Blog Archives

Breakfast Burrito: Easy Recipe

breakfast-burrito

 

Breakfast Burrito

 

YIELD:  1 SERVINGS      CALORIES: 180

 

One of my personal favorites!

 

Double the measurements in this recipe to make it for two. To make this a low-carb meal, sprinkle shredded cheddar cheese over top of the burrito. To make this a high-carb meal, wrap the burrito in a whole-grain tortilla, brown-rice tortilla or two corn tortillas.

 

Ingredients

2 tbsp ground turkey

3 egg whites

1 handful baby spinach

1-2 romaine lettuce leaves

1 tbsp salsa

1 tortilla

 

Directions

Spritz cooking spray in a medium nonstick pan over medium heat. Add turkey and cook through. Set aside. In a large bowl, whisk egg whites for about 45 seconds. In another nonstick pan over medium-high heat, spritz cooking spray. Add the egg whites to the pan. As the egg starts to set, add turkey and baby spinach and scramble until cooked. Wrap the turkey-egg-spinach mixture in one for two leaves of romaine lettuce. Spoon the salsa over the top, then roll up and enjoy!

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr J Jaranson

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/hwa.jaranson

 

 

Protein Breakfast Bowl

protienbowl

Protein Breakfast Bowl

YIELD: 2 SERVINGS   CALORIES:437

Ingredients

1 small onion, sliced

6-8 medium mushrooms, sliced

5 oz grass-fed ground beef

1/2 tsp smoked paprika

2 eggs, lightly beaten

1 small avocado, diced

10-12 pitted black olives, sliced

salt

pepper

Directions

  1. In a heavy skillet over medium high heat, melt a little bit of coconut oil. When oil is hot, add onions, mushrooms, and salt and pepper. Cook for around 2 to 3 minutes, until the vegetables are fragrant and softened.
  2. Add ground beef and smoked paprika and continue cooking until the beef is no longer pink. Set the beef aside on a plate.
  3. Add eggs to the skillet and scramble them to your liking.
  4. Return beef to the pan. Add avocado and sliced olives.
  5. Continue cooking for about 45 seconds to a minute in order to slightly warm up the avocados and olives.
  6. Transfer to a bowl and garnish with parsley, if desired.

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr J Jaranson

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/hwa.jaranson

 

Go For The Garlic : Recipe

Whole-Grain-Penne-Pasta-with-Greens-Beans

GO FOR GARLIC: Recipe

It’s hard to imagine a bowl of pasta without the savory flavor of garlic. Besides being a staple in many Italian, Asian, and French cooking, it turns out that garlic is good for your health, too! Discover tasty ways to add this superfood to your meal plan with some of our best garlic recipes, and learn more about the health benefits of this healthful food below.

 

  1. 1. Garlic Has Been Used to Treat a Plethora of Ailments

 

Garlic is one of the oldest cultivated plants in the world and has been used for its medicinal qualities as far back as 2600 B.C. It is used to treat a plethora of ailments, including: arthritis, immune disorders, cataracts, cancer, strokes, and aging.

 

  1. It’s a Powerful Amino Acid

 

Scientists believe that most of garlic’s superiority is due to its sulfur-containing compounds. Garlic contains close to 100 nutrients, but one in particular, allicin, appears to do the most good. Allicin is an amino acid that is not available when garlic is in clove form, but is released when the garlic is crushed, cut, or chewed. It is allicin that gives garlic its strong smell.

 

  1. Garlic Offers a Host of Healthy Nutrients

 

In addition to allicin, garlic also contains phosphorous, zinc, potassium, selenium, polyphenols, and vitamins B6 and C. It is the total of all of these nutrients that makes garlic an excellent anti-inflammatory superfood!

 

Whole Grain Penne Pasta with Greens & Beans

 

Ingredients

 

 

2 tablespoons good quality olive oil-

2 large garlic cloves peeled and crushed-

1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes-

2 cups whole peeled canned tomatoes roughly chopped-

1-pint fresh cherry tomatoes-

1- 15oz. can cannellini beans-

Sea Salt to taste-

1- 13.25oz. box of whole grain penne pasta-

About 4 cups of loosely packed baby arugula

 

 

Directions

Put a large pot of salted water over high heat to boil for pasta.

 

In a large non-stick skillet warm the olive oil, garlic & pepper flakes until they simmer and garlic is slightly browned. (about 3 min.)

 

Add the canned tomatoes and simmer over medium low heat. (about 10 min.)

 

Add the fresh cherry tomatoes and simmer for 10 min. more

 

Add the cannellini beans and return to a simmer

 

Season with sea salt and keep sauce warm over low heat.

 

Cook the pasta being careful not to overcook…

 

Drain the pasta and transfer into a large bowl.

 

Add the hot sauce and arugula to the bowl and toss with a large kitchen spoon

 

until the arugula has wilted.

 

Divide the pasta into warm bowls and top with good quality grated parmesan.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

P Carrothers

Director of Personalized Health Care and Preventative Medicine

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

The Path to a New You, Starts in the Kitchen

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The Path to a New You, Starts in the Kitchen.

 

Add these 21 must-eat foods to your menu.

 

When you’re choosing recipes to help you and your family, focus on foods that haven’t been heavily processed with artificial sweeteners, refined sugar, unhealthy fats, or excess sodium. Be especially wary of packaged products promoted as diet foods. They may be lower in calories and fat, but they’re often higher in artificial sweeteners and sodium, ingredients manufacturers add to make the product taste better and encourage you to eat more.

 

For the foods below, we’ve included the factors that make them smart choices as well as a healthy recipe that incorporates that ingredient. You’ll find foods that satisfy your appetite with lean protein and monounsaturated fats. We’ve also included plenty of high fiber foods on our list as well. Do you want low-calorie ingredients? You’ll find lots of those superfoods too.

 

  1. Almonds | Fiber, Monounsaturated Fat
  2. Apple Cider Vinegar | Lowers Blood Glucose Levels
  3. Avocado | Monounsaturated Fat
  4. Beets | Diuretic, Low Calorie
  5. Brussels Sprouts| Fiber, Low Calorie
  6. Cauliflower | Fiber, Low Calorie
  7. Chia Seeds | Fiber, Protein
  8. Chicken | Low Calorie, Protein
  9. Egg | Protein
  10. Greek Yogurt | Protein
  11. Green Tea | Catechins
  12. Kale | Fiber, Low Calorie
  13. Mangoes | Fiber
  14. Oatmeal | Fiber
  15. Quinoa | Fiber, Protein
  16. Raspberries | Fiber, Raspberry Ketones
  17. Salmon | Protein
  18. Squash | Fiber, Low Calorie
  19. Turkey | Protein
  20. Walnuts | Monounsaturated Fat
  21. Zucchini | Diuretic, Low Calorie

 

Please adjust this for your needs and for the medications you are taking, and the medical conditions you may have.  Example: If you have a dairy restriction, no yogurt.

 

If you have any questions, please contact us.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

P Carrothers

Director of Personalized Health Care and Preventative Medicine

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Creamy Chicken and Broccoli Casserole

Creamy-Chicken-and-Broccoli-Casserole-600x400

 

 

Creamy Chicken and Broccoli Casserole

 

Creamy casseroles are a favorite when the weather gets chilly, but they’re not always Paleo diet friendly. This easy broccoli casserole recipe layers chicken with vegetables for a filling and comforting meal. Crisp bacon and crunchy almonds give it that casserole-like top, without starchy breadcrumbs or cheese.

 

Ingredients

 

1/2 head(s) broccoli cut into thin slices

3/4 head(s) cauliflower cut into thin slices

1/2 pound(s) mushrooms sliced

2 piece(s) chicken breast(s), boneless skinless (4-6 oz)

1 cup(s) coconut milk, full fat

1 large egg(s)

1/2 cup(s) chicken broth

1/2 cup(s) almonds sliced

4 slice(s) bacon cooked and crumbled

1 tablespoon(s) coconut oil for cooking chicken

1/8 teaspoon(s) sea salt to taste

1/8 teaspoon(s) black pepper to taste

Instructions

 

Heat a large sauté pan over medium-high heat and add 1 TB coconut oil or other cooking oil of your choice when hot.

Season chicken breasts with sea salt and pepper if desired and sauté for 10-15 minutes, turning once or twice until fully cooked. Chop into bite-size pieces.

Preheat oven to 350 F.

Layer the broccoli, cauliflower, mushrooms, and cooked chicken in a (9×13) casserole dish, seasoning with salt and pepper between each layer.

In a bowl or large measuring cup, whisk the coconut milk with the egg and chicken broth until well combined. Pour over the casserole. Cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes.

Remove from oven, uncover and sprinkle with almonds and bacon. Bake uncovered for 5-10 more minutes until almonds are lightly toasted and casserole is bubbly. Let sit for 5-10 minutes before serving.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

P Carrothers

Dir. Of Personalize Healthcare and Preventative Medicine

https://www.facebook.com/angelique.rose.50

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Sausage and Zucchini Breakfast Casserole

Sausage-and-Zucchini-Breakfast-Casserole-3.jpg

Sausage and Zucchini Breakfast Casserole

 

This quick and easy Paleo dish takes a classic combination of sausage, mushrooms and thyme and adds eggs and zucchini to make a filling and delicious breakfast casserole. We recommend assembling the casserole the night before, and then baking it in the morning – it will save you a ton of time and you will have a piping hot breakfast to start off your day right!

 

Ingredients

 

3 medium zucchini trimmed

4 large mushroom(s), white button or cremini halved

1 large onion(s), yellow peeled and quartered

1 pound(s) sausage, ground breakfast

1/2 tablespoon(s) thyme, fresh (optional)

2 tablespoon(s) almond flour

6 large egg(s)

1/2 teaspoon(s) garlic, granulated

1/2 teaspoon(s) sea salt

1/4 teaspoon(s) cayenne pepper (optional)

Instructions

 

Preheat oven to 400 F.

Place a grater blade on a medium or large food processor (or just use a box grater to shred the veggies by hand). Grate the zucchini, mushrooms and onion. With a paper towel, squeeze excess moisture out of the zucchini.

Scrape the veggie mixture into the bottom of a 8×8 or 9×9 baking dish and lightly pat down to form an even surface.

Crumble the raw sausage on top of the veggies. Sprinkle with fresh thyme and almond flour.

In a medium mixing bowl, combine eggs, granulated garlic, sea salt, and cayenne (optional) and whisk until eggs are a pale yellow (about 30 seconds).

Pour egg mixture evenly over sausage and veggies in the baking dish. It should sink to the bottom of the pan.

Place in oven and bake for 45 to 55 minutes, or until browned on top and cooked through. There will be some residual water from the vegetables.

Cool at least 15 minutes. Slice into 4 servings and enjoy warm or cold.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

  1. Carrothers

Dir. Of Personalize Healthcare and Preventative Medicine

https://www.facebook.com/angelique.rose.50

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Fruits with the Most and Least Sugars

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Low-Carb Fruits With the Most and Least Sugar

 

If you follow a low-carb diet or are living with diabetes, you may have a complicated relationship with fruit. You may have heard you don’t need to worry about how much sugar is in fruit because it is considered natural sugar. But that will depend whether you are following a diet that counts carbs or one that relies on the glycemic index or glycemic load. Knowing which fruits are naturally lower in sugar can help you make better choices to fit your diet.

 

The Natural Sugar in Fruit

The FDA recommends adults eat two cups of fruit or fruit juice or a half-cup of dried fruit per day. How much fruit you eat may differ if you are following a specific low-carb diet plan or if you are limiting carbohydrates in your diet due to diabetes.

 

Most fruits have a low glycemic index (GI) due to the amount of fiber they contain and because their sugar is mostly fructose. However, dried fruit (such as raisins, dates, and sweetened cranberries), melons, and pineapples have a medium GI value.

 

Fruits contain many nutrients, and if you want to satisfy a sugar craving, fruit is the best choice. The good news is that the fruits lowest in sugar have some of the highest nutritional values, including antioxidants and other phytonutrients. On the other hand, some people digest and process sugar better than others. If you are someone who responds well to a low-carb diet, it pays to be careful.

 

Quick View of the Sugars in Fruits

For a quick way to think about which fruits are lowest in sugar, use these rules of thumb. Fruits are listed here from lowest to highest sugar content:

 

Berries: These generally are the fruits lowest in sugar, and also among the highest in antioxidants and other nutrients. Lemon and lime are also in the lowest category.

 

Summer Fruits: Melons, peaches, nectarines, and apricots are next in sugar-order.

Winter Fruits: Apples, pears, and sweet citrus fruit such as oranges are moderate in sugars. (lemons and limes are low in sugar).

Tropical Fruits: Pineapple, pomegranates, mangoes, bananas, and fresh figs are high in sugar (guava and papaya are lower than the others).

Dried Fruit: Dates, raisins, apricots, prunes, figs, and most other dried fruits are extremely high in sugar. Dried cranberries and blueberries would be lower, except that a lot of sugar is usually added to combat the tartness.

Here is a deeper dive into the fruits ranked from lowest to highest in sugar.

 

Fruits Low in Sugar (Low-Carb Fruits)

Lime (1.1 grams of sugar per fruit) and lemon (1.5 grams of sugar per fruit) are rarely eaten as-is; they are mostly converted to juice and then sweetened. But you can add a slice to your water or squeeze them on food to add their nutrients and tartness.

Rhubarb: 1.3 grams of sugar per cup. You are unlikely to find unsweetened rhubarb, so check the label before you assume what you are eating is low in sugar. But if you prepare it yourself, you can adjust the amount of added sugar or artificial sweetener.

Apricots: 3.2 grams of sugar per small apricot. They are available fresh in spring and early summer. You can enjoy them whole, skin and all. Be sure to watch your portions of dried apricots, however, as (of course) they shrink when dried.

 

Cranberries: 4 grams of sugar per cup. While very low in sugar naturally, they are usually sweetened when used or dried, so be wary. If you use them in recipes yourself, you can adjust the amount of sugar added.

Guavas: 4.9 grams of sugar per fruit. You can slice and eat guavas, including the rind. Some people enjoy dipping them in salty sauces. They are the low-sugar exception to the tropical fruits.

Raspberries: 5 grams of sugar per cup. Nature’s gift for those who want a low-sugar fruit, you can enjoy raspberries in every way, eaten by themselves or as a topping or ingredient. You can get them fresh in summer or find them frozen year-round.

Kiwifruit: 6 grams of sugar per kiwi. They have a mild flavor but add lovely color to a fruit salad. Also, you can eat the skin.

Fruits Containing Low to Medium Levels of Sugar

Blackberries and strawberries: 7 grams of sugar per cup. With a little more sugar than raspberries, these are excellent choices for a snack, in a fruit salad, or as an ingredient in a smoothie, sauce, or dessert.

Figs: 8 grams of sugar per medium fig. Note that this figure is for fresh figs. It may be harder to estimate for dried figs of different varieties, which can have 5 to 12 grams of sugar per fig.

Grapefruit: 8 grams of sugar per grapefruit half. You can enjoy fresh grapefruit in a fruit salad or by itself, adjusting the amount of sugar or sweetener you want to add.

Cantaloupes: 8 grams of sugar per large wedge. These are a great fruit to enjoy by themselves or in a fruit salad. They are the lowest in sugar of the melons.

Tangerines: 9 grams of sugar per medium tangerine. They have less sugar than oranges and are easy to section for fruit salads. They are also easy to pack along for lunches and snacks, with built-in portion control.

Nectarines: 11.3 grams of sugar in one small nectarine. These are delicious fruits to enjoy when ripe.

Papaya: 12 grams of sugar in one small papaya. They are lower in sugar than the other tropical fruits.

Oranges: 12 grams of sugar in a medium orange. These are great to pack along for lunches and snacks.

Honeydew: 13 grams of sugar per wedge or 14 grams per cup of honeydew balls. They make a nice addition to a fruit salad or to eat by themselves.

Cherries: 13 grams of sugar per cup. Ripe fresh cherries are a delight in the summer, but watch your portions if you are limiting sugar.

Peaches: 13 grams of sugar per medium peach. You can enjoy them by themselves or in a variety of ways in desserts, smoothies, and sauces.

Blueberries: 15 grams of sugar per cup. They are higher in sugar than other berries but packed with nutrients.

Grapes: 15 grams of sugar per cup. While they are a nice snack, you’ll need to limit portions if you are watching your sugar intake.

Fruits Containing High to Very High Levels of Sugar

Pineapple: 16 grams of sugar per slice. It’s delightful, but as a tropical fruit, it is higher in sugar.

Pears: 17 grams of sugar per medium pear. This winter fruit is high in sugar.

Bananas: 17 grams of sugar per large banana. They add a lot of sweetness to any dish.

Watermelon: 18 grams of sugar per wedge. While this melon is refreshing, it has more sugar than the others.

Apples: 19 grams of sugar in a small apple. They are easy to take along for meals and snacks, but higher in sugar than tangerines or oranges.

Pomegranates: 39 grams of sugar per pomegranate. The whole fruit has a lot of sugar, but if you limit the portion to 1 ounce, there are only 5 grams effective (net) carbs.

Mangos: 46 grams of sugar per fruit. These tantalizing tropical fruits have a lot of sugar.

​​​Prunes (66 grams of sugar per cup), raisins (86 grams of sugar per cup) and dates (93 grams of sugar per cup) are dried fruits that are very high in sugar.

Fruit and Low-Carb Diets

Some of the popular low-carb diet plans differ, based on whether they consider glycemic index or glycemic load (South Beach, Zone), while others just look at the amount of carbohydrate (Atkins, Protein Power).

 

Strict low-carb diet: At less than 20 grams of carbohydrate per day, you will likely be skipping fruit or substituting it rarely for other items in your diet. Concentrate on getting your nutrients from vegetables. Diets such as Atkins and South Beach don’t allow fruit in the first phase.

Moderate low-carb diet: Those that allow 20 to 50 grams of carbs per day have room for about one fruit serving per day.

Liberal low-carb diet: If your diet allows 50 to100 grams of carbs per day, you may be able to follow the FDA guidelines, as long as you limit other sources of carbs.

Not all low-carb diets limit fruit, however. Diets like the Paleo diet, Whole30, and even Weight Watchers (although it’s not necessarily a low-carb diet) do not place a limit on fruit.

 

In general, if you are following a low-carb diet, you should try and eat fruits that are low in sugar, 7 grams or less per serving. When consulting the list below, which ranks fruit based on sugar content, keep in mind that some values are per cup while others are per whole fruit.

 

Fruit Choices When You Have Diabetes

Your fruit choices when you have diabetes depend on the diet method you are using. If you are counting carbohydrates, the are about 15 grams of carbohydrate in 1/2 cup of frozen or canned fruit or 2 tablespoons of dried fruit (such as raisins). But the serving size for fresh berries and melons are 3/4 to 1 cup so that you can enjoy more of them.

 

If you are using the plate method, you can add a small piece of whole fruit or 1/2 cup of fruit salad to your plate. If you are using the glycemic index to guide your choices, most fruits have a low glycemic index and are encouraged. However, melons, pineapples, and dried fruits have medium values on the GI index.

 

A Quick Word

You can make the best choices for fruit based on the diet you are following. If you have diabetes, you may want to consult with us  to help you design an eating plan that incorporates fruit appropriately. When you are limiting sugar, fruit is a better choice for a sweet craving than reaching for a sugary snack, as long as you keep portions in mind.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

  1. Dolson
  2. Carrothers

Dir. Of Personalize Healthcare and Preventative Medicine

https://www.facebook.com/angelique.rose.50

 

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Interview with Dr Andrew Weil. Are you taking too many medications?

andrewweil

 

Integrative-medicine pioneer Andrew Weil, MD, talks about why Americans are taking too many drugs.

 

When Andrew Weil, MD, was growing up in the 1940s and 1950s, doctors wrote prescriptions in Latin. To fill that prescription, “you had to hand it to a pharmacist who stood behind a high counter intended to prevent you from seeing what he did,” Weil writes in his new book, Mind Over Meds: Know When Drugs Are Necessary, When Alternatives Are Better — and When to Let Your Body Heal on Its Own.” The upshot? Patients had no idea what medications they were taking.

 

Although times have changed and the Internet has made health information widely available, Weil notes, people still do not ask enough questions about the medicine they’re prescribed. That’s just one reason, he says, why prescription drug use in the United States has increased tenfold in the past 50 years, and over-the-counter drug use has skyrocketed as well.

 

Drugs are certainly life-saving in critical and acute illnesses, Weil notes, but when it comes to chronic illnesses such as diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, and GERD, lifestyle changes such as dietary change, exercise, and stress relief are critical. “Taking a drug just because a doctor says so is not necessarily a good idea,” he counsels. “Always try to understand why you need it.”

 

To get a better sense of when to take drugs — and when to look for alternatives — we spoke to Dr. Weil. Here’s what he had to say:

Dr. Weil, you’ve spent the majority of your career in integrative medicine, using lifestyle-based approaches such as nutrition, movement, and mind-body medicine to tackle the chronic-disease epidemic. Why do you think prescription drug use in the United States has increased so dramatically in the past 50 years?

 

Andrew Weil | Drug makers have had a profound influence on both physicians and the general public. The information that doctors rely on when prescribing typically comes from industry rather than objective sources. For example, pharmaceutical companies commonly fund research. In these studies, drugs are typically pitted against a placebo, almost never against diet and lifestyle changes that may work as well or better. The results drive clinical practice.

 

Advertisements paid for by Big Pharma are the major revenue source for medical journals, a situation that compromises editorial objectivity. The current medical school curriculum and the influence of Big Pharma condition doctors from their first days of training and throughout years of practice to have more faith in the power of prescription drugs than in the healing power of nature.

 

Regarding the public, direct-to-consumer marketing by drug companies has increased demand for their products. Due in part to this type of advertising, people have a strong desire to be medicated, believing it to be the only or the best way to effectively treat disease. Direct-to-consumer marketing by Big Pharma should be banned.

 

Lastly, many people prefer the “quick fix” of popping a pill. Nondrug therapies, such as lifestyle modification, require motivation and active participation on the part of patients and may take time to produce desired results. And the pill, as opposed to safe and effective nondrug approaches, is usually covered by insurance.

 

AS | When it comes to chronic disease, why do so many doctors prescribe drugs as a first-line treatment instead of using lifestyle modifications?

 

AW | Current medical training is heavy on high-tech treatment options, including drug therapy, and neglects the power of prevention, the impact of positive diet and lifestyle changes, and evidence for the safe and effective use of natural remedies and complementary therapies. With little or no background in these areas, healthcare providers are left to rely almost solely on medication. The circumstances outlined in question No. 1 further complicate matters.

 

My colleagues and I at the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine are working to improve medical education so that future healthcare providers enter practice with an understanding of how to support and optimize a patient’s innate healing capacity. Of course, drug therapy is an important method for maintaining health and treating disease — but it’s not the only method.

 

AS | What are the consequences of overmedication?

 

AW | Safety is the biggest concern – polypharmacy (being on multiple medications) increases the odds for adverse reactions, drug interactions, and the unintended worsening of health problems.

 

Another worry is cost — the markup on pharmaceutical drugs is greater than on any other commodity in the marketplace. Big Pharma justifies this by citing the high cost of research, but that represents a small fraction of what they spend on advertising and promotion.

 

There are also environmental concerns — we get exposed to drugs that are excreted from the body or thrown out because they accumulate in our water supplies, in the soil, and in the foods we eat.

 

Overmedication also contributes to the pervasive notion that drugs are the only answer, but drug therapy is often best at hiding symptoms. Drugs alone do not address the root cause of disease.

 

AS| You have a very evocative statement in your book: “No difference exists between a drug and a poison except dose.” What do you mean by that?

 

AW | All drugs become toxic as the dose is increased. Doctors generally believe that the best medications are those that are powerful and work quickly. Unfortunately, concentration of pharmaceutical power inevitably concentrates toxicity. These potent agents are necessary in cases of severe illness, where benefit outweighs risk, but they are now used for almost every disease condition, even mild ones.

 

Strong reliance on these isolated, purified chemical compounds produces a high incidence of adverse reactions, ranging from mild discomfort to multisystem failure and death, even when the drug has been prescribed appropriately. Herbal remedies are far safer because the active components are present in a complex natural balance and in low concentrations.

 

AS | You write in your book that you want people to become wise consumers when it comes to medicine — to know when pharmaceutical products are really needed. So when are they needed?

 

AW | Use of pharmaceuticals should be limited to those situations where they are clearly indicated — critical care, terminal care, and the management of severe disease. I would like to see them play a smaller role in the treatment of common conditions where the risks are not justified. For chronic disease management, drug therapy should be offered in the context of comprehensive care that also includes lifestyle modification and nondrug therapies. Both doctors and patients need to become knowledgeable about less expensive and less dangerous interventions that are safe and effective.

 

AS | Are there any heartening trends afoot? What will it take, in your opinion, for more doctors to adopt a lifestyle-first strategy to tackle the chronic disease epidemic?

 

AW | We are faced with the growing realization that over-reliance on prescription-drug therapy has come at a terrible price — worsening antibiotic resistance and an unprecedented opioid addiction and an epidemic of serious adverse drug reactions are some of the most disturbing developments. Doctors are responding by prescribing fewer antibiotics for viral illnesses such as colds and the flu (antibiotics do not work against viruses), and by recognizing that narcotic medications are only indicated for short-term pain management following acute injury or surgery — they are not effective for the relief of chronic pain. In contrast, positive lifestyle changes such as an anti-inflammatory diet and healthy stress-management practices, as well as complementary therapies including acupuncture and mind-body techniques, are safe and effective ways of managing chronic pain.

 

Crisis offers opportunity. In these challenging times, my hope is that as a country we see the wisdom of integrative medicine and the lifestyle habits it encourages as part of the solution to our healthcare crisis.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr Anne Sullivan

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Frequent Nut Comsumption can Help to Prevent Diabetes and Stabilize Glucose levels.

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Frequent Nut Consumption Can Help to Prevent Diabetes and Improve Blood Glucose Control

 

This year, the WHO, ( World Health Organization) is focusing on diabetes in order to increase awareness about its rise and staggering burden and consequences, in particular in low-and middle-income countries. The International Nut & Dried Fruit Council (INC) wants to raise awareness about the importance of nuts in the treatment and prevention of this disease.

 

Cyril Kendall, PhD at the department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto, explains that this increase of prevalence is linked to our changing lifestyle. “We are becoming less active and our diet is becoming overly processed. This unhealthy diet not only increases blood glucose levels but it also leads to an increase in body weight which further increases the risk of developing diabetes”. Kendall, who has been studying the relation of nut consumption and diabetes, says that “based on the current scientific evidence, nuts may play an important role in improving the risk factors for this disease. Population studies have shown that frequent nut consumption is inversely associated to diabetes development and clinical studies indicate that nuts can help to improve blood glucose control in diabetes”.

 

In fact, nut consumption has been associated with beneficial effects on glucose and insulin levels, according to the latest studies about the relationship between nut intake and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The PREDIMED study concluded that the results of two Mediterranean Diet groups which added extra virgin olive oil and nuts reduced the risk to suffer diabetes by 52%. In addition, researchers at the Human Nutrition Unit, from Rovira i Virgili University, have proven that the intake of two ounces (57 g) of pistachios per day has a significant effect: it decreases fasting glucose, and favors insulin and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Also, researchers at the Shih-Chien University and the Chang Gung University of Science and Tech (Taiwan), have shown that 60 g/day almond consumption improved glycemic control in patients with T2D.

 

Currently, about 400 million people (more than 5% of the world’s population) have T2D. It is estimated that by 2035 there will be almost 600 million people living with T2D and almost 900 million people with pre-diabetes, a silent state associated with a high risk of several deadly conditions including T2D, heart disease, hypertension, strokes and early death.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr Anne Sullivan

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Health Benefits of Coconut Brown Rice Pudding

coconutbrownricepudding

 

When it comes to the first and last meals of the day, it can be extremely difficult to find something that is both healthy and delicious. This challenge becomes increasingly difficult if you are attempting to eat a vegan diet. The answer to the breakfast and dessert dilemma is this delightful healthy twist on traditional rice pudding.

 

Traditional rice pudding is high in fat and heavily processed foods. By replacing regular milk with coconut milk, white rice with brown and removing the egg, the dish becomes an altogether healthier prospect.

 

This is a healthy, animal-friendly and tasty recipe for early mornings and late nights. So get out the slow cooker and start cooking!

 

Coconut Milk

 

The replacement of regular dairy milk with coconut milk not only makes this recipe a great choice for vegans, but it also provides a significant boost to your health. Coconut milk has a high copper content. Elevated levels of copper in the body have been shown to boost your immune system to fight off illness and infections.

 

Additionally, coconut milk has been proven to contain high levels of niacin (also known as Vitamin B-3). One of the significant benefits of increasing the level of niacin in your body is that it helps with a healthy increase of sex hormones and stress relieving hormones. Niacin is crucial to your reproductive and mental health.

 

Coconut Brown Rice Pudding

 

Serves: 8

 

Prep time: 5 minutes

 

Cook time: 3 hours 35 minutes (slow cooker)

 

Ingredients

 

1 cup short grain brown rice

1 can light coconut milk

2 cups water

2 tablespoons maple syrup

1 teaspoon vanilla

2 teaspoons cinnamon

1/2 cup raisins

Instructions

 

Put the coconut milk, brown rice, syrup, vanilla and water into the slow cooker and cook for three and a half hours on low heat.

Stir in the cinnamon and raisins.

Enjoy!

 

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