Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

3 Hormones That Interfere With Your Weight Loss

Health and WEllness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

3 Hormones That Interfere With Your Weight Loss

3hormones

 

Can you relate to any of the following?

  • I follow all the rules, but I still can’t lose the weight.
  • I’m just getting old and my metabolism is slow.
  • It’s genetic. There’s nothing I can do.
  • Maybe I need to accept that I’m fat, and give up my skinny clothes.
  • Nutrition strategies that work for others don’t seem to apply to me.
  • I lose five pounds, and then I regain seven!

I hear these comments frequently from my patients and online community, and most of them don’t know an important secret: the reason for weight loss resistance is that our hormones are out of whack. When it comes to women and weight, hormones can make losing weight very challenging (if not impossible!) when they are out of balance.

Here are the top three hormones that are the most likely culprits when it comes to your difficulty with weight loss, and how you can begin to reset them.

1. Estrogen

Estrogen is the female hormone that gives women breasts and hips, and it keeps joints lubricated. Men have it too, but at far lower levels. But both men and women are at risk of estrogen overload, which is having too much estrogen in the body.

Here’s one action you can take today to lower your estrogen levels and help you lose weight: Eat a pound of vegetables per day. The fiber from the vegetables will help excrete estrogen so it doesn’t keep circulating in your body like bad karma.

Aim for 35 to 45 grams of fiber per day for women, and 40 to 50 grams per day for men, but slowly increase your fiber intake in 5-gram increments each day to get to the goal without gas or bloating.

2. Insulin

One in two Americans have some degree of diabesity, which is diabetes plus obesity. When you’re overweight or skinny fat (normal weight but you have too much fat mass), insulin becomes imbalanced and your cells become numb to the hormone. As a result, you experience blood sugar highs and lows, and you store fat because your glucose regulator is broken.
There are many ways to reset your insulin, but a personal favorite is to drink filtered water with apple cider vinegar. A recent study found that consuming two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar before a high carb meal significantly reduces blood glucose levels in people with insulin resistance1. In fact, apple cider vinegar might work as well as prescription drugs at fixing your blood sugar regulation2.

3. Cortisol

You make cortisol in response to stress, but most of us run around stressed all the time. All those stress hormones wreak havoc over time, and make you store fat — especially in your belly. High cortisol is also linked to depression, food addiction, and sugar cravings. What’s the net result? You get fat.

To reset your cortisol, you need to hit the pause button on your caffeine intake. Slowly wean off caffeine over three days, and notice how your sleep and stress levels improve! There are many more targeted suggestions in my new book, but kick the caffeine first.

My mission is to help people who struggle with weight issues from hormone imbalance. Understanding that permanent weight loss occurs as a result of hormone balance has helped so many of my patients and online community finally get their weight under control and break through weight loss resistance.

When you follow the right program, guided by a trusted mentor and armed with the best knowledge, it’s possible to lose the weight that’s burdened you for so long — and keep it off forever.

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Foods, Uncategorized

Nacho Cheese Fries ( Dairy Free and Fat Free)

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS-Telehealth

 

Nacho Cheese Fries

 

Humble potatoes are an amazing food not only for health (when served without butter, bacon, sour cream, rancid oils and the like,) but also because of the satiety they offer and the variety of ways they can be prepared and enjoyed. In this recipe, potatoes are the star of both the fries and the fat-free, dairy-free nacho cheese dipping sauce. This recipe is simple to make and oh so delicious. Pair it with a leafy green salad for optimal digestion and nutrient assimilation and you have a dinner that will please the whole family.

Potatoes are also high in potassium and rich in vitamin B6, as well as a fantastic source of amino acids, especially lysine in its bioactive form. Lysine is a powerful weapon against cancers, liver disease, inflammation, and the viruses such as Epstein-Barr and shingles that are behind rheumatoid arthritis, joint pain, autoimmune disease, and more. Potatoes will be your allies if you’re looking to fight any chronic illness—to fend off liver disease, strengthen your kidneys, soothe your nerves and digestive tract, and reverse Crohn’s, colitis, IBS, or peptic ulcers. In addition to being antiviral, they’re antifungal and antibacterial, with nutritional cofactors and coenzymes plus bioactive compounds to keep you healthy and assist you with stress. Further, potatoes are brain food that helps keep you grounded and centered.

 

nachocheesefries2

 

Nacho Cheese Fries

 

Ingredients:

Fries:
2-3 russet potatoes
1 tsp paprika
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp dried oregano
1/2 tsp sea salt

Nacho cheese sauce:
1 large potato, diced
1 carrot, diced
1 tsp turmeric
1/2 garlic powder
1/2 tsp cayenne
1 tbsp lemon juice
1 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
1/2 cup steaming water or vegetable stock

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400F. Cut the potatoes into thick fries, then place them in a bowl with paprika, garlic powder, dried oregano and sea salt. Toss to coat. Arrange the potatoes on a baking tray covered with parchment paper so that there’s space between the fries. Place in the oven and bake for 20-25 minutes, until browned, flipping them half way.

To make the sauce, add a couple of inches of water to a medium-sized pot and place a steaming basket in it. Add the diced potato and carrot, cover and cook for 25-30 minutes until soft. Remove from heat and set the steaming water aside.

Place the cooked potatoes and carrots in a blender with turmeric, garlic powder, cayenne, lemon juice, sea salt, pepper and the steaming water. Blend until very smooth. Serve in a bowl with the fries.

Serves: 2

Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Baked Apple Roses

Health and WEllness Associastes

EHS – Telehealth

 

Baked Apple Roses

 

bakedappleroses.jpg

Makes 4 servings

 

Apples: Apples in themselves are miracles. They’re amazing for digestion: They collect and rid bacteria, parasites, viruses, and mold from the entire gut. They create a stable alkaline environment wherever needed. They also help heal diverticulitis and reduce inflammation in the stomach and intestinal tract. Apples are incredibly cleansing and healing for the gallbladder and liver. Not only do they detoxify, carefully extracting sediment from these organs; they also help dissolve gallstones.

Maple syrup: The combination of sugars and high mineral content quickly travels to the liver and becomes instant fuel of phytonutrient composition. It’s like an IV for the liver containing the best of both worlds: a vast array of vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients (many of them still undiscovered) coupled with high-quality sugar on which the liver thrives.

Lemons: The rich calcium levels in lemons binds to the vitamin C within them, and both of these enter into the liver, where they waken a stagnant, sluggish, fatty liver, helping loosen and disperse fat cells. Lemons clean up dirty blood syndrome, improve glucose absorption, and even protect the pancreas.

 

Ingredients:

4 red apples

4 tablespoons maple syrup, divided

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

¾ teaspoon cinnamon, divided

 

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 400°F. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together 3 tablespoons of the maple syrup, the lemon juice, and ½ teaspoon of the cinnamon until combined.

 

Using a knife or mandolin, thinly slice the apples, and toss the slices in the maple syrup mixture until well coated.

 

Arrange the apple slices in 4 small ramekins. Divide the remaining 1 tablespoon of maple syrup over the tops of the ramekins.

 

Finish each one off with a dusting of extra cinnamon. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes until the apples have softened and gently browned. Remove from the oven and enjoy while still warm!

 

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

An Avocado a Day?

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

An Avacado a Day?

avacadoaday

You know caffeine and sugar don’t help your bipolar disorder, but what about grapefruit? Find out why certain foods can derail your treatment and why others, like eggs and dark leafy vegetables, may even decrease need for medication.

There are over 172 different types of bi-polar disorder.  They can be less severe, such as a hormonal imbalance, to a genetic disorder.  Why do they do this?  It is all about billing.  There are no billing mistakes if they only have to compute on identity number.

Following a bipolar disorder diagnosis ,or other mental health diagnosis,  most doctors recommend a regimen of medication and therapy — the best lines of defense against mood disorders. But these treatments can take weeks to reach their full effect, and they are not the only solutions for managing your symptoms and keeping your moods in line.

 

As it turns out, following a proper sleep schedule, getting plenty of exercise, and eating the right foods can do wonders for bipolar symptoms — and improve your overall health in the process.

 

A healthy bipolar disorder diet includes the following:

 

Omega-3s: Multiple studies1 have shown that Omega-3 fatty acids like the kinds found in fish and fish oil supplements can help decrease the feelings of depression so common in bipolar patients. Vegetarian? Try getting your Omega-3s from eggs or nuts instead.

 

Magnesium: Magnesium — found in whole grains, beans, and dark leafy vegetables like spinach — has been shown to have an effect similar to lithium, the most common bipolar medication.2 Upping your intake of magnesium, a natural mood stabilizer, may decrease your need for medication. (It should be noted, however, that magnesium cannot replace lithium entirely.)

 

Salt: Seems counterintuitive, right? If you have bipolar disorder, don’t let your salt intake get too low, and definitely don’t cut out salt entirely — salt is very necessary to regulate the levels of bipolar medication in your bloodstream.

 

Healthy Fats: Healthy fats like those found in avocados and olive oil can help keep you feeling full longer, and decrease your cravings for the “foods to avoid” listed below.

 

Individuals with bipolar disorder should cut back on the following:

 

Caffeine: Caffeine/Soda or Pop, and other stimulants can kick mania up a notch. When experiencing a manic phase, avoid coffee, soda, and energy drinks whenever possible. Try herbal teas or infused water instead — the herbs can give you a natural energy boost to overcome slumps.

 

Sugar: Sugar highs and lows can make an already unbalanced mood even more erratic, and sugar crashes can make a depressive phase much worse. If you really need something sweet, reach for fruit — the natural sugars won’t cause such a drastic blood sugar spike.

 

Refined Carbohydrates: Bipolar patients may be more prone to obesity, since imbalances of seratonin in their brains may lead them to crave more unhealthy carbohydrates. Ditch the processed junk and get your carbs from whole grains, fruits, and vegetables instead.

 

Alcohol: Alcohol and bipolar disorder just don’t mix. Not only can alcohol interact poorly with psychiatric medications, it can also disrupt sleep — bad news for an already high-strung bipolar person. Bipolar patients are also more likely than neurotypical people to develop drug or alcohol addictions. In other words, alcohol is not worth the risk. Watch out for toothpaste and mouthwash, which are filled with alcohol.

 

Grapefruit/Oranges: Talk to your doctor about your specific situation, but some bipolar medications — particularly anticonvulsants — interact poorly with grapefruit/oranges and grapefruit orange and lemon juice.

 

Food can’t cure your bipolar disorder, and it’s always best to talk to your doctor about the best treatment plan for you. But proper diet and a healthy lifestyle can definitely help get your symptoms under control — and your life back on track.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

On-the-Go Breakfast Burrito

Health and WEllness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

On-the-Go Breakfast Burrito

onthegoburrikto.JPG

There’s no excuse to skip breakfast when you have this burrito recipe in your collection. Fluffy eggs are teamed up with high protein ham, cheese, peppers, and whole grains for a handheld meal that you can enjoy on the run. Prep the ingredients the night before and breakfast will be ready in minutes.

Ingredients

  • 1 large egg
  • 1 large egg white
  • 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 slice uncured ham, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons cheddar cheese, shredded
  • ¼ cup green bell pepper, diced
  • 1 medium whole wheat tortilla

Preparation

  1. In a small bowl whisk together egg and egg white. Season with salt and pepper; set aside.
  2. Heat a nonstick skillet over medium heat and spray with nonstick cooking spray.
  3. Place chopped ham skillet and cook for one to two minutes.
  4. Add eggs, cheese, and pepper and cook, scrambling gently until eggs are fluffy, approximately five minutes more.
  5. Pile egg mixture in the center of tortilla.
  6. To roll: fold in the sides towards the middle, then roll up from the bottom (the part closest to you), making sure to roll completely around so that the end of the tortilla is tucked under the bottom of the burrito.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

In this wrap, lower fat ham takes the place of higher calorie ingredients like bacon. Look for an uncured ham such as Applegate or substitute Canadian bacon or a piece of turkey.

Use a gluten free tortilla (like a corn tortilla) for a celiac-friendly version of this recipe.

Cooking and Serving Tips

To help prevent the ingredients from leaking out of the tortilla (this is especially important if taking this meal to-go) wrap entire burrito tightly in parchment paper and cut in half; peel back the paper as you eat.

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Foods, Uncategorized

Asian Chicken Stir-Fry

Health and WEllness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Asian Chicken Stir-Fry

 

Asian Chicken Stir-Fry

Asian cuisine is often discouraged in people who are following low-sodium diets since many of the traditional sauces pack a significant salt load. This recipe uses reduced sodium soy sauce, which adds great flavor when mixed with other lower sodium seasoning options such as ginger and garlic.

People with chronic kidney disease often say that they feel limited in the vegetables they can eat. This is mostly due to the potassium content many vegetables have. This recipe provides a good mix of vegetables​ but keeps the portions moderate enough to keep potassium levels in check. In addition, vegetables provide fiber, which helps people with CKD to more efficiently excrete potassium.​

Ingredients

  • 2 cups broccoli florets
  • 2 cups baby bella mushrooms
  • 1 cup red bell pepper
  • ½ cup white onion
  • 3 cups cooked white rice (3/4 cups dry)
  • 2 tablespoons reduced sodium soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar, packed
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ pound (8 oz) boneless chicken breast

Preparation

1. Chop your broccoli, mushrooms ,red pepper, and onion.

2. Cook rice according to package directions, omitting any butter or salt.

3. Blend soy sauce, sesame oil, rice vinegar, garlic, ginger, and brown sugar in a small blender.

4. Heat olive oil over medium heat. Add chopped vegetables and sauté until soft, about 5-6 minutes. Set aside.

5. Cut chicken into strips. Cook your chicken in the same pan as the vegetables were in over medium heat for 3-4 minutes on each side.

6. Add vegetables to the pan with the chicken. Add sauce and mix well.

7. Serve each plate with ¾ cup cooked rice and top with chicken/vegetables mixture.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

Tofu or shrimp are additional protein options that work well in this dish.

Brown rice should be substituted if you do not have issues with high potassium or phosphorus in your blood.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Triple Tomato Pasta With Spinach and White Beans

Health and Wellness Associates

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Triple Tomato Pasta With Spinach and White Beans

tripletomatoe

Tomatoes get their red color from lycopene, an antioxidant that may help to prevent cancer and cardiovascular disease. Cooking tomatoes actually helps to increase lycopene content, therefore potentially boosting its disease-fighting power.

In addition to lycopene, this recipe also provides great nutritional benefits from the cannellini beans. These beans are full of fiber, at 6 grams per half cup serving. They are also one of the highest potassium beans out there, a micronutrient and electrolyte that can help lower blood pressure.

 

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces whole wheat penne pasta
  • 1 can low sodium cannellini beans
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 package baby spinach
  • 2 cups cherry tomatoes, diced
  • 1 cup sun-dried tomatoes in oil
  • ¼ cup sliced/slivered almonds
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
  • 2 cloves garlic (or 1 teaspoon minced)
  • 2 teaspoons dried basil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper

Preparation

  1. Cook pasta according to package directions.
  2. Combine pesto ingredients in a food processor and blend until mostly smooth; some small chunks are okay. You may need to a litter water to thin, but do not add more than a few tablespoons since the sauce is meant to be thick.
  3. Drain and rinse cannellini beans.
  4. Add olive oil to a pan and heat to medium high. Add baby spinach and cook until wilted. Remove from heat.
  1. Combine the pasta, beans, spinach, and tomatoes into one large pot. Add the pesto and mix well.
  2. Divide into 4 bowls and serve.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

If you cannot find sun-dried tomatoes in oil, then you can substitute ¾ cup bagged sun-dried tomatoes with ¼ cup olive oil. It works best if tomatoes are soaked in the oil for at least an hour.

Cooking and Serving Tips

Leftover pesto tastes delicious as a sandwich spread. It also freezes well.

 

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Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Calorie Counts on Menus May Be Trimming Americans’ Waistlines

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Calorie Counts on Menus May Be Trimming Americans’ Waistlines

fastfood

With roughly 40 percent of Americans now obese, new research finds that one strategy may be helping Americans stay slim: calorie counts on restaurant menus.

Following the passage of the Affordable Care Act of 2010, chain restaurants with 20 or more franchises must now list a meal’s calorie count on their menus and order boards.

And some cities and states — including New York City, Philadelphia and Seattle, and all of California, Massachusetts and Oregon — have gone a step further, imposing broad calorie label mandates in full-service restaurants.

Now, a snapshot of the ordering habits in two full-service, sit-down restaurants suggests the legislative moves are having an impact.

“We conducted an experiment with over 5,500 diners in real-world restaurants and found that calorie labels led customers to order 3 percent fewer calories,” said study author John Cawley. The drop amounted to about 45 fewer calories consumed per meal.

“This was due to reductions in calories ordered as appetizers and entrees,” he added, with little change seen in the calorie count of either drinks or desserts.

That second finding struck Cawley, a professor in the departments of policy analysis and management, and economics at Cornell University, as surprising.

“Before we started, I expected that people would reduce calories in desserts, but they didn’t,” he said.

Why?

“In interpreting that, it’s important to remember that people will change their behavior when the information is new or surprising,” he explained. “People may have already known that desserts are high-calorie and not cut back, but been surprised by the number of calories in appetizers and entrees, and so reduced calories there.”

Cawley calculated that over a three-year period, the calorie cut would lead to weight loss in the range of one pound.

“Not large,” he acknowledged, “but it’s also a cheap policy, and philosophically it’s attractive to allow people to make informed decisions.”

What’s more, “the vast majority of people support having calorie labels on menus, and those who were exposed to them expressed even higher support,” he added.

The findings were published recently as a report issued by the National Bureau of Economic Research, a private nonprofit research organization.

Both restaurants in the study were located on a university campus.

Dining parties were randomly given a menu with or without calorie-count labels. About 43 percent of the study participants were men. The average age was 34, and about two-thirds were white.

Appetizers contained between 200 to 910 calories, entrees contained 580 to 1,840 calories, and desserts contained 420 to 1,150 calories. Drinks ranged from 100 to 370 calories.

Beyond the 3 percent calorie drop linked to the labeling, the researchers also found that consumer support for labeling went up by almost 10 percent among patrons who were given labeled menus.

And restaurant revenue did not seem to be affected by the type of menu offered, despite long-voiced industry concerns that calorie counts might undermine a food establishment’s bottom line.

Lona Sandon is an associate professor in the department of clinical nutrition with the school of health professions at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. She said the study makes it “apparent that some people at least pay attention” to labels.

But the move is just “one piece in the big puzzle of addressing the public health problem of obesity,” she said.

“I do not see a drastic change in overweight and obesity rates anytime soon as a result of the menu labeling,” Sandon added.

“On the positive side, it is making people more aware. It may also be making restaurant owners and chefs more aware, which could lead to them putting more healthier options on the menu,” she said. “Between the labeling and changes in recipes, we could get more impact.”

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Gallbladder Disease — Are You at Risk?

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Although anyone can develop gallbladder problems, certain factors can increase your chances.

gallbladder.jpg

The gallbladder is a tiny organ located under your liver that most people don’t think too much about. That is, of course, until it develops problems, such as gallbladder disease.

More than 25 million men and women in the United States are affected by gallbladder disease, an umbrella term that includes:

Gallstones Hardened deposits of digestive fluid that can form in your gallbladder. They can range in size from as small as a grain of sand to as large as a golf ball. Gallstones can be painful and cause nausea and vomiting, but often they are asymptomatic and don’t require surgery.

 

Cholecystitis This inflammation of the gallbladder is often caused by gallstones blocking the tube that leads out of your gallbladder. Other causes include bile duct problems, tumors, serious illness, and certain infections. Cholecystitis can lead to life-threatening complications if left untreated.

gallbladder2

Gallbladder cancer A form of cancer that starts in the gallbladder with a group of cells that grow out of control. About 9 out of 10 gallbladder cancers are adenocarcinoma — a cancer that starts in cells with gland-like properties that line many internal and external surfaces of the body.

Gallbladder disease can affect anyone, but some people are more vulnerable than others. You are most at risk of having gallbladder problems if you:

  • Are a woman
  • Are older than 60
  • Have a family history of gallbladder problems
  • Are overweight or obese
  • Have diabetes
  • Take certain medications
  • Are Native American or Mexican American

    Risk Factors for Gallbladder Problems Out of Your Control

    Gender In all populations of the world, women are twice as likely as men to develop gallstones, according to research published in April 2012 in the journal Gut and Liver. Pregnant women and those taking hormone replacement therapy are more at risk for gallstones because of higher estrogen levels. Too much estrogen can increase cholesterol in the bile and lessen gallbladder movement, increasing the risk of gallstones. The sex difference narrows with increasing age, but is still prevalent.

Genes According to research published in 2013 in Advances in Clinical Chemistry, the tendency to develop gallstones and gallbladder disease often runs in families, indicating there may be a genetic link. Also, a mutation in a gene that controls the movement of cholesterol from the liver to the bile duct may increase a person’s risk of gallstones. Defects in certain proteins may increase the risk of gallbladder disease in some people.

Age Gallstones are 4 to 10 times more frequent in the older population, especially in people over 60. That’s because as you age your body tends to release more cholesterol into bile, which makes it more likely that stones will form in the gallbladder.

Ethnicity Studies have shown a clear association between race and risk of gallbladder problems that cannot be completely explained by environmental factors. Risk varies widely from extremely low (less than 5 percent) in Asian and African populations, to intermediate (10 to 30 percent) in European and Northern American populations, to extremely high (30 to 70 percent) in Native American populations. Native Americans and Mexican Americans are more likely to develop gallstones than other ethnic groups, probably as a result of dietary and genetic factors.

Risk Factors for Gallbladder Problems You Can Change

Although there are a number of things out of your control when it comes to your risk of developing gallbladder problems, you can reduce your risk by maintaining a healthy weight, watching your diet, and paying close attention to how your body reacts to certain medications.

People who are even moderately overweight or obese are at increased risk of gallbladder problems. When you’re overweight, the liver produces too much cholesterol, overloading the bile ducts and increasing the risk for gallstones. Women especially should watch their weight, because studies have found that a lithogenic risk of obesity is strongest in young women; this means they are more likely to develop calculi (buildup of mineral stones in an organ).

Rapid weight loss as a result of fasting or crash diets, and weight cycling — losing and then regaining weight — can increase cholesterol production in the liver, increasing a person’s risk of gallstones. In fasting associated with severely fat-restricted diets, gallbladder contraction is reduced, which can also lead to gallstone formation. But research shows that a shorter overnight fast is protective against gallstones in both men and women.

Diet plays a major role in gallbladder disease because diet influences your weight. People who are overweight and eat a high-fat, high-cholesterol, low-fiber diet are at increased risk of developing gallstones. Exposure to the Western diet (increased intake of fat, refined carbohydrates, and limited fiber content) is a high risk for developing gallstones. And too much heme iron — iron found in meat and seafood — may increase gallstone formation in men.

Coffee consumption seems to lower the risk of gallstone formation, by enhancing gallbladder motility, inhibiting gallbladder fluid absorption, and decreasing cholesterol crystallization in the bile, according to research published in the July–December 2013 issue of the Nigerian Journal of Surgery.

Certain cholesterol-lowering medications, such as Lopid (gemfibrozil) and Tricor (fenofibrate), can increase a person’s risk of gallstones. While these drugs successfully decrease blood cholesterol, they increase the amount of cholesterol in the bile, and thus the chance for gallstones to develop.

Other drugs that may increase the risk of gallstones include Sandostatin (octreotide)and a group of diuretics known as thiazides. Octreotide is used to treat certain hormonal disorders and severe diarrhea caused by cancer tumors. Prolonged use of proton pump inhibitors has been shown to decrease gallbladder function, potentially leading to gallstone formation.

If you are concerned that a medication you are taking may increase your risk of gallbladder disease, talk to your doctor. There may be another medication that will do the same thing without increasing your risk for gallbladder problems.

Other Risk Factors for Gallbladder Problems

In addition to genetic and lifestyle factors, certain medical conditions or surgical procedures can also increase your likelihood of developing gallbladder problems. These include:

Diabetes and metabolic syndrome People with diabetes generally have high levels of fatty acids, which may increase the risk of gallstones. Additionally, gallbladder function is impaired in the presence of diabetic neuropathy, and regulation of hyperglycemia with insulin seems to raise the lithogenic index (risk of developing mineral deposits in the gallbladder that can turn into gallstones). People with diabetes are at risk for developing a type of gallbladder disease called acalculous cholecystitis, meaning gallbladder disease without gallstones.

Crohn’s disease and other medical conditions People with Crohn’s disease, an inflammatory bowel disorder, are also at increased risk of gallbladder disease. There are a few reasons for this, but one of the main ones is that if bile salts are not reabsorbed in the ileum (the end of the small intestine), they pass out of the body. This loss of bile salts means that the liver has fewer bile salts to put into new bile. The new bile becomes overloaded with cholesterol, which can in turn result in gallstones.

In addition, cirrhosis of the liver and certain blood disorders, such as sickle cell anemia, also increase a person’s risk of pigment gallstones, which are gallstones made up of bilirubin instead of cholesterol. Low melatonin levels associated with diabetes could contribute to gallstones as well because melatonin inhibits cholesterol secretion from the gallbladder; melatonin is also an antioxidant that reduces oxidative stress to the gallbladder.

Surgery People who undergo bariatric surgery to lose weight are at increased risk for gallstones. Rapid weight loss in general is a risk factor. According to Bariatric Innovations of Atlanta, gallstone formation can be found in as many as 35 percent of weight loss surgery patients. Organ transplant surgery may also increase the risk of gallstones, and it is not uncommon for some doctors to recommend that their patients have their gallbladder removed before they undergo an organ transplant.

Ways to Prevent Gallbladder Problems 

Many factors may increase your risk of developing gallbladder problems. While you can’t do much about your genes or ethnicity, you can watch your weight and eat healthfully: Focus on whole grains, fruits and vegetables, fish, and lean meats. Maintaining appropriate portion size and limiting processed foods and added sugars is also essential to a healthy diet. A study published in July 2016 in the journal Preventive Medicine found that vegetable protein is associated with lower gallbladder disease risk.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Creamy Southwest Chicken

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Creamy Southwest Chicken : Low Carb

southwestshicken-56d5d9be3df78cfb37da4765

 

Low carb chicken recipes are a must-have for many on low carb diets. This creamy chicken skillet dish is one you can have on the table in 20 minutes, from prep time to finished product, using canned green chilies and shredded cheese for enhanced flavor. This is also one of those dishes you can still serve to family members who may not be on the low carb diet you’re on. Just add their desired side dish, with your low carb options at the same time. The chilies are mild, so this isn’t a spicy dish, but it is a tasty one. Serve with refried beans and/or a salad and sliced avocado. To give it some heat and spice things up, add red pepper flakes or sriracha.

 

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 medium chicken breast (boneless, skinless)
  • 1/4 cup onion (minced)
  • 2 cloves garlic (minced)
  • 4.5 ounce can green chiles (chopped)
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1/4 cup cheddar (shredded, or jack cheese)

Preparation

1) Heat large skillet with oil over medium heat.

2) Cut chicken into bite-sized pieces and season with salt and pepper. Saute until brown on both sides, adding onions about ​halfway through.

3) Add garlic and cook for another minute.

4) If needed, deglaze the pan with a little water.

5) Add green chilies and cream, and simmer until chicken is done on both sides and the sauce is thickened.

6) Top with shredded cheddar or jack cheese, and serve when cheese melts.

Optional garnish: avocado slices or cilantro.

Suggested Additions: Add low carb veggies such as chopped broccoli or cauliflower to boost fiber; use feta cheese and sun-dried tomatoes instead of cheddar or jack.

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