained in working with couples and dealing with relationship issues can help you sort through some of the potential obstacles that might get in your way,” she says. (But if the wedding officiant you found online is trying to pitch you sessions as part of his or her package, and they don’t have any qualifications, you can probably skip it.)

 

If you’re waffling about whether to get premarital counseling, Engler says it’s best to err on the side of caution. “Even if you never fight, you can still benefit from this,” she says.

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Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Crucial Lifestyle Changes for People with Rheumatoid Arthrits

rA2017

Crucial Lifestyle Changes for People with Rheumatoid Arthrits

Improving your diet using a combination of my nutritional guidelines, nutritional typing is crucial for your success. In addition, there are some general principles that seem to hold true for all nutritional types and these include:

 

Eliminating sugar, especially fructose, and most grains. For most people it would be best to limit fruit to small quantities

Eating unprocessed, high-quality foods, organic and locally grown if possible

Eating your food as close to raw as possible

Getting plenty high-quality, animal-based omega-3 fats. Krill oil seems to be particularly helpful here as it appears to be a more effective anti inflammatory preparation. It is particularly effective if taken concurrently with 4 mg of Astaxanthin, which is a potent antioxidant bioflavanoid derived from algae

Astaxanthin at 4 mg per day is particularly important for anyone placed on prednisone as Astaxanthin offers potent protection against cataracts and age related macular degeneration

 

Incorporating regular exercise into your daily schedule

 

Early Emotional Traumas Are Pervasive in Those with Rheumatoid Arthritis

With the vast majority of the patients I treated, some type of emotional trauma occurred early in their life, before the age their conscious mind was formed, which is typically around the age of 5 or 6. However, a trauma can occur at any age, and has a profoundly negative impact.

 

If that specific emotional insult is not addressed with an effective treatment modality then the underlying emotional trigger will continue to fester, allowing the destructive process to proceed, which can predispose you to severe autoimmune diseases like RA later in life.

 

In some cases, RA appears to be caused by an infection, and it is my experience that this infection is usually acquired when you have a stressful event that causes a disruption in your bioelectrical circuits, which then impairs your immune system.

 

This early emotional trauma predisposes you to developing the initial infection, and also contributes to your relative inability to effectively defeat the infection.

 

Therefore, it’s very important to have an effective tool to address these underlying emotional traumas. In my practice, the most common form of treatment used is called the Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT).

 

Although EFT is something that you can learn to do yourself in the comfort of your own home, it is important to consult a well-trained professional to obtain the skills necessary to promote proper healing using this amazing tool.

 

Vitamin D Deficiency Rampant in Those with Rheumatoid Arthritis

The early part of the 21st century brought enormous attention to the importance and value of vitamin D, particularly in the treatment of autoimmune diseases like RA. From my perspective, it is now virtually criminal negligent malpractice to treat a person with RA and not aggressively monitor their vitamin D levels to confirm that they are in a therapeutic range of 50-70 ng/ml.

 

This is so important that blood tests need to be done every two weeks, so the dose can be adjusted to get into that range. Most normal-weight adults should start at 10,000 units of vitamin D per day. If you are in the US, then Lab Corp is the lab of choice. For more detailed information on vitamin D, you can review my vitamin D resource page.

 

The best way to raise your blood levels is by sensible exposure to large amounts of your skin. Most can’t do this in the winter so if you take supplements make sure to take 500 mg to 1000 mg of magnesium and 150 mcg of vitamin K2, (not 1) which are important cofactors for optimizing vitamin D function.

 

Call us for your RA personalized plan.

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Diets and Weight Loss, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Energy Drinks

energydrinks

Recent research reveals some troubling side effects of these popular beverages.

Energy drinks are one of America’s most popular dietary supplements, according to the National Institutes of Health, but that doesn’t mean they’re actually a boost for your health. There’s been a lot controversy surrounding the drinks following several recent overdoses — and even deaths — linked to the beverages. In 2014, World Health Organization researchers labeled the rise in energy-drink consumption a “danger to public health.”

So, what’s in an energy drink, and how does it affect your body?

A 2015 Mayo Clinic study, published in JAMA, examined the effects of drinking a single 16-ounce can of a popular energy drink (Rockstar Punched). Researchers conducted the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study on 25 healthy volunteers with an average age of 29.

THE EFFECTS

  • 74%: The average percentage increase of the fight-or-flight stress hormone norepinephrine in study participants’ blood levels.
  • 6.2%: The average percentage increase in study participants’ systolic blood pressure.

THE INGREDIENTS

Researchers observed that the effects could be the results of the following stimulants in Rockstar Punched.

  • Caffeine: 240 mg (by comparison, a shot of espresso has about 64 mg)
  • Sugar: 62 grams (15½ teaspoons)
  • B vitamins and ginkgo biloba (additional stimulants)

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