Blog Archives

Breakfast Burrito: Easy Recipe

breakfast-burrito

 

Breakfast Burrito

 

YIELD:  1 SERVINGS      CALORIES: 180

 

One of my personal favorites!

 

Double the measurements in this recipe to make it for two. To make this a low-carb meal, sprinkle shredded cheddar cheese over top of the burrito. To make this a high-carb meal, wrap the burrito in a whole-grain tortilla, brown-rice tortilla or two corn tortillas.

 

Ingredients

2 tbsp ground turkey

3 egg whites

1 handful baby spinach

1-2 romaine lettuce leaves

1 tbsp salsa

1 tortilla

 

Directions

Spritz cooking spray in a medium nonstick pan over medium heat. Add turkey and cook through. Set aside. In a large bowl, whisk egg whites for about 45 seconds. In another nonstick pan over medium-high heat, spritz cooking spray. Add the egg whites to the pan. As the egg starts to set, add turkey and baby spinach and scramble until cooked. Wrap the turkey-egg-spinach mixture in one for two leaves of romaine lettuce. Spoon the salsa over the top, then roll up and enjoy!

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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Dr J Jaranson

312-972-WELL

 

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Go For The Garlic : Recipe

Whole-Grain-Penne-Pasta-with-Greens-Beans

GO FOR GARLIC: Recipe

It’s hard to imagine a bowl of pasta without the savory flavor of garlic. Besides being a staple in many Italian, Asian, and French cooking, it turns out that garlic is good for your health, too! Discover tasty ways to add this superfood to your meal plan with some of our best garlic recipes, and learn more about the health benefits of this healthful food below.

 

  1. 1. Garlic Has Been Used to Treat a Plethora of Ailments

 

Garlic is one of the oldest cultivated plants in the world and has been used for its medicinal qualities as far back as 2600 B.C. It is used to treat a plethora of ailments, including: arthritis, immune disorders, cataracts, cancer, strokes, and aging.

 

  1. It’s a Powerful Amino Acid

 

Scientists believe that most of garlic’s superiority is due to its sulfur-containing compounds. Garlic contains close to 100 nutrients, but one in particular, allicin, appears to do the most good. Allicin is an amino acid that is not available when garlic is in clove form, but is released when the garlic is crushed, cut, or chewed. It is allicin that gives garlic its strong smell.

 

  1. Garlic Offers a Host of Healthy Nutrients

 

In addition to allicin, garlic also contains phosphorous, zinc, potassium, selenium, polyphenols, and vitamins B6 and C. It is the total of all of these nutrients that makes garlic an excellent anti-inflammatory superfood!

 

Whole Grain Penne Pasta with Greens & Beans

 

Ingredients

 

 

2 tablespoons good quality olive oil-

2 large garlic cloves peeled and crushed-

1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes-

2 cups whole peeled canned tomatoes roughly chopped-

1-pint fresh cherry tomatoes-

1- 15oz. can cannellini beans-

Sea Salt to taste-

1- 13.25oz. box of whole grain penne pasta-

About 4 cups of loosely packed baby arugula

 

 

Directions

Put a large pot of salted water over high heat to boil for pasta.

 

In a large non-stick skillet warm the olive oil, garlic & pepper flakes until they simmer and garlic is slightly browned. (about 3 min.)

 

Add the canned tomatoes and simmer over medium low heat. (about 10 min.)

 

Add the fresh cherry tomatoes and simmer for 10 min. more

 

Add the cannellini beans and return to a simmer

 

Season with sea salt and keep sauce warm over low heat.

 

Cook the pasta being careful not to overcook…

 

Drain the pasta and transfer into a large bowl.

 

Add the hot sauce and arugula to the bowl and toss with a large kitchen spoon

 

until the arugula has wilted.

 

Divide the pasta into warm bowls and top with good quality grated parmesan.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

P Carrothers

Director of Personalized Health Care and Preventative Medicine

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

The Path to a New You, Starts in the Kitchen

newpath

The Path to a New You, Starts in the Kitchen.

 

Add these 21 must-eat foods to your menu.

 

When you’re choosing recipes to help you and your family, focus on foods that haven’t been heavily processed with artificial sweeteners, refined sugar, unhealthy fats, or excess sodium. Be especially wary of packaged products promoted as diet foods. They may be lower in calories and fat, but they’re often higher in artificial sweeteners and sodium, ingredients manufacturers add to make the product taste better and encourage you to eat more.

 

For the foods below, we’ve included the factors that make them smart choices as well as a healthy recipe that incorporates that ingredient. You’ll find foods that satisfy your appetite with lean protein and monounsaturated fats. We’ve also included plenty of high fiber foods on our list as well. Do you want low-calorie ingredients? You’ll find lots of those superfoods too.

 

  1. Almonds | Fiber, Monounsaturated Fat
  2. Apple Cider Vinegar | Lowers Blood Glucose Levels
  3. Avocado | Monounsaturated Fat
  4. Beets | Diuretic, Low Calorie
  5. Brussels Sprouts| Fiber, Low Calorie
  6. Cauliflower | Fiber, Low Calorie
  7. Chia Seeds | Fiber, Protein
  8. Chicken | Low Calorie, Protein
  9. Egg | Protein
  10. Greek Yogurt | Protein
  11. Green Tea | Catechins
  12. Kale | Fiber, Low Calorie
  13. Mangoes | Fiber
  14. Oatmeal | Fiber
  15. Quinoa | Fiber, Protein
  16. Raspberries | Fiber, Raspberry Ketones
  17. Salmon | Protein
  18. Squash | Fiber, Low Calorie
  19. Turkey | Protein
  20. Walnuts | Monounsaturated Fat
  21. Zucchini | Diuretic, Low Calorie

 

Please adjust this for your needs and for the medications you are taking, and the medical conditions you may have.  Example: If you have a dairy restriction, no yogurt.

 

If you have any questions, please contact us.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

P Carrothers

Director of Personalized Health Care and Preventative Medicine

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Creamy Chicken and Broccoli Casserole

Creamy-Chicken-and-Broccoli-Casserole-600x400

 

 

Creamy Chicken and Broccoli Casserole

 

Creamy casseroles are a favorite when the weather gets chilly, but they’re not always Paleo diet friendly. This easy broccoli casserole recipe layers chicken with vegetables for a filling and comforting meal. Crisp bacon and crunchy almonds give it that casserole-like top, without starchy breadcrumbs or cheese.

 

Ingredients

 

1/2 head(s) broccoli cut into thin slices

3/4 head(s) cauliflower cut into thin slices

1/2 pound(s) mushrooms sliced

2 piece(s) chicken breast(s), boneless skinless (4-6 oz)

1 cup(s) coconut milk, full fat

1 large egg(s)

1/2 cup(s) chicken broth

1/2 cup(s) almonds sliced

4 slice(s) bacon cooked and crumbled

1 tablespoon(s) coconut oil for cooking chicken

1/8 teaspoon(s) sea salt to taste

1/8 teaspoon(s) black pepper to taste

Instructions

 

Heat a large sauté pan over medium-high heat and add 1 TB coconut oil or other cooking oil of your choice when hot.

Season chicken breasts with sea salt and pepper if desired and sauté for 10-15 minutes, turning once or twice until fully cooked. Chop into bite-size pieces.

Preheat oven to 350 F.

Layer the broccoli, cauliflower, mushrooms, and cooked chicken in a (9×13) casserole dish, seasoning with salt and pepper between each layer.

In a bowl or large measuring cup, whisk the coconut milk with the egg and chicken broth until well combined. Pour over the casserole. Cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes.

Remove from oven, uncover and sprinkle with almonds and bacon. Bake uncovered for 5-10 more minutes until almonds are lightly toasted and casserole is bubbly. Let sit for 5-10 minutes before serving.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

P Carrothers

Dir. Of Personalize Healthcare and Preventative Medicine

https://www.facebook.com/angelique.rose.50

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Sausage and Zucchini Breakfast Casserole

Sausage-and-Zucchini-Breakfast-Casserole-3.jpg

Sausage and Zucchini Breakfast Casserole

 

This quick and easy Paleo dish takes a classic combination of sausage, mushrooms and thyme and adds eggs and zucchini to make a filling and delicious breakfast casserole. We recommend assembling the casserole the night before, and then baking it in the morning – it will save you a ton of time and you will have a piping hot breakfast to start off your day right!

 

Ingredients

 

3 medium zucchini trimmed

4 large mushroom(s), white button or cremini halved

1 large onion(s), yellow peeled and quartered

1 pound(s) sausage, ground breakfast

1/2 tablespoon(s) thyme, fresh (optional)

2 tablespoon(s) almond flour

6 large egg(s)

1/2 teaspoon(s) garlic, granulated

1/2 teaspoon(s) sea salt

1/4 teaspoon(s) cayenne pepper (optional)

Instructions

 

Preheat oven to 400 F.

Place a grater blade on a medium or large food processor (or just use a box grater to shred the veggies by hand). Grate the zucchini, mushrooms and onion. With a paper towel, squeeze excess moisture out of the zucchini.

Scrape the veggie mixture into the bottom of a 8×8 or 9×9 baking dish and lightly pat down to form an even surface.

Crumble the raw sausage on top of the veggies. Sprinkle with fresh thyme and almond flour.

In a medium mixing bowl, combine eggs, granulated garlic, sea salt, and cayenne (optional) and whisk until eggs are a pale yellow (about 30 seconds).

Pour egg mixture evenly over sausage and veggies in the baking dish. It should sink to the bottom of the pan.

Place in oven and bake for 45 to 55 minutes, or until browned on top and cooked through. There will be some residual water from the vegetables.

Cool at least 15 minutes. Slice into 4 servings and enjoy warm or cold.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

  1. Carrothers

Dir. Of Personalize Healthcare and Preventative Medicine

https://www.facebook.com/angelique.rose.50

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Questions to Ask Your Doctor When You are Prescribed Medication.

docotorquestions

 

15 Questions to Ask When Your Doctor Prescribes a Drug

 

As you probably know by now, I am a huge proponent of becoming an active participant in your healthcare. This can begin with asking the following questions when your doctor recommends a drug:

 

WHAT DOES THIS MEDICATION DO?

HOW, WHEN AND FOR HOW LONG SHOULD I TAKE IT?

IS THIS DRUG INTENDED TO CURE MY UNDERLYING CONDITION OR IS IT INTENDED TO GIVE ME RELIEF FROM MY SYMPTOMS?

WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS? ARE THEY MINOR OR MAJOR? COMMON OR RARE?

IS IT SAFE TAKE WHILE PREGNANT OR BREASTFEEDING? (IF APPROPRIATE TO YOU.)

HAVE LONG-TERM STUDIES BEEN DONE ON THIS DRUG? HAVE STUDIES BEEN DONE FOR THIS DRUG ON THE ELDERLY OR WOMEN? (IF APPROPRIATE TO YOU.) ASK THIS ESPECIALLY IF YOU ARE GOING TO TAKE THE DRUG LONG-TERM.

DO THE BENEFITS OUTWEIGH THE RISKS?

IS THIS DOSAGE INDIVIDUALIZED FOR ME, OR IS THIS A ONE-DOSE-FITS-ALL DOSAGE?

WOULD IT BE POSSIBLE TO START ME AT A LOWER DOSE AND ADJUST IT ACCORDING TO MY RESPONSE?

WHAT HERBS, SUPPLEMENTS, FOODS, DRINKS, OR ACTIVITIES SHOULD I AVOID WHILE TAKING THIS MEDICATION?

IS IT SAFE FOR ME TO TAKE THIS MEDICATION WITH OTHER DRUGS OR SUPPLEMENTS I AM TAKING?

WILL ANY TESTS BE NECESSARY WHILE I AM TAKING THIS MEDICATION?

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I MISS A DOSE OF THIS MEDICATION? TAKE IT IMMEDIATELY WHEN I REMEMBER, OR WAIT UNTIL MY NEXT REGULARLY SCHEDULED DOSE?

IS THERE A GENERIC VERSION OF THE MEDICATION?

WHAT ARE MY NON-DRUG ALTERNATIVES?

Health and Wellness Associates

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Dr Anne Sullivan

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

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Interview with Dr Andrew Weil. Are you taking too many medications?

andrewweil

 

Integrative-medicine pioneer Andrew Weil, MD, talks about why Americans are taking too many drugs.

 

When Andrew Weil, MD, was growing up in the 1940s and 1950s, doctors wrote prescriptions in Latin. To fill that prescription, “you had to hand it to a pharmacist who stood behind a high counter intended to prevent you from seeing what he did,” Weil writes in his new book, Mind Over Meds: Know When Drugs Are Necessary, When Alternatives Are Better — and When to Let Your Body Heal on Its Own.” The upshot? Patients had no idea what medications they were taking.

 

Although times have changed and the Internet has made health information widely available, Weil notes, people still do not ask enough questions about the medicine they’re prescribed. That’s just one reason, he says, why prescription drug use in the United States has increased tenfold in the past 50 years, and over-the-counter drug use has skyrocketed as well.

 

Drugs are certainly life-saving in critical and acute illnesses, Weil notes, but when it comes to chronic illnesses such as diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, and GERD, lifestyle changes such as dietary change, exercise, and stress relief are critical. “Taking a drug just because a doctor says so is not necessarily a good idea,” he counsels. “Always try to understand why you need it.”

 

To get a better sense of when to take drugs — and when to look for alternatives — we spoke to Dr. Weil. Here’s what he had to say:

Dr. Weil, you’ve spent the majority of your career in integrative medicine, using lifestyle-based approaches such as nutrition, movement, and mind-body medicine to tackle the chronic-disease epidemic. Why do you think prescription drug use in the United States has increased so dramatically in the past 50 years?

 

Andrew Weil | Drug makers have had a profound influence on both physicians and the general public. The information that doctors rely on when prescribing typically comes from industry rather than objective sources. For example, pharmaceutical companies commonly fund research. In these studies, drugs are typically pitted against a placebo, almost never against diet and lifestyle changes that may work as well or better. The results drive clinical practice.

 

Advertisements paid for by Big Pharma are the major revenue source for medical journals, a situation that compromises editorial objectivity. The current medical school curriculum and the influence of Big Pharma condition doctors from their first days of training and throughout years of practice to have more faith in the power of prescription drugs than in the healing power of nature.

 

Regarding the public, direct-to-consumer marketing by drug companies has increased demand for their products. Due in part to this type of advertising, people have a strong desire to be medicated, believing it to be the only or the best way to effectively treat disease. Direct-to-consumer marketing by Big Pharma should be banned.

 

Lastly, many people prefer the “quick fix” of popping a pill. Nondrug therapies, such as lifestyle modification, require motivation and active participation on the part of patients and may take time to produce desired results. And the pill, as opposed to safe and effective nondrug approaches, is usually covered by insurance.

 

AS | When it comes to chronic disease, why do so many doctors prescribe drugs as a first-line treatment instead of using lifestyle modifications?

 

AW | Current medical training is heavy on high-tech treatment options, including drug therapy, and neglects the power of prevention, the impact of positive diet and lifestyle changes, and evidence for the safe and effective use of natural remedies and complementary therapies. With little or no background in these areas, healthcare providers are left to rely almost solely on medication. The circumstances outlined in question No. 1 further complicate matters.

 

My colleagues and I at the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine are working to improve medical education so that future healthcare providers enter practice with an understanding of how to support and optimize a patient’s innate healing capacity. Of course, drug therapy is an important method for maintaining health and treating disease — but it’s not the only method.

 

AS | What are the consequences of overmedication?

 

AW | Safety is the biggest concern – polypharmacy (being on multiple medications) increases the odds for adverse reactions, drug interactions, and the unintended worsening of health problems.

 

Another worry is cost — the markup on pharmaceutical drugs is greater than on any other commodity in the marketplace. Big Pharma justifies this by citing the high cost of research, but that represents a small fraction of what they spend on advertising and promotion.

 

There are also environmental concerns — we get exposed to drugs that are excreted from the body or thrown out because they accumulate in our water supplies, in the soil, and in the foods we eat.

 

Overmedication also contributes to the pervasive notion that drugs are the only answer, but drug therapy is often best at hiding symptoms. Drugs alone do not address the root cause of disease.

 

AS| You have a very evocative statement in your book: “No difference exists between a drug and a poison except dose.” What do you mean by that?

 

AW | All drugs become toxic as the dose is increased. Doctors generally believe that the best medications are those that are powerful and work quickly. Unfortunately, concentration of pharmaceutical power inevitably concentrates toxicity. These potent agents are necessary in cases of severe illness, where benefit outweighs risk, but they are now used for almost every disease condition, even mild ones.

 

Strong reliance on these isolated, purified chemical compounds produces a high incidence of adverse reactions, ranging from mild discomfort to multisystem failure and death, even when the drug has been prescribed appropriately. Herbal remedies are far safer because the active components are present in a complex natural balance and in low concentrations.

 

AS | You write in your book that you want people to become wise consumers when it comes to medicine — to know when pharmaceutical products are really needed. So when are they needed?

 

AW | Use of pharmaceuticals should be limited to those situations where they are clearly indicated — critical care, terminal care, and the management of severe disease. I would like to see them play a smaller role in the treatment of common conditions where the risks are not justified. For chronic disease management, drug therapy should be offered in the context of comprehensive care that also includes lifestyle modification and nondrug therapies. Both doctors and patients need to become knowledgeable about less expensive and less dangerous interventions that are safe and effective.

 

AS | Are there any heartening trends afoot? What will it take, in your opinion, for more doctors to adopt a lifestyle-first strategy to tackle the chronic disease epidemic?

 

AW | We are faced with the growing realization that over-reliance on prescription-drug therapy has come at a terrible price — worsening antibiotic resistance and an unprecedented opioid addiction and an epidemic of serious adverse drug reactions are some of the most disturbing developments. Doctors are responding by prescribing fewer antibiotics for viral illnesses such as colds and the flu (antibiotics do not work against viruses), and by recognizing that narcotic medications are only indicated for short-term pain management following acute injury or surgery — they are not effective for the relief of chronic pain. In contrast, positive lifestyle changes such as an anti-inflammatory diet and healthy stress-management practices, as well as complementary therapies including acupuncture and mind-body techniques, are safe and effective ways of managing chronic pain.

 

Crisis offers opportunity. In these challenging times, my hope is that as a country we see the wisdom of integrative medicine and the lifestyle habits it encourages as part of the solution to our healthcare crisis.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr Anne Sullivan

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Frequent Nut Comsumption can Help to Prevent Diabetes and Stabilize Glucose levels.

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Frequent Nut Consumption Can Help to Prevent Diabetes and Improve Blood Glucose Control

 

This year, the WHO, ( World Health Organization) is focusing on diabetes in order to increase awareness about its rise and staggering burden and consequences, in particular in low-and middle-income countries. The International Nut & Dried Fruit Council (INC) wants to raise awareness about the importance of nuts in the treatment and prevention of this disease.

 

Cyril Kendall, PhD at the department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto, explains that this increase of prevalence is linked to our changing lifestyle. “We are becoming less active and our diet is becoming overly processed. This unhealthy diet not only increases blood glucose levels but it also leads to an increase in body weight which further increases the risk of developing diabetes”. Kendall, who has been studying the relation of nut consumption and diabetes, says that “based on the current scientific evidence, nuts may play an important role in improving the risk factors for this disease. Population studies have shown that frequent nut consumption is inversely associated to diabetes development and clinical studies indicate that nuts can help to improve blood glucose control in diabetes”.

 

In fact, nut consumption has been associated with beneficial effects on glucose and insulin levels, according to the latest studies about the relationship between nut intake and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The PREDIMED study concluded that the results of two Mediterranean Diet groups which added extra virgin olive oil and nuts reduced the risk to suffer diabetes by 52%. In addition, researchers at the Human Nutrition Unit, from Rovira i Virgili University, have proven that the intake of two ounces (57 g) of pistachios per day has a significant effect: it decreases fasting glucose, and favors insulin and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Also, researchers at the Shih-Chien University and the Chang Gung University of Science and Tech (Taiwan), have shown that 60 g/day almond consumption improved glycemic control in patients with T2D.

 

Currently, about 400 million people (more than 5% of the world’s population) have T2D. It is estimated that by 2035 there will be almost 600 million people living with T2D and almost 900 million people with pre-diabetes, a silent state associated with a high risk of several deadly conditions including T2D, heart disease, hypertension, strokes and early death.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr Anne Sullivan

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Risk of Stroke with Nexium, Prilosec and other Heart Burn Drugs Seen in Study

nexium

 

Risk of Stroke with Nexium, Prilosec, Other Heart Burn Drugs Seen in New Study

 

The findings of new research raise additional concerns about the potential side effects of Nexium, Prilosec and other heart burn drugs, suggesting that certain users of the popular medications may face an increased risk of stroke.

 

According to preliminary findings of a study presented this week at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016, researchers from the Danish Heart Foundation indicate that the overall stroke risk with Nexium, Prilosec and other proton pump inhibitors (PPI) increased 21%, especially among users of higher doses, which is a strong indicator that the drugs are likely causing the strokes.

 

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a class of heartburn medications used by millions of Americans, including blockbuster brands like Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid, Protonix, Dexilant, AcipHex and others, many of which have over-the-counter versions available without a prescription.

 

Although most users assume the drugs carry few serious side effects, often continuing to use Nexium or other PPIs for years, without any attempt to discontinue the drugs, the medications have been linked to a number of possible health risks in recent years, including heart attacks, dementia, kidney disease and kidney failure. However, some experts suggest that the link between Nexium and strokes may be most worrying, if confirmed.

 

“At one time, PPIs were thought to be safe, without major side effects,” Dr. Thomas Sehested, the study’s lead author, said in an American Heart Association press release. “This study further questions the cardiovascular safety of these drugs.”

 

The study, which has not yet been completed or peer-reviewed, looked at the records of nearly 250,000 Danish patients, with an average age of 57, who underwent an endoscopy procedure to seek out causes of stomach problems. Nearly 9,500 of those patients suffered an ischemic stroke during the six year follow up period of the study. The researchers looked to see which of those patients were taking either Nexium, Prilosec, Protonix, or Prevacid.

 

Researchers found that the overall stroke risk with Nexium, Prilosec, Protonix and Prevacid increased by 21% for patients taking the drugs. The risk increased at higher doses for some, with high doses of Prevacid increasing the risk of stroke to 30%, and high doses of Protonix carrying the most risk of stroke with a 94% increased risk.

 

The study also looked at another class of heartburn drugs, known as H2 blockers, which includes Pepcid and Zantac. However, no increased risk of stroke was seen with those other drugs.

 

The researchers said their findings should inspire doctors to be more cautious in prescribing PPIs, and suggested that they should carefully consider if a PPI prescription is necessary and for how long to keep the patient on the drugs.

 

Other Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid, and Protonix Health Risks

 

Over the past year, a growing number of Nexium lawsuits, Prilosec lawsuits ,Prevacid lawsuits, Protonix lawsuits, Dexilant lawsuits and other claims have been brought against the makers of proton pump inhibitors, alleging that users and the medical community were not adequately warned about the risk of serious and potentially life-threatening injuries.

 

The litigation has emerged over the past year, after a series of independent studies suggested there is a link between Nexium and kidney risks, including acute interstitial nephritis, acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney failure. This has raised questions in recent months about whether the drugs may be overused.

 

Earlier this year, a study published in the medical journal JAMA Internal Medicine also found an increased risk of chronic kidney disease with the heartburn medications, indicating that users of Nexium, Prilosec and other PPI may be 50% more likely when compared to non-users.

 

In 2014, a study published by researchers from the University of Findlay College of Pharmacy noted that not only was overuse and abuse of heartburn drugs widespread, but many who take the drugs do so for longer than four years. The study noted that this increases the risk of any side effects associated with the drugs, but it also has a large economic impact as well.

 

Plaintiffs claim that drug makers placed their desire for profits before consumer’s safety by withholding important safety information, alleging that if warnings had been provided about the risk of acute interstitial nephritis, kidney injury, kidney disease and kidney failure, many individuals may have been able to avoid these severe and potentially life-threatening injuries.

 

Given the large number of users throughout the United States, it is expected that thousands of cases may be filed in the coming months as heartburn drug injury lawyers continue to review and file cases.

We here at Health and Wellness Associates have mentioned this many times over the past few years.  Luckily, we have helped many of you get off these drugs safely.  If you are on any of these medications and you wish help in getting off them, please call us, or write to us, and we will be happy to get back with you.

 

Please share with family and loved ones.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

P Carrothers

Director of Personal Healthcare and Preventative Medicine

312-972-WELL

 

Are Sleeping Problems a Warning for Alzheimer’s?

sleepingproblems

Are Sleeping Problems a Warning for Alzheimer’s?

 

Trouble getting enough sleep may be linked to a bigger risk of Alzheimer’s disease for some people, new research suggests.

 

The results of the small study hint that people with a higher-than-normal risk of Alzheimer’s disease who had worse sleep quality, more sleep problems and daytime sleepiness had more markers for Alzheimer’s disease in their spinal fluid than those who didn’t have sleep issues.

 

The markers found by researchers included signs of the proteins amyloid and tau, and brain cell damage and inflammation, all linked to potential Alzheimer’s.

 

Amyloid is a protein that folds and forms plaques. Tau is a protein that forms tangles. Plaques and tangles are found in the brains of those with Alzheimer’s disease and are considered a hallmark of the disease.

 

“This study and others in the field suggest that sleep may be a modifiable risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease,” said senior researcher Barbara Bendlin. She’s an associate professor of medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.

 

“This will require studies that directly test whether modifying sleep has a beneficial effect on the brain,” Bendlin said.

 

So, if you’re someone who’s always tossing and turning at night, does that mean you’re destined to a future with Alzheimer’s disease?

 

Not necessarily. Bendlin said these findings cannot prove that poor sleep causes Alzheimer’s disease. “We found an association,” she said. “But that does not mean cause and effect.”

 

It’s possible changes in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s could affect sleep, as opposed to the other way around, Bendlin added.

 

People with markers — signs — of Alzheimer’s in their spinal fluid aren’t necessarily predestined to develop the condition either, she said.

 

“We found relationships between sleep and levels of proteins related to Alzheimer’s disease, but the proteins that we were measuring haven’t yet been shown to predict future dementia when measured in cognitively healthy people,” Bendlin said.

 

 

The study included 101 people and their average age was 63. At the time of testing, all of the study volunteers had normal thinking and memory skills. But they were considered at risk for Alzheimer’s either because they had a parent with the disease or they carried a gene that increases the risk for Alzheimer’s called apolipoprotein E, or APOE.

 

The study volunteers gave a sample of spinal fluid to be tested for markers of Alzheimer’s disease.

 

They also answered questions to judge the quality of their sleep. Examples included: “During the past four weeks, how often did you get the amount of sleep you needed?” Or “Did you get enough sleep to feel rested upon waking in the morning?” Bendlin said.

 

Although a strong association between sleep problems and Alzheimer’s markers was seen in most people, not everyone with sleep difficulty had these markers in their spinal fluid, Bendlin said.

 

For example, there was no association seen between people who had sleep apnea and markers for Alzheimer’s in their spinal fluid.

 

Other factors — such as the use of drugs to aid sleep, education, depression and weight — didn’t change the association between poor sleep and markers for Alzheimer’s disease, the researchers found.

 

One thing that could have thrown the findings off is that the participants reported their own sleep problems. It’s possible that people misreported their sleep issues or didn’t remember them correctly, the researchers said.

 

One specialist said that the association between sleep and amyloid has been seen in mice, but its effect on people isn’t clear.

 

“There is a positive feedback loop involving sleep and amyloid,” said Dr. Sam Gandy, director of the Center for Cognitive Health at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

 

In mice, the worse the sleep, the more amyloid builds up. The more amyloid builds up, the worse the sleep, he said.

 

It’s not known if this occurs in the same way in humans, Gandy said.

 

“Since our ability to slow progression of Alzheimer’s is still quite limited, this is an important area for research so that we might be able to exploit sleep regulation therapeutically,” he said.

 

Bendlin said it’s important to identify modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer’s because delaying Alzheimer’s disease in people by as little as five years could reduce the number of cases in the next 30 years by nearly 6 million and save $367 billion in health care costs.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

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