Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Goat Cheese & Artichoke Dip Recipe

Goat Cheese & Artichoke Dip Recipe

 

Goat cheese & artichoke dip recipe - Dr. Axe

INGREDIENTS:

  • One 14-ounce can artichoke hearts, drained
  • 1 pound chévre goat cheese
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • ½ cup pecorino romano, grated
  • 1 tablespoon parsley
  • 1 tablespoon chives
  • ½ tablespoon basil
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • Dash of cayenne pepper (optional*)

 

DIRECTIONS:

  1. In a food processor, mix all ingredients except the pecorino romano until well incorporated and creamy.
  2. Top with freshly grated pecorino romano.

 

If you’re someone who enjoys snacking or dips, you’ve likely had your share of artichoke and cheese dips. And sure, they’ve probably been tasty. You might have even prepared a few. But if you’re ready to take your dips to the next level, it’s time to make this artichoke dip recipe. Trust me — this one’s tastier (and much healthier) than any spinach and artichoke dip or cheesy dip I’ve ever had.

 

Goat Cheese Appetizers: A Crowd Favorite

Goat cheese is one of my favorite cheeses. It’s tangy and creamy, perfect for adding to your favorite dishes. It’s also lower in the milk proteins some people are sensitive to, so often even if you struggle with digesting traditional cow’s milk cheeses, you might find you can tolerate goat’s milk better. Different countries call goat’s cheese by different names; one of the most common is the French chèvre, which is what we’ll use here.

Goat cheese & artichoke dip recipe ingredients - Dr. Axe

 

Remember we are in this together!

 

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EHS Telehealth

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Heart-Healthy Eggs Benedict Recipe with Asparagus

Heart-Healthy Eggs Benedict Recipe with Asparagus

 

Eggs benedict recipe - Dr. Axe

 

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 bunch asparagus (16 pieces)
  • 1–2 teaspoons coconut or avocado oil
  • ¼ tomato, sliced
  • ½ avocado, sliced
  • 2 eggs, poached
  • hollandaise sauce  ( recipe below)

 

DIRECTIONS:

  1. In a medium-size frying pan over medium heat, add coconut or avocado oil.
  2. Add the asparagus to the frying pan and pan fry until for tender, about 8–10 minutes.
  3. In a small pot, bring 2–3 cups of water to a boil.
  4. Once boiling, gently lower the eggs into the water and allow to boil for 3 minutes. Remove the eggs once finished and set them aside for assembly.
  5. Divide the asparagus on two separate plates and add sliced tomato and avocado on top.
  6. Add the eggs and drizzle on the hollandaise.
  7. Top with chives.

Eggs Benedict is one of those items that you’ll always see on a breakfast or brunch menu. It’s a breakfast classic. But, when prepared with the traditional ingredients, it can be hard on your waistline, heart, brain and digestion.

In my eggs Benedict recipe, I use immune-boosting, heart healthy, anti-inflammatory foods like avocado, asparagus and tomato. This low-carb breakfast is also high in healthy fats that are key for maintaining optimal health. So give this eggs Benedict recipe a try — you’ll never go back to the traditional dish again.

5-Minute Blender Hollandaise Sauce Recipe

Hollandaise sauce recipe - Dr. Axe

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 tablespoon grass-fed butter or ghee
  • 1 egg yolk
  • ¼ teaspoon dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • ½ tablespoon water

DIRECTIONS:

  1. In a small sauce pan, melt the butter or ghee over medium-low heat.
  2. Add all the ingredients into a high-powered blender until well combined.

 

Remember we are in this together!

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EHS Telehealth

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Magnesium and Heart Disease

 

Magnesium and heart health are linked.

 

For years, the medical industry thought cholesterol was the most important factor in heart disease.

But that idea is being flipped on its head…

A decade-long study looking at cardiovascular disease found that low magnesium contributed more to heart disease than cholesterol or saturated fat. That’s amazing!

The simple act of taking a high quality magnesium supplement can help prevent heart problems better than obsessing about cholesterol levels.

More and more doctors are turning to magnesium as the first line of defense to protect the heart.

It makes sense! Magnesium…

  • Regulates heart rhythm (preventing arrhythmia)
  • Wards off angina (the intense chest pain caused by arteries having spasms)
  • Keeps electrical signals firing properly
  •  And reduces high blood pressure

Supplementing is even more important as you age, since older people have a harder time absorbing magnesium, they store less of it in their bones, and lose more of it in their urine.

It can be difficult to get enough magnesium through food alone. That’s why most doctors recommend supplementing…

In all my studying, I’ve found your heart deserves all the help it can get.

Heart disease is the number one cause of death in the U.S.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. Prevention is possible.

And magnesium is one of the best ways to keep your heart beating pain-free.

Like any medication, you have to make sure the right magnesium and the amount you take is right for you.  Also magnesium can not be taken alone.

Contact us, and we can help you figure this out for YOU!

Remember we are in this together,

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EHS Telehealth

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Plastic Tea Bags : Plastic in Your Body

 

Billions of ‘Microplastics’ in Your Tea From Each Plastic Teabag

News Picture: Billions of 'Microplastics' in Your Tea From Each Plastic Teabag: Study

A new study warns that even your soothing cup of tea might serve up some invisible health hazards.

Some tea companies are replacing traditional paper teabags with plastic ones, but the new bags may be adding billions of tiny bits of plastic to your beverage, a team from Canada reports.

“We show that steeping a single plastic teabag at brewing temperature [205 degrees Fahrenheit] releases approximately 11.6 billion microplastics and 3.1 billion nanoplastics into a single cup of the beverage,” concluded a team led by Nathalie Tufenkji. She’s a professor of chemical engineering at McGill University in Montreal.

The global proliferation of microplastics — bits of plastic so small they are often invisible to the naked eye — have made headlines recently, having been found in large numbers in ocean and tap water, seafood and even human poop.

“In the past few years, there has been a steadily increasing body of scientific literature demonstrating that not only are microplastics permeating the broader environment, they are entering our bodies, as well,” noted Dr. Kenneth Spaeth, chief of occupational and environmental medicine at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y. He wasn’t involved in the new research.

Spaeth stressed that there’s just too little data on whether or not microplastics pose a threat to human health. However, “based on the molecular composition of microplastics, there is reason to have real concern about the potential health effects,” he said, “since they contain a variety of components known to harm human health — including hormone-disrupting chemicals, as well as human carcinogens.”

In the new study, the Montreal team noted that the heat of brewed tea can cause plastic tea bags to break down into bits of plastic that are thousands of times smaller than the diameter of a human hair. That means you can’t see, taste or feel them in your mouth.

Investigating further, the researchers removed the tea from plastic teabags sourced from four different manufacturers. They then washed out the empty bags and placed them in hot water.

Using a powerful electron microscope, Tufenkji’s team found that a single bag released close to 12 billion microplastic particles, and more than 3 billion of the [even smaller] nanoplastic particles, into the water.

These levels were thousands of times greater than seen in other foods, they noted.

In a separate experiment, the researchers fed varying doses of these particles to very tiny animals — water fleas. Although the fleas lived, they did exhibit some physical and behavioral abnormalities after being fed the microplastics, the researchers report Sept. 25 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Still, more research must be done to see if microplastics have health effects on humans, the McGill researchers said.

Spaeth said the new study “raises the specter that human exposure to microplastics is not just a result of the widespread contamination of the broader environment, but that our use of plastics in consumer products is notably adding to our microplastics exposure.”     Steven Reinberg

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Foods, Uncategorized

Chicken Scarpariello

Chicken Scarpariello With Sausage and Peppers Recipe

 

 

Looking for a healthier take on the classic sausage and peppers recipe? This chicken scarpariello dish has both chicken breasts and chicken sausages and is overflowing with delicious flavor. Of course, I recommend using organic, free-range chicken products, which I personally think taste better in addition to being healthier options overall.

This chicken scarpariello with sausage recipe takes less than an hour to make and can feed at least six people. It’s a perfect choice if you’re looking for a crowd-pleasing dish that only requires one pot and minimal effort. Before we dive into the how-to’s of this recipe, what is chicken scarpariello exactly?

Chicken scarpariello recipe - Dr. Axe

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3 tablespoons avocado oil
  • 4 chicken breasts
  • 3 chicken sausages
  • 2 sweet cherry peppers, halved and de-seeded
  • 1 orange pepper, sliced
  • 1 cup dry white cooking wine
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1 cup mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 shallot, sliced into rounds
  • 1 cup okra, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 1 tablespoon sage
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper

 

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven 350 degrees F.
  2. In a large oven-safe pan over medium-high heat, warm avocado oil.
  3. Brown chicken and sausage separately and then remove when braised but not fully cooked.
  4. Reduce to medium heat and add garlic, peppers, mushrooms, shallots, okra, oregano, sage, salt and pepper.
  5. Sauté until vegetables are soft, about 15 minutes.
  6. Add wine and broth to deglaze the pan.
  7. Scrape bottom of the pan with a wooden spatula to incorporate the flavors.
  8. Place chicken and sausage on top of the vegetables and bake in oven for 30 minutes.
  9. Allow to rest 10 minutes before serving.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Spinach Quiche Recipe : Low Carb

Crustless Spinach Quiche Recipe

 

This crustless spinach quiche recipe is keeping things simple yet delicious with only five key ingredients. It’s loaded with impressive spinach nutrition, eggs and healthy raw cheese.

Get ready to make a healthy crustless spinach quiche recipe so loaded with flavor you’ll easily end up eating it for breakfast, lunch and dinner. And that’s really one of the best things about a quiche — that it makes a perfect snack or meal any time of the day.

This crustless spinach quiche recipe is delicious, so easy to make and high in protein. Plus, it’s gluten-free, vegetarian and ketogenic diet-approved.

Crustless spinach quiche recipe - Dr. Axe

INGREDIENTS:

  • 8 eggs, beaten
  • 1 package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and drained
  • 1½ cups shredded raw cheese
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil + extra for greasing
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon black pepper

 

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and grease a 9-inch pie pan with coconut oil.
  2. Heat coconut oil and onions over medium heat in sauce pan until onions are soft. Stir in spinach and cook until excess moisture has evaporated.
  3. In a bowl, combine eggs, cheese, salt and pepper. Stir.
  4. Add spinach mixture and blend together.
  5. Scoop into pan and bake for 30 minutes.

 

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Uncategorized, Vitamins and Supplements

Bruise Cream with Arnica & Bilberry

Bruise Cream with Arnica & Bilberry

Bruise cream - Dr. Axe

All of us get bruised every now and then, from the kids taking a fall while playing to simply bumping into that nightstand … ouch! Bruises can be unsightly, and it can seem to take forever to heal bruises. While having a good diet can truly help with the healing process, using natural home remedies can make an even bigger difference.

I want to share my recommendation for the best DIY bruise cream. Try this and watch that bruise fade away.

Let’s start! If you have double boiler, you can use that or simply place a heat safe dish or jar in a pan of hot water. The key here is that we need to soften the skin-healing shea butter so that we can whip it into a nice texture.

Now, place the jojoba oil and shea butter into the double boiler or your heat safe dish and hot water. Bring it to a point where it is getting soft and stir with a whisk so that you continuously blend well.

Once well, blended, transfer to a small mixing bowl.

Next up, add the arnica oil! Arnica has been used since the 1500s to reduce bruising on the body — and it works due to the helenalin, a natural anti-inflammatory agent, within. Not only does it reduce the discoloration of bruising, but it reduces the pain, too, as arnica is commonly used for sore muscles.

We know we can’t go wrong with unrefined coconut oil. Let’s add this to the mixture, while continuing to blend. Coconut oil is great for helping to remove impurities and toxins from the skin and can help heal any damaged or bruised skin.

Have you heard of comfrey oil? It can do wonders for your bruises due to anti-inflammatory properties it contains. The leaf, root and root-like stem are commonly used to make medicine and has been attributed to its high content of allantoin, a substance that promotes new skin cell growth. Add the comfrey oil and continue to stir. I want to note that there are parts of the comfrey plant that are toxic. While comfrey oil should be just fine, make sure you know what you are buying and use in small amounts.

In the next step we will add the bromelain and bilberry extract. Did you know that bromelain comes from the pineapple? It contains proteolytic enzymes that help reduce the inflammation caused by bruises. For your recipe, just empty the capsule into your mixture. And let’s not forget the amazing bilberry! Bilberry, similar to the blueberry, contains antioxidants that will also reduce the swelling and appearance of bruises.

Now, let’s add some essential oils. Blend the frankincense drops right into the mixture. Frankincense has been used since biblical times and helps reduce pain and inflammation caused by bruising.

Once you have blended these ingredients, slowly add the water and continue to blend well. If you like the mixture thick, simply add less water. Try blending just a little at a time to help get the right consistency. Use as much or as little as you want.

Now that you have blended the ingredients to the consistency that you prefer, transfer the mixture into a glass jar. Use two to three times daily until the bruise has diminished. If you notice any irritation upon use, use less frequently or discontinue use.

You now have an amazing chemical-free bruise cream filled with completely natural ingredients! Depending on how warm it is where you live, you may want to keep it in the refrigerator to help maintain the consistency and just set it out for a few minutes prior to use to allow it soften.

I hope your entire family enjoys the benefits of this useful bruise cream!

 

Bruise Cream with Arnica & Bilberry

Total Time: 15 minutes
Serves: 10–12 ounces

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1/3 cup jojoba oil
  • 1/4 cup arnica oil
  • 1/4 cup shea butter
  • 1/8 cup coconut oil
  • 3–4 drops comfrey oil
  • 1 500 milligram bromelain capsule
  • 1 teaspoon bilberry extract
  • 10 drops frankincense essential oil
  • 1/8–1/4 cup of purified water (based on desired consistency)

Directions:

  1. Using a double boiler or a heat safe dish or jar in a pan of hot water, add the jojoba oil and shea butter.
  2. Whisk to soften the mixture and blend well.
  3. Once well-blended, transfer to a small mixing bowl.
  4. Add the arnica oil and blend.
  5. Add the coconut oil and blend.
  6. Add the comfrey oil and continue to stir.
  7. Empty the bromelain capsule into the mixture and stir.
  8. Add the bilberry extract and frankincense essential oil. Blend well.
  9. Once you have blended these ingredients, slowly add the water and continue to blend well. Adjust the amount of water to get the consistency you want.
  10. Transfer the mixture into a glass jar.
  11. Keep the container in the refrigerator to help maintain the consistency and just set it out for a few minutes prior to use to allow it soften.

 

 

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

HFMD: Hand Foot and Mouth Disease

What is hand, foot, and mouth (HFMD) disease?

Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a viral infection characterized by fever and a typical rash most frequently seen on the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, and inside the mouth. It should not be confused with foot (hoof) and mouth disease that affects cattle, sheep, and swine.

Picture of Verruca Vulgaris After Treatment

What causes hand, foot, and mouth disease?

HFMD is one of several infectious diseases caused by different members of the enterovirus family of viruses. The most common cause is Coxsackievirus A16; less frequently enterovirus 71 is the infectious agent. The clinical manifestations of routine HFMD are the same regardless of the responsible virus. However, patients infected with enterovirus 71 are more likely to experience rare complications (for example, viral meningitis or cardiac muscle involvement).

What are the risk factors for hand, foot and mouth disease?

Risk factors for developing HFMD include

  • summer and fall seasons,
  • toddler age range,
  • high-risk exposure location (such as daycare and preschool) and close contact (for example, family home) locations,
  • ineffective hygiene — infrequent soap and water hand-washing or not wearing disposable gloves when changing stool-containing diapers, and
  • a compromised immune system.

Picture of characteristic rash and blisters of hand, foot, and mouth disease

Is hand, foot, and mouth disease contagious? How does HFMD spread?

HFMD is spread person to person by direct contact with the infecting virus (either Coxsackievirus A16 or less commonly enterovirus 71). These viruses are most commonly found in the nasal and throat regions but also in the blister fluid or stool of infected individuals. The virus can survive on inanimate surfaces such as desktops, faucets, etc. It can then be transferred by touching contaminated surfaces and then touching your nose, mouth, or eyes before washing your hands. Likewise, changing diapers from an infected infant without wearing gloves or hand-washing can transmit disease. Water contaminated with the virus can also transmit the infection. Women who are infected shortly prior to delivery may pass on the infection to their infant. The baby will generally have a mild illness but should be monitored closely since in rare cases they could develop a more severe infection or experience complications. Infected individuals are most contagious during the first week of their illness. HFMD cannot be contracted from pets or animals.

The viruses that cause HFMD may remain in the person’s respiratory or intestinal tract for several weeks to months after all symptoms have resolved. It is possible, therefore, to transmit the infection even though the formerly ill individual has completely recovered. Some individuals (most commonly adults) may exhibit no symptoms or signs during their infection but may unwittingly transmit the illness to those (commonly infants and children) who are not immune.

Picture of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Mouth (2 of 2)

What is the contagious period for hand, foot, and mouth disease?

Once exposed to the virus, those who develop symptoms and signs will do so within 1-3 days. They are most contagious during the first week of the illness. However, the virus may continue to be shed for one to three weeks in respiratory secretions (saliva and/or nasal mucous) and in the stool for two to eight weeks after the primary infection.

What is the incubation period for hand, foot, and mouth disease?

HFMD is moderately contagious and spreads from person to person. It cannot be spread by animals. Usually, the virus is passed via oral secretions (nasal discharge and saliva, etc.) or via stool. There is a short 1- to 3-day incubation period between exposure and development of initial symptoms (fever and malaise). A person is most contagious during the first week of illness.

Picture of characteristic mouth sores of hand, foot, and mouth disease

Can adults get hand, foot, and mouth disease?

An adult who was never exposed to the viruses that cause HFMD as a child could develop the characteristic symptoms and physical signs (vesicular rash with the characteristic distribution) if infected by the virus. Interestingly, the majority of adults exposed to enteroviruses will remain without symptoms. Unfortunately, an infected person is still contagious even though he lacks objective physical findings.

What are the symptoms and signs of hand, foot, and mouth disease?

HFMD is most commonly an illness of the summer and fall seasons.

  • Initial symptoms of a low-grade fever (101 F-102 F) and malaise are followed within 1 or 2 days by a characteristic skin rash.
  • Small (2 mm-3 mm) red spots that quickly develop into small blisters (vesicles) appear on the palms, soles, and oral cavity.
    • The gums, tongue, and inner cheek are most commonly involved in the mouth.
    • The foot lesions may also involve the lower calf region and rarely may appear on the buttocks.
    • Oral lesions are commonly associated with a sore throat, uncomfortable eating and drinking, and as a result, a diminished appetite. It is very rare for an infected child to become dehydrated due to oral discomfort.
  • It is estimated that approximately 50% of those infected with this enterovirus never develop symptoms. Symptoms are much more common in infants, toddlers, and young children. Older children, teens, and adults are more likely to incur no symptoms.

When does hand, foot, and mouth disease usually occur?

In the temperate northern hemisphere, summer and fall are the most frequent seasons for community epidemics of HFMD. The illness is year-round in the tropics. While anyone exposed to the viral causes of HFMD may develop disease, not everyone infected will develop symptoms and signs

Picture of Verruca Vulgaris

How long does hand, foot, and mouth disease last?

The total duration of illness from HFMD is approximately 5-7 days. One to three days after viral invasion of the patient, the first symptoms become evident. These include fever, reduced appetite, sore throat, and a general sense of feeling ill (malaise). One to two days later, the characteristic painful mouth sores develop. The final stage of the illness is manifested by small, tender red spots which progress to blisters in the mouth, palms of the hands, soles of the feet, and less frequently on the arms and legs, as well as the buttock and genital areas.

What is the course of hand, foot, and mouth disease?

The illness is characteristically self-limited and is usually resolved within a week, particularly when due to its most common cause, Coxsackievirus A16. In those outbreaks due to enterovirus 71, the illness may be more severe with complications such as infection of the heart muscle and/or viral meningitis and encephalitis and paralytic disease. As a rule, HFMD is generally a mild and self-limited illness.

Picture of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Mouth (1 of 2)

Why haven’t we heard more about hand, foot, and mouth disease?

Recognition of hand, foot, and mouth disease is relatively recent (when contrasted with mumps, measles, and chickenpox, for example). HFMD was first reported in 1956 in Australia. By the early 1960s, it had emerged as a common childhood illness around the world.

How do health care professionals diagnose hand, foot, and mouth disease?

Usually, the diagnosis of HFMD is made on a combination of clinical history and characteristic physical findings. Laboratory confirmation is rarely necessary unless severe complications develop.

Picture of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease on Foot

What is the treatment for hand, foot, and mouth disease?

Treatment of HFMD is directed toward symptomatic relief of fever and sore throat. Antibiotics are not indicated in the treatment of this viral disease. Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) has been tried as a therapy for severely ill patients or immunocompromised older patients with variable success.

Picture of Verruca Plana

What are complications of hand, foot, and mouth disease?

Complications of HFMD are relatively rare. The more common cause of HFMD (Coxsackievirus A16) is less likely to cause complications when compared with enterovirus-71.

Complications include the following:

  1. “Aseptic” (also called “viral”) meningitis (rare): Symptoms of meningitis are moderate-severe headache, discomfort when bending the head forward (classically tested by trying to touch the chin to the chest), and nausea and vomiting. Meningitis is an infection of the tissues and spinal fluid that surrounds the brain and the spinal cord. The diagnosis is confirmed by a lumbar puncture (also known as a “spinal tap”). Depending upon severity of the patient’s symptoms, they may need to be hospitalized.
  2. Encephalitis (brain infection): Encephalitis is much less common but more ominous when compared with meningitis and requires hospitalization for close monitoring. Other rare neurologic complications include paralysis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, transverse myelitis, and cerebellar ataxia. Transient and permanent impairment can both occur.
  3. Occasionally, the virus may infect the heart muscle fibers and thus compromise the heart’s blood-pumping capabilities.
  4. Young infants may very rarely become dehydrated due to refusal to take oral fluids as a consequence of mouth pain.
  5. In very rare circumstances, the skin vesicles may develop a secondary bacterial infection. A short course of antibiotics are used to treat the secondary infection.

How does hand, foot, and mouth disease affect pregnancy and the baby?

Commonly, HFMD is an illness of children less than 10 years of age; adults generally were exposed during childhood and maintain a natural immunity. Information regarding fetal exposure to HFMD during pregnancy is limited. No solid evidence exists that maternal enterovirus infection is associated with complications such as spontaneous abortion or congenital defects. However, should a baby be born to a mother with active HFMD symptoms and signs, the risk of neonatal infection is high. While such newborns often have a mild illness, a newborn infant is highly vulnerable and may develop an overwhelming and potentially fatal infection involving vital organs such as liver, heart, and brain, which could be fatal.

Picture of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease on Hand (1 of 2)

When can children with hand, foot, and mouth disease return to school?

Children may return to school once without fever for 24 hours (usually day three or four of the disease).

What is the prognosis of hand, foot, and mouth disease?

The prognosis for routine HFMD is excellent. A patient’s symptoms are bothersome but not debilitating. Medications designed to reduce fever and/or pain relievers are helpful, such as acetaminophen(Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin). Young children often find that cool/soft foods (ice cream, smoothies, etc.) provide some pain relief and are psychologically helpful as “special treats.” An individual assessment is required for those unique individuals who develop complications (such as meningitis). As would be anticipated, those with an immunocompromised status are more likely to develop either a more serious infection or an illness of a more intense nature than those with a normally functioning immune system.

Picture of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease on Hand (2 of 2)

Is it possible to prevent hand, foot, and mouth disease?

There is no vaccine to prevent HFMD. Routine hygiene (soap and water washing of the hands) is a primary strategy to limit transmission of the virus. Cleaning a child’s toys (especially those which would be placed into the mouth or drooled upon) is important. Avoidance of direct saliva exposure (kissing, sharing eating utensils, etc.) is also very helpful to limit transmission. Since transmission of the virus is also possible via stool, wearing disposable gloves during changing of diapers (especially in a preschool or day care setting) is also beneficial.

 

 

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Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Dont Fight In Front Of the Kids!

What Happens to the Children When Parents Fight?

News Picture: What Happens to the Children When Parents Fight?

“Don’t fight in front of the kids.”

Sounds like familiar advice that’s been passed down from generation to generation. But as it turns out, it’s not always the fighting, but rather the way you fight that can have a negative — or a positive — effect on your children.

Researchers E. Mark Cummings and Patrick Davies have studied this topic for decades. They say hearing parents argue in a positive, constructive way can actually boost a child’s development, from learning better social skills to doing better in school.

On the other hand, whether you go behind closed doors to fight or argue in front of your kids, if you do it in a mean-spirited way, you create a stressful environment that can affect their psychological development. It can also lead to behavioral problems, especially if kids are drawn into the arguments. Kids also get the wrong message when one parent tries to stop fights by giving in, especially if he or she is resentful or simply shuts down communication.

Taking a positive approach to arguments is better for kids and your relationship. Rather than having the mindset of an adversary prepared for battle, look at the situation from your partner’s point of view to understand his or her perspective. If both of you do this, it will be easier to find solutions. Whether the fight is over a transgression or a difference in opinion, resist being critical and show kindness, an important behavior to model to your children that teaches them how to handle difficult situations in their own lives.

Len Canters

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Chipotle Lime Chicken Thighs With Pineapple Salsa Recipe

Chipotle Lime Chicken Thighs With Pineapple Salsa Recipe

 

chipotle chicken with salsa

 

Boneless, skinless chicken thighs are great for quick, flavorful meals. They are easy to prepare with little effort and are almost impossible to dry out. They take on any flavor well and are the perfect vehicle for fresh, healthy ingredients like fruits, vegetables, and herbs. To keep them on the healthier side, trim off visible fat before cooking. They will still stay plenty moist and flavorful!

Chipotle, garlic and lime add so much flavor with almost no effort in this recipe. A fresh pineapple salsa kicks up the flavor even more and makes this meal a fun and exciting change-up to your normal dinner routine.

Ingredients

  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • 3/4 teaspoon chipotle powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • Juice from 1 lime
  • 2 teaspoons avocado oil or other high-heat oil
  • 1/4 cup red onion, diced
  • 1/2 cup fresh pineapple, diced
  • 1 small jalapeno, seeded and diced
  • 2 tablespoons fresh cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
  • Juice from 1/2 lime

Preparation

  1. Heat oven to 350F. Trim visible fat from chicken thighs.
  2. In a small bowl, combine chipotle powder, garlic, and cumin.
  3. Squeeze lime over the tops of chicken thighs and sprinkle heavily with the spice blend. Rub to coat the tops of thighs well.
  4. Heat an oven-proof skillet on the stove over high heat. Add oil and swirl skillet to coat.
  5. Sear chicken thighs in the skillet, about 2 minutes per side. Place skillet in the oven to finish cooking, 5 to 10 minutes. Chicken is done when a thermometer inserted in the center reads 165F.
  1. While chicken is cooking, prepare the salsa. Combine red onion, pineapple, jalapeno, cilantro, and lime in a bowl.
  2. Once the chicken is done remove from oven and serve with pineapple salsa.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

You can use chicken breasts in place of thighs, but they will need to be pounded thin to ensure they cook thoroughly but do not dry out.

Cooking and Serving Tips

Use a meat thermometer to be sure chicken is cooked all the way through. You may also grill chicken thighs if you do not have an oven-proof skillet.

Serve these chicken thighs with black beans or brown rice and a green salad or grilled vegetables to round out the meal.