Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

SIDS Risk : Smoking!

Smoking While Pregnant Sends SIDS Risk Soaring

News Picture: Smoking While Pregnant Sends SIDS Risk Soaring

Smoking during pregnancy is never a good idea, but new research shows it might double the risk of a baby dying from sudden infant death syndrome(SIDS).

“Any maternal smoking during pregnancy — even just one cigarette a day — doubles the risk of sudden unexpected infant death [SID, another term for unexplained infant deaths],” said lead researcher Tatiana Anderson. She is a fellow at Seattle Children’s Research Institute, Center for Integrative Brain Research.

Doctors should strongly encourage women to give up smoking during pregnancy, or if they can’t quit, to smoke less, she said. Each cigarette smoked increases the risk of SIDS, Anderson added.

If women didn’t smoke during pregnancy, the rate of SIDS in the United States could be cut by 22 percent, preventing some 800 infant deaths a year, according to the new report published online March 11 in the journal Pediatrics.

Although 55 percent of the women in the study who smoked didn’t stop or cut back during pregnancy, those who did markedly reduced the risk of SIDS, Anderson said.

Specifically, women who cut down on their smoking by the third trimester reduced the risk of SIDS by 12 percent. Women who quit by the third trimester reduced the risk by 23 percent, the researchers found.

For the study, Anderson and her colleagues collected data on more than 19,000 SID cases. SID cases include sudden infant death syndrome and other unknown causes of death, as well as suffocation and strangulation in bed of infants under age 1.

It’s not just smoking, said Dr. Rahul Gupta, chief medical and health officer at the March of Dimes. But the more women smoke, the greater the risk for SID becomes, he said.

Women should stop smoking before pregnancy and certainly during pregnancy, Gupta advised.

Smoking during pregnancy can impair the baby’s brain development. In addition, women who smoke are depriving their baby of oxygen, as smoking decreases the amount of oxygen in the blood and, therefore, in the placenta, he explained.

“Smoking also causes preterm birth, decreases in development of the brain and respiratory system of the baby,” Gupta said. “Nicotine has also been linked with an important part of the development of the brainstem in the infant.”

Gupta explained that if an infant stops breathing during sleep, a mechanism in the brain senses the lack of oxygen and triggers breathing to start. This is called auto-resuscitation.

Nicotine, however, alters this response, he said. “That baby may not be able to auto-resuscitate, and as a result, we end up with sudden infant death syndrome,” Gupta said.

Because e-cigarettes are a nicotine delivery device, they are not a safe alternative to cigarettes, he added.

“Nicotine is in the vaping device, so all the impacts we are talking about are still harmful when nicotine is delivered, regardless of the device,” Gupta said. “Nicotine and babies do not match.”

In addition, flavorings and other ingredients in e-cigarettes may be harmful to developing babies, he noted.

“Quitting smoking is one of the most effective actions you can take to protect yourself and your baby,” Gupta said.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth
Dr P Carrothers
Dr  Rahul Gupta

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

 

 

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Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Spread Yourself Thin

Spread Yourself Thin : Recipe

 

It is incredible – and spreadable!

Did we mention that it is edible?

The only thing regrettable is that is wont last long.

Sea for Yourself!

 

Image result for spread yourself thin seafood dip

 

4 oz light cream cheese, softened

1/4 c up seafood cocktail sauce

1 tsp lemon juice

1/4 tsp each ground cumin and chili powder

8 oz chopped cooked shrimp

8 oz chopped lump crab meat

1/3 cup minced green onions, optional

 

In a large bowl, beat together cream cheese and cocktail sauce on high speed of electric mixer.  Beat until smooth.

 

Add lemon juice, cumin, and chili powder and beat until well blended

 

Stir in shrimp, crab meat and onions.  Mix well.  Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours before serving.

 

Serve seafood spead with low carb crackers, celery, or raw vegetables.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Food Allergies

Symptoms of Food Allergies

 

Food allergies are immune-based diseases that have become a serious health concern in the United States. An estimated one-fifth of the population believe that they have adverse reactions to food, but the true prevalence of food allergies ranges between 3 and 4 percent in the general population.

Despite the risk of severe allergic reactions and even death, there is no current treatment for food allergies. The condition can only be managed by allergen avoidance or treatment of food allergy symptoms. Fortunately, there are natural allergy fighters that can help to boost the immune system and enhance the gut microbiota, which helps to reduce the development of food allergies and allergy symptoms.

What Are Food Allergies?

Food allergies consist of an immune system response to a disagreeable food. The body senses that a protein in a particular food may be harmful and triggers an immune system response, producing histamine to protect itself. The body “remembers” this and when this food enters the body again, the histamine response is more easily triggered.

The diagnosis of food allergies may be problematic because nonallergic food reactions, such as food intolerance, are frequently confused with food allergy symptoms. Intolerance derived from an immunological mechanism is referred to as a food allergy, and the non-immunological form is called a food intolerance. Food allergies and intolerance are often linked, but there’s a clear difference between the two conditions.

A food allergy comes from a reaction of the allergen-specific immunoglobulin E antibody that is found in the bloodstream. Non-IgE-mediated food allergies are also possible; this happens when someone is exposed to a food that causes signs and symptoms of an allergy, such as allergic contact dermatitis. A food intolerance is an adverse reaction to foods or food components, but not due to immunologic mechanisms.

For example, a person may have an immunologic response to cow’s milk because of the milk’s protein, or that individual may be intolerant to milk due to an inability to digest the sugar lactose. The inability to digest lactose leads to excess fluid production in the GI tract, resulting in abdominal pain and diarrhea. This condition is termed lactose intolerance because lactose in not an allergen, as the response is not immune-based. Food intolerance are nonspecific and the symptoms often resemble common medically unexplained complaints, such as digestive issues.

IgE-medicated food allergies are the most common and dangerous of adverse food reactions; they cause your immune system to react abnormally when exposed to one or more specific foods. Immediate reactions to IgE-mediated food allergies are caused by an allergen-specific immunoglobulin E antibody that floats around in the bloodstream.

When IgE is working properly, it identifies triggers that could be harmful to the body, such as parasites, and tells the body to release histamine. Histamine causes allergy symptoms such as hives, coughing and wheezing. Sometimes IgE reacts to normal proteins that are found in foods — and when the protein is absorbed during digestion and it enters the bloodstream, the entire body reacts as if the protein is a threat. This is why food allergy symptoms are noticeable in the skin, respiratory system, digestive system and circulatory system.

According to a 2014 comprehensive review published in Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology, the prevalence of food allergies in infancy is increasing and may affect up to 15–20 percent of infants. And researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine suggest that food allergies affect as many as 6 percent of young children and 3–4 percent of adults. The alarming rate of increase calls for a public health approach in the prevention and treatment of food allergy, especially in children.

Researchers suggest that this increase in the prevalence of food allergies may be due to a change in the composition, richness and balance of the microbiota that colonize the human gut during early infancy. The human microbiome plays a vital role in early life immune development and function. Since IgE-mediated food allergies are associated with immune dysregulation and impaired gut integrity, there is substantial interest in the potential link between gut microbiota and food allergies.


The 8 Most Common Food Allergies

Although any food can provoke a reaction, relatively few foods are responsible for a vast majority of significant food-induced allergic reactions. Over 90 percent of food allergies are caused by the following foods:

1. Cow’s Milk

Cow’s milk protein allergy affects 2 to 7.5 percent of children; persistence in adulthood is uncommon since a tolerance develops in 51 percent of cases within 2 years of age and 80 percent of cases with 3–4 years.  Numerous milk proteins have been implicated in allergic responses and most of these have been shown to contain multiple allergenic epitopes (targets that an individual target binds to). IgE-mediated reactions to cow’s milk are common in infancy and non-IgE-mediated reactions are common in adults.

A 2005 study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutritionsuggests that the prevalence of self-diagnosed cow’s milk allergy is 10-fold higher than the clinically proven incidence, suggesting that a sizable population is unnecessarily restricting dairy products (for allergy purposes).

2. Eggs

After cow’s milk, hen’s egg allergy is the second most common food allergy in infants and young children. A recent meta-analysis of  the prevalence of food allergy estimated that egg allergy affects 0.5 to 2.5 percent of young children. Allergy to eggs usually presents itself in the second half of the first year of life, with a median age of presentation of 10 months. Most reactions occur upon a child’s first known exposure to egg, with eczema being the most common symptoms. Five major allergenic proteins from the egg of the domestic chicken have been identified, the most dominant being ovalbumin.

3. Soy

Soy allergy affects approximately 0.4 percent of children. According to a 2010 study conducted at John Hopkins University School of Medicine, 50 percent of children with a soy allergy outgrew their allergy by 7 years old.  Prevalence of sensitization after the use of soy-based formulas is around 8.8 percent. Soy formula is commonly used for infants who are allergic to cow’s milk and research suggests that soy allergy occurs in only a small minority of young children with IgE associated cow’s milk allergy.

4. Wheat 

Gluten-related disorders, including wheat allergy, celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity, have an estimated global prevalence close to 5 percent. These disorders share similar symptoms, making it difficult to make a clear diagnosis. A wheat allergy represents a type of adverse immunologic reaction to proteins contained in wheat and related grains. IgE antibodies mediate the inflammatory response to several allergenic proteins found in wheat. Wheat allergy affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract and respiratory tract. Wheat allergy shows greater prevalence in children who commonly outgrow the allergy by school-age.

5. Peanuts 

Peanut allergy tends to present itself early in life and affected individuals generally do not outgrow it. In highly sensitized people, just trace quantities of peanuts can induce an allergic reaction. Research suggests that early exposure to peanuts may reduce the risk of developing a peanut allergy.

According to a 2010 study, peanut allergy affects approximately 1 percent of children and 0.6 percent of adults in the U.S. Peanuts are inexpensive and frequently eaten in unmodified form and as components of many different prepared foods; they cause the largest number of cases of severe anaphylaxis and death in the U.S.

6. Tree Nuts

The prevalence of tree nut allergies continue to increase worldwide, affecting about 1 percent of the general population. These allergies begin most often during childhood, but they can occur at any age. Only about 10 percent of people outgrow tree nut allergies and frequent lifetime reactions caused by accidental ingestion are a serious problem.

Nuts that are most commonly responsible for allergic reactions include hazelnuts, walnuts, cashews and almonds; those that are less frequently associated with allergies include pecans, chestnuts, Brazil nuts, pine nuts, macadamia nuts, pistachio, coconut, Nangai nuts and acorns. A 2015 systematic review found that walnut and cashew allergies were the most prevalent types of tree nut allergy in the U.S.

7. Fish 

According to a study published in Clinical Reviews of Allergy and Immunology, adverse reactions to fish are not only mediated by the immune system causing allergies, but are often caused by various toxins and parasites, including ciguatera and Anisakis . Allergic reactions to fish can be serious and life threatening, and children usually don’t outgrow this type of food allergy.

A reaction is not restricted to the ingestion of fish, as it can also be caused by handling fish and intaking the cooking vapors. Prevalence rates of self-reported fish allergy range from 0.2 to 2.29 percent in the general population, but can reach up to 8 percent among fish processing workers.

8. Shellfish 

Allergic reactions to shellfish, which comprises the groups of crustaceans (such as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimp, krill, woodlice and barnacles) and molluscs (such as squid, octopus and cuttlefish), can cause clinical symptoms ranging from mild urticaria (hives) and oral allergy syndrome to life-threatening anaphylactic reactions. Shellfish allergy is known to be common and persistent in adults, and it can cause anaphylaxis in both children and adults; the prevalence of shellfish allergy is 0.5 to 5 percent. Most shellfish-allergic children have sensitivity to dust mite and cockroach allergens as well.

A phenomenon called cross-reactivity may occur when an antibody reacts not only with the original allergen, but also with a similar allergen. Cross-reactivity occurs when a food allergen shares structural or sequence similarity with a different food allergen, which may then trigger an adverse reaction similar to that triggered by the original food allergen. This is common among different shellfish and different tree nuts.

Allergic Reaction Symptoms

Food allergy symptoms can range from mild to severe and, in rare cases, can lead to anaphylaxis, a severe and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction. Anaphylaxis can impair breathing, cause a dramatic drop in blood pressure and alter your heart rate. It can come on within only minutes of exposure to the trigger food. If a food allergy causes anaphylaxis, it can be fatal and it must be treated with an injection of epinephrine (a synthetic version of adrenaline).

Food allergy symptoms may involve the skin, gastrointestinal tract, cardiovascular system and respiratory tract. Some common symptoms include:

  • vomiting
  • stomach cramps
  • coughing
  • wheezing
  • shortness of breath
  • trouble swallowing
  • swelling of the tongue
  • inability to talk or breathe
  • weak pulse
  • dizziness
  • pale or blue-colored skin

Most severe food allergy symptoms occur within two hours of eating the allergen and often they start within minutes.

Exercise-induced food allergy is when the ingestion of a food allergen provokes a reaction during exercise. As you exercise, your body temperature goes up and if you consumed an allergen right before exercising, you may develop hives, become itchy or even feel light-headed. The best way to avoid exercise-induced food allergy is to avoid the food allergen completely for at least 4 to 5 hours before any exercise.

These symptoms are easy to spot.  There are many that are harder to spot, and you need to work with healthcare providers that have experience in putting this all together for you.

Contact us if you need help in determining an allergy or a treatment.  Remember, in the medical books in medical schools, it says, only a mother can determine an allergy .

 

Food allergy guide - Dr. Axe

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth
Dr P Carrothers, Regenerative and Preventative Medicine
Dr Axe

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Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

My Yammy Spice

My Yammy Spice   Low Fat Recipe

Police, Put Your Yams Up!

You are under arrest for tasting so good!  You  have the right to remain spicy!

Any fries you bake , can and will, be used to lure your kids to the dinner table.

Ingredients:

4 medium sweet potatoes
1 tbsp olive oil
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp paprika
1/2 tsp dried oregano
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp black pepper

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 425 F. Line baking pan with tin foil. Brush with olive oil or non-stick spray.
  2. Slice potatoes into shoestring French fry shapes. Toss with olive oil in a large bowl.
  3. In a small bowl, mix remaining ingredients together. Add the spice mixture to the potatoes and stir until the potatoes are evenly covered.
  4. Arrange the fries in a single layer on pan. Bake for 25 minutes. Flip the fries halfway through cooking.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Tuna Turner

Tuna Turner :  Low Fat Recipe

What’s Lime Got to do, Got to do with it!

Well, lime is diva-vine – especially when it is grouped with tropical friends.

These grilled tuna steaks are sure to top the flavor charts!

 

 

Asian Sesame Grilled Tuna Steak (This was so delicious we couldn't believe it was tuna! Such a simple recipe and even people who don't like fish would probably love this! We substituted the sesame see

    • Grill Makes 4 servings
    • 1/2 cup mixed tropical fruit jam (a pineapple-mango-orange combination works well)
    • 1/4 cup hoisin sauce
    • 2 tbsp. lime juice
    • 1 tbsp. chopped, fresh cilantro
    • 1 tsp. grated gingerroot
    • 1 tsp. sesame oil
    • 4 tuna steaks, about 6 oz. each and 1-inch thick
    • To prepare marinade, combine jam, hoisin sauce, lime juice, cilantro, gingerroot, and sesame oil in a small Bowl. Stir well.
    • Rinse tuna steaks and pat dry with paper towels. Arrange steaks in a glass baking dish. Pour marinade over fish. Turn pieces to coat both sides. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour.
    • Brush grill with a little oil to prevent fish from sticking. Heat to medium-high. Grill steaks for 4 to 5 minutes per side. Baste with extra marinade during cooking. Be careful not to overcook.
    • Tuna should be lightly browned on outside, but still slightly pink in middle. (Overcooked tuna is very dry, so pay attention!) Serve immediately.
    Per serving: 336 calories, 3.3 g fat. 0.7 g saturated fat, 40.4 g protein, 31.8 g carbohydrate, 0.5 g fiber, 77 mg cholesterol, 321.6 mg sodium % calories from fat: 9

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth
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Uncategorized

Yellow Bows of Texas

Yellow Bows of Texas  : Low Fat Recipe

Deep in the heart of Texas, the locals rank this spicy masterpiece the best pasta dish this side of the Alamo!

IMG_9316

1 lb ground turkey
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 cup chopped onion (we prefer red onion)
1 cup chopped bell pepper, any color
1 cup diced carrots
1 1/2 cups tomato sauce
1 1/2 cups salsa
1 can (15 oz) black beans, rinsed and drained
2-3 tsp chili powder
1 tsp cumin
12 oz. bow tie pasta
Toppings as Desired: sour cream, shredded cheese, green onion

1. Cook turkey and garlic over medium heat.
2. Add onions, pepper and carrots. Cook and stir for 4-5 minutes.
3. Stir in tomato sauce, salsa, beans, chili powder, cumin and oregano. Bring mixture to a boil and reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes.
4. Prepare pasta according to package directions. Drain.
5. Divide pasta among shallow bowls. Cover with chili and toppings.

Notes: This makes quite a bit of food. Maybe 6 total servings. It can be cut in half, but as a chili product, it also freezes or saves for a few days pretty easily.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Foods, Uncategorized

Sugar-Free Coconut Shrimp Recipe

Sugar-Free Coconut Shrimp Recipe

Coconut Shrimp

Coconut shrimp is a fan favorite finger food—it is crispy, slightly sweet, and of course, features delicious shrimp! But restaurant and party versions of this appetizer can often be over sweet and therefore loaded with sugar. In this sugar-free version of coconut shrimp, the sweetener in the coating is optional, so you can add a bit to mimic the popular restaurant versions’ sweetness if you desire.

These sugar-free coconut shrimp can be served as an appetizer, party food, or main course.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup coconut flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (ground, or 1 teaspoon ground ancho pepper)
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • Optional: sugar substitute (such as stevia) to taste
  • 1/2 cup coconut (unsweetened shredded coconut)
  • Cooking oil of your choice, such as vegetable or canola, for frying
  • 1 pound large shrimp (raw, peeled and deveined and thaw if frozen)

Preparation

  1. Mix coconut flour with seasonings in a shallow bowl.
  2. Whisk the eggs with a fork in a small dish, and mix with the 2 tablespoons water. Add sweetener if desired.
  3. Put shredded coconut in a separate dish.
  4. Pour oil into a large skillet to about 3/4 inch depth. Heat to 350 to 360 F, or until the end of a wooden spoon handle dipped into the oil collects bubbles around it.
  5. Holding shrimp by the tail, roll in the seasoned coconut flour and shake to get most of it off—you just want a thin coating. Then dip in egg mixture, again shaking off the excess. Finally, roll in coconut.
  6. 6Place shrimp in the oil and fry until golden, about 2 minutes per side. Don’t crowd the pan, which will lower the temperature of the oil—this makes them absorb more oil and end up heavy and greasy. Tongs are the best tool for turning and removing the shrimp.
  7. Remove shrimp from the oil to a paper towel or cooling rack.

Cooking and Nutrition Notes

To thaw shrimp, place frozen shrimp in a colander and place under cold running water for several minutes until shrimp are no longer icy and stiff. Place between paper towels to absorb the water.

When frying the shrimp, you can put each in the oil as you bread them, but you will have to watch the shrimp you put in the skillet first closely to make sure they’re not getting overcooked (and don’t forget to flip!). An alternative method is to bread a few shrimp at once and then put them all in the pan at the same time (as long as they fit without being too crowded).

Keep in mind that the calorie count listed here can vary since the amount of oil used by each cook can differ depending on the pan size. It is also difficult to get a precise number since the frying temperature will affect the amount of oil absorbed. In addition, the exact amount of coconut breading per shrimp will vary.

Nutrition Highlights (per serving)

CALORIES354
FAT23g
CARBS23g
PROTEIN13g

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Foods, Uncategorized

CHOCOLATE AVOCADO COOKIES

CHOCOLATE AVOCADO COOKIES

Chocolate Avocado Cookies

Chocolate avocado cookies are healthy fudgy chocolate cookies made of 5 simple ingredients 100 % gluten free + low carb + paleo + sugar free.

Chocolate Avocado Cookies

Ingredients

  • 1 ripe avocado about 1/2 cup mashed avocado
  • 1/4 cup natural maple Flavored Sugar-Free Syrup or maple syrup (if not low carb)
  • 1/2 cup nut butter peanut butter or almond butter (if paleo)
  • 1 egg or chia egg if vegan
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

Optional

  • 1/4 cup dark chocolate chips, no sugar added or choose your favorite one
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2-3 drops liquid stevia drops

 

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 180 C (360F)
  • Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper. Slightly oil the paper with 1/2 teaspoon of liquid vegetable oil (coconut or peanut oil) . This will prevent the cookies to stick to the paper. Set aside.
  • Chocolate Avocado Cookies
  • In a food processor, with the S blade attachment, add ripe avocado and sugar free maple syrup (or liquid sweetener you like). Process for 30 seconds until it forms a creamy avocado batter with no lumps.
  • Stop, add egg, nut butter and cocoa powder. Process again for 30 seconds. Scrap down the bottom and side of the bowl and process for an extra 15 seconds to make sure all the batter is combine – no lumps.
  • Transfer the chocolate cookie batter onto a mixing bowl. It will bit moist and sticky that is what you want. Stir in chocolate chips and vanilla – if used.
  • Chocolate Avocado Cookies
  • Combine with a spatula until the chocolate chips are evenly incorporated. Test the batter and adjust with 2-3 drops of liquid stevia – only if you want a sweeter cookie. I did not add any to mine and my kids love them but if you have a sweet tooth I recommend few drops of stevia to make them sweeter. Add one drop at a time and see how it taste.
  • Prepare a small bowl with warm water, dip a spoon in the water and use that spoon to sample some chocolate cookie batter from your bowl. The water will prevent the batter to stick too much to your spoon.
  • Spoon the chocolate batter onto the baking sheet – I used another spoon to push the batter out of the first spoon.  Use a silicon spoon or spatula to flatten the cookie into a cookie shape. The batter won’t stick onto silicon which makes it easier to spread.
  • Repeat until you form 6 jumbo cookies. Those cookies won’t spread so you don’t need to leave more than half thumb space between each.
  • Sprinkle extra chocolate chips on top of each cookies if you like.
  • Bake for 12-15 minutes or until the centre is set.
  • Cool down 5 minutes on the baking sheet then transfer onto a cooling rack to cool down.
  • Store the cookies in the fridge for up to 5 days in an airtight container.

 

 

People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Do You Have Ringing In Your Ears?

Tinnitus, or chronic ringing in your ears, affects about 1 in 5 people. While it’s typically not serious, it can significantly impact your quality of life, and it may get worse with age or be a symptom of an underlying condition, such as age-related hearing loss, ear injury or a circulatory system disorder.1

In the majority of cases, tinnitus is diagnosed after the age of 50 years, however, recent research has shown that tinnitus in youth is surprisingly common and on the rise, likely due to increased exposure to loud music and other environmental noise.2

Worse still, it may be a sign of permanent nerve damage that could predict future hearing impairment.

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One-Quarter of Youth May Experience Tinnitus, Risk Hearing Loss Later in Life

In a study of 170 students between the ages of 11 and 17 years, researchers from McMaster University in Canada found “risky listening habits,” including exposure to loud noise at parties or concerts, listening to music with ear buds and use of mobile phones excluding texting, were the norm.

More than half of the study participants reported experiencing tinnitus in the past, such as experiencing ringing in the ears for a day following a loud concert.

This is considered a warning sign; however, nearly 29 percent of the students were found to have already developed chronic tinnitus, as evidenced by a psychoacoustic examination conducted in a sound booth.3

Youth with and without tinnitus had a similar ability to hear, but those with tinnitus had significantly reduced tolerance for loud noise and tended to be more protective of their hearing.

Reduced sound level tolerance is a sign of damage to the auditory nerves because, when nerves used to process sound are damaged, it prompts brain cells to increase their sensitivity to noise, essentially making sounds seem louder than they are.

Prevention Is the Best Solution to Tinnitus

Auditory nerve injury that’s associated with tinnitus and heightened sensitivity to loud noises cannot be detected by typical hearing tests, which is why it’s sometimes called “hidden hearing loss.” Further, such damage is permanent and tends to worsen over time, causing increasing hearing loss later in life.

Because there is no known cure, the best solution is prevention. Study author Larry Roberts, Ph.D., of McMaster University’s Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour has compared the emerging risks from loud noises to early warnings about smoking.

At this point, many people are unaware that listening to loud music via earbuds or at parties may be permanently damaging their hearing, particularly since they may still hear normally at this point in time.

If more people were aware of the risks, more would take steps to turn down the volume and give their ears a break. Roberts told Science Daily:4

“It’s a growing problem and I think it’s going to get worse … My personal view is that there is a major public health challenge coming down the road in terms of difficulties with hearing …

The levels of sound exposure that are quite commonplace in our environment, particularly among youth, appear to be sufficient to produce hidden cochlear injuries … The message is, ‘Protect your ears.'”


Tinnitus Is Associated With Psychiatric Disorders and Stress

In adults, the majority of people with tinnitus (77 percent) may suffer from co-existing psychiatric disorders ranging from anxiety to personality disorders. Further, 62 percent of tinnitus patients may suffer from depressive disorders while 45 percent may have anxiety disorders.5

Further, there appears to be a close link between tinnitus and stress, such that stress may make tinnitus worse and vice versa. In one study, emotional exhaustion — or the feeling of being drained due to chronic stress — was a strong predictor of tinnitus severity.6

In addition, chronic stress may be as large a risk factor for developing tinnitus as exposure to occupational noise. Research has found that exposure to highly stressful situations and occupational noise each double the risk of tinnitus.7

Further, stress is especially influential in the transition from mild to severe tinnitus, with researchers concluding, “Stress management strategies should be included in hearing conservation programs, especially for individuals with mild tinnitus who report a high stress load.”8

Also of note, many people with tinnitus first noticed the ringing in their ears during a stressful life event, such as divorce, being laid off, sickness in family members, accidents or surgery. As noted in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry (JNNP):9

These events can heighten the brain’s arousal, and the tinnitus may be noted cortically [by the cerebral cortex]. This interaction between reduced auditory sensation and brain compensation might explain why some people are very bothered by their tinnitus and others just adjust to it.”

The researchers have suggested that tinnitus is not simply a condition affecting the auditory system but rather is neuropsychiatric in nature, which would explain why it often occurs alongside cognitive and behavioral symptoms.

Other Tinnitus Associations to Be Aware Of: Sleep, Trauma, Headaches and More

Tinnitus is often described as a symptom, not a disease in itself, and it may result from a variety of conditions. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one common cause, with nearly 40 percent of military personnel with TBI also experiencing tinnitus.10

Tinnitus is also associated with pain disorders and headaches, including migraines, and often leads to sleep difficulties such as delayed sleep, mid-sleep awakenings and chronic fatigue. In addition, tinnitus is also associated with cognitive deficits, including slowed cognitive processing speed and problems with attention.11

There are different types of tinnitus as well, and the variety may give clues as to its origin. For instance, tinnitus may occur in one or both ears and be described as:12

  • Throbbing or pulsing, which may be due to vascular tumors near the ear
  • High-pitched and continuous (this is most common)
  • Clicking, which may be related to muscle spasms in the roof of your mouth, which cause the Eustachian tube in your ear to open and close; temporomandibular joint (TMJ) issues may also cause a clicking sound in your ear
  • Buzzing or humming

Abnormal bone growth in the middle ear, known as otosclerosis, may also cause tinnitus, as can damage to your vestibulocochlear nerve, which transmits sound from your ear to your brain. Such damage may occur from acoustic neuroma tumor or drug toxicity, for instance.

Additionally, certain medications, including certain cancer drugs, sedatives, and anti-inflammatories like ibuprophen and aspirin may also trigger tinnitus.

If this condition is causing you serious emotional or physical distress, seek professional help. In many cases, however, natural interventions such as those described below may help.

Effective Tinnitus Treatments

A slew of pharmaceuticals, including antidepressants, anxiety drugs, mood stabilizers and anticonvulsants, have been used to treat tinnitus.  A meta-analysis of a range of tinnitus management strategies revealed only antidepressants had a possible benefit, but even that study could not conclude that antidepressants were the answer.13

Considering their risks, and the fact that some antidepressants may cause ringing in the ears, non-drug options present the best course of action — and of these there are many.14

In many cases natural interventions, including the following, may help:

Cognitive behavioral therapy: which has been shown to improve quality of life in people with tinnitus.15 Even internet-based guided CBT has been shown to effectively manage tinnitus.16

Acupuncture: which was found to improve tinnitus severity and patients’ quality of life.17

Nutritional interventions, herbal remedies and melatonin: specifically, zinc deficiency and vitamin B12 deficiency may be associated with tinnitus.18,19 Herbal remedies, including Japanese cornel, dogwood, bayberry, hawthorn leaf, ginkgo and black cohosh may also be useful.20

In animal studies, ginkgo extract led to significant improvement in tinnitus, including complete relief in some cases.21 Melatonin also shows promise, and in one study melatonin supplementation led to a significant decrease in tinnitus intensity and improved sleep quality in patients with chronic tinnitus.22

Organic black coffee: research has shown that women who consumed higher amounts of caffeine (mostly in the form of coffee) were less likely to have tinnitus.23

Specifically, women who consumed less than 150 milligrams of caffeine a day (the amount in about 12 ounces of coffee) were 15 percent more likely to develop tinnitus than those who consumed 450 milligrams to 599 milligrams.24 The researchers weren’t sure why caffeine may reduce tinnitus risk, although past research has shown it has a direct effect on the inner ear or may be involved through its role in stimulating your central nervous system.

Stress management: including exercise, relaxation exercises and the Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT), is important for tinnitus treatment and prevention.

Simple Home Remedies May Provide Relief

If tinnitus is interfering with your quality of life, home remedies may help to relieve your symptoms (and if not, there’s no harm done in trying). Organic Facts compiled several examples worth considering:25

Warm salt pillow: fill a fabric bag with warm salt. Lie down on the pillow and alternate each ear on the bag. Reheat the salt as necessary and repeat several times a day. Foot baths: alternate your feet in hot and cold foot baths. This may dilate your blood vessels and stimulate blood flow toward your head, helping to relieve tinnitus symptoms.
Garlic oil: blend six cloves of fresh garlic with 1 cup of olive oil (the garlic should be finely minced in the process). Let the mixture steep for a week then strain out the garlic. Apply a few drops of the oil in each ear. Music: soft soothing music, white noise, nature sounds or even humming to yourself may help relieve tinnitus.
Stimulate your little toe: use a toothpick to gently stimulate the edge of your little toe near the toenail. This should result in a tingling sensation near the top of your toe. Doing this once a day may relieve tinnitus symptoms. Ear drumming: gently drum on each ear using your fingertips for two to three minutes twice a day to help relieve ringing.
Jawbone massage: massage the hollow and top areas of your jawbone behind your earlobes using coconut oil or sesame oil. You can also apply a hot compress to this neck area for relief.

How to Protect Your Ears From Loud Noise Exposures

While there are many causes of tinnitus, loud noise exposure is a primary culprit, especially among youth. It’s far easier to prevent related damage to your ears than it is to treat it. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends teens and young people take the following steps to protect their hearing and avoid hearing loss (although the advice applies to people of all ages):

Turn down the volume on personal audio devices Try a decibel meter app for your smartphone, which will flash a warning if the volume is turned up to a potentially damaging level Wear earplugs when you visit noisy venues (or when using loud equipment like lawnmowers or leaf blowers)
Use carefully fitted noise-cancelling earphones/headphones, which may allow you to listen comfortably at a lower volume Limit the amount of time you spend engaged in noisy activities Take regular listening breaks when using personal audio devices
Restrict the daily use of personal audio devices to less than one hour

J Mercola

P Carrothers

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Diets and Weight Loss, Uncategorized

Frozen Strawberry Yogurt Drops

Frozen Strawberry Yogurt Drops

yougurtstrawberries

 

Frozen Strawberry Yogurt Drops
Don’t these look so good ? You can make them by dipping strawberries (halved or whole) in vanilla yogurt (Greek might be best, because it’s thicker), then putting on a sheet pan lined with parchment or wax paper and freezing. Voila: Yogurt-covered strawberries!
You can also put strawberries in an ice cube tray and add yogurt.

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/