Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Healthier Green Bean Casserole With Onion Topping

Healthier Green Bean Casserole With Onion Topping

 

Green bean casserole is a holiday meal favorite and a tradition in many American homes. The classic green bean casserole includes canned cream of mushroom soup. If you make your own sauce, however, you have much more control over the ingredients—choosing your preference of butter or oil, the type of liquid to add, and the thickener to use.

In addition, the green bean casserole we’re all familiar with features a topping of crispy, deep-fried onions, usually from a can. Both of these pre-made ingredients add fat, calories, and preservatives to the dish. This recipe uses all fresh ingredients, and replaces the fried onions with sauteed, making this green bean casserole a much healthier version while remaining familiar and delicious. One thing to note, however, is that this casserole is not very saucy and may not satisfy all diners.

 

Green bean casserole with onion and mushroom

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 large onion, thinly slice
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup ​​almond meal
  • 8 ounces mushrooms, sliced
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup unsweetened soy milk
  • 1/4 cup cream
  • 14-ounce bag frozen green beans, thawed

Preparation

  1. Heat oven to 350 F.
  2. Put half of oil in a skillet and add about 3/4 of the onion slices. Let them slowly cook. When they start to get soft, add salt and pepper. You want the onions to get soft and sweet, but if you let them cook down for a very long time they will start to lose too much volume.
  3. When they are soft, remove from heat and toss with almond meal. Taste and adjust seasonings.
  4. Chop up the rest of the onion slices and saute the mushrooms in the rest of the oil. Add thyme, stir, and add the thickener. Stir for another two minutes.
  1. In a measuring cup or small bowl, combine the milk with the cream; add to the sauteed onions and bring to a simmer for 1 minute. Mix in the beans and put in a casserole dish. Bake for 30 minutes. Spread the onions on top and cook for 5 more minutes or until topping begins to brown.

Ingredient Substitutions and Cooking Tips

Any type of “dairy” product works in this recipe. If you are watching your carbohydrate intake, the lowest carb count is in unsweetened soy milk. This recipe combines unsweetened soy milk and cream for richness, but you can use any fat level of milk you want to use, and any combination. Since cream adds some body and thickness, you may need to adjust the amount of thickener if you change the amount of cream.

The type of thickener you use in this recipe is up to you as well. You can use any type of flour or other lower-carb thickeners such as guar gum and proprietary thickeners.

“We” can turn illness into “We”llness!

Health and Wellness Associates

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

Advertisements
Foods, Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Three-Cheese Spinach Casserole With a Twist

Three-Cheese Spinach Casserole With a Twist

 

This spinach casserole is easy to make and cheesy, yet light. This recipe can replace your traditional spinach dip appetizer. Using cottage cheese and feta instead of cream cheese and cheddar cheese in this recipe saves fat and calories, but gives a similar taste and texture. Bake this in the oven, or use a slow cooker to make ahead. Enjoy as an entree, appetizer or snack.

 

Spinach Casserole with Cheese

 

Ingredients

  • 2 10-ounce boxes frozen chopped spinach
  • ¼ chopped onion
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 8-ounce package cottage cheese, low-fat 2%
  • ½ cup feta cheese
  • ½ cup Monterrey jack cheese
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon seasoned salt or other spice mixture to taste
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese, hard (not the dried kind in a can)

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 350F.

2. Defrost spinach in the boxes or in a 2-quart casserole dish.

3. Fry chopped onions in oil until they are translucent and begin to soften.

4. Mix all ingredients except for the Parmesan cheese in the casserole dish. Sprinkle Parmesan on top.

5. Bake for 40-45 minutes or until knife inserted in the center comes out clean and cheese on top begins to brown. Let stand for 10 minutes.

Serve warm with crudites or chips of your choice.

Ingredient Substitutions and Cooking Tips

This recipe is easy to adapt, so if you have certain spice mixtures or salad dressing seasonings that you like, feel free to add them. For example, you can add ½ teaspoon of Chinese Five Spice Powder or another spice mix to give the spinach casserole some depth. It’s not unusual to add dried ranch dressing mix or dried vegetable soup mix to the recipe to give your spinach casserole a distinct flavor.

Speaking of spice, you can make this spinach dip spicy too. Add some kick to this spinach dish by adding jalapeno peppers, red pepper flakes or cayenne pepper. Simply add these when preparing the onion.

Spinach is full of iron, folate, and fiber, but who says you can’t add more. Add shredded artichoke hearts, broccoli, carrots or zucchini to boost the nutritional value of the dish. Instead of crackers, corn chips, or bread, serve with cucumbers, jicama, cauliflower florets or bell pepper strips.

Kale can be substituted for spinach if you want to try different greens with this recipe. Another excellent addition is fresh garlic for extra flavor. A cup of cooked quinoa or chopped chicken breast can also be added to this recipe to boost protein, although the Greek yogurt addition in this recipe provides plenty of it.

 

 

We can turn an Illness into Wellness

Health and Wellness Asssociates

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

Diets and Weight Loss, Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

The One Grocery Store Item To Avoid In 2019

The One Grocery Store Item To Avoid In 2019

When You Drink Soda For The First Time

The food product we suggests you avoid entirely this year (and every year) is soda. Whether regular or diet, it is essentially liquid candy, and studies indicate that drinking it can lead to:

 

  1. Obesity. Drinking a single sugar-containing soda per day is linked to weight gain. Drinking diet soda doesn’t seem to do your weight much good either – over the course of nine years, one study found a 70 percent greater increase in waist circumference among participants in a study who drank diet soda compared to those who didn’t.
  2. Diabetes. A daily sugar-containing soda habit increases a woman’s risk of developing diabetes by 83 percent compared to women who have less than one sweetened drink per month. And another study showed that artificial sweeteners altered the collection of bacteria (known as the microbiome) in the digestive tract in a way that caused blood glucose levels to rise higher than expected and to fall more slowly than they otherwise would. This suggests that the use of artificial sweeteners contributes directly to rising rates of type 2 diabetes.

****** Sometimes Diabetics have no choice.  But when you do, dont!   Shasta has a diet pop in good flavors that is alright to drink.  It has no aspartame in it at all.

3. Heart disease. One study found a 43 percent increase in the risk of heart attack and stroke among individuals who habitually consumed a daily diet soda compared to those who do not.

4. Kidney issues. Drinking two or more diet sodas daily is associated with a decline in a measure of kidney function in women.

5. Premature birth. One study found that the risk of giving birth prematurely increased by 38 percent among women who drank diet soda daily and by 78 percent among those who drank four or more diet sodas per day.

Bottom line: Forget cutting back on soda (diet or regular) – this is one to eliminate altogether. Opt instead for filtered water, unsweetened tea (the sweetened version would be no better) or sparkling water mixed with a splash of natural fruit juice. After a week or two you will feel better and may be less likely to go back.

 

Contact us at healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

 

Dr Gail Bohannon

Health and Wellness Associates

Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Lentil Tacos Recipe : For the Liver that Loves You Back

 

Lentil Tacos Recipe :

For the Liver that Loves You Back

 

 

Who doesn’t love tacos? The lentil filling for these romaine lettuce tacos can be enjoyed warm or cold according to your preference. If you’re looking for something a little heartier add some chopped chicken.

Onions (and scallions): Very similar to garlic, onions have antimicrobial sulfur compounds that expel unfriendly pathogens from the liver. Onions have a disinfecting quality for the liver, keeping it from becoming inflamed. They also improve the temperature control or “thermostat” of the liver so it can heat and cool itself properly.

Leafy greens (especially lettuces and their stems): An extremely cleansing tool for your liver that you can apply on a daily basis. The leafy outer greens of lettuce provide dozens of micronutrients for the liver to stay healthy and balanced, while the core of the lettuce, down closer to the root, provides milky chemical compounds that act as a purging mechanism for it. When leafy greens are eaten with fruit, their medicinal qualities increase twofold.

Mushrooms: Contain hundreds of undiscovered phytochemical compounds, many of which are detoxifying for the liver without hurting it. Mushrooms are medicine for the liver. Many people fear mushrooms because they believe that their status as a type of fungus means they feed fungus within the body. It’s just the opposite. A mushroom is a fungus that destroys fungus, and the liver accepts mushrooms as allies—if the liver is dealing with unwanted microorganisms such as fungus, mushrooms are very helpful in pushing them out of the liver. Mushrooms also reduce fungus, bacteria, and viruses in the intestinal tract, allowing for cleaner nutrients and cleaner blood to arrive in the liver.

Lentil Tacos

Makes 3 servings

Ingredients:
1 cup diced onion
½ cup vegetable broth
1 cup diced mushrooms (optional)
4 garlic cloves, minced
3 cups cooked lentils
1 teaspoon poultry seasoning
½ teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon cumin
½ teaspoon paprika
½ teaspoon chipotle powder
¼ teaspoon honey or maple syrup (optional)
½ teaspoon sea salt
¼ teaspoon cayenne (optional)
2 heads romaine or butter lettuce

( if you are just starting out, you could try Progressive Lentil Soup instead of broth)

Directions:
Sauté the onion in 2 tablespoons of vegetable broth over medium-high heat for approximately 5 minutes until tender. Continue to add vegetable broth by the spoonful as needed to prevent sticking.

Add the mushrooms, garlic, lentils, poultry seasoning, cumin, paprika, chipotle, honey, and sea salt to the sauté pan. If spiciness is desired, add the cayenne as well.

Continue to cook everything over medium-high heat for 5 minutes or until the mushrooms are tender and cooked through.

Serve the lentil mixture in individual romaine leaves as “taco shells” and top with any or all of the optional toppings.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

 

 

Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Metallic Taste in Your Mouth?

Metallic Taste in Your Mouth?

 

I’ve heard that a metal taste in the mouth means something about health, but I can’t remember what it was. Can you help?

Metallic Taste in Your Mouth? | Metal Taste | Andrew Weil, M.D.

A metallic taste in the mouth is a common complaint and can be due to a variety of causes – from medication you may be taking to dental problems. In the absence of other symptoms, it is unlikely that a metallic taste in your mouth indicates serious disease. But if you haven’t had a thorough general checkup recently, I would suggest seeing your doctor to rule out any health problems such as issues with your liver and kidneys, hyperparathyroidism, or undiagnosed diabetes.

 

You also might consider visiting your dentist, because the funny metallic taste in your mouth could be a symptom of gum disease. Even if you don’t have gum problems, poor oral hygiene can affect taste. Be sure to brush your teeth carefully at least twice a day and use a tongue scraper to remove the bacteria and debris that can collect on your tongue. Dental work done in the past can break down and alter taste, so your dentist will probably look at that as well.

Not drinking enough water can also contribute to problems with this strange taste in your mouth. Increase your intake and see if it helps. While you don’t necessarily have to drink the standard recommendation of eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day, my rule of thumb is to drink as much of that amount as you can comfortably consume and more than you think you need.

Among the drugs that can cause a metallic or coppery taste in your mouth are antibiotics like Biaxin (clarithromycin); Flagyl (metronidazole) , used to treat a wide variety of infections; drugs used to treat an overactive thyroid; captopril, used to treat high blood pressure ; griseofulvin, used to treat skin infections; lithium, used in bipolar disorder; penicillamine, used for rheumatoid arthritis or to prevent kidney stones; and some drugs used in cancer treatment.

Ayurvedic supplements from India have been found to exceed acceptable amounts of metal such as mercury, lead, or arsenic and I would be cautious about purchasing them online. Multivitamins containing copper, zinc, or chromium, as well as iron or calcium supplements might cause a temporary taste of metal, but typically subside as it’s being processed by your digestive system. This taste can be symptomatic of a vitamin D overdose , but with most of the population being vitamin D deficient and extremely high dosages (over 10,000 IUs) required, I doubt this is of any great concern. A metal taste is actually more commonly associated with a deficiency of vitamin B12, D, or zinc.

While a metallic taste can be a symptom of acute metal poisoning, it’s rare since our bodies are quite efficient at sequestering and neutralizing the contaminants that it’s not able to expel through the skin, liver, and kidneys. Heavy metal poisoning such as having too much lead or copper in the body due to conditions such as Wilson’s Disease, being around fungicides containing copper sulfate, or contaminated drinking water require intervention such as chelation therapy, so consider possible exposures when speaking with your physician.

Metal on metal (MoM) hip replacements have been known to cause metal poisoning. If you have had a MoM hip replacement and you develop symptoms of metallic taste in your mouth I recommend you see your primary or orthopedic physician.

A taste disorder called dysgeusia could potentially be at the root of phantom flavors as well. When taste cells are stimulated, messages are sent through three specialized nerves to the brain to identify.

Sometimes these wires get crossed in cases of dementia, head injury, or as the result of radiation therapy. Pregnancy hormones can also cause temporary bouts of dysgeusia, especially in the first trimester. Eating citrus fruits or vinegar-marinated foods will help counteract the taste and activate salivation to dilute the unsavory taste of metal. With such a strong tie between the sense of smell and taste, respiratory infections such as sinusitis can also throw your taste buds for a loop and give you the false perception of a metallic taste.

If you rule out all of these possible causes, have been medically evaluated, and still have the metallic taste in your mouth, it might be worthwhile to consult with a practitioner of Chinese medicine. That system might have an answer for you.

Health and Wellness Associates

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

Foods, Uncategorized

On-the-Go Breakfast Burrito

Health and WEllness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

On-the-Go Breakfast Burrito

onthegoburrikto.JPG

There’s no excuse to skip breakfast when you have this burrito recipe in your collection. Fluffy eggs are teamed up with high protein ham, cheese, peppers, and whole grains for a handheld meal that you can enjoy on the run. Prep the ingredients the night before and breakfast will be ready in minutes.

Ingredients

  • 1 large egg
  • 1 large egg white
  • 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 slice uncured ham, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons cheddar cheese, shredded
  • ¼ cup green bell pepper, diced
  • 1 medium whole wheat tortilla

Preparation

  1. In a small bowl whisk together egg and egg white. Season with salt and pepper; set aside.
  2. Heat a nonstick skillet over medium heat and spray with nonstick cooking spray.
  3. Place chopped ham skillet and cook for one to two minutes.
  4. Add eggs, cheese, and pepper and cook, scrambling gently until eggs are fluffy, approximately five minutes more.
  5. Pile egg mixture in the center of tortilla.
  6. To roll: fold in the sides towards the middle, then roll up from the bottom (the part closest to you), making sure to roll completely around so that the end of the tortilla is tucked under the bottom of the burrito.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

In this wrap, lower fat ham takes the place of higher calorie ingredients like bacon. Look for an uncured ham such as Applegate or substitute Canadian bacon or a piece of turkey.

Use a gluten free tortilla (like a corn tortilla) for a celiac-friendly version of this recipe.

Cooking and Serving Tips

To help prevent the ingredients from leaking out of the tortilla (this is especially important if taking this meal to-go) wrap entire burrito tightly in parchment paper and cut in half; peel back the paper as you eat.

Health and Wellness Associates

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

FACEBOOK:  https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Contagious?

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Contagious?

UTI

 

The answer depends upon what microbe is infecting the urinary tract. The urinary tract consists of the urethra, bladder, ureters, and kidneys, each of which can become infected with different microbes. Urinary tract infections usually arise from organisms that are normally present in (colonizing) the person’s gut and/or urethral opening. These organisms (for example, bacteria such as E. coli or Pseudomonas infect the urinary tract by relocating against the flow of urine (retrograde) toward the kidneys.

Lower urinary tract infections do not involve the kidneys while upper urinary tract infections involve the kidneys and are typically more severe. These types of infections of the urinary tract are almost never contagious to other individuals. This article will not consider STDs and the organisms that cause STDs as urinary tract infections as they are discussed in other articles. However, STDs are often contagious and are transferred to others during intercourse, while UTIs are not usually transmitted by intercourse, so UTIs are rarely contagious to a partner. In addition, women who are sexually active and those individuals (males and females) who have anal intercourse have an increased chance to develop a UTI.

It is unlikely for anyone to get a UTI or STD from a toilet seat, as the urethra in males and females typically wouldn’t touch the toilet seat. It is theoretically possible to transfer infectious organisms from a toilet seat to a buttock or thigh cut or sore and then have the organisms spread to the urethra or genitals. Nevertheless, such transmission of UTIs and/or STDs are highly unlikely.

How long before I know I have an infection of the urinary tract?

The incubation period (time of exposure to time symptoms begin) varies with the microbe. In general, common urinary tract infections with colonizing bacteria, like E. coli, varies from about three to eight days.

How are urinary tract infections spread?

Bacterial infections of the urinary tract are almost never spread to others if the infecting organisms originate from the bacteria normally colonizing the individual (for example, E. coli).

 

When should I seek medical care for a urinary tract infection (UTI)?

 

For symptoms of itching and/or burning on urination or discomfort with urination, people should seek help within 24 hours. Individuals who may develop an upper urinary tract infection (kidney involvement with flank pain, for example) should seek medical help immediately.

When are urinary tract infections no longer contagious?

Simple lower and upper urinary tract infections caused by bacteria residing in the patient are not considered to be contagious. Clinicians suggest people are cleared of lower urinary tract infections after about three to seven days of antibiotic treatment and upper urinary tract (kidneys) infections by about 10-14 days after treatment. Some individuals with kidney infection may benefit from an initial IV dose of antibiotics followed by oral antibiotics.

Health and Wellness Associates

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

 

FACEBOOK    https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Twitter:  Health and Wellness Associates

@Healtha98410402

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Household Chemicals Tied to Kidney Problems

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Household Chemicals Tied to Kidney Problems

kidney4141.jpg

 

“Because so many people are exposed to these PFAS chemicals, and to the newer, increasingly produced alternative PFAS agents such as GenX, it is critical to understand if and how these chemicals may contribute to kidney disease,” Stanifer said.

Analyzing 74 studies on PFAS, the researchers found the chemicals are associated with poorer kidney function and other kidney problems. They said it’s particularly concerning that children have greater exposure to these chemicals than adults.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says PFAS can be found in food packaging; stain- and water-repellent fabrics; nonstick cookware; polishes, waxes, paints and cleaning products; and firefighting foams. In fish, animals and humans, PFAS have the ability to build up and persist over time.

The study appears in the Sept. 13 issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

“By searching all the known studies published on the topic, we concluded that there are several potential ways in which these chemicals can cause kidney damage,” Stanifer said in a journal news release.

“Further, we discovered that there have already been multiple reports suggesting that these chemicals are associated with worse kidney outcomes,” he added.

“Because so many people are exposed to these PFAS chemicals, and to the newer, increasingly produced alternative PFAS agents such as GenX, it is critical to understand if and how these chemicals may contribute to kidney disease,” Stanifer said.

Analyzing 74 studies on PFAS, the researchers found the chemicals are associated with poorer kidney function and other kidney problems. They said it’s particularly concerning that children have greater exposure to these chemicals than adults.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says PFAS can be found in food packaging; stain- and water-repellent fabrics; nonstick cookware; polishes, waxes, paints and cleaning products; and firefighting foams. In fish, animals and humans, PFAS have the ability to build up and persist over time.

The study appears in the Sept. 13 issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

“By searching all the known studies published on the topic, we concluded that there are several potential ways in which these chemicals can cause kidney damage,” Stanifer said in a journal news release.

“Further, we discovered that there have already been multiple reports suggesting that these chemicals are associated with worse kidney outcomes,” he added.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

FACEBOOK    https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Twitter:  Health and Wellness Associates

@Healtha98410402

kidney4141.jpg

Uncategorized, Vitamins and Supplements

Moringa

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Moringa

 

moringa

Moringa oleifera is a fast-growing tree native to South Asia and now found throughout the tropics. Its leaves have been used as part of traditional medicine for centuries, and the Ayurvedic system of medicine associates it with the cure or prevention of about 300 diseases.

Moringa, sometimes described as the “miracle tree,” “drumstick tree,” or “horseradish tree,” has small, rounded leaves that are packed with an incredible amount of nutrition: protein, calcium, beta carotene, vitamin C, potassium, you name it, moringa’s got it. No wonder it’s been used medicinally (and as a food source) for at least 4,000 years.

The fact that moringa grows rapidly and easily makes it especially appealing for impoverished areas, and it’s been used successfully for boosting nutritional intake in Malawi, Senegal, and India. In these areas, moringa may be the most nutritious food locally available, and it can be harvested year-round.

Personally, I grew a moringa tree for two years and I can attest to the fact that it grows like a weed. For those living in third-world countries, it may very well prove to be a valuable source of nutrition.

However I don’t recommend planting one in your backyard for health purposes as the leaves are very small and it is a timely and exceedingly tedious task to harvest the leaves from the stem to eat them.

The leaves are tiny and difficult to harvest and use, so you’ll likely find, as I did, that growing one is more trouble than it’s worth. That being said, there is no denying that moringa offers an impressive nutritional profile that makes it appealing once it is harvested…

6 Reasons Why Moringa Is Being Hailed as a Superfood

  1. A Rich Nutritional Profile

Moringa leaves are loaded with vitamins, minerals, essential amino acids, and more. One hundred grams of dry moringa leaf contains:

  • 9 times the protein of yogurt
  • 10 times the vitamin A of carrots
  • 15 times the potassium of bananas
  • 17 times the calcium of milk
  • 12 times the vitamin C of oranges
  • 25 times the iron of spinach
  1. Antioxidants Galore

Moringa leaves are rich in antioxidants, including vitamin C, beta-carotene, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid. The latter, chlorogenic acid, has been shown to slow cells’ absorption of sugar and animal studies have found it to lower blood sugar levels. As noted in the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention:

“The leaves of the Moringa oleifera tree have been reported to demonstrate antioxidant activity due to its high amount of polyphenols.

Moringa oleifera extracts of both mature and tender leaves exhibit strong antioxidant activity against free radicals, prevent oxidative damage to major biomolecules, and give significant protection against oxidative damage.”

Further, in a study of women taking 1.5 teaspoons of moringa leaf powder daily for three months, blood levels of antioxidants increased significantly.

  1. Lower Blood Sugar Levels

Moringa appears to have anti-diabetic effects,7 likely due to beneficial plant compounds contained in the leaves, including isothiocyanates. One study found women who took seven grams of moringa leaf powder daily for three months reduced their fasting blood sugar levels by 13.5 percent.

Separate research revealed that adding 50 grams of moringa leaves to a meal reduced the rise in blood sugar by 21 percent among diabetic patients.

  1. Reduce Inflammation

The isothiocyanates, flavonoids, and phenolic acids in moringa leaves, pods, and seeds also have anti-inflammatory properties. According to the Epoch Times:

“The tree’s strong anti-inflammatory action is traditionally used to treat stomach ulcers. Moringa oil (sometimes called Ben oil) has been shown to protect the liver from chronic inflammation. The oil is unique in that, unlike most vegetable oils, moringa resists rancidity.

This quality makes it a good preservative for foods that can spoil quickly. This sweet oil is used for both frying or in a salad dressing. It is also used topically to treat antifungal problems, arthritis, and is an excellent skin moisturizer.”

  1. Maintain Healthy Cholesterol Levels

Moringa also has cholesterol-lowering properties, and one animal study found its effects were comparable to those of the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin.   As noted in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology:

Moringa oleifera is used in Thai traditional medicine as cardiotonic. Recent studies demonstrated its hypocholesterolemic effect.

… In hypercholesterol-fed rabbits, at 12 weeks of treatment, it significantly (P<0.05) lowered the cholesterol levels and reduced the atherosclerotic plaque formation to about 50 and 86%, respectively. These effects were at degrees comparable to those of simvastatin.

 The results indicate that this plant possesses antioxidant, hypolipidaemic, and antiatherosclerotic activities, and has therapeutic potential for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.”

  1. Protect Against Arsenic Toxicity

The leaves and seeds of moringa may protect against some of the effects of arsenic toxicity, which is especially important in light of news that common staple foods, such as rice, may be contaminated.   Contamination of ground water by arsenic has also become a cause of global public health concern, and one study revealed: 

“Co-administration of M. oleifera [moringa] seed powder (250 and 500 mg/kg, orally) with arsenic significantly increased the activities of SOD [superoxide dismutase], catalase, and GPx with elevation in reduced GSH level in tissues (liver, kidney, and brain).

These changes were accompanied by approximately 57%, 64%, and 17% decrease in blood ROS [reactive oxygen species], liver metallothionein (MT), and lipid peroxidation respectively in animal co-administered with M. oleifera and arsenic.

Another interesting observation has been the reduced uptake of arsenic in soft tissues (55% in blood, 65% in liver, 54% in kidneys, and 34% in brain) following administration of M. oleifera seed powder (particularly at the dose of 500 mg/kg).

It can thus be concluded from the present study that concomitant administration of M. oleifera seed powder with arsenic could significantly protect animals from oxidative stress and in reducing tissue arsenic concentration. Administration of M. oleifera seed powder thus could also be beneficial during chelation therapy…”

Moringa Leaves May Even Purify Water… and More

From a digestive standpoint, moringa is high in fiber that, as the Epoch Times put it, “works like a mop in your intestines… to clean up any of that extra grunge left over from a greasy diet.” Also noteworthy are its isothiocyanates, which have anti-bacterial properties that may help to rid your body of H. pylori, a bacteria implicated in gastritis, ulcers, and gastric cancer. Moringa seeds have even been found to work better for water purification than many of the conventional synthetic materials in use today.

According to Uppsala University:

“A protein in the seeds binds to impurities causing them to aggregate so that the clusters can be separated from the water. The study… published in the journal Colloids and Surfaces A takes a step towards optimization of the water purification process.

Researchers in Uppsala together with colleagues from Lund as well as NamibiaBotswanaFrance, and the USA have studied the microscopic structure of aggregates formed with the protein.

The results show that the clusters of material (flocs) that are produced with the protein are much more tightly packed than those formed with conventional flocculating agents. This is better for water purification as such flocs are more easily separated.”

There is speculation that moringa’s ability to attach itself to harmful materials may also happen in the body, making moringa a potential detoxification tool.

How to Use Moringa

If you have access to a moringa tree, you can use the fresh leaves in your meals; they have a flavor similar to a radish. Toss them like a salad, blend them into smoothies, or steam them like spinach. Another option is to use moringa powder, either in supplement form or added to smoothies, soups, and other foods for extra nutrition. Moringa powder has a distinctive “green” flavor, so you may want to start out slowly when adding it to your meals.

You can also use organic, cold-pressed moringa oil (or ben oil), although it’s expensive (about 15 times more than olive oil.As mentioned, while I don’t necessarily recommend planting a moringa tree in your backyard (a rapid-growing tree can grow to 15 to 30 feet in just a few years), you may want to give the leaves or powder a try if you come across some at your local health food market. As reported by Fox News, this is one plant food that displays not just one or two but numerous potential healing powers:

“Virtually all parts of the plant are used to treat inflammation, infectious disorders, and various problems of the cardiovascular and digestive organs, while improving liver function and enhancing milk flow in nursing mothers. The uses of moringa are well documented in both the Ayurvedic and Unani systems of traditional medicine, among the most ancient healing systems in the world.

Moringa is rich in a variety of health-enhancing compounds, including moringine, moringinine, the potent antioxidants quercetin, kaempferol, rhamnetin, and various polyphenols. The leaves seem to be getting the most market attention, notably for their use in reducing high blood pressure, eliminating water weight, and lowering cholesterol.

Studies show that moringa leaves possess anti-tumor and anti-cancer activities, due in part to a compound called niaziminin. Preliminary experimentation also shows activity against the Epstein-Barr virus. Compounds in the leaf appear to help regulate thyroid function, especially in cases of over-active thyroid. Further research points to anti-viral activity in cases of Herpes simplex 1.”

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

healthandwellnessassociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

312-972-WELL

Foods, Uncategorized

Easy Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Bars

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Easy Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Bars

chocolate-chip-pumpkin-bars

This dessert is super easy to pull together and the flavorful results will win you nothing but rave reviews.

Ingredients

  • 1 package spice cake mix (regular size)
  • 1 can (15 ounces) solid-pack pumpkin
  • 2 cups (12 ounces) semisweet chocolate chips, divided

 

Directions

  • In a large bowl, combine cake mix and pumpkin; beat on low speed for 30 seconds. Beat on medium for 2 minutes. Fold in 1-1/2 cups chocolate chips. Transfer to a greased 13×9-in. baking pan.
  • Bake at 350° for 30-35 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool completely in pan on a wire rack.
  • In a microwave, melt the remaining chocolate chips; stir until smooth. Drizzle over bars. Let stand until set.
Nutrition Facts

1 bar: 139 calories, 6g fat (4g saturated fat), 0 cholesterol, 92mg sodium, 23g carbohydrate (16g sugars, 1g fiber), 1g protein.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/