Foods, Uncategorized

Itsy-Bitsy Teeny-Weeny Colored Polka-Dot Rotini Recipe

Itsy-Bitsy Teeny-Weeny Colored Polka-Dot Rotini Recipe

Itsy-Bitsy Teeny-Weeny Colored Polka-Dot Rotini Recipe - Genius Kitchen

Ingredients

 

  • 8 oz tri-color spiral pasta, uncooked (about 3 cups dry )
  • 1 1/2 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 cup light coconut milk
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp curry powder
  • 1/4 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 cup frozen green peas, thawed or 1 cup cooked lentils
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped red bell pepper
  • 1/4 cup dried currant

 

Directions

Directions:

  1. In a medium saucepan, combine broth, coconut milk, sugar and spices.
  2. Bring to a boil.
  3. Add rotini.
  4. Reduce heat to medium-low; cover and simmer for six minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. Add peas, red pepper and currants.
  6. Simmer for 6 to 7 minutes, until liquid has been absorbed and pasta is tender.
  7. Remove from heat and let stand for five minutes before serving.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Advertisements
Foods, Uncategorized

NAME-THAT-TUNA CASSEROLE

NAME-THAT-TUNA CASSEROLE

 

Name-That-Tuna Casserole

 

Ingredients

4 cup uncooked high-fibre rotini pasta

1 cup frozen green peas

1 Tbsp butter

¾ cup diced yellow onions

½ cup diced celery

1 tsp minced garlic

½ tsp dried tarragon

1 can reduced-sodium chicken broth, undiluted (10 oz/284 mL)

1 can 2% evaporated milk (13 oz/370 mL)

2 Tbsp all-purpose flour

1 tsp Dijon mustard

Grated zest of 1 lemon

¼ tsp each salt and freshly ground black pepper (or to taste)

¾ cup packed shredded light Monterey Jack cheese (3 oz/85 g)

½ cup packed shredded Parmesan cheese (2 oz/56 g)

1 Tbsp minced fresh dill

1 can wild salmon, well drained (6 oz/170 g)

1 can tuna, well drained (6 oz/170 g)

 

 

Directions

 

  1. It is best to have all ingredients ready to go before starting. Chop the onions and celery, grate the cheeses, drain the canned fish, etc.

2. In a large pot, cook pasta according to package directions, adding frozen green peas to pot during last 2 minutes of cooking time. Drain and keep warm.

3. Meanwhile, prepare sauce. Melt butter over medium heat in a large non-stick pot. Add onions, celery, and garlic. Cook and stir until vegetables are tender, about 4 minutes. Stir in tarragon and cook 30 more seconds. Add broth. Whisk together evaporated milk and flour until smooth. Add to pot. Cook and stir until sauce bubbles and begins to thicken.

4. Stir in mustard, lemon zest, salt, and pepper. Cook 1 more minute. Remove sauce from heat and stir in both cheeses until melted. Add drained tuna and salmon and mix well. Add drained noodles and peas and mix well. Serve hot with freshly ground black pepper on top. Enjoy!

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Paleo Turkey Wonton Soup Recipe

Paleo Turkey Wonton Soup Recipe

Have you ever thought of wonton soup as a health food? Probably not. But with my gluten-free, gut- and figure-friendly wonton soup recipe, you can think again! For my wonton soup recipe, I use a combination of gluten-free cassava flour and tapioca flour to make the wonton dough. I also fill the wontons with ground turkey instead of pork or shrimp since I avoid both of those foods.

And the healthy choices don’t stop there. I also add a ton of vegetables, herbs and spices to this soup to boost its nutritional value. The vegetables in this wonton soup recipe may just leave you with a stronger immune system, healthier heart and gut and improved digestive tract. You’ll also feel completely satisfied from this hearty recipe.

 

What is Wonton Soup?

Wonton soup is commonly prepared in Chinese cuisine. It includes wontons, which are tiny dumplings that are filled with a seasoned ground meat. The traditional way to prepare wonton dough is using a combination of flour, egg, salt and water, but for my wonton soup, I chose to use cassava flour and tapioca flour so the wontons are completely gluten-free.

Wonton soup recipe - Dr. Axe

My favorite thing about wonton soup is that it includes a bunch of nutrient-dense vegetables, like mushrooms, cabbage, carrots and onions, plus a handful of anti-inflammatory herbs and spices, like ginger, garlic, cayenne pepper and cilantro. With so many ingredients in wonton soup, you are getting a slew of health benefits, from improved digestion and heart health, to a reduced risk of obesity.

INGREDIENTS:

  • Wonton Wrapper:
  • 1 cup cassava flour
  • 1 cup tapioca starch
  • 1 cup hot water
  • ½ cup avocado oil
  • Filling:
  • ½ pound ground turkey
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon ginger powder
  • 1 green onion, chopped
  • 2 cups cabbage, thinly sliced
  • ½ cup carrots, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Soup:
  • 8 cups chicken bone broth
  • 4 tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1 cup of mushrooms
  • ¼ cup chopped cilantro
  • ½ teaspoon onion powder
  • ½ teaspoon ginger powder
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon chili flakes
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper

DIRECTIONS:

  1. In a large pot, combine broth, aminos, garlic, onion, ginger, cayenne, sesame oil, chili flakes, cilantro, salt and pepper.
  2. Bring broth to a boil and then simmer on low.
  3. While broth is simmering, combine cabbage and carrots in a strainer placed over a bowl. Pour 1 teaspoon of salt over the top. Let sit for 10 min.
  4. Massage cabbage and carrots to release excess water. Ring out the water and place in a medium sized bowl.
  5. Add ground turkey, onions, coconut aminos, garlic, ginger and salt. Set aside.
  6. In a large bowl, mix flours, avocado oil and hot water. Knead dough thoroughly until smooth.
  7. Lay parchment paper on a flat surface and sprinkle flour.
  8. Place 2 tablespoons of dough on the parchment and flatten with a rolling pin. Cut dough into 3 inch squares.
  9. Place 1 tablespoon of turkey filling in the center of the dough. With one lightly wet finger, trace two edges of the wonton dough in an “L” shape.
  10. Gently, enclose wonton fillings to create a triangle shape. Fold the wings inward, making sure to release any air pockets.
  11. Bring the broth back to a boil and gently drop wontons into the soup.
  12. Boil wontons for about 10 minutes.
  13. Serve with fresh green onions, sliced.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Foods, Uncategorized

Blast From the Past-a

Blast From The Pasta

Fusilli, with far out flavor, man!

Whether you are cooking dinner for My Three Sons, lunch for the Partridges or brunch for the Brady’s, this recipe will feed an army.  Any leftover?   Just Leave them to Beaver!

A healthy homemade “hamburger helper” without meat!
This is fantastic on a cold or rainy night or anytime you need a comfy, homey and cosy meal!

Blast from the Past! Cheesy Homemade Helper

Ingredients

    • 1 cup chopped onions
    • 1 cup chopped green peppers
    • 2 cups sliced fresh white mushrooms
    • 1 can of low-sodium diced tomatoes (28 oz)
    • 1 can condensed low-fat cream of celery soup
    • 1 can condensed low-sodium tomato soup
    • 1/2 cup 1% milk
    • 1-1/2 tsp dried oregano
    • 1 tsp chili powder
    • 1/2 tsp paprika
    • 1/ 4 tsp black pepper
    • 1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes
    • 8 oz whole grain fusilli pasta (about 3 cups dry)
    340 gm pkg of Yves veggie ground round

 

Directions

Spray a large deep cooking pot with cooking spray. Cook green peppers, onions and mushrooms over medium heat about 3-4 minutes until softened.
Add dice tomatoes and their juice and tomato and celery soup. Mix well until combined. Add all of the remaining ingredients EXCEPT the veggie ground round and mix well.
Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer for 20 minutes.
Crumble the veggie ground round into the pot and mix well. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes. Serve hot.
Thank you to Susan Drews for submitting some of this fun and wild recipes

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Diets and Weight Loss, Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Abdominal Fat

 

Excess Abdominal Fat is Not Only Ugly, but Extremely Dangerous to Your Health – This is More Than a Vanity Issue!

 

The difference between subcutaneous fat and the more deadly “visceral fat”… Plus the simple steps to REMOVE this fat permanently.

 

big stomach, visceral fat

 

Although this picture depicts an overweight man, this article applies to dangerous types of fat inside the bodies of both men and women … and this discussion also applies even if you only have a slight amount of excess stomach fat.

Did you know that the vast majority of people in this day and age have excess abdominal fat?  It’s true — as much as 70% of the population in some “westernized” countries such as the US and Australia are now considered either overweight or obese.  The first thing that most people think of is that their extra abdominal fat is simply ugly, is covering up their abs from being visible, and makes them self conscious about showing off their body.

However, what most people don’t realize is that excess abdominal fat in particular, is not only ugly, but is also a dangerous risk factor to your health. Scientific research has clearly determined that although it is unhealthy in general to have excess body fat throughout your body, it is also particularly dangerous to have excess abdominal fat.

There are two types of fat that you have in your abdominal area The first type that covers up your abs from being visible is called subcutaneous fat and lies directly beneath the skin and on top of the abdominal muscles.

The second type of fat that you have in your abdominal area is called visceral fat , and that lies deeper in the abdomen beneath your muscle and surrounding your organs. Visceral fat also plays a role in giving certain men that “beer belly” appearance where their abdomen protrudes excessively but at the same time, also feels sort of hard if you push on it.

Both subcutaneous fat and visceral fat in the abdominal area are serious health risk factors, but science has shown that having excessive visceral fat is even more dangerous than subcutaneous fat .  Both types of fat greatly increase your risk of developing heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, sleep apnea, various forms of cancer, and other degenerative diseases.

Part of the reason visceral fat is particularly dangerous is that studies show that it releases more inflammatory molecules into your system on a consistent basis.

One of the major reasons that some people accumulate more visceral fat than others can be from a high carbohydrate diet that leads to insulin resistance over time (years of bombarding your system with too much sugars and starches for your pancreas to properly handle the constant excess blood sugar) … and studies show that high fructose intake particularly from high-fructose corn syrup can be a major contributor to excess visceral fat.

So what gets rid of extra abdominal fat, including visceral fat? 

Both your food intake as well as your training program are important if you are to get this right and the good news is that I’ve spent over a decade researching this topic, analyzing the science, and applying it “in the trenches” with myself as well as thousands of my clients from all over the world to see what works to really stimulate abdominal fat loss.

I’ve actually even seen a particular study that divided thousands of participants into a diet-only group and an exercise & diet combined group. While both groups in this study made good progress, the diet-only group lost significantly LESS abdominal fat than the diet & exercise combined group .

From my research, two of the most important aspects to getting rid of visceral fat are:

1. The use of high intensity forms of exercise and full-body resistance training.  Low intensity cardio exercise simply isn’t as effective for removing visceral fat in particular.  High intensity exercise such as interval training, sprints (bike sprints or running sprints), AND full-body weight training are very effective at helping to improve your body’s ability to manage glucose and increases insulin sensitivity, a crucial step in removing visceral fat.


These types of high intensity exercise routines are also very effective at increasing your fat-burning hormones and creating a hormonal environment conducive to burning off abdominal fat, including visceral fat.

2.   In addition, it’s vitally important to get blood sugar under control to help restore insulin sensitivity through the right nutrition.  This means greatly reducing sugars and refined starches in your diet (including fully eliminating any use of harmful high fructose corn syrup!), and focusing more of your diet on healthy fats (such as avocados, nuts, seeds, coconut fat, olive oil, grass-fed butter, free-range eggs, fatty fish and fish oils, etc), as well as increasing protein and fiber intake.  The standard diet recommended by the government, which contains an unnaturally high grain intake is NOT conducive to controlling blood sugar and reducing visceral fat!

Reducing grain-based foods in your diet and getting more of your carbs from veggies and high fiber fruits such as berries can go a long way to helping to solve this problem.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth
Mike  Geary

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Spread Yourself Thin

Spread Yourself Thin : Recipe

 

It is incredible – and spreadable!

Did we mention that it is edible?

The only thing regrettable is that is wont last long.

Sea for Yourself!

 

Image result for spread yourself thin seafood dip

 

4 oz light cream cheese, softened

1/4 c up seafood cocktail sauce

1 tsp lemon juice

1/4 tsp each ground cumin and chili powder

8 oz chopped cooked shrimp

8 oz chopped lump crab meat

1/3 cup minced green onions, optional

 

In a large bowl, beat together cream cheese and cocktail sauce on high speed of electric mixer.  Beat until smooth.

 

Add lemon juice, cumin, and chili powder and beat until well blended

 

Stir in shrimp, crab meat and onions.  Mix well.  Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours before serving.

 

Serve seafood spead with low carb crackers, celery, or raw vegetables.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

 

 

 

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Food Allergies

Symptoms of Food Allergies

 

Food allergies are immune-based diseases that have become a serious health concern in the United States. An estimated one-fifth of the population believe that they have adverse reactions to food, but the true prevalence of food allergies ranges between 3 and 4 percent in the general population.

Despite the risk of severe allergic reactions and even death, there is no current treatment for food allergies. The condition can only be managed by allergen avoidance or treatment of food allergy symptoms. Fortunately, there are natural allergy fighters that can help to boost the immune system and enhance the gut microbiota, which helps to reduce the development of food allergies and allergy symptoms.

What Are Food Allergies?

Food allergies consist of an immune system response to a disagreeable food. The body senses that a protein in a particular food may be harmful and triggers an immune system response, producing histamine to protect itself. The body “remembers” this and when this food enters the body again, the histamine response is more easily triggered.

The diagnosis of food allergies may be problematic because nonallergic food reactions, such as food intolerance, are frequently confused with food allergy symptoms. Intolerance derived from an immunological mechanism is referred to as a food allergy, and the non-immunological form is called a food intolerance. Food allergies and intolerance are often linked, but there’s a clear difference between the two conditions.

A food allergy comes from a reaction of the allergen-specific immunoglobulin E antibody that is found in the bloodstream. Non-IgE-mediated food allergies are also possible; this happens when someone is exposed to a food that causes signs and symptoms of an allergy, such as allergic contact dermatitis. A food intolerance is an adverse reaction to foods or food components, but not due to immunologic mechanisms.

For example, a person may have an immunologic response to cow’s milk because of the milk’s protein, or that individual may be intolerant to milk due to an inability to digest the sugar lactose. The inability to digest lactose leads to excess fluid production in the GI tract, resulting in abdominal pain and diarrhea. This condition is termed lactose intolerance because lactose in not an allergen, as the response is not immune-based. Food intolerance are nonspecific and the symptoms often resemble common medically unexplained complaints, such as digestive issues.

IgE-medicated food allergies are the most common and dangerous of adverse food reactions; they cause your immune system to react abnormally when exposed to one or more specific foods. Immediate reactions to IgE-mediated food allergies are caused by an allergen-specific immunoglobulin E antibody that floats around in the bloodstream.

When IgE is working properly, it identifies triggers that could be harmful to the body, such as parasites, and tells the body to release histamine. Histamine causes allergy symptoms such as hives, coughing and wheezing. Sometimes IgE reacts to normal proteins that are found in foods — and when the protein is absorbed during digestion and it enters the bloodstream, the entire body reacts as if the protein is a threat. This is why food allergy symptoms are noticeable in the skin, respiratory system, digestive system and circulatory system.

According to a 2014 comprehensive review published in Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology, the prevalence of food allergies in infancy is increasing and may affect up to 15–20 percent of infants. And researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine suggest that food allergies affect as many as 6 percent of young children and 3–4 percent of adults. The alarming rate of increase calls for a public health approach in the prevention and treatment of food allergy, especially in children.

Researchers suggest that this increase in the prevalence of food allergies may be due to a change in the composition, richness and balance of the microbiota that colonize the human gut during early infancy. The human microbiome plays a vital role in early life immune development and function. Since IgE-mediated food allergies are associated with immune dysregulation and impaired gut integrity, there is substantial interest in the potential link between gut microbiota and food allergies.


The 8 Most Common Food Allergies

Although any food can provoke a reaction, relatively few foods are responsible for a vast majority of significant food-induced allergic reactions. Over 90 percent of food allergies are caused by the following foods:

1. Cow’s Milk

Cow’s milk protein allergy affects 2 to 7.5 percent of children; persistence in adulthood is uncommon since a tolerance develops in 51 percent of cases within 2 years of age and 80 percent of cases with 3–4 years.  Numerous milk proteins have been implicated in allergic responses and most of these have been shown to contain multiple allergenic epitopes (targets that an individual target binds to). IgE-mediated reactions to cow’s milk are common in infancy and non-IgE-mediated reactions are common in adults.

A 2005 study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutritionsuggests that the prevalence of self-diagnosed cow’s milk allergy is 10-fold higher than the clinically proven incidence, suggesting that a sizable population is unnecessarily restricting dairy products (for allergy purposes).

2. Eggs

After cow’s milk, hen’s egg allergy is the second most common food allergy in infants and young children. A recent meta-analysis of  the prevalence of food allergy estimated that egg allergy affects 0.5 to 2.5 percent of young children. Allergy to eggs usually presents itself in the second half of the first year of life, with a median age of presentation of 10 months. Most reactions occur upon a child’s first known exposure to egg, with eczema being the most common symptoms. Five major allergenic proteins from the egg of the domestic chicken have been identified, the most dominant being ovalbumin.

3. Soy

Soy allergy affects approximately 0.4 percent of children. According to a 2010 study conducted at John Hopkins University School of Medicine, 50 percent of children with a soy allergy outgrew their allergy by 7 years old.  Prevalence of sensitization after the use of soy-based formulas is around 8.8 percent. Soy formula is commonly used for infants who are allergic to cow’s milk and research suggests that soy allergy occurs in only a small minority of young children with IgE associated cow’s milk allergy.

4. Wheat 

Gluten-related disorders, including wheat allergy, celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity, have an estimated global prevalence close to 5 percent. These disorders share similar symptoms, making it difficult to make a clear diagnosis. A wheat allergy represents a type of adverse immunologic reaction to proteins contained in wheat and related grains. IgE antibodies mediate the inflammatory response to several allergenic proteins found in wheat. Wheat allergy affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract and respiratory tract. Wheat allergy shows greater prevalence in children who commonly outgrow the allergy by school-age.

5. Peanuts 

Peanut allergy tends to present itself early in life and affected individuals generally do not outgrow it. In highly sensitized people, just trace quantities of peanuts can induce an allergic reaction. Research suggests that early exposure to peanuts may reduce the risk of developing a peanut allergy.

According to a 2010 study, peanut allergy affects approximately 1 percent of children and 0.6 percent of adults in the U.S. Peanuts are inexpensive and frequently eaten in unmodified form and as components of many different prepared foods; they cause the largest number of cases of severe anaphylaxis and death in the U.S.

6. Tree Nuts

The prevalence of tree nut allergies continue to increase worldwide, affecting about 1 percent of the general population. These allergies begin most often during childhood, but they can occur at any age. Only about 10 percent of people outgrow tree nut allergies and frequent lifetime reactions caused by accidental ingestion are a serious problem.

Nuts that are most commonly responsible for allergic reactions include hazelnuts, walnuts, cashews and almonds; those that are less frequently associated with allergies include pecans, chestnuts, Brazil nuts, pine nuts, macadamia nuts, pistachio, coconut, Nangai nuts and acorns. A 2015 systematic review found that walnut and cashew allergies were the most prevalent types of tree nut allergy in the U.S.

7. Fish 

According to a study published in Clinical Reviews of Allergy and Immunology, adverse reactions to fish are not only mediated by the immune system causing allergies, but are often caused by various toxins and parasites, including ciguatera and Anisakis . Allergic reactions to fish can be serious and life threatening, and children usually don’t outgrow this type of food allergy.

A reaction is not restricted to the ingestion of fish, as it can also be caused by handling fish and intaking the cooking vapors. Prevalence rates of self-reported fish allergy range from 0.2 to 2.29 percent in the general population, but can reach up to 8 percent among fish processing workers.

8. Shellfish 

Allergic reactions to shellfish, which comprises the groups of crustaceans (such as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimp, krill, woodlice and barnacles) and molluscs (such as squid, octopus and cuttlefish), can cause clinical symptoms ranging from mild urticaria (hives) and oral allergy syndrome to life-threatening anaphylactic reactions. Shellfish allergy is known to be common and persistent in adults, and it can cause anaphylaxis in both children and adults; the prevalence of shellfish allergy is 0.5 to 5 percent. Most shellfish-allergic children have sensitivity to dust mite and cockroach allergens as well.

A phenomenon called cross-reactivity may occur when an antibody reacts not only with the original allergen, but also with a similar allergen. Cross-reactivity occurs when a food allergen shares structural or sequence similarity with a different food allergen, which may then trigger an adverse reaction similar to that triggered by the original food allergen. This is common among different shellfish and different tree nuts.

Allergic Reaction Symptoms

Food allergy symptoms can range from mild to severe and, in rare cases, can lead to anaphylaxis, a severe and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction. Anaphylaxis can impair breathing, cause a dramatic drop in blood pressure and alter your heart rate. It can come on within only minutes of exposure to the trigger food. If a food allergy causes anaphylaxis, it can be fatal and it must be treated with an injection of epinephrine (a synthetic version of adrenaline).

Food allergy symptoms may involve the skin, gastrointestinal tract, cardiovascular system and respiratory tract. Some common symptoms include:

  • vomiting
  • stomach cramps
  • coughing
  • wheezing
  • shortness of breath
  • trouble swallowing
  • swelling of the tongue
  • inability to talk or breathe
  • weak pulse
  • dizziness
  • pale or blue-colored skin

Most severe food allergy symptoms occur within two hours of eating the allergen and often they start within minutes.

Exercise-induced food allergy is when the ingestion of a food allergen provokes a reaction during exercise. As you exercise, your body temperature goes up and if you consumed an allergen right before exercising, you may develop hives, become itchy or even feel light-headed. The best way to avoid exercise-induced food allergy is to avoid the food allergen completely for at least 4 to 5 hours before any exercise.

These symptoms are easy to spot.  There are many that are harder to spot, and you need to work with healthcare providers that have experience in putting this all together for you.

Contact us if you need help in determining an allergy or a treatment.  Remember, in the medical books in medical schools, it says, only a mother can determine an allergy .

 

Food allergy guide - Dr. Axe

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth
Dr P Carrothers, Regenerative and Preventative Medicine
Dr Axe

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Diets and Weight Loss, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Are You Eating Too Fast

Eating Too Fast Can Pile on the Pounds

five health risks of eating too fast

Has your hectic lifestyle turned you into someone who gulps down meals?

People who eat quickly tend to eat more and have a higher body mass index (a measure of body fat based on height and weight) than those who eat slowly. People who eat slowly feel full sooner and eat less in the process.

Part of the reason for this is the time it takes for your brain to get key messages from your digestive system. Conventional wisdom says that’s about 20 minutes, and one study found that slowing down to 30 minutes is even more effective. But that means you have to find ways to really stretch out your meals.

Tricks like eating with your non-dominant hand can help a lot, but eating fast can be a hard habit to break. One high-tech solution is a commercially available smart fork, a utensil that registers your eating speed and sends a signal, with a vibration and a flash of light, if you eat too quickly. Participants in an experimental study found that it was comfortable to hold and did a good job of making them more aware of their eating speed. But you can also try to slow down on your own with a regular fork: Just put it down and count to 10 between each and every bite.

Reinforce the slower eating habit with portion cues such as using smaller plates and bowls. Part of feeling full is visual, and an overflowing smaller plate might trick your mind into thinking you’re eating more calories than you really are. Large dishes with empty spaces do the opposite, giving the illusion that your diet portions are smaller than they really are.

Always use measuring cups and spoons to dole out correct portions — you may be surprised at how you’ve supersized your meals on your own! Also, don’t go back for second helpings, and stay focused on your food — no TV or reading while you eat

Slow Down, You Chew Too Fast

For many of us, rushing through meals has become second nature. Breaking that habit takes some conscious effort. These strategies can help you develop a new habit of slowing down and savoring your food:

  • Allow enough time. Make meals a priority item on your schedule. Block off at least 20 minutes for each meal. It can take that long for your body to send signals about fullness to your brain.
  • Enlist all your senses. When you first start eating, take a few moments to really notice the aroma, flavor, crunchiness, texture and other sensory properties of the food. Then keep noticing these things as the meal goes on.
  • Choose more chews. Take small bites, and chew them thoroughly. In addition to slowing you down, chewing well makes food easier to digest, which increases the absorption of nutrients.
  • Put down that fork! It’s easy to slip into a robotic eating rhythm. Before you know it, you’re shoveling food into your mouth with the efficiency of an eating machine. Setting down your utensils between bites helps prevent that.
  • Revive the art of table talk (even if you’re not sitting at a table). Chatting between bites is one of the most pleasant ways to stretch out a meal.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

The Rolling Scones

The Rolling Scones

Taste buds can’t get no satisfaction?

This old time, yet delicious, will get them rockin!

 

2 cups all-purpose flour (or use 2 cups Gluten-free baking mix)
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
1/3 cup almond paste
1/3 cup cold unsalted butter (or vegan margarine)
1/3 cup lingonberry jam (found at European grocery stores or use leftover cranberry sauce)
1/3 cup heavy cream (or vegan creamer)
1 large egg (or add ¼ cup more of vegan creamer)
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon almond extract
Sliced almonds to top
1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Rub the butter and almond paste into the dry ingredients until the mixture resembles small peas.

3. In a separate small bowl, whisk together the heavy cream, egg, and extracts. With a spatula, gradually stir the liquid ingredients until the mixture just starts to come together, reserving about 1 tablespoon of the liquid to brush the tops of the scones.

4. Divide the dough in half. Turn the both batches of dough out onto a lightly floured surface and very gently pat each into 8-inch rounds about ¾-inch thick.
5. Spread the lingonberry jam onto one round. Gently place the second round on top of the jam. Using a floured chef’s knife (or bench scraper), cut the dough round into 8 wedges. Transfer the wedges to the baking sheet, spacing the scones at least 1 inch apart. Lightly brush the tops of the scones with the reserved egg-cream mixture and sprinkle liberally with almonds.

5. Bake in the top third of the oven for 15 to 18 minutes or until the tops are golden. Transfer the scones to a wire rack to cool slightly, 3 to 4 minutes. Serve warm.

Yields: 8 scones

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

 

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

My Yammy Spice

My Yammy Spice   Low Fat Recipe

Police, Put Your Yams Up!

You are under arrest for tasting so good!  You  have the right to remain spicy!

Any fries you bake , can and will, be used to lure your kids to the dinner table.

Ingredients:

4 medium sweet potatoes
1 tbsp olive oil
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp paprika
1/2 tsp dried oregano
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp black pepper

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 425 F. Line baking pan with tin foil. Brush with olive oil or non-stick spray.
  2. Slice potatoes into shoestring French fry shapes. Toss with olive oil in a large bowl.
  3. In a small bowl, mix remaining ingredients together. Add the spice mixture to the potatoes and stir until the potatoes are evenly covered.
  4. Arrange the fries in a single layer on pan. Bake for 25 minutes. Flip the fries halfway through cooking.

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard- 

Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/