Foods, Uncategorized

Sugar-Free Coconut Shrimp Recipe

Sugar-Free Coconut Shrimp Recipe

Coconut Shrimp

Coconut shrimp is a fan favorite finger food—it is crispy, slightly sweet, and of course, features delicious shrimp! But restaurant and party versions of this appetizer can often be over sweet and therefore loaded with sugar. In this sugar-free version of coconut shrimp, the sweetener in the coating is optional, so you can add a bit to mimic the popular restaurant versions’ sweetness if you desire.

These sugar-free coconut shrimp can be served as an appetizer, party food, or main course.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup coconut flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (ground, or 1 teaspoon ground ancho pepper)
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • Optional: sugar substitute (such as stevia) to taste
  • 1/2 cup coconut (unsweetened shredded coconut)
  • Cooking oil of your choice, such as vegetable or canola, for frying
  • 1 pound large shrimp (raw, peeled and deveined and thaw if frozen)

Preparation

  1. Mix coconut flour with seasonings in a shallow bowl.
  2. Whisk the eggs with a fork in a small dish, and mix with the 2 tablespoons water. Add sweetener if desired.
  3. Put shredded coconut in a separate dish.
  4. Pour oil into a large skillet to about 3/4 inch depth. Heat to 350 to 360 F, or until the end of a wooden spoon handle dipped into the oil collects bubbles around it.
  5. Holding shrimp by the tail, roll in the seasoned coconut flour and shake to get most of it off—you just want a thin coating. Then dip in egg mixture, again shaking off the excess. Finally, roll in coconut.
  6. 6Place shrimp in the oil and fry until golden, about 2 minutes per side. Don’t crowd the pan, which will lower the temperature of the oil—this makes them absorb more oil and end up heavy and greasy. Tongs are the best tool for turning and removing the shrimp.
  7. Remove shrimp from the oil to a paper towel or cooling rack.

Cooking and Nutrition Notes

To thaw shrimp, place frozen shrimp in a colander and place under cold running water for several minutes until shrimp are no longer icy and stiff. Place between paper towels to absorb the water.

When frying the shrimp, you can put each in the oil as you bread them, but you will have to watch the shrimp you put in the skillet first closely to make sure they’re not getting overcooked (and don’t forget to flip!). An alternative method is to bread a few shrimp at once and then put them all in the pan at the same time (as long as they fit without being too crowded).

Keep in mind that the calorie count listed here can vary since the amount of oil used by each cook can differ depending on the pan size. It is also difficult to get a precise number since the frying temperature will affect the amount of oil absorbed. In addition, the exact amount of coconut breading per shrimp will vary.

Nutrition Highlights (per serving)

CALORIES354
FAT23g
CARBS23g
PROTEIN13g

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Foods, Uncategorized

CHOCOLATE AVOCADO COOKIES

CHOCOLATE AVOCADO COOKIES

Chocolate Avocado Cookies

Chocolate avocado cookies are healthy fudgy chocolate cookies made of 5 simple ingredients 100 % gluten free + low carb + paleo + sugar free.

Chocolate Avocado Cookies

Ingredients

  • 1 ripe avocado about 1/2 cup mashed avocado
  • 1/4 cup natural maple Flavored Sugar-Free Syrup or maple syrup (if not low carb)
  • 1/2 cup nut butter peanut butter or almond butter (if paleo)
  • 1 egg or chia egg if vegan
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

Optional

  • 1/4 cup dark chocolate chips, no sugar added or choose your favorite one
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2-3 drops liquid stevia drops

 

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 180 C (360F)
  • Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper. Slightly oil the paper with 1/2 teaspoon of liquid vegetable oil (coconut or peanut oil) . This will prevent the cookies to stick to the paper. Set aside.
  • Chocolate Avocado Cookies
  • In a food processor, with the S blade attachment, add ripe avocado and sugar free maple syrup (or liquid sweetener you like). Process for 30 seconds until it forms a creamy avocado batter with no lumps.
  • Stop, add egg, nut butter and cocoa powder. Process again for 30 seconds. Scrap down the bottom and side of the bowl and process for an extra 15 seconds to make sure all the batter is combine – no lumps.
  • Transfer the chocolate cookie batter onto a mixing bowl. It will bit moist and sticky that is what you want. Stir in chocolate chips and vanilla – if used.
  • Chocolate Avocado Cookies
  • Combine with a spatula until the chocolate chips are evenly incorporated. Test the batter and adjust with 2-3 drops of liquid stevia – only if you want a sweeter cookie. I did not add any to mine and my kids love them but if you have a sweet tooth I recommend few drops of stevia to make them sweeter. Add one drop at a time and see how it taste.
  • Prepare a small bowl with warm water, dip a spoon in the water and use that spoon to sample some chocolate cookie batter from your bowl. The water will prevent the batter to stick too much to your spoon.
  • Spoon the chocolate batter onto the baking sheet – I used another spoon to push the batter out of the first spoon.  Use a silicon spoon or spatula to flatten the cookie into a cookie shape. The batter won’t stick onto silicon which makes it easier to spread.
  • Repeat until you form 6 jumbo cookies. Those cookies won’t spread so you don’t need to leave more than half thumb space between each.
  • Sprinkle extra chocolate chips on top of each cookies if you like.
  • Bake for 12-15 minutes or until the centre is set.
  • Cool down 5 minutes on the baking sheet then transfer onto a cooling rack to cool down.
  • Store the cookies in the fridge for up to 5 days in an airtight container.

 

 

People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Do You Have Ringing In Your Ears?

Tinnitus, or chronic ringing in your ears, affects about 1 in 5 people. While it’s typically not serious, it can significantly impact your quality of life, and it may get worse with age or be a symptom of an underlying condition, such as age-related hearing loss, ear injury or a circulatory system disorder.1

In the majority of cases, tinnitus is diagnosed after the age of 50 years, however, recent research has shown that tinnitus in youth is surprisingly common and on the rise, likely due to increased exposure to loud music and other environmental noise.2

Worse still, it may be a sign of permanent nerve damage that could predict future hearing impairment.

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One-Quarter of Youth May Experience Tinnitus, Risk Hearing Loss Later in Life

In a study of 170 students between the ages of 11 and 17 years, researchers from McMaster University in Canada found “risky listening habits,” including exposure to loud noise at parties or concerts, listening to music with ear buds and use of mobile phones excluding texting, were the norm.

More than half of the study participants reported experiencing tinnitus in the past, such as experiencing ringing in the ears for a day following a loud concert.

This is considered a warning sign; however, nearly 29 percent of the students were found to have already developed chronic tinnitus, as evidenced by a psychoacoustic examination conducted in a sound booth.3

Youth with and without tinnitus had a similar ability to hear, but those with tinnitus had significantly reduced tolerance for loud noise and tended to be more protective of their hearing.

Reduced sound level tolerance is a sign of damage to the auditory nerves because, when nerves used to process sound are damaged, it prompts brain cells to increase their sensitivity to noise, essentially making sounds seem louder than they are.

Prevention Is the Best Solution to Tinnitus

Auditory nerve injury that’s associated with tinnitus and heightened sensitivity to loud noises cannot be detected by typical hearing tests, which is why it’s sometimes called “hidden hearing loss.” Further, such damage is permanent and tends to worsen over time, causing increasing hearing loss later in life.

Because there is no known cure, the best solution is prevention. Study author Larry Roberts, Ph.D., of McMaster University’s Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour has compared the emerging risks from loud noises to early warnings about smoking.

At this point, many people are unaware that listening to loud music via earbuds or at parties may be permanently damaging their hearing, particularly since they may still hear normally at this point in time.

If more people were aware of the risks, more would take steps to turn down the volume and give their ears a break. Roberts told Science Daily:4

“It’s a growing problem and I think it’s going to get worse … My personal view is that there is a major public health challenge coming down the road in terms of difficulties with hearing …

The levels of sound exposure that are quite commonplace in our environment, particularly among youth, appear to be sufficient to produce hidden cochlear injuries … The message is, ‘Protect your ears.'”


Tinnitus Is Associated With Psychiatric Disorders and Stress

In adults, the majority of people with tinnitus (77 percent) may suffer from co-existing psychiatric disorders ranging from anxiety to personality disorders. Further, 62 percent of tinnitus patients may suffer from depressive disorders while 45 percent may have anxiety disorders.5

Further, there appears to be a close link between tinnitus and stress, such that stress may make tinnitus worse and vice versa. In one study, emotional exhaustion — or the feeling of being drained due to chronic stress — was a strong predictor of tinnitus severity.6

In addition, chronic stress may be as large a risk factor for developing tinnitus as exposure to occupational noise. Research has found that exposure to highly stressful situations and occupational noise each double the risk of tinnitus.7

Further, stress is especially influential in the transition from mild to severe tinnitus, with researchers concluding, “Stress management strategies should be included in hearing conservation programs, especially for individuals with mild tinnitus who report a high stress load.”8

Also of note, many people with tinnitus first noticed the ringing in their ears during a stressful life event, such as divorce, being laid off, sickness in family members, accidents or surgery. As noted in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry (JNNP):9

These events can heighten the brain’s arousal, and the tinnitus may be noted cortically [by the cerebral cortex]. This interaction between reduced auditory sensation and brain compensation might explain why some people are very bothered by their tinnitus and others just adjust to it.”

The researchers have suggested that tinnitus is not simply a condition affecting the auditory system but rather is neuropsychiatric in nature, which would explain why it often occurs alongside cognitive and behavioral symptoms.

Other Tinnitus Associations to Be Aware Of: Sleep, Trauma, Headaches and More

Tinnitus is often described as a symptom, not a disease in itself, and it may result from a variety of conditions. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one common cause, with nearly 40 percent of military personnel with TBI also experiencing tinnitus.10

Tinnitus is also associated with pain disorders and headaches, including migraines, and often leads to sleep difficulties such as delayed sleep, mid-sleep awakenings and chronic fatigue. In addition, tinnitus is also associated with cognitive deficits, including slowed cognitive processing speed and problems with attention.11

There are different types of tinnitus as well, and the variety may give clues as to its origin. For instance, tinnitus may occur in one or both ears and be described as:12

  • Throbbing or pulsing, which may be due to vascular tumors near the ear
  • High-pitched and continuous (this is most common)
  • Clicking, which may be related to muscle spasms in the roof of your mouth, which cause the Eustachian tube in your ear to open and close; temporomandibular joint (TMJ) issues may also cause a clicking sound in your ear
  • Buzzing or humming

Abnormal bone growth in the middle ear, known as otosclerosis, may also cause tinnitus, as can damage to your vestibulocochlear nerve, which transmits sound from your ear to your brain. Such damage may occur from acoustic neuroma tumor or drug toxicity, for instance.

Additionally, certain medications, including certain cancer drugs, sedatives, and anti-inflammatories like ibuprophen and aspirin may also trigger tinnitus.

If this condition is causing you serious emotional or physical distress, seek professional help. In many cases, however, natural interventions such as those described below may help.

Effective Tinnitus Treatments

A slew of pharmaceuticals, including antidepressants, anxiety drugs, mood stabilizers and anticonvulsants, have been used to treat tinnitus.  A meta-analysis of a range of tinnitus management strategies revealed only antidepressants had a possible benefit, but even that study could not conclude that antidepressants were the answer.13

Considering their risks, and the fact that some antidepressants may cause ringing in the ears, non-drug options present the best course of action — and of these there are many.14

In many cases natural interventions, including the following, may help:

Cognitive behavioral therapy: which has been shown to improve quality of life in people with tinnitus.15 Even internet-based guided CBT has been shown to effectively manage tinnitus.16

Acupuncture: which was found to improve tinnitus severity and patients’ quality of life.17

Nutritional interventions, herbal remedies and melatonin: specifically, zinc deficiency and vitamin B12 deficiency may be associated with tinnitus.18,19 Herbal remedies, including Japanese cornel, dogwood, bayberry, hawthorn leaf, ginkgo and black cohosh may also be useful.20

In animal studies, ginkgo extract led to significant improvement in tinnitus, including complete relief in some cases.21 Melatonin also shows promise, and in one study melatonin supplementation led to a significant decrease in tinnitus intensity and improved sleep quality in patients with chronic tinnitus.22

Organic black coffee: research has shown that women who consumed higher amounts of caffeine (mostly in the form of coffee) were less likely to have tinnitus.23

Specifically, women who consumed less than 150 milligrams of caffeine a day (the amount in about 12 ounces of coffee) were 15 percent more likely to develop tinnitus than those who consumed 450 milligrams to 599 milligrams.24 The researchers weren’t sure why caffeine may reduce tinnitus risk, although past research has shown it has a direct effect on the inner ear or may be involved through its role in stimulating your central nervous system.

Stress management: including exercise, relaxation exercises and the Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT), is important for tinnitus treatment and prevention.

Simple Home Remedies May Provide Relief

If tinnitus is interfering with your quality of life, home remedies may help to relieve your symptoms (and if not, there’s no harm done in trying). Organic Facts compiled several examples worth considering:25

Warm salt pillow: fill a fabric bag with warm salt. Lie down on the pillow and alternate each ear on the bag. Reheat the salt as necessary and repeat several times a day. Foot baths: alternate your feet in hot and cold foot baths. This may dilate your blood vessels and stimulate blood flow toward your head, helping to relieve tinnitus symptoms.
Garlic oil: blend six cloves of fresh garlic with 1 cup of olive oil (the garlic should be finely minced in the process). Let the mixture steep for a week then strain out the garlic. Apply a few drops of the oil in each ear. Music: soft soothing music, white noise, nature sounds or even humming to yourself may help relieve tinnitus.
Stimulate your little toe: use a toothpick to gently stimulate the edge of your little toe near the toenail. This should result in a tingling sensation near the top of your toe. Doing this once a day may relieve tinnitus symptoms. Ear drumming: gently drum on each ear using your fingertips for two to three minutes twice a day to help relieve ringing.
Jawbone massage: massage the hollow and top areas of your jawbone behind your earlobes using coconut oil or sesame oil. You can also apply a hot compress to this neck area for relief.

How to Protect Your Ears From Loud Noise Exposures

While there are many causes of tinnitus, loud noise exposure is a primary culprit, especially among youth. It’s far easier to prevent related damage to your ears than it is to treat it. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends teens and young people take the following steps to protect their hearing and avoid hearing loss (although the advice applies to people of all ages):

Turn down the volume on personal audio devices Try a decibel meter app for your smartphone, which will flash a warning if the volume is turned up to a potentially damaging level Wear earplugs when you visit noisy venues (or when using loud equipment like lawnmowers or leaf blowers)
Use carefully fitted noise-cancelling earphones/headphones, which may allow you to listen comfortably at a lower volume Limit the amount of time you spend engaged in noisy activities Take regular listening breaks when using personal audio devices
Restrict the daily use of personal audio devices to less than one hour

J Mercola

P Carrothers

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Diets and Weight Loss, Uncategorized

Frozen Strawberry Yogurt Drops

Frozen Strawberry Yogurt Drops

yougurtstrawberries

 

Frozen Strawberry Yogurt Drops
Don’t these look so good ? You can make them by dipping strawberries (halved or whole) in vanilla yogurt (Greek might be best, because it’s thicker), then putting on a sheet pan lined with parchment or wax paper and freezing. Voila: Yogurt-covered strawberries!
You can also put strawberries in an ice cube tray and add yogurt.

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Are You Taking Buspirone : Buspar or Vanspar

Buspirone (Oral Route)

 

Mayo Clinic: Opioid Prescribing Has Not Changed — Pain News Network

US Brand Name

  1. Buspar
  2. Buspar Dividose
  3. Vanspar

Descriptions

 

Buspirone is used to treat certain anxiety disorders or to relieve the symptoms of anxiety. However, buspirone usually is not used for anxiety or tension caused by the stress of everyday life.

It is not known exactly how buspirone works to relieve the symptoms of anxiety. Buspirone is thought to work by decreasing the amount and actions of a chemical known as serotonin in certain parts of the brain.

This medicine is available only with your doctor’s prescription.

 

Before Using

The Following Information was prepared by the Mayo Clinic, Rochester MN.

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

IBS, Celiac Disease, Hodgkins Lymphoma, Crohns Disease, Gastric ByPass Patients, and other digested conditions, taking it in tablet form my increase your symptoms.

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of buspirone have not been performed in the pediatric population. However, no pediatric-specific problems have been documented to date.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of buspirone in the elderly.

Pregnancy

Information about this buspirone-oral-route
Pregnancy Category Explanation
All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus.

Breastfeeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Do not eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice, orange juice, tomato juice, or other heavily citric juices while you are taking this medicine.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Isocarboxazid
  • Linezolid
  • Phenelzine
  • Tranylcypromine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Alfentanil
  • Almotriptan
  • Amitriptyline
  • Amoxapine
  • Amphetamine
  • Benzhydrocodone
  • Benzphetamine
  • Bromazepam
  • Bromopride
  • Buprenorphine
  • Butorphanol
  • Carbinoxamine
  • Ceritinib
  • Clorgyline
  • Clozapine
  • Cobicistat
  • Codeine
  • Conivaptan
  • Desvenlafaxine
  • Dextroamphetamine
  • Dihydrocodeine
  • Dolasetron
  • Doxylamine
  • Duvelisib
  • Escitalopram
  • Esketamine
  • Fentanyl
  • Flibanserin
  • Fosnetupitant
  • Granisetron
  • Hydrocodone
  • Hydromorphone
  • Hydroxytryptophan
  • Idelalisib
  • Iproniazid
  • Ivosidenib
  • Larotrectinib
  • Levomilnacipran
  • Levorphanol
  • Lisdexamfetamine
  • Lithium
  • Lofexidine
  • Lorcaserin
  • Lorlatinib
  • Loxapine
  • Lumacaftor
  • Meclizine
  • Meperidine
  • Metaxalone
  • Methadone
  • Methamphetamine
  • Methylene Blue
  • Metoclopramide
  • Midazolam
  • Mirtazapine
  • Moclobemide
  • Morphine
  • Morphine Sulfate Liposome
  • Nalbuphine
  • Netupitant
  • Nialamide
  • Oxycodone
  • Oxymorphone
  • Palonosetron
  • Pargyline
  • Pentazocine
  • Periciazine
  • Procarbazine
  • Remifentanil
  • Scopolamine
  • Selegiline
  • Sertraline
  • Sodium Oxybate
  • Sufentanil
  • Tapentadol
  • Toloxatone
  • Tramadol
  • Trazodone
  • Vilazodone
  • Vortioxetine
  • Ziprasidone
  • Zolpidem

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Diltiazem
  • Erythromycin
  • Fluoxetine
  • Ginkgo
  • Haloperidol
  • Itraconazole
  • Nefazodone
  • Rifampin
  • St John’s Wort
  • Verapamil

Other Interactions

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following may cause an increased risk of certain side effects but may be unavoidable in some cases. If used together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use this medicine, or give you special instructions about the use of food, alcohol, or tobacco.

  • Grapefruit Juice

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Kidney disease or
  • Liver disease—Effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

Take buspirone only as directed by your doctor. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered. To do so may increase the chance of unwanted effects.

This medicine comes with a patient information insert. Read and follow the instructions in the insert carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions.

You may take this medicine with or without food, but take it the same way each time.

Do not eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice, orange juice, tomato juice, or other heavily citric juices while you are taking this medicine.

After you begin taking buspirone, 1 to 2 weeks may pass before you begin to feel the effects of this medicine.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For anxiety:
      • Adults—At first, 7.5 mg two times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 60 mg a day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.   ( We always recommend calling the local Veterinarian Office to see if he can use it)

 

Precautions

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

If you will be using buspirone regularly for a long time, your doctor should check your progress at regular visits to make sure the medicine is working properly and does not cause unwanted effects.

Do not take buspirone if you are also taking a drug with monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor activity (e.g., isocarboxazid [Marplan®], phenelzine [Nardil®], selegiline [Eldepryl®], or tranylcypromine [Parnate®]). If you do, you may develop extremely high blood pressure.

This medicine will add to the effects of alcohol, ( so no alcohol ) and other CNS depressants (medicines that make you drowsy or less alert). Some examples of CNS depressants are antihistamines or medicine for hay fever, other allergies, or colds; sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicine; prescription pain medicine or narcotics; barbiturates; medicine for seizures; muscle relaxants; or anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics. Check with your medical doctor or dentist before taking any of the above while you are taking this medicine.

Buspirone may cause some people to become dizzy, lightheaded, drowsy, or less alert than they are normally. Make sure you know how you react to this medicine before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are dizzy or are not alert.

Avoid drinking alcoholic beverages while you are using this medicine.

Do not suddenly stop taking this medicine without checking first with your doctor. Your doctor may want you to gradually reduce the amount you are taking before stopping it completely. This is to decrease the chance of having withdrawal symptoms such as increased anxiety; burning or tingling feelings; confusion; dizziness; headache; irritability; nausea; nervousness; muscle cramps; sweating; trouble with sleeping; or unusual tiredness or weakness.

If you think you or someone else may have taken an overdose of buspirone, get emergency help at once. Symptoms of an overdose are dizziness or light headedness; severe drowsiness or loss of consciousness; stomach upset, including nausea or vomiting; or very small pupils of the eyes.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Side Effects

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Rare

  1. Chest pain
  2. confusion
  3. fast or pounding heartbeat
  4. fever
  5. incoordination
  6. mental depression
  7. muscle weakness
  8. numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness in the hands or feet
  9. skin rash or hives
  10. sore throat
  11. stiffness of the arms or legs
  12. uncontrolled movements of the body

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur:

Symptoms of overdose

  1. Dizziness or light headedness especially when getting up from a sitting or lying position suddenly
  2. drowsiness (severe)
  3. loss of consciousness
  4. nausea or vomiting
  5. stomach upset
  6. very small pupils of the eyes

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

  1. Restlessness, nervousness, or unusual excitement

Less common or rare

  1. Blurred vision
  2. clamminess or sweating
  3. decreased concentration
  4. diarrhea
  5. drowsiness
  6. dryness of the mouth
  7. muscle pain, spasms, cramps, or stiffness
  8. ringing in the ears
  9. trouble with sleeping, nightmares, or vivid dreams
  10. unusual tiredness or weakness

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

 

 

People Start to Heal, The Moment They Feel They are Heard

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Chicken Parmesan Casserole

Chicken Parmesan Casserole Recipe

Ingredients

  • 5 cups cubed cooked chicken
  • 1 cup no-sugar-added marinara sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 ounce Parmesan cheese, grated(about 1 cup)
  • 1 1/2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese (about 6 ounces)
  • 1-ounce pork rinds, crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed dried basil

Preparation Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 F and lightly grease an 8-inch square baking pan
  2. Spread the chicken in the greased dish and pour the tomato sauce over it.
  3. Sprinkle with the red pepper flakes. Top with the Parmesan and then the mozzarella.
  4. Lightly sprinkle the crushed pork rinds and basil over the top.
  5. Bake for 25 minutes, until the cheese, is melted and bubbly.

 

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Lower Your Blood Pressure With The Foods You Eat

6 Foods That Lower Blood Pressure

 

Over 70 million Americans suffer from high blood pressure and 30 percent of Americans have prehypertension, making this condition extremely crucial to control. However, sometimes prescription drugs used to control hypertension can have potentially dangerous side effects.

a medical technician takes a patient's blood pressure

With the recent recall of several blood pressure drugs due to potential contamination, it’s more important than ever to try natural ways to keep blood pressure under control.

Here are six foods that can help control blood pressure:

 

  • Insoluble fiber. Dr. Oz says that eating foods like beans, 100 percent whole wheat or bran products, green beans, potatoes, cauliflower, or nuts helps balance the gut biome which in turn produces fatty acids that reduce cardiovascular problems such as blood pressure, irregular heart beat, and atherosclerosis. Insoluble fiber also adds bulk to stool and helps food pass more quickly through the stomach and intestines, protecting your heart from high blood pressure.
  • Leafy greens. According to Medical Daily, the potassium found in leafy green vegetables eliminates sodium from the body which in turn can reduce blood pressure. Kale and spinach are options that provide a good portion of your daily recommended intake. The Environmental Working Group recommends that you consume organic greens due the high levels of pesticide residues in commercially grown veggies.
  • Berries. Berries, and specifically blueberries, contain nitric acid which can have protective effects on heart health. “There’s something very special about the composition of blueberries that is responsible for their effect on blood pressure,” Florida State researcher Sarah A. Johnson told The New York Times. “Other fruits and plant extracts have not produced the same results.”
  • Olive oil. The most popular heart-healthy diets are the DASH and the Mediterranean both of which recommend using olive oil in your diet. The benefits may be attributed to the polyphenols as well as the monounsaturated fats. These “good” fats make a fine replacement for butter which contains unhealthy fat. Studies show that women, in particular, experience the greatest health benefits from using olive oil.
  • Salmon. The American Heart Association recommends consuming fatty fish twice weekly. Studies have found that high omega-3 content may play a role in lowering blood pressure and targeting inflammation in the body. Prevention also notes that salmon contains vitamin D which “helps the body absorb calcium, protects against depression, and regulates blood pressure,” according to their website.
  • Chocolate. As long as you stick to dark chocolate and watch the portion size, you can enjoy a number of health benefits. The dark variety contains compounds called flavanols which experts believe have beneficial effects on blood pressure, cholesterol levels, cognition, and more. To avoid weight gain, limit your consumption to an ounce daily and make sure your chocolate contains at least 70 percent cocoa.

You Are What You Eat, So dont be Cheap, Easy or Fake

 

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Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Battle Arthritis With The Foods You Eat

Top 10 Foods to Battle Arthritis

 

More than 54 million American adults suffer from some form of arthritis according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Furthermore, the CDC predicts that by the year 2040, an estimated 78 million adults are projected to have doctor-diagnosed arthritis.

But experts say that eating the right, anti-inflammatory diet can help protect your joints and alleviate some of the symptoms of this potentially painful disease. These same anti-inflammatory foods can also stave off other dreaded diseases as well, because we know that inflammation plays a major role in almost every major disease. According to the Cleveland Clinic, it’s the culprit in many forms of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and even depression.

woman's arthritic hands

According to Health Fitness Revolution, here are the top 10 foods and nutrients to eat to treat your arthritis — and improve your health:

  1. Foods rich in calcium. Dairy products that are low in fat like milk and yogurt are rich in calcium and vitamin D, which can help increase the strength in your bones and joints. If you are lactose intolerant take a supplement or eat leafy, green veggies.
  2. Vitamin C. This water-soluble vitamin is essential to slow down the progression of osteoarthritis. Consume more fruits like strawberries, pineapples and kiwis.
  3. Broccoli. Aside from being rich in vitamin C, broccoli contains sulforaphane, a compound that can help prevent and slow down the progression of osteoarthritis.
  4. Garlic. Garlic contains diallyl disulfide, a compound that can help alleviate arthritis. Chop garlic into your pasta, soups and stews or take supplements such as Kyolic Aged Garlic extract. Adding garlic to your diet could benefit not only arthritis symptoms but also your overall health since it has also been associated with reduced risk of certain cancers and heart disease.
  5. Fish. Fatty fish contains inflammation-fighting omega-3 fatty acids, which can reduce the inflammation in your joints and relieve pain. Aim for at least 4 ounces of fish, like salmon, herring, sardines or cod, twice weekly to reap the benefits.
  6. Soy. Like fish, soy also contains omega-3 fatty acids. If you’re aren’t a fan of fish, try eating soybeans with your meals. Soybeans are low in fat, with lots of protein and fiber.
  7. Tart cherries. You may find relief from these cherries that are chock full of powerful anthocyanins, antioxidants that give the cherries their red color. You can find tart cherry supplements at your health food store or eat the actual cherries themselves. Tart cherry juice is a great tasting option but look for the unsweetened variety.
  8. Green tea. Studies have shown that an antioxidant in green tea called epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) actually cancels the molecules that come together to cause joint damage. Green tea is also full of polyphenols that are great for healthy joints.
  9. Whole grains. Whole grains should be your new best friend. They contain a compound called CRP which can help reduce inflammation and reduce the risk of rheumatoid arthritis. Eating breakfast of whole grain cereal or oatmeal is a great way to introduce whole grains into your diet.
  10. Ginger. A recent study assessed the effects of ginger extract on patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. A whopping 63% experienced improvements in knee pain after only six weeks. You can consume ginger in fresh, powdered or dried form or use the extract itself.

You Are What You Eat, So Dont Be Cheap, Easy, or Fake

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Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

3 Foods to Avoid to Lose Weight

Get Rid of the Calorie Culprits That Ruin Your Diet

 

salad dressing

 

Diet experts often say that you should clean out your pantry, your cupboards, and your refrigerator when you start a new weight loss plan. Why? Because there are foods to avoid to lose weight and it’s important to set up your kitchen for success if you’re really serious about slimming down. But often, dieters don’t have the time for a complete kitchen overhaul

If you are short on time but committed to getting lean and fit, here’s the quick-start plan for kitchen clean-up. Grab your trash can, open the refrigerator door and dump these three items to decrease your calorie intake and lose weight faster.

Foods to Avoid to Lose Weight

Of course, you should evaluate your entire eating plan when you start weight loss program. If you overeat any food, you may want to get rid of it in order to achieve nutritional balance.

But there are certain foods that most people think of as healthy, that can put a substantial dent in your energy balance. Sadly, these are foods that don’t contribute essential micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) or important macronutrients (healthy fats, heart-friendly carbohydrates, lean protein). So which foods are they? Open your refrigerator and check for these products.

Salad Dressing

Salad sounds like the perfect diet food. Fill your lunch plate full of healthy veggies and you’ll lose weight, right? Wrong! In many cases, your salad is a diet disaster. And many times, the salad dressing is what adds the most fat and calories.

In small amounts, salad dressing isn’t too bad. But when is the last time you measured the amount that you poured on your salad? The calories in salad dressing can ruin your energy balance for the day.

Even fat-free dressings have a downside. Often, these products are full of sugar and still very high in calories. A better option is to add spicy, flavorful ingredients like peppers or radishes to your greens and go dressing-free. Or dress your salad with lemon.

Another smart option is olive oil. While olive oil is a fat, it is a source of monounsaturated fat—which is better for your heart than saturated fat. You can also use an olive oil alternative such as avocado oil or flax seed oil. Just remember to measure your dressing before adding it to your salad. A reasonable serving size is one to two tablespoons for a meal-sized salad.

Flavored Coffee Creamer

If you read the nutrition facts label, the calorie and fat content of flavored creamer doesn’t look too bad. But when you read between the lines, the story isn’t so pretty.

Flavored creamers are one of the most common foods we overeat. Do you know what a single serving of creamer is? A single serving of liquid coffee creamer is just one tablespoon. Most of us pour much more than that into each coffee cup. And many of us drink several cups of coffee, So, if you multiply your actual portion size times the calorie count and fat per serving, you might be surprised…or horrified.

Another problem with coffee creamer is the ingredients. You’ll see that many popular brands list hydrogenated oil as the primary ingredient. Hydrogenated oils are trans fats—a type of fat that health experts recommend we avoid.

Sadly, if you think the fat-free creamers are better? Nope. Non-dairy fat free creamers are one of the most common sources of hidden fat and many of them provide substantial grams of added sugar to our daily intake.

You can use products made from real full-fat dairy (rather than oil) to get the creamy consistency that you desire. But you won’t get a break on the calorie and fat grams if you use products that are more “natural.” A better option is to learn to make healthier flavored coffee drinks at home. Use low fat dairy, or indulge in the full fat variety and be mindful of your portion size.

Juice 

Again, juice sounds like it should be part of a healthy diet-friendly breakfast. In fact, some dieters make juice the entire meal. But the bottom line is that when you drink fruit juice you are drinking a glass full of sugar.

Fresh juice does contain vitamins that are good for you, but why not just eat a whole piece of fruit? You might be surprised to find that when you compare the calories in an orange to the calories in a glass of orange juice the fruit fares better. And whole food is more satisfying than sipping your calories through a straw.

The one thing that these foods have in common is that many dieters believe they are healthy because they contain a healthy ingredient or because they have a healthy looking label. We often overeat foods that carry that “health halo” and we end up consuming excess fat, calories and ingredients that aren’t good for us.

Of course, if you avoid these foods to lose weight, weight loss isn’t a slam dunk. Dumping these items is just the beginning of a full kitchen clean-up. But if you can trash these three things, you’ll be on your way to a healthier diet and a slimmer physique.  Malia Frey

 

 

 

You are What You Eat, So Dont be Fast, Cheap, Easy or Fake

 

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Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Avoid Sun to Prevent Cancer? Wrong

 

Avoid Sun to Prevent Cancer? Wrong

The Beach People are here  who wouldn't want to sun their buns on this over Labor Day @thebeachpeople #shopnow #beachpeople #largodrive #sunyourbuns #tanning #laborday

We have been told, again and again, to avoid the sun because ultraviolet radiation causes cancer. But is that really the best strategy?

One survey, called the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, looked at 450,934 white subjects 50-71 years old. They estimated skin ultraviolet radiation exposure (UVR) from satellite Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer data from NASA.

Estimated sun exposure was linked to a 2000 U.S. Census Bureau tract.

In the International Journal of Cancer, the authors compared the highest exposure UVR quartile to the lowest quartile. After nine years of follow-up, UVR was inversely associated with total cancer risk (3 percent decline).

Looking at specific cancers, the scientists found a decreased risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (18 percent), as well as a decreased risk of cancer of the colon (12 percent), lung (14 percent), prostate (9 percent), kidney (17 percent), and bladder (12 percent).

Conventional medicine would have you believe that the sun is a cancer-causing ball of fire. We are told to never to let the sun hit our skin, unless we wear sunscreen.

But what, exactly, is the consequence of avoiding the sun? It will guarantee low vitamin D levels, which have been associated with a host of illnesses from rickets to cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disorders, and cancer.

Only melanoma was shown to increase with more UVR. However, the incidence of melanoma is far less than lung, prostate, and colon cancers, which all declined with more UVR.

Exposure to moderate amounts of UVR should not be feared. Of course, this doesn’t mean that you should allow yourself to get burned. But moderate exposure is not only safe, but healthy.           Russell Blaylock

 

You are What you Eat, So Dont Be Fast, Cheap, Easy or Fake!

 

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