Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Cervical Cancer

 

ladyslippergroup.jpg

 

The good news is the number of cervical cancer cases is

falling yearly.  If you have a family history

of cervical cancer, including vulva and labia, then there are things you can do

to prevent it from happening. 

Cutting your risk with grapes and berries

 

Eating one cup of grapes, strawberries or blueberries, or

drinking 4 oz. of pomegranate juice daily cuts your risk of ever getting

cervical cancer. Compounds in these fruits help stop abnormal growth from

spreading making it easier for your immune system to find and destroy them

quickly.
If you have any questions or concerns contact us at:

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Picture:  Lady Slippers, taken in Northern Minnesota

 

 

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Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Simple and Cleansing Kichadi

kichadi

 

Simple and Cleansing Kichadi

Serves 6-8

 

Ingredients:

1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee

½ Tbsp. cumin seeds

½ Tbsp. mustard seeds

½ Tbsp. coriander seeds

½ tsp. ground turmeric

1 cinnamon stick

1-2 Tbsp. minced ginger (to taste)

1 large tomato, chopped (optional)

2 medium yellow onion, diced

2 medium carrots, chopped

1 small / 250g sweet potato (or other seasonal root veggie), chopped

1 cup / 200g brown rice

½ cup / 110g mung beans or brown lentils

1 tsp. fine grain sea salt

1 cup / 140g green peas, frozen or fresh

4 cups / 1L water (or more, as needed)

a couple handfuls finely chopped cilantro

lemon to garnish

 

Directions:

  1. If possible, soak the rice and pulses together overnight, or for 8-12 hours. Drain and rinse very well.

 

  1. Melt the oil in a large stockpot. Add the cumin and mustard seed and fry just until the mustard seeds start to pop. Add the remaining spices, stir and then add the tomato and ginger (if you’re opting out of the tomato, simply use a few splashes of water). Fry for a couple minutes until fragrant.

 

  1. Add the onion, carrots, sweet potato, brown rice, mung beans, salt, and water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook for about 45 minutes, until the rice and beans are soft. About five minutes before serving, add the peas whether fresh or frozen, and cook until they are warm. Add more water for a stew-y consistency, or if the pot becomes dry while cooking.

 

  1. Serve kichadi hot, garnished with cilantro and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Give thanks and enjoy.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-9355

HealthWellnessAssocaites@gmail.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Three Rules of Love to Live By

love

Three Rules of Love to Live By!

 

Love Is Not Just Chemistry, You Need Physics!

 

When people say – “That couple’s got chemistry!” – what exactly are they talking about? Well, they “hit it off,” or they have “much in common,” or they are “bonding,” or they’re “clicking,” or they got-it-going on “romantically!” These phrases are used frequently, but when you think about it, they are surface-statements that do not explain much about the nuts and bolts of a loving relationship. We need physics! The domain of chemistry is the molecular level, while physics is about the motion of bodies in the larger world. Here are three well-known, simple-to-understand physical laws and how they might apply to a couple that’s falling in love, or maintaining a relationship, or struggling toward a break-up. The hope is that some key insights emerge that inspire couples to elevate their relationship through understanding and compassion.

 

Physical Law: “Opposites Attract”

For human beings to breathe, move, eat, think, and feel it is necessary that the electrical charge outside each cell in our bo dies be opposite to the charge inside the cell. When a positive charge and a negative charge exert force on each other, something vital occurs: life happens! With couples, it is the opposing charges – the differences – that allow two people to fit together – Yin and Yang.  Opposite charges can lead people to have great conflict, but if these opposing charges can be understood and accepted, the result can be a dynamic and beautiful relationship. You and your partner are different. If you are secure enough within yourself that you don’t have to change or control your partner, you can appreciate the differences between you. This appreciation of differences means that you feel complete enough as a person that you don’t need your partner to fill in your gaps and be like you. They are free to be themselves and you can now experience the wonder of discovering more and more about them. When this process is mutual your relationship gets deeper and more intimate.

 

Physical Law: “For every action, an equal and opposite reaction”

This law has two main effects on relationships:

  1. Everything you do in a relationship has an effect on your partner. Whether you say or do something in the presence of your partner, or you tell them about something you said or did some other time, some other place, and with someone else, it will invariably have an effect. The bonds of commitment are quite pervasive. It’s almost like you and your partner – on some level – are always together. Your partner may enjoy you, complain about you, or keep their reactions to themselves, but they are always affected. So, the lesson is that how you behave, how you treat others, how you carry yourself, even your self-image has consequences for your partner.
  2. When we take an action with our partner’s well-being and happiness in mind, we may have a conscious or unconscious expectation that they will recognize it and appreciate us. Though it is obvious that “keeping score” is not helpful, we are human and vulnerable to the expectation of reciprocity.

Physical Law: “Inertia”

Isaac Newton, the Einstein of his day in the 17th century, stated that objects in motion tend to stay in motion, while objects at rest tend to stay at rest. It makes sense. Simply put, this law of inertia is basically resistant to change. This is a primary issue for couples to deal with. We all wish that the “Honeymoon Phase” would last forever, or we wish to recapture the feeling of its luminosity. Yet, the river of life moves on and each individual and each couple must learn, grow, mature, and adapt to present life circumstances. So, we must overcome this resistance to change. We must overcome the very law of inertia! This is a tall task, but that’s what why we have developed the cortex of the brain. We do have it within our capacity to attain higher and higher states of consciousness. And we have the advantage that each of us has already had higher-consciousness experiences in our lives: seeing your parents have a loving moment together; realizing that you and a friend have developed a true friendship; feeling that you have a secure place in a group; falling in love; exchanging wedding vows with your beloved; providing help or support to deliver the birth of your child; hugging someone tightly and feeling that same loving force when they squeeze you back; etc. So, we are capable of attaining higher consciousness. It is simply the matter of going to that beautiful, loving place more often than before, and going there with our partner. Then you two stay there together for “stretches” of time that become memorable and transcendent.

 

As you can see, physics plays an integral part of every relationship. By taking these 3 physical laws into consideration, you can better nurture your relationships so that they are full of love and understanding.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr. M Williams   MD  PsyD

312-972-9355

 

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HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Sibling Stress

Sibling-Stress

How to Navigate A Stressful Relationship with a Sibling

 

Parents have a huge effect on the people their children become. But there’s another family dynamic that can influence us just as much, if not more: the one with our siblings. Relationships with brothers and sisters usually continue long after our parents are gone, and they affect us at every stage of life.

 

Never is this more evident than when we struggle with an adult sibling. It is normal for brothers and sisters to compete with each other as kids, and even fight; parents often assume we’ll grow out of it, and many of us do. Yet simmering resentments about family roles or parental favoritism can persist over time and cause real pain and rivalry.

 

We may also find ourselves at odds with a sibling over core values — like political or religious views, or how to best raise our kids — and these differences can intensify routine disagreements.

 

As intractable as sibling conflicts can seem, they don’t need to be permanent, says psychotherapist Jeanne Safer, PhD. Adjusting our perceptions and taking a few simple actions can help build the best possible bonds with our challenging brothers and sisters, even if the relationships might never be perfect.

 

CHALLENGES TO OVERCOME

Idealizing sibling relationships.   “We have this idea that these relationships are, or should be, wholly positive,” says Safer, “and we use them as metaphors for very high ideals: Sisterhood is powerful. All men are brothers. It can be hard to live up to the idealizations.”

Parental favoritism. Safer says parental favoritism plays a prominent role in nearly all sibling conflicts — and it has its roots in a parent’s experience with his or her own siblings. “If a parent is the youngest of three children, and has three children, she is probably going to favor the youngest child, seeing herself there unconsciously,” she explains.

Denial. Believing you’ve outgrown any childhood rivalry with your sibling, or that you should have, makes it hard to address underlying resentments.

Differing destinies. If one sibling has a more successful career, is luckier in love, or has an easier time having or raising children, this can sustain resentments developed in childhood, Safer says. She cites the case of a physician who was a failed musician. The doctor envied her less-affluent sister, who played the piano beautifully.

Opposing values. You may be a lifelong Democrat and your sister a staunch Republican, or you may let your kids roam free while your brother keeps his on a short leash. If these differences create tension, Safer believes it indicates historical factors are at play. “These differences in values can usually be handled if the underlying issues are addressed,” she says.

Divergent memories. We might be angry at siblings who don’t share our views of the family system, but Safer believes that our memories and experiences are inevitably different. “You and your siblings have the same biological parents but live in different ‘psychological families’ because of the different roles you play,” she says.

Parental interference. When conflict erupts between siblings, parents often push for immediate reconciliation, Safer notes. “This very often means that the higher-functioning sibling is supposed to suck it up and tolerate anything that the lower-functioning one does.”

STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS

Take the initiative. “If you’re waiting for your sibling to address the issues between you, you may have to wait a very long time,” says Safer. “Get the ball rolling by reaching out yourself.”

Remember the good things. If you’re preparing to address a conflict with your sibling, Safer suggests a positive focus. Recall times when he or she was kind to you, stood up for you, helped you with something. “In your conversation, bring it up and thank him or her.”

Ask your sibling about his or her experience. Ask how he or she felt in your family — and be open to the explanation. Don’t expect it to match your own. Safer suggests this type of approach: “I really want to make things better between us, and I think that starts with our childhood. What was your experience of our parents?”

Address difficulties directly. Don’t let a casual “Mom likes you best” or “I always have to take care of everything” pass without a sincere response, Safer says. Ask if the two of you can talk about it. Explain that you want to connect and get beyond your roles.

Listen nondefensively. “You need to do a lot of listening,” says Safer. “And you need to listen particularly carefully to what the sibling has to say about the person you least want to hear about — yourself.”

Offer your services. Your sibling may respond better to what you do than what you say, especially if he or she is less inclined to ask for help, Safer notes. Offer to watch the kids, do some cooking, run errands. This allows you to show your implicit regard for him or her, which can help build trust.

Settle for modest improvements. Sibling struggles are deeply rooted, and they don’t always change for the better immediately — or completely. Your sibling might disagree that your issues stem from early family life, and he or she may not be ready for change. “But trying counts,” says Safer. “If you can go from being so estranged that you can’t stand to be together to being able to be decent to each other, that’s big progress.”

 

Please contact us with any of your concerns.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived   J Spayde

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com