Foods, Uncategorized

Cauliflower Mac and Cheese with Lobster

Health and WEllness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Cauliflower Mac and Cheese with Lobster

caulliflowermacandcheesewithlobster

 

Mac and cheese may be a beloved staple from our childhoods, but this lower carb switch-up with a luxurious twist makes it the perfect dish for your next dinner party! This “mac” and cheese recipe featuring a crisped top, cheesy cauliflower and poached lobster comes to us from the ADA’s Diabetes Food Hub, and we can’t wait for you to make it!

 

Ingredients

Cooking spray

1 cauliflower, trimmed into 8 cups florets

5 cups water

2 4-oz frozen lobster tails (or 1 cup chopped imitation lobster meat)

1 tbsp olive oil

2 tbsp all-purpose flour

2 cups milk (fat free)

1 pinch ground nutmeg

1/2 tsp salt

1/4 tsp black pepper

1/4 tsp hot sauce

3 oz colby jack cheese (reduced fat)

4 oz cream cheese (fat free)

1/2 cup whole wheat panko bread crumbs

lobstermac-cheese_rcp

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Coat in a 9×13-inch glass baking dish with cooking spray. Set aside.

Place cauliflower florets in a large microwave-safe dish. Pour 1 cup of water over the cauliflower and cover. Microwave for 12 minutes or until cauliflower is tender. Drain and then keep warm.

While cauliflower is microwaving: If using lobster tails, bring 4 cups of water to a boil and then reduce until water is just barely simmering. Add the lobster tails to the water and poach for 7 minutes. Remove the tails from the water to cool slightly. Cut the lobster tails, remove the meat from the tails and chop. Makes about a cup of lobster meat.

Add olive oil to saucepan over medium heat. Add the flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. Add the milk while whisking. Add the nutmeg, salt, pepper and hot sauce. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for 3 minutes.

Add the Colby-jack and cream cheeses and stir until melted.

Add the cauliflower to the baking dish. Use a fork to break up the florets into 1-inch or smaller pieces.

Pour the cheese sauce over the cauliflower and stir to coat.

Sprinkle the lobster over the cauliflower and stir to coat.

Sprinkle the panko bread crumbs evenly over the top of the casserole and then spray the top of the panko with cooking spray.

Bake for 30 minutes.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Roasted Cauliflower/ Gobi

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Teleheatlh

Roasted Gobi/Cauliflower

Roastedcauliflowergobi.jpeg

Roasted Gobi/cauliflower is very tasty and we can serve it as a starter or evening snack for school going kids. I’ve used one medium sized cauliflower to prepare the recipe. Cauliflower florets are blanched in water and marinated for 20 minutes in fresh cream(Medium fat) adding spices. The marinated cauliflower florets are placed in a baking tray with greased parchment paper. They are oven roasted @190degrees centigrade in a preheated oven for 20-25 minutes. Here I present delicious roasted gobi which can be served with mint curd chutney. Njoy Cooking, Serving n Savoring!

 

Ingredients:

 

Cauliflower: 1 no. Medium sized

Fresh cream(Medium fat): 3 tbsp

Salt: As required

Ginger garlic paste: One tsp

Red chilli powder: 3/4 th tsp

Garam masala: 1 tsp

Turmeric: Generous pinch

Method of preparation:

 

Take one medium sized cauliflower.

Separate the stem of the cauliflower.

Chop the big florets into bite size florets.

Rinse well with water and keep aside.

Keep the cauliflower florets in hot boiling water for three minutes to blanch them.

Now transfer the cauliflower florets into cold water to stop further cooking.

Take a broad vessel and put the ingredients mentioned above except cauliflower.

Mix thoroughly.

Now completely drain the water and keep the blanched cauliflower florets.

Mix thoroughly and marinate the cauliflower mixture for 20 minutes.

Preheat oven@190 degrees for ten minutes.

Meanwhile take parchment paper and place the paper onto baking tray. Grease with oil. Now place all the marinated cauliflower florets onto the parchment paper.

Bake them in a preheated oven@190 degrees for twenty five minutes or till they are completely roasted.

Take out of the oven and transfer them onto a Serving plate.

Serve the roasted(Oven) gobi with mint curd chutney.

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Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Amylopectin:    Amy What?

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Amylopectin:    Amy What?

 

3 Reasons to Avoid Foods with This Type of Starch

 

We all know that loading up on the cookies, candy and soda can skyrocket blood sugar levels and lead to adverse effects on health. But did you know that the same could be true for certain types of starch as well? Thanks to amylopectin, a type of carbohydrate found in starch, some starches may actually have a similar effect.

 

Amylopectin digestion may raise blood sugar and insulin levels, causing an increase in triglycerides and cholesterol and leading to fat accumulation.

 

This carbohydrate is widespread throughout the food supply and is the main component of starches, including rice, bread and potatoes.

 

However, by opting for foods lower in amylopectin and increasing your intake of high-fiber, low-glycemic foods instead, you can sidestep the negative side effects of this carbohydrate.

 Amylopectin-Graphic-2 (2).jpg

What Is Amylopectin?

The official amylopectin definition is: “a component of starch that has a high molecular weight and branched structure and does not tend to gel in aqueous solutions.”

 

To put it more simply, though, amylopectin is a type of carbohydrate found in the starches that we commonly consume, such as rice, potatoes and bread.

 

Starch is made up of two different polysaccharides, or carbohydrates: amylose and amylopectin. Each starch molecule is about 80 percent amylopectin and 20 percent amylose.

 

Amylose is made up of long, linear chains of glucose units while amylopectin is highly branched. In fact, it is composed of between 2,000 and 200,000 glucose units, and each inner chain comprises 20–24 subunits of glucose.

 

Amylopectin is also considered insoluble, meaning that it does not dissolve in water.

 

This starch molecule has a very similar structure to glycogen, a type of branched polysaccharide that is used to store glucose, or sugar, in your liver and muscles. When comparing amylopectin vs. glycogen, both are highly branched and made up of alpha glucose units, but glycogen has more branches.

 

While starch molecules are considered the main storage form of energy in plants, glycogen is the primary storage form of energy in humans and animals.

 

Amylopectin vs. Amylose

Amylose and amylopectin share some similarities but are also drastically different in the ways that they are digested and processed in the body. As mentioned previously, the differences between these two starch molecules starts with their physical structure. Amylose is long and linear while amylopectin is made up of thousands of branches of glucose units.

 

Although starches contain both of these carbohydrates, the ratio can make a major impact on the way it’s digested and processed. This is because amylopectin is more easily digested and absorbed than amylose. While this may sound like a good thing, it actually means that eating foods rich in this carbohydrate can lead to spikes in blood sugar, insulin and cholesterol levels as well as increased belly fat. A high amount of amylopectin can also increase the glycemic index of foods, which is a measure of how much blood sugar levels increase after consumption.

 

Meanwhile, foods high in amylose tend to have higher levels of resistant starch, a type of starch that isn’t completely broken down or absorbed by the body. Resistant starch has been shown to reduce fat storage, increase satiety, lower cholesterol levels and blood sugar, and improve insulin sensitivity.

 

Therefore, it’s best to minimize your intake of foods high in amylopectin and instead focus on selecting starches that have a higher ratio of amylose to ensure you’re getting the most health benefits possible from your diet.

 

Amylopectin Function

Amylopectin makes up the majority of the starch molecule, which is the primary storage form of energy for plants.

 

Much like humans, animals and all living organisms, plants need energy so they can grow and function. Plants use a special process called photosynthesis, which involves using chlorophyll to convert sunlight, carbon dioxide and water into sugar, or glucose, to be used as energy. Any extra glucose is stored as starch, which the plant can then convert back into glucose when it needs an extra bit of energy.

 

In humans, when we eat starch, it is converted to sugar, or glucose, which can also be used for energy. The cells in our bodies depend on this energy to function, making sure that we are able to build and maintain healthy tissues, move our muscles, and keep our organs working efficiently.

 

Like plants, we are also able to keep unused glucose for use later in the form of glycogen, which is mainly stored in the muscles and liver and can be easily converted to glucose when needed.

 

Amylopectin Side Effects

Spikes Blood Sugar and Insulin

Raises Cholesterol Levels

 

 

Increases Belly Fat

  1. Spikes Blood Sugar and Insulin

Foods with a higher amount of amylopectin have a higher glycemic index, which means they can cause a quick increase in blood sugar and insulin levels.

 

Insulin is the hormone that is responsible for the transportation of sugar from the blood to the tissues where it can be utilized. When you sustain high levels of insulin over a long period of time, it can decrease the effectiveness of insulin, leading to insulin resistance and high blood sugar.

 

A study from the Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center in Maryland published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition fed 12 participants a diet composed of either 70 percent amylose or amylopectin for five weeks. Compared to amylose, amylopectin led to a greater increase in blood sugar and insulin levels.

 

Another animal study from Australia showed that feeding rats a high-amylopectin diet for 16 weeks resulted in a 50 percent higher insulin response as well as insulin resistance.

 

Conversely, another study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that higher amounts of amylose delayed carbohydrate digestion and absorption and caused decreased blood sugar and insulin levels.

 

  1. Raises Cholesterol Levels

In addition to increasing blood sugar levels, a diet high in amylopectin could also negatively impact blood cholesterol levels. Research shows that eating foods with a higher glycemic index, such as those that are high in amylopectin, could decrease triglyceride and good HDL cholesterol levels.

 

Studies have also found that insulin resistance, which can occur as a result of an a high-glycemic diet, may be associated with an increase in cholesterol production.  The Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center study mentioned above, in particular, found that eating a diet high in amylopectin led to increases in cholesterol and triglyceride levels compared to a diet high in amylose.

 

Meanwhile, multiple animal studies have found that resistant starch from higher concentrations of amylose could lead to lower blood cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in rats.

 

  1. Increases Belly Fat

One of the most visible side effects of amylopectin is its effect on your waistline. That’s because eating lots of amylopectin can increase insulin, leading to an increase in visceral fat.

 

Insulin plays a major role in fat storage and metabolism. It blocks the breakdown of fat and increases the uptake of triglycerides from the blood into the fat cells. Sustaining high levels of circulating insulin can cause insulin resistance as well as an increase in fat storage and a decrease in fat burning, as noted in research out of the University of Toronto in Canada.

 

Additionally, eating foods with a high glycemic index, such as those with a higher ratio of amylopectin, can increase hunger and the risk of overeating, as research from the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University shows.

 

On the other hand, studies have shown that amylose and resistant starch can enhance fat burning, promote satiety and reduce fat storage.

 

Amylopectin Foods

Although all starches contain some amylopectin, certain types may have a higher ratio of amylopectin than others. Simple carbs that have a high glycemic index are likely to be higher in amylopectin while foods with a lower glycemic index are likely higher in amylose.

 

High-amylopectin foods include:

 

Short-grain rice                White bread                      Bagels                  White potatoes

Cookies                               Crackers                             Pretzels                Instant oatmeal

Puffed rice                         Cornflakes                          Rice cakes

Instead of filling your plate with these foods, consider swapping in a few foods that are higher in amylose instead. These foods can help you maintain normal blood sugar levels, keep cholesterol levels low and prevent fat accumulation.

 

Low-amylose foods include:

 

Long-grain rice                 Oats                      Quinoa                 Sweet potatoes                Bananas

Whole wheat                    Barley                   Rye                       Beans                                  Legumes

 

 

History

Starch has been an integral part of our history since ancient times. Early documentation on the uses of starch is limited; Egyptians supposedly used a starchy adhesive to stick pieces of papyrus together as far back as 4,000 B.C. while in 312 A.D., starch helped proved useful in preventing ink penetration in Chinese papers.

 

However, although starch has been a dietary and industrial staple for centuries, it is only in the last several hundred years that we’ve come to understand more about its unique structure and the way that amylose and amylopectin function in the body.

 

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, often dubbed as the father of microbiology, was the first to observe starch microscopically in 1716. However, it wasn’t until over 200 years later that researchers began to focus on the differences between amylose and amylopectin.

 

In the 1940s, scientists developed more accurate techniques to separate amylose and amylopectin from starch molecules and began studying the highly branched structure of amylopectin. They were also able to discover the amylopectin enzyme that contributes to the synthesis and breakdown of starch, which helped them understand the complexities of its structure even more.

 

Other research into the different types of starch has also been fairly recent. In the 1970s, for example, the concept of resistant starch was initially created. Years later, the Commission of the European Communities officially funded research to form an official definition of resistant starch.

 

As our knowledge about starch continues to increase, we have begun to learn more about how this important dietary component can affect many different facets of health.

 

Precautions/Side Effects

A diet high in starch can negatively impact many aspects of health. It can result in an increase in blood sugar, insulin, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, as well as increased fat accumulation.

 

Ideally, amylopectin should be limited in all diets. However, this is especially important for those who have diabetes or uncontrolled blood sugar levels.

 

For these individuals, carbohydrate intake should be kept in moderation, and the carbs that are included in the diet should be from nutrient-rich, high-fiber and low-glycemic foods. This can help slow the absorption of sugar from the bloodstream and prevent spikes and crashes in blood sugar levels.

 

Additionally, many foods high in both amylose and amylopectin contain gluten. If you have celiac disease or a sensitivity to gluten, you should swap these foods for gluten-free, nutrient-dense whole grains like millet, quinoa, sorghum, rice or buckwheat.

 

Final Thoughts

Starch molecules are made up of two types of carbohydrates, amylose and amylopectin. Amylose is long and linear while amylopectin is highly branched.

Amylopectin is broken down rapidly and has a higher glycemic index, meaning it can increase blood sugar rapidly after eating.

Eating a diet high in this carbohydrate can also increase insulin, cholesterol and triglyceride levels; lead to insulin resistance; and cause fat accumulation.

Conversely, eating foods higher in amylose may have the opposite effect, decreasing cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin and blood sugar levels, while also promoting satiety and weight loss.

Foods high in amylopectin include white bread, short-grain rice, cookies, crackers, pretzels and breakfast cereals.

To promote healthy blood sugar levels and achieve optimal health, opt for low-glycemic foods that are lower in amylopectin and high in fiber and use in combination with an overall healthy diet.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Why Should You Pick Steel Oats?

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Why Should You Eat Steel Oats and Not Quaker Oatmeal

 

steel oats

 

Oats are sold in more forms than any other grain. All of them are high in beta-glucan, a kind of fiber that has special cholesterol-lowering properties. Studies have shown that individuals with high cholesterol have reduced their total level by eight to 23 percent simply by consuming three grams of this soluble fiber per day – the amount you get in one bowl of oatmeal.

 

Steel-cut oats (also known as Irish or pinhead oats) are whole oats that have been chopped into two or three pieces with steel blades. Uncut, they are known as oat groats. Steel-cut oats and oat groats are the least processed forms available.

 

Rolled oats are made by steaming the groats, then rolling them, steaming them again, and, finally, toasting them resulting in the familiar thin flakes. Though processed, rolled oats are still a whole grain. The cooking time for steel-cut oats is 20 to 40 minutes, compared to 10 minutes for rolled oats and 45 to 60 minutes for oat groats.

 

I prefer steel-cut oats because they digest more slowly than rolled ones. Like all other grains in whole or cracked form, steel-cut oats rank lower than rolled oats on the glycemic index (GI), which ranks carbohydrate foods on the basis of how rapidly they affect blood sugar (glucose). The reason for this difference is that it takes longer for digestive enzymes to reach the starch inside the thicker pieces, slowing down their conversion to sugar.

 

The higher on the glycemic index a food ranks, the more likely it is to cause spikes in blood sugar. Over time, these rapid fluctuations can cause genetically susceptible people (many of us) to develop insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance is associated with obesity, high blood pressure, elevated blood fats, and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

 

You can be sure you’re eating a whole grain with a low GI ranking if you have to chew it or can see the grains or pieces of grains. The more your jaw has to work, the better.

 

Oat bran – the finely ground meal of oat groats’ outer layer – has the health benefits of a whole grain with its high fiber and low starch content. It makes a good addition to other foods, especially baked goods. Despite its short cooking time and smooth texture, it won’t spike blood sugar levels, thanks to its soluble fiber.

 

While I recommend steel-cut oats, “old fashioned” rolled oats are preferable to quick-cooking ones or instant oatmeal. Those products do not provide whole, intact grains, and some brands of the latter contain partially hydrogenated oils, artificial flavors and colors, or a lot of added sugar and salt.

 

Because oats have a higher fat content than other grains, they go rancid more easily. For that reason, whether you’re buying oat groats, steel-cut oats, rolled oats or oat bran, buy in smaller quantities, and store these foods in the refrigerator.

 

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Cauliflower Steak

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Cauliflower Steak

cauliflowersteak.jpg

 

One of the components of a heart-healthy dietary pattern that helps lower blood pressure is consuming less meat. Poultry and fish are better than red meat and processed meat, but vegetables are even better.

 

One of the best ways to make vegetables feel hearty enough for the main dish is to cut them into “steaks” so that you still feel like you’re eating an entree-sized portion instead of just a bunch of side dishes. The other way is to add tons of flavor so that you feel satisfied.

 

Grilling the cauliflower instead of baking or sautéing it adds some nice flavor, but the real punch comes from the bold Romesco sauce. Roasting the bell pepper, tomato, garlic, and almonds bring out natural sweetness that pairs beautifully with the smoky paprika. It packs such a huge burst of flavor that you would never guess there is no salt in it.

 

Ingredients

2 tablespoons raw almonds

2 cloves garlic

1/2 large red bell pepper

1 Roma tomato

1 teaspoon olive oil

1 teaspoon white balsamic vinegar

2 teaspoons smoked paprika

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 small head cauliflower

2 teaspoons olive oil

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Fresh parsley, chopped for garnish

Preparation

To make the romesco sauce, heat oven to 400F. Line a baking sheet with foil. Place peppers, tomatoes, garlic, and almonds on the baking sheet and roast for 10 to 15 minutes, or until almonds are toasted.

Remove almonds, rotate peppers and tomatoes, and stir garlic. Return to the oven and continue roasting, another 10 minutes, or until garlic and tomatoes are soft.

Remove garlic and tomatoes and keep roasting peppers, rotating occasionally, until skins are blistered.

 

Remove peppers and place in a bowl with tomatoes. Cover and let sit for 10 minutes.

Gently peel skins away from peppers and tomatoes. Discard skins and pepper seeds and stem.

Place all ingredients for the sauce in a high powered blender or food processor and blend until smooth.

Cut cauliflower vertically into 1-inch steaks. Rub with olive oil and sprinkle with garlic powder and pepper.

Heat a grill or grill pan to medium heat. Grill cauliflower steaks for 4-5 minutes per side. You want them to be slightly charred on the outside but not mushy on the inside.

Spoon about 1/4 cup of Romesco over each cauliflower steak and sprinkle with parsley.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

Be sure to buy smoked paprika, because regular paprika doesn’t have the same effect- your sauce will just be bland without it.

 

Cooking and Serving Tips

To ensure you get a complete protein profile in this meal, pair the cauliflower steaks with quinoa or black beans and perhaps a green veggie.

Double or triple the recipe for the sauce to keep in your refrigerator to spoon over chicken, fish, or eggs for a quick and flavorful dinner.

Each serving should be two steaks covered with about 1/2 cup of sauce.

 

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

China refuses GMO grain imports from the United States

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

China refuses GMO grain imports from the United States

 GMOcorn

 China has decided to suspend the issuance of permits for the importation of animal feed produced in America that is made with corn. China is not known for having exceptionally high standards, which is what makes this so disturbing.

 

Three trading executives discussed the turn of events with Bloomberg Business Week not too long ago. Dried distillers’ grains, also known as DDGS by industry professionals, can no longer be exported from America to China. The reason for this puzzling decision is because the Chinese government fears that MIR 162 corn, a GM strain that the Chinese have not approved, carries a high risk of contamination.

 

China was once the largest buyer of this American corn byproduct, which is produced in the process of making ethanol. More than 40 percent of the corn grown in the United Sates is used to make ethanol, and China bought 34 percent of the United States’ DDGS exports.

 

Of course, this turn of events is not really all that surprising. China rejected several shipments of corn that proved to be contaminated by MIR 162. In one instance, the government rejected 1.1 million metric tons of Syngenta corn that was tainted. The  Chinese government also turned away 758 tons of corn. It is therefore understandable that the Chinese government simply decided to suspend importation of corn-based animal feeds.

 

So China probably thinks we’re purposefully trying to contaminate their food supply with GMOs. Could you blame them? Our government has contaminated our own food supply with them!

 

On the bright side, AG Web reports that a class-action lawsuit has been filed against Syngenta, MIR 162’s creator and manufacturer, on behalf of American farmers. The corn was genetically engineered to be more resistant to insects, and was approved by the U.S. in 2010. The corn, also known as Agrisure Viptera, was marketed and promoted before it had received import approval from China. The ensuing turmoil over China’s rejection of the product  has left farmers shortchanged.

 

James Pizzirusso, a partner with the Hausfeld law firm in Washington, D.C., has said, “Syngenta must be held accountable for its blatant misrepresentations to U.S. corn farmers. By promoting and marketing a genetically-modified corn seed before the seed had received import approval from China, Syngenta placed its own profit margins over corn farmers’ livelihoods.” Pizzirusso also notes that China’s rejection of the MIR 162 corn has been a nightmare for affected farmers, causing losses equating to more than 1 billion dollars.

 

Syngenta has also been sued by both Cargill and Trans Coastal Supply Co. for their losses due to China’s rejection of products contaminated with MIR 162. Cargill has sued for a cool $90 million, while Trans Coastal Supply Co. blames Syngenta for $41 million in losses. Naturally, Syngenta believes that it is not at fault at all. In fact, they all but pat themselves on the back for providing farmers access to their “new technologies.”

“Dr P. Carrothers of Health and Wellness Associates says, ” The bottom line is, if corn is not good enough for animals in Europe and China, it definately is not good enough for humans in the United States.  But they are still able to sell it!”

 

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Asparagus, Canadian Bacon, and Cheese Frittata: Low Carb

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Asparagus, Canadian Bacon, and Cheese Frittata: Low Carb

 

asparagusplyufritta

Ingredients

5 large eggs

4 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan

2 tablespoons milk

1/4 teaspoon freshly grated lemon zest

1 teaspoon kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

4 ounces medium asparagus stalks (about 8), woody stems trimmed, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

4 medium slices Canadian bacon (about 2 ounces), coarsely chopped

 

Directions

Position an oven rack in the upper part of the oven and preheat the broiler. Whisk the eggs, 3 tablespoons of the cheese, the milk, lemon zest, salt, and pepper to taste together in a bowl.

 

Heat the olive oil in an 8-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add the asparagus and Canadian bacon, and cook until the asparagus is crisp-tender, about 4 minutes. Reduce heat to low, pour the egg mixture into the skillet, stirring gently to distribute the fillings evenly. Cover, and cook until the bottom sets, but does not get too brown, about 9 minutes. Remove the cover, scatter the remaining 1 tablespoon of cheese over the surface. Run the frittata under the broiler until the top sets and browns slightly, about 1 minute. Set aside for about 5 minutes before unmolding. Slip the frittata out of the pan onto a cutting board, cut into wedges. Serve warm or room temperature.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Low Carb New York Ricotta Cheesecake

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Low Carb New York Ricotta Cheesecake

 ricottacheesecake.jpeg

Ingredients

24 ounces cream cheese, softened

1 cup extra-fine whole milk ricotta cheese (to refine, process in a food processor for 1 minute)

1/2 cup sour cream

1 1/2 cups sugar substitute (recommended: Splenda)

1/3 cup heavy cream

1 tablespoon no sugar added vanilla extract

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

2 eggs

3 egg yolks

 

Directions

Special equipment: 1 (8-inch) springform cake pan

 

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

 

Spray the springform pan with nonstick vegetable oil cooking spray. Set aside. In a shallow roasting pan big enough to fit the cake pan, pour about 1-inch of water and place it on the center rack of the oven to preheat.

 

In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat softened cream cheese, ricotta, sour cream and sugar substitute on low speed for about 1 minute until well blended.

 

In a separate bowl, using a wire whisk, mix heavy cream, vanilla, lemon juice, eggs, and egg yolks until blended.

 

Turn the mixer on medium speed, and slowly pour the egg mixture into the cream cheese mixture. Beat just until blended and then turn off; be careful not to over-whip.

 

Pour batter into the greased springform pan. Place pan into the heated water bath. Bake for 15 minutes, and then lower the oven temperature to 275 degrees F. Continue baking for 1 1/2 hours, or until top is light golden brown and cake is pulling away from the sides of the pan. Turn the oven off when finished cooking and leave the cake in the oven to cool for 3 more hours. (This will keep the cake nice and tall.) Then remove cake and refrigerate before serving. Serve chilled.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Salmon Cakes

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Salmon Cakes

 

salmoncake3s

Ingredients

2 strips bacon, cooked until crispy, crumbled, bacon fat reserved

1/4 cup chopped onion

1 egg

1/2 cup mayonnaise

2 teaspoons Dijon mustard

1/2 teaspoon sugar

1/2 lemon, zested

1 (14-ounce) can wild salmon, checked for large bones

1 baked or boiled russet potato, peeled, and fluffed with a fork

1/4 cup bread crumbs

2 tablespoons grated Parmesan

Freshly ground black pepper

1/2 cup vegetable oil

 

Directions

Watch how to make this recipe.

 

Heat 1 tablespoon of the reserved bacon fat in a small saute pan over low heat. Add the onions and cook until translucent. Cool the onions for a bit.

 

Mix the bacon, onion, egg, mayonnaise, mustard, sugar, and lemon zest in a bowl. Add the salmon and potato, mixing gently after each addition. Form the mixture into 12 small patties. In a shallow dish, combine the bread crumbs, Parmesan, and pepper, to taste. Coat the patties in the bread crumb topping. Heat 1/4 cup of the oil in a large saute pan over medium heat, and cook the salmon cakes in batches until golden, about 3 to 4 minutes per side. Add more oil, as necessary. Arrange on a serving platter and serve.

 

**  I personally do not use the potato, and I add Bay Seasoning.

 

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Health and Disease, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Are You Really Convinced That Vaccines Are Safe

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS-Telehealth  

 

Are You Really Convinced That Vaccines Are Safe

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If you’re convinced that vaccines are safe, you’re not listening to the people who’ve lost a child after a round of vaccines was administered. The U.S. government set up a special court to hear vaccine injury cases, with reparation for select victims but no accountability for vaccine makers. If you’re new to learning about vaccine risk, check out LearnTheRisk.org, ChildhoodShots.com and TheWorldMercuryProject, three of many places where the truth is being told.

 

As the truth comes forth, will you laugh in the faces of the victims who have been vaccine damaged? Sudden infant death syndrome, seizures, allergies, brain swelling, skin conditions, eating disorders and neurological development issues are all sad consequences of failed vaccine policy in the U.S. and around the world. Every vaccine on the market today, no matter what its intended use, will burden a body, especially small bodies with lower blood volume and weight.

 

Vaccines use adjuvants to inflame the immune system and force it to respond to pathogens. The most popular adjuvant used in vaccines are aluminum salts. As Dr. Chris Exley demonstrates, after a vaccine is administered, immune-responsive cells quickly travel to the injection site and load up their cytoplasm with the antigen and aluminum salts from the vaccine. The immune-responsive cells then travel throughout the body, taking aluminum cations to unpredictable places, including the brain. When the vesicles undergo acidification, they will dissolve the enclosed aluminum salt. Biologically reactive A13+ aluminum cations rupture the membrane, entering the cell cytoplasm and causing cell death.

This is the first problem with vaccines; the aluminum that augments an immune response is traveling throughout the body and causing cell death, inflammation, and aluminum toxicity throughout the person. If you’re convinced vaccines are safe, you don’t understand the toxicity of compounding aluminum cations at the cellular level and the potential damage that occurs to the brain and immune system when aluminum-based vaccines are injected.

 

Vaccines use preservatives. One of the preservatives in some vaccines is a form of inorganic mercury called thimerosal. Researchers have studied thimerosal exposure on mammalian brains. While thimerosal clears from the brain quicker than organic forms of mercury, it also concentrates there more rapidly, leading to harmful exposure amounts. A laboratory investigation of GlaxoSmithKline’s Flulaval flu vaccine found mercury at 51 ppm, or 25,000 times the legal maximum for drinking water regulated by the EPA. Mercury is one of the worst preservatives to directly inject into the body, bypassing the gastrointestinal filters, microbiome, and the gut wall. When this vaccine is recommended for pregnant women, is the fetus protected? Absolutely not. The developing infant can be poisoned for life due to the slightest exposure to mercury in the womb. If you’re convinced vaccines are safe, you do not understand the toxicity of mercury or the dangers of putting a brain-damaging element into the muscles and bloodstream without normal body filtration.

 

Texas researcher Dawn Richardson led a study at an Austin morgue investigating cases of sudden infant death syndrome. They found high concentrations of SIDS deaths at 2, 4, and 6 months, the same time the pediatricians schedule multiple vaccine doses for vulnerable infants. Will there be an investigation to see if these statistics replicate at morgues across the country? If so, is SIDS just a vague term to cover up the deaths of babies who are the victims of failed vaccine policy.

 

Even though polio vaccines are advertised as saving lives, the sad truth is that polio vaccines are causing deadly paralysis in the Middle East. Thirty-three children were crippled after receiving the polio vaccine in Syria. Despite the announcement in August 2017, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) called on more polio vaccines to stop what the vaccines started. If you are convinced vaccines are safe, don’t realize that an unpredictable number of children are sacrificed just so the remaining children can supposedly be “protected.”

 

Did you know a consortium of vaccines contain attenuated live viruses that can potentially revert back to infectious form, sickening the vaccine recipient with the disease the vaccine was supposed to prevent? Did you know that these viruses can shed for up to a month or longer, spreading to others, especially the immune-compromised? Viral shedding is a real issue caused by vaccines, especially in people who are malnourished from the start. If you’re convinced vaccines are safe, you don’t know how vaccines can cause the disease to form in the recipient and spread it to the most vulnerable among us.

 

This information is the tip of the iceberg. For more research, check out Vaccines.News.

 

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