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Sweet Potato Casserole

Sweet-Potato-Casserole_EXPS_TGCBBZ_3234_D05_10_1b

SWEET POTATO CASSEROLE RECIPE

 

INGREDIENTS

CASSEROLE:

2-1/4 to 2-1/2 pounds (about 4 cups) sweet potatoes, cooked, peeled and mashed

1/3 cup butter, melted

2 eggs, beaten ( adding protein is smart when you use sugar)

1/2 cup milk

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/2 cup sugar or sugar substitute

TOPPING:

1/2 cup chopped nuts

1/2 cup flaked coconut

1/2 cup packed brown sugar

3 tablespoons butter, melted

 

DIRECTIONS

In a large mixing bowl, combine mashed potatoes, butter, eggs, milk, vanilla extract and sugar. Spread into a greased 1-1/2-qt. casserole. For topping, combine all ingredients and sprinkle over potatoes. Bake at 375° for 25 minutes or until heated through. Yield: 6-8 servings.

 

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Surviving Heart Attack Often Means Leaving Job Behind

heartattack

Surviving Heart Attack Often Means Leaving Job Behind

 

Recovering from a heart attack can be a long, painful process, and now a new study finds that almost one-quarter of those patients who returned to work ultimately left their jobs over the following year.

 

The findings suggest that “even though patients return to work after a heart attack, they may still require individual adjustments at their workplaces in order to stay employed,” said study author Dr. Laerke Smedegaard Petersen. She is a graduate student at Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark.

 

An estimated 676,000 people in the United States survive heart attacks each year, according to the American Heart Association. Many survivors are of working age: The average age of heart attack is 65 for men and 72 for women, the association says.

 

The new study examined the medical and work records of over 22,000 patients in Denmark who were employed before suffering heart attacks between 1997 and 2012.

 

Of those, 91 percent returned to work within a year. But within a year of going back to work, 24 percent of the patients had left their jobs. That’s three times the normal rate of leaving a job, the researchers reported. It’s not clear, however, whether the heart attack survivors quit their jobs, or were fired or laid off.

 

Patients aged 30 to 39 and 60 to 65, and those who had heart failure, diabetes or depression, were especially likely to leave their jobs. Workers with higher incomes and more education were more likely to stay on the job, the findings showed.

 

Petersen said the percentage of heart attack patients who return to work and then leave their jobs may be even higher in the United States.

 

“In Denmark, all citizens have equal access to health care and all patients receive treatment free of charge,” she explained.

One U.S. expert said the findings are sobering.

 

“The study is an important reminder that recovery is often measured in months and years, not just weeks,” said Dr. Harlan Krumholz, director of the Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation at Yale-New Haven Hospital in Connecticut.

 

“To understand the impact of a heart attack requires that we fully understand people’s roles and function. We should study how best to help people fully resume their prior activities and have the choice as to whether they want to continue working,” Krumholz explained.

 

Karina Davidson, executive director of Columbia University’s Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health, said fatigue and an inability to perform manual labor are some of the reasons why heart attack survivors leave their jobs.

 

“Patients after a heart attack do indeed have a long road to recovery, and cardiac rehabilitation, strong family support and follow-up with their medical care are important components to ensure the best recovery possible,” she said. “Returning to work full-time will be realistic for some patients, but not for all.”

 

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Pancreatic Cancer A Silent Killer

pancreaticcancer

Pancreatic cancer:

What are the symptoms of ‘silent killer’ set to kill more than breast tumors?

 

Pancreatic cancer will claim an increasing number of lives over the next decade and overtake breast cancer to become the fourth most deadly form of the disease overall, a charity has warned.

It is often difficult to diagnose pancreatic cancer early enough to stop it from spreading, because the symptoms are so vague.

A lack of new diagnosis methods means that by 2026, 11,279 people are predicted to die every year from the disease – a 28 per cent rise on the 8,817 in 2014, said Pancreatic Cancer UK.

The only live-saving treatment available for pancreatic cancer is an operation to remove the tumor.

However, in 92 per cent of cases, the cancer is not caught early enough for surgery, meaning it has the lowest survival rate of all cancers.

The signs of pancreatic cancer, sometimes called the ‘silent killer’, may come and go at first. These are the most common symptoms.

 

Jaundice

 

Anyone with jaundice – yellow skin and whites of the eyes – should see their GP straight away. People who develop jaundice may also feel itchy and notice pale feces and dark urine.

 

Jaundice is the yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (Rex Features)

The yellow pigmentation is caused by a build-up of a substance called bilirubin.

 

It can also be caused by non-cancerous conditions such as hepatitis and gallstones, but should always be taken seriously and everyone over 40 with the condition is referred to a specialist for testing.

 

Abdominal pain

 

The pancreas is a large gland buried deep inside the body and a common symptom of pancreatic cancer is pain the tummy area, which can come and go and spread to the back.

The pain is often worse when lying down or after eating.

Unexplained weight loss and loss of appetite

Sudden, unintentional weight loss can be the sign of a serious illness like pancreatic cancer, although it can also take place after a stressful event.

Weight loss can take place because the pancreas plays an important role in the digestive system, which can be disrupted by the cancer, so food is not properly absorbed by the body.

 

Indigestion

 

Indigestion is a symptom of pancreatic cancer but has many other causes and isn’t usually linked to the disease – making it more difficult for doctors to diagnose.

Changes to bowel habits

Because digestion is affected by pancreatic cancer, the body can stop breaking down fat in food, which is then excreted in large amounts.

This can make stools large, pale and oily, with a particularly disgusting smell. They can also be difficult to flush down the toilet.

 

Diarrhea and constipation can also be caused by the disease.

Difficulty swallowing

Another symptom that can be caused by other health problems, some people with pancreatic cancer find it difficult to swallow and may find themselves coughing, choking or feeling as if food is stuck in their throat.

 

Nausea

 

Pancreatic cancer can make you vomit and feel sick.

Recently diagnosed diabetes

The pancreas produces a hormone called insulin, which helps control blood sugar levels, but cancer can interrupt this process.

Diabetes occurs when a person’s blood sugar levels become too high. This can be caused by a lack of insulin, so it is recommended that GPs refer patients over 60 who have lost weight and have recently been diagnosed with diabetes for a scan.

 

Any one of these symptoms can be just that.  One Symptom!

 

If you have any questions, please call us, and we can work with you on a personalized health care plan, and hopefully take those worries away from you.

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived: K. Foster Yahoo Health

312-972-WELL

 

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