Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Gluten-Free Cinnamon Lemon Coconut Bliss Balls Recipe

Gluten-Free Cinnamon Lemon Coconut Bliss Balls Recipe

gluten free balls

Word of warning: these cinnamon lemon coconut bliss balls are ever so slightly addictive. But that’s alright because each one has just under 100 calories and only 3 grams of sugar, so you can use your own best judgment on when to indulge.

Want to know the key to keeping the sugar so low? The unusual but delicious pairing of cinnamon and lemon zest. If you love lemon and cinnamon and you’ve never tried this combo before, you’ll be hooked!

In addition to being low in sugar, they’re also a good source of heart-healthy mono and polyunsaturated fats. Plus, they’re super easy to make? The hardest part is zesting the lemon, but you can still be noshing in under 10 minutes flat—perfect when you’re craving a little something sweet!​

Ingredients

  • 2 cups fine almond flour
  • ¼ cup pure maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons almond oil
  • 2 teaspoons lemon zest, or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, or to taste
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt or table salt
  • ¼ cup shredded unsweetened coconut ​

Preparation

  1. Combine almond flour, maple syrup, almond oil, lemon zest, cinnamon, and salt in a food processor bowl. Process until mixture is well combined and slightly sticky.
  2. Line a large plate or small baking sheet with plastic wrap and divide dough into 20 pieces. Roll each piece into a ball.
  3. Place shredded coconut on a small plate and roll each ball in the coconut, then return to plate or baking sheet. May serve immediately or store covered in refrigerator until ready to eat

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

You may substitute the almond oil for any neutral tasting vegetable oil or liquid coconut oil. Feel free to add additional lemon zest and coconut if desired. Start with recommended amounts, then add more as needed.

Cooking and Serving Tips

You can make a big batch of these and store them in a well-sealed container in the freezer. Enjoy them frozen, or thaw them out a little in the refrigerator before serving. These bliss balls are perfect for dessert or an afternoon treat with a cup of tea.

 

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

6 Foods You Should Never Eat Raw

6 Foods You Should Never Eat Raw

 

We all know that we should include more raw food in our daily diet such as fresh fruits and vegetables. But some foods, even some vegetables, can be toxic in their undercooked state.

6 Foods You Should Never Eat Raw

“Many foods can be dangerous when eaten raw,” the team dietitian for the Orlando Magic basketball team tells Newsmax. “For example, eggplant contains solanine, a poisonous compound that can cause vomiting, diarrhea and damage to the central nervous system and needs to be cooked. Animal protein in general — dairy, raw cauliflower,poultry, pork and eggs — can be very dangerous when eaten raw because of the bacteria and parasites that can be found in these foods.”

Here are six more foods that should never be eaten raw:

  1. Cookie dough. We’ve all been guilty of licking the bowl, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a formal warning titled “Say No to Raw Dough!” urging folks NOT to yield to temptation and indulge. Raw dough contains flour and often eggs, both products that can harbor harmful germs and bacteria in their uncooked states.
  2. Potatoes. This vegetable, like eggplant, contains solanine. Green potatoes are particularly high in solanine and can be toxic even when cooked, according to Prevention. When you bake potatoes in a casserole or stew, make sure they are thoroughly cooked.
  3. Sprouts. Adding bean sprouts to salads is a great way to jazz up the meal, but uncooked sprouts can contain harmful bacteria, such as salmonella and E. Coli.
  4. Steak tartare. As delicious as this gourmet dish of raw ground beef mixed with eggs dish appears, that’s how dangerous it can be. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says on its website, Eatright.org, that we should never consume rare or even medium rare meat because in the grinding process, harmful bacteria on the surface gets ground into the meat. Ground meat needs to cooked to an internal temperate of 160 F.
  5. Raw milk. Drinking raw milk has become trendy as many people believe it can cure many diseases, but Collingwood warns it’s a health hazard. “Drinking unpasteurized milk can be dangerous because of the bacteria it can contain,” she says.
  6. Raw asparagus. This is another vegetable that should be cooked even though it’s not toxic, according to Alternative Daily. Cooking enhances the cancer-fighting antioxidants in this vegetable and increased the absorption of vital nutrients like vitamins A, B, C, E, and K. Cooking will also help break down the fiber making it more easily digestible.

“While you may have eaten raw cookie dough or steak tartare without incident in the past, all it takes is one time that you willnews get sick and it can be potentially deadly, especially for someone with a compromised immune system,” says Collingwood.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Sugar-Free Coconut Shrimp Recipe

Sugar-Free Coconut Shrimp Recipe

Coconut Shrimp

Coconut shrimp is a fan favorite finger food—it is crispy, slightly sweet, and of course, features delicious shrimp! But restaurant and party versions of this appetizer can often be over sweet and therefore loaded with sugar. In this sugar-free version of coconut shrimp, the sweetener in the coating is optional, so you can add a bit to mimic the popular restaurant versions’ sweetness if you desire.

These sugar-free coconut shrimp can be served as an appetizer, party food, or main course.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup coconut flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (ground, or 1 teaspoon ground ancho pepper)
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • Optional: sugar substitute (such as stevia) to taste
  • 1/2 cup coconut (unsweetened shredded coconut)
  • Cooking oil of your choice, such as vegetable or canola, for frying
  • 1 pound large shrimp (raw, peeled and deveined and thaw if frozen)

Preparation

  1. Mix coconut flour with seasonings in a shallow bowl.
  2. Whisk the eggs with a fork in a small dish, and mix with the 2 tablespoons water. Add sweetener if desired.
  3. Put shredded coconut in a separate dish.
  4. Pour oil into a large skillet to about 3/4 inch depth. Heat to 350 to 360 F, or until the end of a wooden spoon handle dipped into the oil collects bubbles around it.
  5. Holding shrimp by the tail, roll in the seasoned coconut flour and shake to get most of it off—you just want a thin coating. Then dip in egg mixture, again shaking off the excess. Finally, roll in coconut.
  6. 6Place shrimp in the oil and fry until golden, about 2 minutes per side. Don’t crowd the pan, which will lower the temperature of the oil—this makes them absorb more oil and end up heavy and greasy. Tongs are the best tool for turning and removing the shrimp.
  7. Remove shrimp from the oil to a paper towel or cooling rack.

Cooking and Nutrition Notes

To thaw shrimp, place frozen shrimp in a colander and place under cold running water for several minutes until shrimp are no longer icy and stiff. Place between paper towels to absorb the water.

When frying the shrimp, you can put each in the oil as you bread them, but you will have to watch the shrimp you put in the skillet first closely to make sure they’re not getting overcooked (and don’t forget to flip!). An alternative method is to bread a few shrimp at once and then put them all in the pan at the same time (as long as they fit without being too crowded).

Keep in mind that the calorie count listed here can vary since the amount of oil used by each cook can differ depending on the pan size. It is also difficult to get a precise number since the frying temperature will affect the amount of oil absorbed. In addition, the exact amount of coconut breading per shrimp will vary.

Nutrition Highlights (per serving)

CALORIES354
FAT23g
CARBS23g
PROTEIN13g

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

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Uncategorized, Lifestyle

Poor Diet = Poor Mental Health

Poor Diet = Poor Mental Health

In this groundbreaking talk, Dr. Weil illuminates the worst trends in American nutrition, and the toll they are taking on our health.

Researchers at Loma Linda University in California have found that adults in the state whose diets are poor are more likely to have poor mental health regardless of their gender, age, education, marital status or income level than those with healthy diets. The team reported that increased consumption of sugar was associated with bipolar disorder and that fried foods, or those that contain a lot of sugar and processed grains, were linked with depression.

To reach these conclusions the researchers reviewed data from more than 240,000 telephone surveys conducted with California residents over a 10-year period. The team found that nearly 17 percent of adults were likely to suffer from mental illness – 13.2 percent with “moderate psychological distress and 3.7 percent with severe psychological distress. Those whose diets were poor (they ate more French fries, fast food, soda and sugar) were more likely to be among those with mental illness than people whose diets were deemed healthy Study leader Jim E. Banta, Ph.D., M.P.H., said the results are similar to those from earlier studies conducted in other countries that found links between mental illness and unhealthy diets. While the new findings don’t prove that unhealthy diets contribute to mental illness, Dr. Banta said evidence seems to be pointing in that direction.

May take? These findings are disheartening but not surprising. The evidence from previous investigations conducted in Europe that Dr. Banta referred to suggests that the trans-fats and saturated fats in some junk foods increase the risk of depression. In 2010 researchers from Spain who followed the diet and lifestyle of more than 12,000 men and women for 6 years reported that at the outset, none of the participants had been diagnosed with depression, but at the study’s end, 657 were found to be depressed. They noted that the risk of depression increased among participants who consumed junk foods. In 2009, British researchers reported that among nearly 3,500 midlife men and women participating in a 5-year study those whose diets were high in processed meat, chocolates, sweet desserts, fried foods, refined cereals and high-fat dairy products were 58 percent more likely to be depressed that those whose diets were composed mainly of fruit, vegetables and fish.Contact us and we can get you started on the right track.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Ways to Help Your Cholesterol Level

5 Ways to Help You with Your Cholesterol Level

5 Foods That Can Help Manage High Cholesterol Levels - Dr. Weil's Daily Tip

For people battling high cholesterol, choosing meals wisely can be a challenge, but it is essential. Restaurants, parties, even an office potluck may present unhealthy temptations. But simple dietary modifications can help you eliminate those unhealthy choices:

  1. Reduce sugar and flour. Recent research indicates that added sweeteners and flour-based carbohydrates, which are far too abundant in the American diet, are major contributors to obesity and heart disease.  Be aware of the flour-based foods that may seem less obvious, such as breads, tortilla chips and cereals, as they are all high carbohydrate foods. As far as your cholesterol profile goes, they will raise your triglycerides. Recent research suggests that higher non-HDL cholesterol, comprised of LDL and triglycerides connect strongly to heart disease risk.  Gluten Free means there is still flour and sugar in the products.
  2. Avoid trans-fat. Stay away from items that list “hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oil” on the label, especially snack foods such as chips or popcorn. Try baked or air-popped versions instead.
  3. Use fresh garlic regularly in your meals. Garlic has been shown to help lower cholesterol levels.
  4. Drink green tea daily. The antioxidants in green tea help lower cholesterol and prevent the cholesterol in your blood from oxidizing.  Women need to limit the amount that they drink daily.
  5. Eat plenty of soluble fiber. It has a powerful cholesterol-lowering effect. The best sources are beans and lentils, apples, citrus fruits, oats, barley, peas, carrots and freshly ground flaxseed.
  6.  Dairy Products :  The sugar and the additives they they are allowing in dairy products now will increase your cholesterol.  Even if it says organic, or gluten free, you will not be able to consume dairy products.

You do not see anything in here written about eggs , red meat, bacon or ham, because all of that has been dis-proven time and time again.

In addition, relax. There is quite a bit of data connecting stress, both physical and emotional, to elevated cholesterol levels. We talk about relaxation a lot, but rarely do we think of it as a way to lower cholesterol.

Always contact us if you need help, or have a question?

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

Health and Wellness Associates
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Foods, Uncategorized

CHOCOLATE AVOCADO COOKIES

CHOCOLATE AVOCADO COOKIES

Chocolate Avocado Cookies

Chocolate avocado cookies are healthy fudgy chocolate cookies made of 5 simple ingredients 100 % gluten free + low carb + paleo + sugar free.

Chocolate Avocado Cookies

Ingredients

  • 1 ripe avocado about 1/2 cup mashed avocado
  • 1/4 cup natural maple Flavored Sugar-Free Syrup or maple syrup (if not low carb)
  • 1/2 cup nut butter peanut butter or almond butter (if paleo)
  • 1 egg or chia egg if vegan
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

Optional

  • 1/4 cup dark chocolate chips, no sugar added or choose your favorite one
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2-3 drops liquid stevia drops

 

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 180 C (360F)
  • Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper. Slightly oil the paper with 1/2 teaspoon of liquid vegetable oil (coconut or peanut oil) . This will prevent the cookies to stick to the paper. Set aside.
  • Chocolate Avocado Cookies
  • In a food processor, with the S blade attachment, add ripe avocado and sugar free maple syrup (or liquid sweetener you like). Process for 30 seconds until it forms a creamy avocado batter with no lumps.
  • Stop, add egg, nut butter and cocoa powder. Process again for 30 seconds. Scrap down the bottom and side of the bowl and process for an extra 15 seconds to make sure all the batter is combine – no lumps.
  • Transfer the chocolate cookie batter onto a mixing bowl. It will bit moist and sticky that is what you want. Stir in chocolate chips and vanilla – if used.
  • Chocolate Avocado Cookies
  • Combine with a spatula until the chocolate chips are evenly incorporated. Test the batter and adjust with 2-3 drops of liquid stevia – only if you want a sweeter cookie. I did not add any to mine and my kids love them but if you have a sweet tooth I recommend few drops of stevia to make them sweeter. Add one drop at a time and see how it taste.
  • Prepare a small bowl with warm water, dip a spoon in the water and use that spoon to sample some chocolate cookie batter from your bowl. The water will prevent the batter to stick too much to your spoon.
  • Spoon the chocolate batter onto the baking sheet – I used another spoon to push the batter out of the first spoon.  Use a silicon spoon or spatula to flatten the cookie into a cookie shape. The batter won’t stick onto silicon which makes it easier to spread.
  • Repeat until you form 6 jumbo cookies. Those cookies won’t spread so you don’t need to leave more than half thumb space between each.
  • Sprinkle extra chocolate chips on top of each cookies if you like.
  • Bake for 12-15 minutes or until the centre is set.
  • Cool down 5 minutes on the baking sheet then transfer onto a cooling rack to cool down.
  • Store the cookies in the fridge for up to 5 days in an airtight container.

 

 

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Uncategorized, Diets and Weight Loss

Frozen Strawberry Yogurt Drops

Frozen Strawberry Yogurt Drops

yougurtstrawberries

 

Frozen Strawberry Yogurt Drops
Don’t these look so good ? You can make them by dipping strawberries (halved or whole) in vanilla yogurt (Greek might be best, because it’s thicker), then putting on a sheet pan lined with parchment or wax paper and freezing. Voila: Yogurt-covered strawberries!
You can also put strawberries in an ice cube tray and add yogurt.

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Do You Have SIBO Symptoms? Here Is What You Need to Know!

Do You Have SIBO Symptoms?

Here Is What You Need to Know!

SIBO symptoms - Dr. Axe

Millions of Americans suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms and distress each year. Diagnoses of leaky gut syndrome, Crohn’s and celiac disease, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) continue to grow, and researchers still can’t quite put their fingers on why our digestive systems are under attack.

Recently, researchers have started to acknowledge there’s another digestive disorder lurking: small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, or SIBO. It’s more prevalent than previously believed, and it occurs in many people suffering from IBS and certain other underlying conditions. (1)


What Is SIBO?

SIBO is the acronym for “small intestinal bacterial overgrowth,” defined as excessive bacteria in the small intestine, or small bowel. While bacteria naturally occurs throughout the digestive tract, in a healthy system, the small intestine has relatively low levels of bacteria; it’s supposed to be at highest concentrations in the colon. (2)

The small intestine is the longest section of the digestive tract. This is where the food intermingles with digestive juices, and the nutrients are absorbed into the bloodstream. If SIBO is indicated, malabsorption of nutrients, particularly fat-soluble vitamins and iron, can quickly become a problem.

When in proper balance, the bacteria in the colon helps digest foods and the body absorb essential nutrients. However, when bacteria invades and takes over the small intestine, it can lead to poor nutrient absorption, symptoms commonly associated with IBS, and may even lead to damage of the stomach lining.

When you have SIBO, as food passes through the small intestine, the bacterial overgrowth interferes with the healthy digestive and absorption process. The bacterium associated with SIBO actually consumes some of the foods and nutrients, leading to unpleasant SIBO symptoms, including gas, bloating and pain.

Even when treating small intestinal bacterial overgrowth with antibiotics, relapse rate is high. This is a chronic condition that can be cured, but it takes patience, perseverance and a change in diet. In fact, SIBO treatment includes a healing diet, and some foods should be avoided until the gut flora is back in balance.


SIBO Symptoms

The indications of SIBO mirror the symptoms of other gastrointestinal disorders, including IBS. According to a study published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology, there’s good reason for the similar symptoms — there’s a definite association between IBS and SIBO. Researchers suggest that physicians give consideration of excluding SIBO before giving a definitive diagnosis of IBS. (3)

Common symptoms of SIBO and IBS include:

  • Nausea
  • Bloating
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Malnutrition
  • Weight loss
  • Joint pain
  • Fatigue
  • Rashes
  • Acne
  • Eczema
  • Asthma
  • Depression
  • Rosacea

Causes and Risk Factors of SIBO

There are a number of underlying conditions believed to contribute to small intestine bacterial overgrowth. These include aging, dysmotility (when muscles in the digestive system don’t work properly), chronic pancreatitis, diabetes, diverticulosis, a structural defect in the small intestine, injury, fistula, intestinal lymphoma and scleroderma. (4)

The use of certain medications, including immunosuppressant medications, proton pump inhibitors, immune system disorders, recent abdominal surgery and celiac disease are also associated with an increased risk for developing SIBO. Celiac disease can be of particular concern as it disturbs gut motility leading to improper small intestine functioning. (5)

According to a study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, 66 percent of patients with celiac disease who maintained a strict gluten-free diet tested positive for bacterial overgrowth.

In this study, patients were treated individually with a combination of antibiotics, prescription medications for worms and parasites, and a change in diet. All patients reported their symptoms were abated after SIBO treatment. (6)

Another underlying cause of SIBO symptoms is blind loop syndrome. This occurs when the small intestine actually forms a loop, causing food to bypass parts of the digestive tract. This causes food to move more slowly through the system, and the result is a breeding ground for bacteria. (7)

Metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes that’s not properly controlled, are believed to lead or contribute to certain gastrointestinal disorders. In fact, a study published in Diabetes & Metabolism indicates that SIBO was present in 43 percent of diabetics with chronic diabetes. (8)

Aging is another risk factor for developing small intestine bacterial overgrowth. As we age, the digestive tract slows down. It’s generally accepted that non-hospitalized adults over the age of 61 have a 15 percent prevalence rate of SIBO, in contrast with just under 6 percent in individuals 24 to 59 years old. A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society also found that over 30 percent of disabled older adults have SIBO. (9)

Rosacea, a skin condition that causes redness and rashes on the face, (10) is also associated with SIBO symptoms. Researchers from the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Genoa in Italy found that rosacea patients have a significantly higher prevalence rate of SIBO.

For those who suffer with rosacea, there’s good news — this study also indicates “an almost complete regression of their cutaneous lesions and maintained this excellent result for at least 9 months” after the eradication of SIBO. (11)

As you can see, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is linked, caused or associated with a wide array of conditions. Even those not thought to be related to the gastrointestinal tract seem to correlate with SIBO symptoms.


Breath Testing for SIBO

In order to diagnose SIBO, doctors use a hydrogen breath test to measure the amount of gas produced by the bacteria in the small intestine. The test measures the amount of hydrogen and methane in your body. This works because the only way the human body produces these gases is through the output of bacteria.

A solution containing one of the following sugars is used to complete the breath test:

  • Lactulose
  • Glucose
  • Xylose

First the patient participates in a special diet for two days prior to the test. Then the patient drinks a solution containing one of the sugars listed above, which feeds the bacteria. The breath test measures how much hydrogen and methane has been produced by the bacteria as a result. These results allow your health care professional to determine if you are experiencing SIBO. (1213)


Complications Associated with SIBO

SIBO, left untreated, can cause potentially serious health complications. It’s vital to get rid of the bacterial overgrowth as soon as possible.

Bacteria overgrowth in the small intestine can lead to malnutrition, one of the biggest concerns with SIBO. Essential nutrients, protein, carbohydrates and fats aren’t properly absorbed, causing deficiencies, including iron deficiency, vitamin B12 deficiency, calcium deficiency and deficiencies in the fat-soluble vitamins — vitamin A deficiency, vitamin D deficiencyvitamin E deficiency and vitamin K deficiency.

These deficiencies can lead to symptoms, including weakness, fatigue, confusion and damage to the central nervous symptom. (14)

Vitamin B12 deficiency is more common than most people believe. There are a number of factors that can lead to deficiency, besides SIBO. Vegetarians and vegans are at particular risk, as are individuals who have inadequate stomach acid or take medications that suppress stomach acid — such as proton pump inhibitors, H2 blockers and other antacids.(15)

As noted above, these commonly prescribed medications are linked to SIBO.

According to Harvard Medical School, the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency can appear gradually — or very rapidly. Symptoms may include numbness or tingling in extremities, anemia, jaundice, decline in cognitive function, memory loss, fatigue, weakness, and even paranoia or hallucinations. (16)

In a report in the British Journal of Haematology, researchers indicate that megaloblastic anemia, a blood disorder that causes the loss of red blood cells, is directly related to bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. This is due to the malabsorption of vitamin B12. (17)

If you have SIBO or a vitamin B12 deficiency, it’s imperative to catch megaloblastic anemia quickly; prolonged vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to permanent nerve damage. (18)

If you experience any of these symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency, in addition to any of the common SIBO symptoms mentioned above, take charge of your health, and get started ridding your body of small intestinal bacteria.

B12 can not!  be taken alone.  Many more symptoms and problems will happen if  you do.   Please do not get a B12 shot!  The chemicals in this medication will wreck you intestinal flora.

Treating SIBO

Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is most often treated with antibiotics such as rifaximin (brand name Xifaxan). This helps reduce the problem bacteria but also kills off the healthy bacteria necessary for proper digestive functioning. For some patients with SIBO caused by blind loop syndrome, long-term antibiotic courses may be required. (19)

Even with antibiotics, SIBO is difficult to treat. In fact, a study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, researchers concluded SIBO patients treated with antibiotics have a high recurrence rate and that gastrointestinal symptoms increased during the recurrences. (20)

The good news is that researchers have found that herbal remedies are as effective as three courses of antibiotic therapy in patients who don’t respond well to rifaximin. (21) This study mentions a variety of herbal remedies but doesn’t include dosing or further details. Oregano oil, berberine extract, wormwood oil, lemon balm oil and Indian barberry root extract are all mentioned in the study.

So how do you treat SIBO and SIBO symptoms? First, it’s important to identify if there’s an underlying cause. The next step is to start reversing the nutritional deficiencies. A healthy diet, nutritional supplements and lifestyle changes are necessary to get the body back in balance.

My first recommendation to overcome SIBO is to consume smaller amounts of food during meals. Spread your meals out at 5–6 smaller portions per day rather than 3 larger meals. Eating smaller meals allows you to digest foods more quickly, which is crucial to overcoming SIBO. Overeating is one of the worst things for SIBO because it causes food to sit longer in the stomach and can also damage gastric juice production. Low stomach acid production is one of the main contributing factors of SIBO because stomach acid kills off bacteria in your upper GI regions.

Next, one of the key things you can do today to help get rid of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is to start probiotic supplements and eat probiotic-rich foods immediately. A pilot study from researchers at the Center for Medical Education and Clinical Research in Buenos Aires, Argentina, found probiotics have a higher efficacy rate than metronidazole for individuals with SIBO. (22)

In this study, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Streptococcus faecalis and Bifidobacterium brevis were administered for five days to half of the study group, while the other half of the study group received antibiotics for five days. All participants ate the same diet, which limited consumption of dairy products, legumes, leafy green vegetables and alcohol.

The results? An astounding 82 percent of the group receiving probiotics reported clinical improvement, while only 52 percent of the group receiving antibiotics reported clinical improvement.

In addition to probiotics and combatting nutrient deficiencies, it’s important to change your diet.

Please do not take it upon yourself to figure out your condition or to treat yourself.  You must work with a holistic healthcare provider, and your primary care doctor may have one to recommend.    Look for a provider in preventative medicine, functional medicine, or regenerative medicine.

Dr Josh Axe

Dr Gemma Carney

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Bacon, Zucchini & Feta Risotto with a Hint of Lemon Zest

 Bacon, Zucchini & Feta Risotto with a Hint of Lemon Zest Recipe

 

Yields three main servings or four entree serves

Pressure Cooker, Oven and On the Stove Methods of Cooking

 

Low fodmap bacon and zucchini risotto with feta and a hint of lemon zest- A Fussy Fodmapper Recipe (low fodmap, gluten free, low lactose, fructose friendly, no garlic, no onion)

 

Ingredients

 

1 1/2 tablespoons of onion infused olive oil

2 rashers/slices of bacon, roughly chopped (approx 50g)

Green part of one leek, finely sliced

1 cup of Arborio rice

½ cup dry white wine

500 mls of chicken stock

Additional 500mls of stock for stove top or oven baked methods

One zucchini, grated (up to 120g)

Zest of ½ a lemon

To serve

Salt and Pepper to taste

Feta cheese

Garlic infused olive oil to taste

 

Method

 

In the pressure cooker:

Set the pressure cooker to ‘Sautee’ and add ½ tablespoon of the onion-infused oil.  Cook the bacon in the oil then remove it and set aside.

Next, add the leeks and the remaining onion-infused olive oil to the pot and sauté until soft. Add the Arborio rice and cook for 1-2 minutes or until the rice is translucent.  Then add the wine, stirring until the rice has absorbed it. Add the stock and stir to combine.  Close the lid for the pressure cooker and set to pressure cook (my pressure cooker has a Risotto function, if yours doesn’t, set to pressure cook for seven minutes).

When finished, turn the pressure cooker to the ‘Keep Warm’ function. Stir through the bacon, zucchini and lemon zest and let the risotto sit for 3-5 minutes until the zucchini has softened.

To serve, add salt and pepper to taste, drizzle with a small amount of the garlic-infused olive oil (amount depending on taste but be careful, it is potent) and top with a crumble of the feta cheese.

 

In the oven:

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees.  In a frypan add ½ tablespoon of the onion-infused oil.  Cook the bacon in the oil then remove it and set aside.

Next, add the leeks and the remaining onion-infused olive oil and saute until soft. Add the Arborio rice and cook for 1-2 minutes or until the rice is translucent.  Add the wine, stirring until the rice has absorbed it.

Transfer the rice mixture to a casserole dish and add the stock, stirring to combine.  Place the lid on your baking dish (or cover with aluminium foil) and place in the oven. Cook for 20 minutes then add the bacon, zest and grated zucchini, stirring to mix it through the risotto mixture.  Continue to cook for another 10 minutes or until the rice is cooked through and all of the stock has been absorbed by the rice.

When finished, add salt and pepper, drizzle with a small amount of the garlic-infused olive oil (amount depending on taste but be careful, it is potent) and give the rice a stir to combine all of the ingredients.  Top with a crumbling of feta cheese.

 

On the stove method:

Set your stove-top to a medium-high heat.  In a deep-dish frypan add ½ tablespoon of the onion-infused oil.  Cook the bacon in the oil then remove it and set aside.
Next, add the leeks and the remaining onion-infused olive oil and saute until soft.  Add the arborio rice and cook for 1-2 minutes or until the rice becomes translucent. Stir in the wine and continue to cook until the rice has absorbed the liquid. Reduce the heat to low-medium and add a small amount of the stock (about ½ a cup), stirring until it has been absorbed by the rice.  Repeat this step until all of the stock has been used and the rice is cooked through.
Stir through the bacon, grated zucchini and zest.  Continue to cook for a few minutes until the zucchini softens then transfer the risotto to your serving dish.  Add salt and pepper to taste, drizzle with the garlic-infused olive oil and top with a crumbling of feta cheese. Enjoy!

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

 

 

Diets and Weight Loss, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Weight Loss Surgery? Really?

Woman Loses Legs After Weight-Loss Surgery

 

Weight Loss Surgery Meme | TELL ME AGAIN THAT WEIGHT-LOSS SURGERY IS THE EASY WAY OUT... | image ... #weightlosssurgerybeforeandafter #fatloss #weightlosssurgeryrecipes #weightloss #weightlosssurgery #weightlosssurgerysleeve

 

If you’re significantly overweight, you may feel you’d be willing to do anything to get the weight off, even resorting to surgery. And with rates of obesity skyrocketing — two-thirds of all U.S. states already have obesity rates exceeding 25 percent — the use of bariatric (weight loss) surgery has increased 10-fold since 2000 in some areas.

But before you decide to go under the knife, you must understand the risks involved — and know that they can be severe and even deadly. Due to complications from weight loss surgery, the woman in the video above lost both of her legs, while others, like 55-year-old Paula Rojeski, have made the ultimate sacrifice and lost their lives!

These are not rare events.

Since 2009, five people have died after Lap-Band surgery from one group of weight loss clinics in California alone. Please understand that you, too, could be forced to make a similar sacrifice if you opt for weight loss surgery, which is especially tragic because there are safe ways to lose weight that can help virtually everyone. You don’t need to risk your life, or your limbs, to achieve your weight loss goals!

 

The Truth About Bariatric Surgery!

Nearly Half of Weight Loss Surgeries Result in Major Complications

All surgeries have inherent risks, but bariatric surgeries seem to have a much higher ratio of complications. In fact, nearly 40 percent of patients who undergo weight loss surgery experience major complications, including:

Band erosion Malnutrition Infection
Kidney stones Bowel and gallbladder problems Liver failure
Black-outs Increased risk of death Abnormal band expansion

Complications occur for both types of surgery, gastric banding and the more invasive gastric bypass. Gastric banding consists of surgically inserting a band around the top section of your stomach, and cinching it into a small pouch. This is often touted as a simpler, less invasive procedure to gastric bypass, and whereas gastric banding is at least reversible, while gastric bypass is not, the complications are often so debilitating that patients opt to have the bands removed completely.

A study published earlier this year found that:

  • Nearly 50% of patients required removal of their bands
  • Nearly 1 out of 3 patients experienced band erosion
  • 60 percent needed to undergo additional surgery

As such, the researchers had no choice but to conclude:

LAGB [laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding] appears to result in relatively poor long-term outcomes.”

Even according to LapBand.com, one American clinical study that included a 3-year follow-up reported a staggering 88 percent of gastric banding patients experienced one or more adverse events, ranging from mild to severe. Common complications, from gastric banding included the following — and keep in mind that excess weight increases your risks even further, which means everyone who undergoes weight loss surgery is at even greater risk:

Gastroesophageal reflux Band slippage and/or pouch dilation Stomach obstruction
Esophageal dilation Reduced esophageal function Difficulty swallowing
Leaking or twisted access port into the stomach Band eroding into the stomach

One in 50 Die after Gastric Bypass

Would you risk an elective surgery if you knew you had a one in 50 chance of dying within 30 days? This is the actual risk reported for gastric bypass surgery by a study published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. You had also better hope that your surgeon knows what he or she is doing, as risk of death was associated with surgical inexperience. Within the surgeon’s first 19 procedures, the odds of death within 30 days were 4.7 times higher!

In this procedure, a section of your small intestine is typically removed entirely, and your stomach is reconnected further down your intestine, bypassing the duodenum, hence the name “gastric bypass.” Your duodenum — that first section of your small intestine — is responsible for the majority of nutrient absorption. Hence, if you make it through the surgery, malnutrition is a common concern after this type of surgery.

You should also know that once you receive this surgery, you will not be able to eat normally for the rest of your life. According to the Barrington Bariatric Center, not only will you need to exist on a diet of solely pureed food for at least two weeks, but even in “Stage 2” of your transitional post-surgery diet you may only be able to eat 2 ounces of ground chicken breast before feeling full.

Gastric Bypass Will Wreak Havoc on Your Digestive Processes and Ability to Absorb Nutrients

Gastric bypass involves stapling your stomach into a pouch that’s only a half-ounce in size, so it literally cannot hold much. The idea is that you’ll feel full faster, since your stomach will be unnaturally tiny, but it also means you’ll often be eating meals that are sorely lacking in nutritional requirements.

A small opening is also created to allow food to empty slowly from the pouch. Because the opening is so small (made this way deliberately to keep the small amount of food you’ve eaten in your stomach longer, making you feel “full”), food must be chewed very thoroughly or it won’t be able to fit through the opening, leading to vomiting.

You’ll also be instructed to eat the protein portion of your meal first, because you very well may get too full to fit in a vegetable or anything else. Even liquids must be restricted for up to 45 minutes before and after a meal, lest they take up what little space you have to consume actual food. As you might suspect, because bariatric surgery patients can consume very little roughage, constipation is often a problem. It is even described as “normal” to have a bowel movement only once every two or three days!

Hair loss and muscle loss are also common after the surgery — both signs that your body is not receiving proper nutrition.

If this, plus constipation and vomiting are not enough to make you think twice, you should also know that certain foods, including tomato sauces, mayonnaise, fruit juice, dressings and others, will lead to “dumping syndrome,” aka cramps, nausea and diarrhea. Snacking is also expressly forbidden after gastric bypass, as you’re only allowed three small meals a day, and you may have to write off certain foods entirely because your body just can’t digest them anymore.

This includes:

  • Red meats
  • Membranes of oranges or grapefruit
  • Skins of fruits and vegetables (this is where the bulk of the antioxidants are!)
  • Fibrous vegetables such as celery and sweet potatoes
  • Chili and other spicy foods

This is simply NOT a healthy way of eating, and the long-term implications are just as severe as the short-term risks. Likely because of the related malnutrition, a possible link between gastric bypass surgery in adolescent girls and an increased risk for neural tube defects, which can lead to varying degrees of disability such as paralysis and mental retardation due to damage to the nervous system, in their future children has been revealed.  People who receive bariatric surgery also more than double their risk of fractures, and are about three times more likely to break a hand or foot than normal.

A FAR Better Alternative — Lose Weight in Three Steps

Overall, 75 percent of American adults and nearly one-third of children and teens are currently obese or overweight … and weight-loss surgery centers are seeing dollar signs as their customer base keeps rising. But you can count yourself out of these statistics, and spare yourself from the potentially serious and even deadly consequences of weight loss surgery, by losing weight naturally. I believe there are three primary recommendations that could make all the difference in the world for most people.

They are:

  1. Severely restricting carbohydrates (sugars, fructose, and grains) in your diet
  2. Increasing healthy fat consumption
  3. Engaging in Peak Fitness exercises

In terms of your weight, calories from fructose are just about as bad as they come, as they will turn off your body’s appetite-control system. Fructose does not appropriately stimulate insulin, which in turn does not suppress ghrelin (the “hunger hormone”) nor stimulate leptin (the “satiety hormone”), which together results in your eating more and developing insulin resistance.

My recommendation is to keep your total fructose intake below 25 grams of fructose per day if you’re in good health, and below 15 grams a day if you need to lose weight.

Fructose is also “isocaloric but not isometabolic,” according to Dr. Robert Lustig. This means you can have the same amount of calories from fructose or glucose, fructose and protein, or fructose and fat, but the metabolic effect will be entirely different despite the identical calorie count. This is largely because different nutrients provoke different hormonal responses, and those hormonal responses determine, among other things, how much fat you accumulate.

This is why counting calories alone is often not enough to lose weight successfully!

When you eat according to my nutrition plan, most people will lose weight without counting calories at all because it’s all about eating the proper ratios of the right types of food. This includes eating healthy sources of fat, because eating healthy fats is conducive to weight loss.

When you eat fats as part of your meal, they actually slow down your food absorption so that you can go longer without feeling hungry.

Case in point is the fat conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), found in grass-fed beef and full-fat raw dairy products from grass-fed cows (raw butter, raw milk, raw-milk cheese, etc.), which is associated with reduced body fat and weight. Again, you can get all the details of a healthy diet that will naturally propel you toward your ideal body weight by reading through my comprehensive nutrition plan.

The foods you choose to eat will be the driving force behind successfully achieving your weight loss goals, but exercise is still important, especially the right type of exercise.  It’s important that you are engaging in high-intensity activities like Peak Fitness exercises, which engage a certain group of muscle fibers that you cannot engage through aerobic cardio. Engaging these muscle fibers causes a cascade of positive health benefits, including improved fat burning, and you only need to do them for 20 minutes, three times a week.

There is simply no need to resort to surgery for weight loss — virtually everyone who restricts their carbohydrate consumption (including fructose, sugar and grains), increases their intake of healthy fats, and engages in proper Peak Fitness type of exercises will slim down safely and naturally, and enjoy better health and increased longevity because of it.

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/