Health and Disease, Uncategorized

4 Types of Diabetic Neuropathy

What Are the Symptoms of Diabetic Neuropathy?

neuropathy tip of an iceberg

As soon as I posted on Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy, the question was asked about the other types of Diabetic Neuropathy.

 

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on the type of neuropathy that affects a person and the nerves being targeted. Common symptoms are known to involve the sensory, motor and autonomic (or involuntary) nervous systems.

However, some people with nerve damage may not manifest symptoms at all, while others may only experience mild symptoms such as numbness, tingling or pain in the feet.

Mild cases may also remain unnoticed for a long period of time because most damage occurs over several years. Other people, typically those with focal neuropathy, can also experience sudden, severe and painful symptoms.

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms Vary According to the Type of Condition
There are four types of diabetic neuropathy that can affect people, and symptoms are usually specific to the type.2

1.Peripheral neuropathy — Feet and legs are often affected first, followed by hands and arms. Patients with peripheral neuropathy may experience:

◦ Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes

◦ A tingling or burning sensation

◦ Sharp pains or cramps

◦ Increased sensitivity to touch

◦ Muscle weakness

◦ Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle

◦ Loss of balance and coordination

◦ Serious foot problems such as ulcers, infections, deformities and bone and joint pain

2. Autonomic neuropathy — This form of neuropathy targets the autonomic nervous system responsible for controlling the heart, bladder, lung, stomach, intestines, sex organs and eyes. Symptoms include:

◦ Hypoglycemia unawareness (a lack of awareness that blood sugar levels are low)

◦ Bladder problems including urinary tract infections or urinary retention or incontinence

◦ Constipation, uncontrolled diarrhea or a combination of the two

◦ Gastroparesis (slow stomach emptying), which can cause nausea, vomiting, bloating and appetite loss

◦ Vaginal dryness and other sexual difficulties (women)

◦ Erectile dysfunction (men)

◦ Difficulty swallowing

◦ Increased or decreased sweating

◦ Changes in the way your eyes adjust from light to dark

◦ Problems with body temperature regulation

◦ Increased heart rate during rest

◦ Inability of the body to adjust blood pressure and heart rate, causing sharp drops in blood after sitting or standing and leading to fainting or lightheadedness

3. Radiculoplexus neuropathy — Radiculoplexus neuropathy affects nerves in the thighs, hips, buttocks or legs. This condition is also called diabetic amyotrophy, femoral neuropathy or proximal neuropathy.

Typically, symptoms of radiculoplexus neuropathy are found on one side of the body, but in some cases these can spread to the other side:

◦ Sudden and severe pain in your hip and thigh or buttock

◦ Eventual weak and atrophied thigh muscles

◦ Difficulty rising from a sitting position

◦ Abdominal swelling if the abdomen is affected

◦ Weight loss

Take note that most radiculoplexus neuropathy patients improve at least partially over time, but there are instances when symptoms can worsen before they get better.

4. Mononeuropathy — In this form, there is damage to a specific nerve in the face, torso or leg. Mononeuropathy, also called focal neuropathy, often comes on suddenly. The symptoms of this type of diabetic neuropathy depend on the nerve involved, and can include:

◦ Difficulty focusing your eyes, double vision or aching behind one eye

◦ Paralysis on one side of the face (Bell’s palsy)

◦ Pain in the shin or foot

◦ Pain in the lower back or pelvis

◦ Pain at the front of the thigh

◦ Pain in the chest or abdomen

Mononeuropathy may also occur when a nerve is compressed. Among diabetics, carpal tunnel syndrome is a common type of compression neuropathy.

Patients can experience a numbness or tingling in the fingers or hand (especially in the thumb and/or index, middle and ring fingers), a sense of weakness in the hand and a tendency to drop things.

While mononeuropathy is known to trigger severe pain, this disease doesn’t necessarily  cause long-term problems, unless untreated. Symptoms may disappear on their own within a few weeks or months, with proper treatment.

If you notice these symptoms, talk to your doctor immediately to determine the type of diabetic neuropathy that may be affecting you so you can receive proper treatment.

 

Health and Wellness Associates
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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

What Is Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy?

WebMD shows you how to improve your balance and ideas for exercises to help you prevent or lessen the numbness and pain of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders triggered by diabetes. There are four forms of this disease, with diabetic peripheral neuropathy being the most common. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy occurs when a patient’s feet and legs are affected by nerve damage, followed by the hands and arms.

Diabetic peripheral neurophathy will first show signs in the feet, then cramps in ones legs, and unlike other neuropathies, the pain in the leg will be on both outsides of the leg, and along the shinbone.

The Mayo Clinic points out that while the cause of the disease is unclear, a combination of factors likely play a role in the development of diabetic neuropathy, such as the complex interaction between nerves and blood vessels.

High blood sugar levels are known to interfere with the nerves’ ability to transmit signals and weaken the capillaries or walls of the small blood vessels that provide oxygen and nutrients to the nerves.

As long as 20 years in the making, this type of neuropathy started, and some may have drank too much in their 20’s or 30’s, been around heavy metals, or had a sweet tooth all of which might have been accompanied by too much stress in ones life, and is now stressing your body.

 

Symptoms and Complications of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Some of the initial symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy include:

  • Numbness or insensitivity to pain or temperature

At a point in your life you may have been able to handle cold or hot temperatures better than your peers, and now mainly the cold is very hard on your body.

PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY: What you need to know about this disorder that results from damage to your peripheral nerves and often causes unusual sensations such as vibrations, tingling, burning, numbness, weakness, loss of balance, and even pain. Symptoms are usually in the hands, feet but can occur in other areas of the body. Do you have this? Share your story with us. www.mollysfund.org

  • A tingling, burning or prickling sensation

One of the earliest symptoms is to have a burning or hot sensation in the bottom of ones feet, and mostly ignored.  Then a prickly, or even itchy type of sensation would have followed.

 

Diabetes leg pain and cramps often occur as a result of damaged nerves (diabetic peripheral neuropathy). Neuropathy can also cause tingling and numbness.

  • Sharp pains or cramps

People get cramps, especially in their legs and brush it off.  They may even go to the doctor and get something for them, and that is it.

  • Extreme sensitivity to touch, even light touch

Sometimes a soft touch is nice, but when one gets that “creepy” feeling along with it, that is sensitivity.

 

Fibromyalgia vs. peripheral neuropathy: Causes, symptoms, risk factors, and complications

  • Muscle weakness

When you say to yourself ” I use to do this,  and I remember I use to be able to do that”    Those are , and should be a large red flag to  your healthcare provider.  Muscle weakness is a powerful warning sign.

 

Nerve Regeneration Sound Therapy | Peripheral Neuropathy Treatment Binaural Beats Meditation Music - YouTube

  • Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle

Did you ever wake up and feel like you twisted your ankle, but you dont remember anything?    When you walk, does it feel like you are flat footed, but it probably is your ankle reflexes gone.    Orthopedic shoes are usually recommended, but in fact will make this problem worse.

 

  • Loss of balance and coordination

Dizziness, tripping, occasionally feeling like you are leaning to one side or the other.   Not able to try out for a tightrope walker?   When you tell this to your healthcare provider, they want to check your ears right away.  They may even send you to see someone else, and some precautionary measures may be taken, but they dont have an answer.

  • Serious foot problems such as ulcers, infections, deformities and bone and joint pain

Notice if any of the bones in  your feet and/or toes have changed shape.

Diabetes can damage the nerves that help you feel pain, heat, and cold, especially in your feet. Learn about the symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and the problems it can cause, what you can do about it, and how to prevent it.

 

These are some of the main symptoms at the first level, with each level there are more symptoms.  If you have been diagnosed with neuropathy and also diabetes it is good to know these symptoms, and what might happen if you ignore them.

These symptoms are known to worsen at night. Many diabetics already show signs of neuropathy that a doctor can take note of, but patients themselves don’t feel them.

If left untreated, diabetic peripheral neuropathy can lead to muscle weakness and loss of reflexes, especially at the ankle, eventually causing changes in the way a person walks. Foot deformities, such as hammertoes (a deformity that causes the toe to bend or curl downward instead of pointing forward) and the collapse of the midfoot, may occur too.

Should pressure or an injury remain unnoticed, this can prompt blisters and sores to appear on numb areas of the foot. If there is an infection that’s not treated immediately, it can spread to the bone and may require the foot to be amputated. Fortunately, many amputations are preventable if minor problems are examined and treated immediately.

This is not necessarily something one has to live with.  There are many methods people have used to send this disease into remission, sometimes permanently, or at least try to decrease the symptoms, and not move on to a worse state.

This is a progressive disease, and you want to STOP it!, NOT, put up with it!

Other Risk Factors of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy can also be triggered by factors apart from diabetes, namely:

  • Shingles (post herpetic neuralgia)

Never get the shingles shot, if you think you have this condition

  • Vitamin deficiency, particularly of vitamin B9 (folate) and B12

Do  not start taking either of these supplements without a good provider telling  you the other supplements that MUST be taken with them, so as to cause no more harm.

  • Alcohol intake
  • Autoimmune diseases such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis or Guillain-Barre syndrome

If this disease is not handled correctly you will develop one of these conditions also.

  • AIDS, whether from the disease or its treatment, or from syphilis or kidney failure

 

  • Inherited diseases such as amyloid polyneuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

 

  • Exposure to toxins, such as heavy metals, gold compounds, lead, arsenic, mercury and organophosphate pesticides

If you work with metals, you have a greater chance to develop this condition.   Stay away from heavy metal work, if you are already a diabetic, and also fertilizer.

  • Cancer therapy drugs like vincristine (Oncovin and Vincasar) and antibiotics including metronidazole (Flagyl) and isoniazid

Remember these medicatios, and have your healthcare provider order something else.

  • Diseases such as neurofibromatosis, Fabry disease, Tangier diseases, hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy and hereditary amyloidosis (albeit rare)

 

  • Statins —    neuropathy caused by this group of  medications is rising at an alarming rate.  Yet, sometimes some of the symptoms are masked.  

Do everything you can to get off of a statin drug, especially if you are already a diabetic.

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a major health concern. If you experience any of the symptoms mentioned here, consult a good healthcare provider immediately. If someone you know exhibits these signs, but is unaware that they are symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, talk to them about having their condition checked.

Always contact us here at :  healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

You can make a big impact in improving their health and may even help save their lives by being aware of this disorder.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS Telehealth

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Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Cutting Down On Drinking Can Help You Quit Smoking

Health and Wellness Associates

 

Cutting Down On Drinking Can Help You Quit Smoking

 

stopsmoking.jpg

 

Research has revealed that heavy drinkers who’re attempting to quit smoking could find that limiting their alcohol consumption could also help them to quit smoking.  The nicotine metabolite ratio of study participants who consumed alcohol heavily reduced as their alcohol consumption was limited. Nicotine metabolite ratio is a biomarker which indicates how fast an individual’s body metabolizes nicotine, and is an index of nicotine metabolism.

Using alcohol together with cigarettes is common, with almost 1 in 5 individuals making use of both. Cigarette smoking is particularly common in heavy drinkers. Alcohol consumption is a proven risk factor for smoking, and smoking is proven risk factor for consuming alcohol. It requires a great deal of determination to quit smoking, usually taking quite a few attempts.

Previous studies have indicated that individuals having higher nicotine metabolism ratios will probably smoke a lot more and that individuals with higher rates have a more difficult time quitting. Slowing an individual’s nicotine metabolism rate by means of reduced alcohol consumption could provide an edge when attempting to quit smoking, which is proven to be a challenging undertaking.

The nicotine metabolite ratio was examined over a few weeks in a group of 22 individuals who smoked daily and had been looking for alcohol use disorder treatment, the medical term used for severe alcohol consumption.

This study indicates that the nicotine metabolism is changed by alcohol consumption as indexed by the nicotine metabolite ratio. The study also suggests that smoking and consuming alcohol on a daily basis should best be treated at the same time.

The nicotine metabolite ratio proved to be clinically useful. Individuals having a higher ratio have a more difficult time giving up smoking cold turkey. They’re also not as likely to successfully stop smoking by making use of nicotine replacement therapy products.

It was discovered that the nicotine metabolite rate of the male study participants decreased as they cut down on their alcohol consumption from an average of 29 drinks per week to 7 drinks per week.

The researchers’ results for men replicated those of previous research which discovered similar effects and provide more proof of the significance of the nicotine metabolite ratio biomarker for advising treatment for smokers attempting to quit.

Although the nicotine metabolite ratio is considered to be an index that is stable, it might not be as stable as previously thought. This is positive from a clinical point of view, because if an individual wants to quit smoking, they should be encouraged to cut down on alcohol consumption to assist with a smoking cessation plan.

The female study participants didn’t see reductions in the nicotine metabolite ratio, but it was found that they didn’t reduce their alcohol consumption very much for the duration of the study period. Their rate of alcohol consumption started low and remained low.

 

Nothing Will Work Unless You Do It!

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

The Exercise Hormone Irisin May Help Protect Against Alzheimer’s

Health and Wellness Associates

 

The Exercise Hormone Irisin May Help Protect Against Alzheimer’s

 

According to a study, exercise produces the irisin hormone that could help in improving memory and protecting against Alzheimer’s. It’s known that physical activity improves memory, and research has suggested that it could also help to reduce Alzheimer’s risk.

The irisin hormone that’s released into circulation when performing physical activity was discovered by scientists several years ago. It was initially suggested that irisin primarily played a part in the metabolism of energy. Subsequent research discovered that the irisin hormone could also play a role in promoting neuronal growth in the hippocampus of the brain, a region important for memory and learning.

For the current study, researchers first looked for an irisin and Alzheimer’s association. Making use of brain bank tissue samples, the irisin hormone was found to be present in the hippocampus and that levels of irisin in the hippocampus are reduced in people with Alzheimer’s.

The researchers used mice for investigating the effect of irisin in the brain. They discovered that irisin protects the synapses of the mice’s brains as well as their memory. Synapses and memory were weakened in healthy mice when irisin was immobilized in the hippocampus. Both measures of brain health improved when levels of irisin were boosted in the brain.

The impact that exercise has on irisin and the brain was then examined. It was discovered that mice that swam almost every day for 5 weeks didn’t develop memory impairment even though they got beta amyloid infusions, which is the protein implicated in Alzheimer’s that clogs neurons and destroys memory.

The benefits of swimming were completely eliminated when irisin was blocked with a drug. Mice that were given irisin-blocking drugs and swam did not perform better on memory tests compared to sedentary mice after beta amyloid infusions.

anageoldstory

 

Nothing Will Work Unless You Do It!

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Flaxseed and Breast Cancer

Health and Wellness Associates

 

Flaxseed and Breast Cancer

 

Flaxseeds as well as flaxseed oil are rich sources of plant lignans. Research has shown that flaxseed lignans have considerable anticancer properties. Lignans are fiber compounds that are able to bind to estrogen receptors and restrict the cancer promoting effects of estrogen on breast tissue. Fish and flaxseed, and that includes flaxseed oil, also increase the production of a compound called SHBG (sex hormone-binding globulin). This protein regulates levels of estrogen levels by eliminating excess estrogen out of the body.fishandflaxsee

 

Women with high levels of the phytoestrogen enterolactone, which is linked to high lignan intake from foods such as flax, flaxseed oils and fish, have been found to have a 58% reduction of breast cancer risk.

A study has shown that daily supplementation of ground flaxseed can reduce estrogen levels. Reducing estrogen reduces risk of breast cancer.

grindinggrains

The director of the breast cancer prevention program at the Toronto Hospital has reported that flaxseed in the diet may shrink breast cancer tumors. His research involved 50 women who had been recently diagnosed with breast cancer and were waiting for surgery. They were divided into 2 groups, one group was given a daily muffin containing 25 grams of ground flaxseed, and the other group had plain muffins. After surgery, it was found that those who had been given the flaxseed muffins had slower-growing breast cancer tumors than the others.

 

Nothing will work unless You do it!

Health and Wellness Associates

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Foods, Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Three-Cheese Spinach Casserole With a Twist

Three-Cheese Spinach Casserole With a Twist

 

This spinach casserole is easy to make and cheesy, yet light. This recipe can replace your traditional spinach dip appetizer. Using cottage cheese and feta instead of cream cheese and cheddar cheese in this recipe saves fat and calories, but gives a similar taste and texture. Bake this in the oven, or use a slow cooker to make ahead. Enjoy as an entree, appetizer or snack.

 

Spinach Casserole with Cheese

 

Ingredients

  • 2 10-ounce boxes frozen chopped spinach
  • ¼ chopped onion
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 8-ounce package cottage cheese, low-fat 2%
  • ½ cup feta cheese
  • ½ cup Monterrey jack cheese
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon seasoned salt or other spice mixture to taste
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese, hard (not the dried kind in a can)

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 350F.

2. Defrost spinach in the boxes or in a 2-quart casserole dish.

3. Fry chopped onions in oil until they are translucent and begin to soften.

4. Mix all ingredients except for the Parmesan cheese in the casserole dish. Sprinkle Parmesan on top.

5. Bake for 40-45 minutes or until knife inserted in the center comes out clean and cheese on top begins to brown. Let stand for 10 minutes.

Serve warm with crudites or chips of your choice.

Ingredient Substitutions and Cooking Tips

This recipe is easy to adapt, so if you have certain spice mixtures or salad dressing seasonings that you like, feel free to add them. For example, you can add ½ teaspoon of Chinese Five Spice Powder or another spice mix to give the spinach casserole some depth. It’s not unusual to add dried ranch dressing mix or dried vegetable soup mix to the recipe to give your spinach casserole a distinct flavor.

Speaking of spice, you can make this spinach dip spicy too. Add some kick to this spinach dish by adding jalapeno peppers, red pepper flakes or cayenne pepper. Simply add these when preparing the onion.

Spinach is full of iron, folate, and fiber, but who says you can’t add more. Add shredded artichoke hearts, broccoli, carrots or zucchini to boost the nutritional value of the dish. Instead of crackers, corn chips, or bread, serve with cucumbers, jicama, cauliflower florets or bell pepper strips.

Kale can be substituted for spinach if you want to try different greens with this recipe. Another excellent addition is fresh garlic for extra flavor. A cup of cooked quinoa or chopped chicken breast can also be added to this recipe to boost protein, although the Greek yogurt addition in this recipe provides plenty of it.

 

 

We can turn an Illness into Wellness

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Yes! You Need to Eat Walnuts!

4 Reasons You Should Eat Walnuts

walnuts

A mainstay of any dietary recommendations, walnuts are an excellent choice when it comes to healthy snacking. Walnuts are good sources of:

  1. Omega-3 fatty acids, protective fats that may promote cardiovascular health, help maintain optimal cognitive function, and tone down inflammation.
  2. Heart-healthy monounsaturated fats.
  3. Ellagic acid, an antioxidant compound that helps support a healthy immune system.
  4. L-arginine, an essential amino acid that promotes healthy blood pressure.

Try adding walnuts to your plain yogurt and fruit parfaits or steel cut oatmeal to start the day, eat them as a snack, and use walnut oil in salad dressings for a nutritional boost. Or try a Walnut Pesto recipe!

basilwalnutpicture

Basil Walnut Recipe

Ingredients
  1. 2 cups gently packed fresh basil leaves.
  2. 2 large garlic cloves, roughly chopped.
  3. 1/2 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano.
  4. 1/3 cup walnuts.
  5. 1/2 teaspoon salt.
  6. 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper.
  7. 2/3 cup extra virgin olive oil, best quality such as Lucini or Colavita.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Is Pork a Cause of Fatty Liver Disease

  • Is Pork a Cause of Fatty Liver Disease

  • What Is Fatty Liver Disease?
  • Pork consumption has a strong epidemiological association with cirrhosis of the liver — in fact, it may be more strongly associated with cirrhosis than alcohol
  • Other studies also show an association between pork consumption and liver cancer as well as multiple sclerosis.
  • Several factors may be behind these health risks, including pork raised on grains and seed oils, making it high in omega-6 fats, as well as the fact that most pork consumed in the United States is processed (processed meats are known to increase the risk of cancer)
  • Being scavenger animals, pigs are also prime breeding grounds for potentially dangerous infections; even cooking pork for long periods is not enough to kill many of the retroviruses and other parasites that many of them harbor (this is true even of pasture-raised pork)

 

Do you have fatty liver disease?  Contact us and we will find out.

Health and Wellness Associates

Dr J Jaranson

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Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Do You Have High Blood Pressure? Eat more of this!

Do You Have High Blood Pressure?

Eat more of this!

  • get nourished with nitrates
  • In the modern diet, nitrates can be found both in nitrate-rich plant foods and in processed meats. However, while nitrates from plant foods promote nitric oxide production, processed meats trigger conversion of nitrates into carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds
  • Nitrites from plants turn into beneficial nitric oxide due to the presence of antioxidants such as vitamin C and polyphenols
  • Nitric oxide is a soluble gas, and while it’s a free radical, it’s also an important biological signaling molecule that supports normal endothelial function, lowers blood pressure, protects your mitochondria and more
  • Plant foods high in nitrates include arugula, rhubarb, cilantro, butter leaf lettuce, spring greens, basil, beet greens, oak leaf lettuce, Swiss chard and red beets, especially fermented beets
  • To further augment nitric oxide production, combine nitrate-rich plant food with probiotics

Do you need help with your high blood pressure.  Do you want to try to get off your medications.  Then contact us at healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Dr J Jaranson

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Baked Bananas Foster Recipe: Your Liver Loves it!

Baked Bananas Foster Recipe

Your Liver Loves it!

 

It may feel hard to find fat-free, healthy dessert recipes that are absolutely indulgent and rich. Well, look no further. This Baked Bananas Foster recipe is just as decadent as the original yet full of only the best ingredients for your whole body and soul. Enjoy them plain or serve them with the included Banana Nice Cream. Either way, you will find yourself swept off your feet.

Bananas: The fructose in banana is liver’s favorite source of food. It provides quick fuel to the liver and wakes up sleepy cells, increasing their ingenuity and work output. Soothes the linings of the intestinal tract and also soothes the nerves attached to the intestinal tract. Contrary to popular belief, bananas are one of the most antibacterial, anti-yeast, antifungal foods. A great food to combine with other nutrient-rich foods or to take with supplements, because they improve the liver’s ability to absorb nutrients.

Maple syrup: The combination of sugars and high mineral content quickly travels to the liver and becomes instant fuel of phytonutrient composition. It’s like an IV for the liver containing the best of both worlds: a vast array of vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients (many of them still undiscovered) coupled with high-quality sugar on which the liver thrives.

Baked Bananas Foster

Makes 3 servings

Ingredients:
3 bananas
2 ½ tablespoons maple syrup, divided
½ teaspoon cinnamon
2 teaspoons maple sugar
¹⁄8 teaspoon sea salt (optional)

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 400°F. Slice the bananas in half lengthwise and arrange them in a baking dish lined with parchment paper.

In a small bowl, stir together ½ tablespoon of the maple syrup with the cinnamon, maple sugar, and sea salt until well combined.

Brush the banana slices with the remaining 2 tablespoons of maple syrup, making sure to coat both sides. Spread the cinnamon mixture evenly along the top of the banana slices and bake them in the oven for 15 to 18 minutes, until the bananas are soft and golden brown.

Remove the baked bananas from the oven and serve alongside Banana Nice Cream if desired.

Banana Ice Cream Recipe

Ingredients:
3 frozen bananas
2 tablespoons warm water

Directions:
Roughly chop the frozen bananas and place them into the food processor. Process the bananas, adding warm water by the tablespoon as needed to prevent sticking. Stop processing once the bananas have reached a smooth, soft-serve consistency. Enjoy immediately or place in the freezer to set for 2 to 4 hours.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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