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Sausage and Zucchini Breakfast Casserole

Sausage-and-Zucchini-Breakfast-Casserole-3.jpg

Sausage and Zucchini Breakfast Casserole

 

This quick and easy Paleo dish takes a classic combination of sausage, mushrooms and thyme and adds eggs and zucchini to make a filling and delicious breakfast casserole. We recommend assembling the casserole the night before, and then baking it in the morning – it will save you a ton of time and you will have a piping hot breakfast to start off your day right!

 

Ingredients

 

3 medium zucchini trimmed

4 large mushroom(s), white button or cremini halved

1 large onion(s), yellow peeled and quartered

1 pound(s) sausage, ground breakfast

1/2 tablespoon(s) thyme, fresh (optional)

2 tablespoon(s) almond flour

6 large egg(s)

1/2 teaspoon(s) garlic, granulated

1/2 teaspoon(s) sea salt

1/4 teaspoon(s) cayenne pepper (optional)

Instructions

 

Preheat oven to 400 F.

Place a grater blade on a medium or large food processor (or just use a box grater to shred the veggies by hand). Grate the zucchini, mushrooms and onion. With a paper towel, squeeze excess moisture out of the zucchini.

Scrape the veggie mixture into the bottom of a 8×8 or 9×9 baking dish and lightly pat down to form an even surface.

Crumble the raw sausage on top of the veggies. Sprinkle with fresh thyme and almond flour.

In a medium mixing bowl, combine eggs, granulated garlic, sea salt, and cayenne (optional) and whisk until eggs are a pale yellow (about 30 seconds).

Pour egg mixture evenly over sausage and veggies in the baking dish. It should sink to the bottom of the pan.

Place in oven and bake for 45 to 55 minutes, or until browned on top and cooked through. There will be some residual water from the vegetables.

Cool at least 15 minutes. Slice into 4 servings and enjoy warm or cold.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

  1. Carrothers

Dir. Of Personalize Healthcare and Preventative Medicine

https://www.facebook.com/angelique.rose.50

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Benefits of Asparagus with Recipe

Asparagus-Side-Dish

 

Asparagus is a fantastic healing vegetable that is high in essential minerals such as selenium, zinc, and manganese which are vital for a strong and healthy immune system. This is especially important if you have a family line of breast cancer or cardiac problems.  It is also high in vitamins A, K, and B-complex including folate which is a building block for a healthy cardiovascular system and for woman who are trying to conceive.

 

Asparagus contains aspartic acid which is an amino acid that neutralizes excess amounts of ammonia in the body that is often the cause of exhaustion, headaches, and poor digestion. Perfect of people with gout. Asparagus contains significant amounts of healthy fiber and protein which helps to maintain blood sugar levels, prevent constipation, stabilize digestion, and stop the urge to overeat.

 

It also contains a compound called asparagine which is a natural diuretic that breaks up oxalic and uric acid crystals stored in muscles and in the kidneys and eliminates them through the urine. This natural diuretic is helpful in reducing water retention, bloating, and swelling in the body.

 

Asparagus is also high in glutathione which is an antioxidant powerhouse and particularly beneficial for those suffering with autoimmune conditions, liver disease, heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Asparagus is known to help strengthen the liver, kidneys, skin, ligaments, and bones and it’s chlorophyll content makes it a great blood builder. Asparagus also contains inulin which encourages good bacteria in the gut that boosts nutrient absorption and helps to keep the immune system functioning properly. Asparagus is a nutrient-packed, delicious vegetable that can be eaten raw or steamed and added to soup, salads, stews, rice, and/or veggie dishes.

 

 

 

ASPARAGUS WITH LEMON BUTTER SAUCE RECIPE

 

FOR THE ASPARAGUS

water

salt

2 pound asparagus, trimmed

 

FOR THE LEMON BUTTER SAUCE

3 tablespoons fresh meyer lemon juice

3 tablespoons organic , low-sodium vegetable broth

1 teaspoon white vinegar

3 tablespoons heavy cream

1 teaspoon sugar

4 tablespoons unsalted butter , cut into pats*

salt and fresh ground pepper , to taste

OPTIONAL

Garnish with parmesan cheese , fresh chopped parsley and lemon zest

 

Instructions

FOR THE ASPARAGUS

Fill a large pot with about 2 inches of salted water and bring to a boil.

Add asparagus to the boiling water; cover with a lid and let it steam until it’s cooked to your liking, about 5 to 8 minutes, depending on the thickness of the asparagus.

Drain. Transfer asparagus to a large bowl of ice water to cool, and drain again.

In the meantime, prepare the LEMON BUTTER SAUCE

In a saucepan combine lemon juice, vegetable broth, and white vinegar. Cooking over medium heat, reduce the sauce by half.

Turn heat down to a simmer and whisk in the cream; keep whisking to break up the curds.

Add sugar and continue to whisk while adding the pats of butter, letting each pat melt into the sauce before you add the next.

Season with salt and pepper.

Simmer until sauce begins to thicken.

Remove from heat and let stand couple of minutes. Sauce will thicken as it stands.

Taste for seasonings and adjust accordingly.

Transfer cooked asparagus to a serving plate.

Serve the lemon butter sauce by drizzling over the asparagus or on the side.

Recipe Notes

*IF you prefer a creamier sauce, add more butter, about a tablespoon at a time.

 

Please share with family and friends, thank you.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

Dr P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

 

This Snack Food is Causing Cancer

doritos

Popular Snack Chips May Be Linked to Cancer and Other Diseases

 

Deadly processed foods are very addictive.  Americans currently spend about 90% of their food income buying processed junk like popular Doritos. Doritos are statistically listed as the most popular chips worldwide. Why are Doritos so bad? Take a look at the ingredients.

 

Doritos Ingredients:

 

Whole corn, vegetable oil (corn, soybean, and/or sunflower oil), salt, cheddar cheese (milk, cheese cultures, salt, enzymes), maltodextrin, wheat flour, whey, monosodium glutamate, buttermilk solids, romano cheese (part skim cow’s milk, cheese cultures, salt, enzymes), whey protein concentrate, onion powder, partially hydrogenated soybean and cottonseed oil, corn flour, disodium phosphate, lactose, natural and artificial flavor, dextrose, tomato powder, spices, lactic acid, artificial color (including Yellow 6, Yellow 5, Red 40), citric acid, sugar, garlic powder, red and green bell pepper powder, sodium caseinate, disodium inosinate, disodium guanylate, nonfat milk solids, whey protein isolate, corn syrup solids.

 

Whole Corn:

 

Genetically modified foods (especially corn) contain toxic chemicals and pesticides that can wreak havoc on your digestive system over time and tax your organs of elimination such as liver, kidneys, bladder, lymphatic system.

 

According to the Institute for Responsible Technology (IRT):

 

“Several animal studies indicate serious health risks associated with GMO food including infertility, immune problems, accelerated aging, faulty insulin regulation, and changes in major organs and the gastrointestinal system.”

 

Vegetable Oil:

 

Most vegetable oils are genetically modified. Almost 90 % of canola and corn oil in America is GMO. Soy, corn, safflower and canola  oils are dangerous to cook with as they contain very high amounts of Omega-6. Omega-6 is only beneficial for our bodies if the ratio of Omega-6 and Omega-3 is 3 to 1.  Omega-3 sources include fatty fish and cod liver oil. As a nation, we do not consume enough of these. The current ratio in America is at 50:1.   Our culture is way to indulged in processed pre-packaged food, so adding foods cooked with vegetable oil make matters even worse.

Cheddar Cheese (milk, cheese cultures, salt, enzymes): Pasteurized cow’s milk on an industrial commercial level is loaded with unhealthy components such growth hormone and GMOs.  Doritos contain hormones that lead to breast cancer.

 

Yellow #6:

 

Can cause cancer, hyperactivity, allergic reactions, diarrhea, vomiting, nettle rash, migraines and swelling of the skin.

 

Yellow #5:

 

Can cause allergic reactions, hyperactivity, cancer.

 

Red #40:

 

Damages DNA, causes swelling around the mouth, hives, hyperactivity in children and cancer.

 

Maltodextrin:

 

Maltodextrin is a commercial sweetener made from cornstarch. Almost all the maltodextrin used in health foods, vitamins, and supplements are derived from genetically modified corn. Abdominal bloating and flatulence can be experienced; other problems relating to digestion can also become a problem such as constipation and diarrhea.

 

Citric Acid:

 

Citric acid is used as both a flavor enhancer and a preservative ingredient. Citric acid has been known to irritate the digestive system , causing heartburn and damage to the mucous membrane of the stomach. According to a few European studies, citric acid could be responsible for promoting tooth decay as well.

 

Corn Syrup Solids:

 

This is precisely the ingredient that is contributing to the obesity in the United States. Fructose can disturb your metabolism, elevate blood pressure and triglycerides, cause weight gain, heart disease and liver damage, and even deplete your body of vitamins and minerals.

 

Other Flavors:

 

Buttermilk, Romano cheese (part skim cow’s milk, cheese cultures, salt, enzymes), whey protein concentrate, onion powder, corn flour, natural and artificial flavors, dextrose, tomato powder, lactose, spices, wheat flour, salt, lactic acid, citric acid, sugar, garlic powder, skim milk, whey protein isolate, corn syrup solids, red and green bell pepper powder, sodium caseinate, disodium inosinate, disodium guanylate. All these ingredients can cause serious chronic diseases and are the norm for processed snacks.

 

Doritos also contain acrylamides — toxic substances formed when carbohydrates are cooked a high temperature. Acrylamides are linked to cancer and other serious diseases. One study shows that eating acrylamides increases the risk of kidney cancer by 59 percent

 

Remember, you are what you eat. The choice is yours!

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Are Allergies Causing Your Illness

enviromentalallergies

Allergies and Illness

 

You may have heard about different ways our environment is polluted, but you may be surprised to find out about some of the specific poisons in our environments that can hinder us from overcoming symptoms and conditions and slow down our healing process. These pollutants and toxins can trigger issues and keep us stuck in a place of poor health if we aren’t made aware of their presence in our lives and learn ways to fight against these various harmful elements.

This is one area that we are well trained in.  Many of us have worked with this for years, and yet, they still don’t teach allergies in medical school, so many doctors have not a clue, yet, how important this is. Many allergist still do skin scratch tests, which are antiquated, but they can charge big bucks for.

Not only will this article shed light on some of the environmental toxins you may not be aware of, but it will also provide you with information on how to protect and arm yourself against these destructive forces. Your body is constantly adjusting to things in its environment and fighting against toxins it encounters. Once you have this information and begin to offer your body the foods, supplements, and protective measures it needs to thrive, you will be on your way not to be a victim to the ever-changing environments you find yourself in.

You still should contact us, or an environmental allergist.  That is a specialty field, and you have to ask.

 

Environmental Issues Inside the Home

 

Allergies, monthly headaches during your menstrual cycle, asthma, eczema, anxiety, fatigue, hair loss, brain fog, confusion, weakness, aches and pains, and a host of other health issues can all be exacerbated by various environmental issues. You may be wondering what is going on in your environment that is causing your unique health complications. Here are just a few of the environmental triggers you may be up against:

 

Carpet Chemicals

 

I’ve been discussing the issue of carpet chemicals for decades now, and especially how serious it is not to put a baby on a carpet.  Brand new carpet contains solvents, fungicides, and other toxic chemicals, which can trigger seasonal affective disorder-like symptoms and other conditions and symptoms connected with any active or inactive viruses you have. For example, if you have Epstein-Barr virus and you are exposed to the chemicals found in new carpets, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Lyme disease, aches and pains, brain fog, migraines, Hashimoto’s, psoriasis, asthma or a host of other conditions and symptoms may arise or worsen.

 

Using a conventional carpet cleaning service can also be problematic. A conventional carpet cleaner typically uses a large number of different solvent chemicals mixed into a single, toxic brew. People don’t realize that the freshly cleaned carpets they are padding around on barefoot and letting their children play on have been saturated in such a harmful solution. Problems can especially arise in the wintertime when people get their carpets cleaned and keep their windows shut for months at a time.

 

Even if you feel you’re in fantastic health, just getting your carpets cleaned could potentially set you up for your first Lyme disease diagnosis. The solvents and chemicals found inside these freshly cleaned carpets can trigger off viruses in people’s bodies such as Epstein-Barr and neurotoxins, such as those that create neurological Lyme. Lyme disease at its core is never bacterial or parasitical, it is always a viral issue. This is still undiscovered information that many healthcare providers will hear for the first time, if you talk to them.  These viruses create the neurotoxins that trigger neurological issues that are associated with Lyme. If someone has no symptoms of Lyme until they are exposed to a toxin like carpet chemicals, it means the toxin triggered the virus to worsen, resulting in the start of the symptoms associated with Lyme disease. You could ask for a test for Lyme disease, and if you have a high antigen count, it may be exposure to carpet and cleaning solutions.

Be mindful of how old your carpet is as well. Older carpets tend to begin breaking down and can start to harbor various levels of mold. You may not notice mold in any other parts of your home, and still be unknowingly affected by a low-grade fungus growing in your older carpets.

 

Depending on your specific circumstances, you may have to live in a place with carpets and face these issues. If you’re living in a rental apartment that has new carpeting, extremely old carpeting, or carpets that have been freshly cleaned with toxic chemicals, do not burden yourself with worry. There are many choices you can make in your life when it comes to foods, supplements, and other more flexible lifestyle and self-care choices that can help you combat the environmental toxins you face. Just give us a call.

 

Paint

 

You may see people giggling as they splatter paint on each other while finishing a painting project in a commercial, television show, or movie, but this staged scene is actually highlighting a scenario that could actually be incredibly harmful in real life. The paint they are playfully splashing at each other is in fact toxic and the less exposure you have, the better.

 

Be cautious and mindful of painting projects inside the home. Fresh paint can have a negative impact on your health, and it takes time for the paint fumes to dissipate. If possible, use low-VOC paint, which may somewhat help in lowering the toxins you and your housemates are exposed to.

 

Both viral and bacterial conditions are more easily triggered when someone is living in a freshly painted rental or any environment that has been newly painted. One condition that may be triggered to worsen is a streptococcus infection, which could result in a handful of health-related difficulties including SIBO, sinus congestion, UTIs, styes, and acne. Even if you are in excellent health, regular exposure to fresh paint could still negatively impact your health.

 

Mold

 

Mold can be present in a variety of places in the home. Different types of black mold that may appear inside the walls, underneath the kitchen sink, or in a variety of other locations in the home can trigger serious health symptoms and conditions. Black mold can be a major trigger for neurological viruses that create Lyme disease symptoms, a variety of multiple sclerosis, or a host of other health-related issues.

Again, I have to say, if you have questions you need to talk to us. Many of us  know what it’s like to live in a one room apartment that’s filled with harmful pesticides, toxic paint, and mold. I understand that many people do not have the financial means or the ability for one reason or another to move away from and/or modify their living quarters. The awareness of potential environmental toxins inside the home can still bring about understanding, and some of the suggested dietary and supplement recommendations can still be beneficial for you and your loved ones to help safeguard your health.

 

Water

 

From brushing your teeth to washing your hands to soaking in the tub after a busy day, you are constantly encountering varying qualities of water. Many people know to avoid drinking tap water whenever possible. If you cannot afford a high-quality water filter, even a semi-decent filtration system can offer some benefit.

 

You may not know that you are often bathing in chlorine and fluoride when you run a bath or step into the shower. These two substances are not ideal for your health or healing. I’ve worked with a client who developed chronic fatigue largely because of their constant exposure to chlorine while showering. They hopped from doctor to doctor, were given numerous misdiagnoses, and didn’t actually experience positive shifts in their health until they filtered the chlorine out of the water they were showering in. My client, who was suffering from low-grade Epstein-Barr that gave rise to chronic fatigue syndrome, was already fighting off neurotoxins from the Epstein-Barr that were creating neurological fatigue, and the chlorine exposure in addition to the neurotoxins overburdened the immune system. After this fix, the client no longer needed to pause their day after a shower to take a nap and noted that this simple change seemed to make their fatigue disappear by 75%. If you want to address this issue yourself, consi der installing a filter in the shower. You may also be interested in installing a reverse osmosis water system throughout your home, which is another option.

 

I always talk about the importance of little steps in the right direction. If you can decrease your exposure to environmental toxins, this may play a 5% role or more in your overall healing. Any other healing efforts, including your dietary choices, the supplements you choose to take, and the healing meditations you practice all have different positive percentages in which they impact your healing. The more of these positive pieces of healing you can bring into your life, the more results you are likely to see because it matters and all adds up.

 

Air

 

What I’m about to reveal is negatively affecting the health of our children, our families, and our communities, but is not being openly discussed. This harmful practice is present throughout the United States and in many other countries around the world. Every state in the U.S. has areas that are specifically designated for agricultural use. In the areas that are used for farming most conventional vegetables and certain conventional fruits, workers lay down hundreds of billions of pounds of plastic throughout the rows of produce. These often white, but sometimes black colored row covers are vastly different than the row covers you may use in your backyard garden to provide protection and pest control. These toxic plastic row covers blanket thousands of acres of crops throughout the United States and elsewhere and are sprayed multiple times a week with rodenticides, herbicides, pesticides, insecticides, and fungicides. The barrels these chemicals come from display a unique variety of hazard label, which is a large skull and bones, and the mixture that is eventually sprayed on the crops is concocted in a massive containment unit. The people who cover these plastics in heavy quantities of these toxic chemicals have to wear hazmat suits to protect themselves. Chemicals being sprayed on conventional crops is nothing new, but this part is.

 

Once the conventional crops are ready to be harvested, the plastics are gathered and burned. During this process, dangerous furans take to the air. Environmental activists are understandably worried about the pollution generated by factories and certain forms of transportation, but nobody within the environmental movement is aware of this practice or is talking about the toxic plumes that arise, billow through the air, cross state lines, and wreak unparalleled havoc on people’s lives. Burning plastic by itself can be toxic, but this becomes an even greater issue because of the high levels of pesticides, fungicides, rodenticides, and herbicides covering these plastics. If you’re someone that follows, believes or is interested in climate change, protecting our environment, wildlife and the future of our children’s health and wellbeing, it’s important to know that this hidden practice of burning agricultural plastic is by far one of the most damaging. It is wreaking havoc on all of us, but slips under the radar of the experts and environmentalists.

 

One source has always told me that this destructive practice is one of the reasons for the currently high rate of cancers. This is unknown to medical science and research. Many people are suffering from viruses such as Epstein-Barr that are creating severe fatigue and a multitude of other symptoms and conditions. These symptoms can be triggered off by this pollution as well. Additionally, allergy and asthma sufferers are greatly impacted by this practice. Oftentimes spring allergies people suffer from are largely due to the increase in the burning of plastics on agricultural lands during the spring season. Pollen may cause some irritation, but what could be triggering most of someone’s allergies is exposure to toxic, odor-free plumes. Because these crops are burned at different times in different areas, people can experience symptoms and conditions related to this destruction all year around.

 

The west coast has been especially impacted by this tragic practice, and when the winds blow, a terribly toxic soot that was created in the agricultural areas spreads throughout the west. Across the country, places have been affected by this free-flowing air pollution. This is especially true for states with warmer climates. Environmental groups are unaware of the immense harm this particular air pollution is causing and have no clue that this practice is one of the biggest reasons for air pollution-related illnesses in the world today.

 

Sadly, this is not even a necessary practice. Replacing these conventional techniques with organic farming practices could have a number of outstandingly positive consequences for our health. But as of right now, this destruction continues to take place.

 

If you are living near these agricultural lands, know that you do not necessarily need to move away from the place you call home. Even people eighty miles away from an area where burning occurs can be affected for a few days, a week or longer when a heavy period of burning takes place. Maybe you are outside breathing in polluted air and take a few steps back in your overall healing. If this happens, have faith that you will move forward once again. Instead of learning about these issues and growing fearful, I hope you can use this new knowledge to fight even harder against the things that are keeping you from embracing total health.

 

Besides air pollution from the burning plastics, you also need to be aware of the many chemicals falling out of the sky on a regular basis. Exhaust and jet fuel can be issues, especially for people who live near airports, but exhaust and jet fuel are not the only pollutants we need to worry about. I’m not going to expound on this topic in too much detail, but I just want to make you aware of the constant chemical fallout we are regularly exposed to. Other air pollutants include the radiation fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster and the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It may be surprising to learn that only a small fraction of the radiation from World War II has fallen to the ground level of earth thus far.

 

Not only are we up against the toxins that stem from the abuse of conventional agricultural lands, but we also have to fight off other environmental toxins as well as the viral explosion, toxic heavy metals, and radiation.   Medical science and research are unaware that these toxins  are responsible for most illnesses today and these environmental issues are simply triggers to underlying health problems caused by these  factors. Fortunately, we are resilient, our bodies are always working for us, and you now know the truths that can help you to truly begin healing.

 

Communities

 

If you live in a gated community, retirement complex, condo, or other communal space, know that you are most likely being exposed to rampant pesticide use. Large quantities of pesticides are oftentimes sprayed in areas of community living unbeknownst to the people and families dwelling in these areas. The hundreds of pounds of pesticides used on the lawns, bushes, and other greenery in these community spaces not only affect those who choose to live in these places, but can also be carried to other locations by the wind. This is one reason why you may unknowingly be suffering from pesticide exposure.

 

Golf Courses, Parks, & Lawns

 

If you or a loved one likes to play golf, it is important to be aware of the environmental toxins you may be exposing yourself to. Lethal fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides cover most golf courses, and most people who play on these courses will suffer some negative health consequences because of it. Not only are your feet, ankles, and legs exposed to tremendous amounts of pesticides and herbicides, but you are breathing in these toxins as well.

 

Parks and sports fields are also heavily sprayed with chemicals. It is unfortunate that places such as these, that bring joy to so many families, can be highly toxic environments.

 

If you are spraying your lawn with an herbicide or treating the inside or outside of your home with insecticide, you may want to reconsider these methods of maintenance. Unfortunately, if you discontinue these practices but still have a neighbor who continues to use these toxic chemicals you may still suffer from mild exposure. If a home down the street is treated with pesticides around its foundation, a windy day could easily blow those toxins onto your property and cause you or your loved one’s health issues to arise or grow worse. In a case such as this, someone could even develop a symptom of Lyme disease.

 

New Cars, Furniture, & Clothes

 

Have you ever gotten into a brand-new car and noticed that smell that tends to be in new vehicles? Toxic solvents create that “new car” smell and can linger in a vehicle and cause problems for up to six months. If you have allergies or chemical sensitives and you get a new car, know that you may suffer with these symptoms more during the first few months after your purchase. If you do experience a slight setback in your healing during this time, do not lose faith. Continue to implement the healing protocol that is working for you and your body, and remember that the healing process involves steps forward and steps back.

 

If you buy a new piece of furniture, be aware that it is most likely laced with fungicides and nanotechnology. It may also have a smell, which is due to the high-level of solvents typically found in new fabrics. Even if the furniture does not smell, solvents are still usually present. Due to the toxic nature of the solvents, just sitting on a new piece of furniture could slow down someone’s healing. To protect yourself while waiting for the solvents to air out, buy a new comforter, wash it once or twice, and spread it over the new piece of furniture. Sitting on top of the comforter will help reduce your exposure to the solvents and help better support you healing.

 

Whenever you purchase new clothes, make sure to wash them before you wear them. This is true for any blankets, towels, quilts, and other bedding you buy. Many of these new pieces have been saturated with formaldehyde, fungicide, and other toxic chemicals. Try to avoid having your dry cleaning done at traditional dry cleaners as well. The toxic chemicals used at these places can hinder healing for some.

 

Detergents & Hair Care Products

 

When doing laundry, it is important to use a natural detergent. Conventional detergents usually contain petrol oil, which is an ingredient that may play a part in retarding your healing efforts.

 

Being mindful of the products you choose to use is important. This is true when it comes to the creams, gels, sprays, and other products you choose to use on your hair. One past client returned to my office after a period of time because her headaches had come back after a three-month respite. I found out that the client was using a different, more toxic brand of hairspray. My client confirmed this was the case. I suggested she stop using this new brand and return to using her old brand, which was slightly less toxic, or refrain from using hairspray altogether. The client was initially hesitant to stop using hairspray because she worried that her hair would not hold well and she would consequently not look her best at work. But eventually, my client came to realize that if she continued to use the hairspray, she would not even be able to show up to work because of the headaches the toxic hairspray could trigger.

 

Perfumes & Colognes

 

Perfumes and colognes are harmful and should be avoided whenever possible. Chemical compounds used in perfumes and colognes have the same chemical compound construction as particular pesticides and herbicides. You may be surprised to learn that pesticides, when freshly placed on agricultural fields, smell just like the perfumes and colognes you would find at a department store. Anyone suffering from a chronic condition or symptom should stay clear of perfumes and colognes, which can greatly retard your healing process. If you suffer with chemical sensitivity, exposure to perfume or cologne can be particularly devastating. If you are hesitant to give up your perfume or cologne, try switching these products for some high-quality essential oils. Essential oils can give you a wonderful fragrance without exposing you to toxins.

 

Perfumes and colognes are so toxic that just breathing in the cologne or perfume of another colleague at work on a daily basis can actually set your healing back slightly. That being said, it is important to remember that healing does not happen in a straight line and that with patience and consistently applying the healing information I share, you can eventually overcome this hindrance.

 

Air Fresheners

 

Plug-in air fresheners, like perfumes and colognes, possess the same chemical compound construction as certain pesticides and herbicides. Remove any plug-in air fresheners you may have around your home and toss any air freshener sprays you may be using. Air fresheners are so harmful that moving into a place where air fresheners were once used can actually slow down someone’s healing for a period of time.

 

Invisible Issues

 

I’ve worked with tens of thousands of clients throughout my life. There was a more than twenty-year span where I worked seven days a week, from six-thirty in the morning until midnight. During this time, there was a five-year period where I even spent the holidays meeting with the many sick people who continued to pour into my office. I say this to highlight something I’ve learned throughout the countless years. There are many things we are up against in our lives. Some of these things are visible and many of these things are invisible.

 

Resilience & Adaptation

 

It is important to remember that even though we are being bombarded with environmental toxins wherever we live and wherever we go, our bodies are incredibly resilient. Even if you only lower the level of heavy metals in your body by a small margin, or slightly decrease your viral load, it is likely your body will noticeably reward you for your efforts.

For those who are not familiar with the term “viral load”  and  are not sure how it’s relevant, I’ve talked about how viruses like Epstein-Barr and others cause multiple symptoms that make people sick without them even being aware of it. You may be more familiar with terms like “candida”, “leaky gut”, “SIBO”, “fibromyalgia”, “autoimmune disease”, “chronic fatigue syndrome” and others, but there’s more to understand about these conditions and what’s really behind them and that’s what I we do for you.

This is because your body has the ability to adapt once it is given the right foods, supplements, and care, and the body’s God-given, miraculous ability to adapt is a critical part of the healing process.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

 

The Art of Stillness

theartofstillness

The Art of Stillness

In a world obsessed with speed and rife with distractions, there are few things that feel better than sitting still, paying attention — and going nowhere. A celebrated travel writer explains how to get there.

 

When I was 29, I had the life I always dreamed of as a boy: a 25th-floor office in Midtown Manhattan, an apartment on Park Avenue and 20th Street, and an endlessly fascinating job. Writing for Time magazine, I covered the fall of apartheid in South Africa, the People Power Revolution of the Philippines, and the turmoil around Indira Gandhi’s assassination. With no dependents or domestic responsibilities, I took long vacations, traveling everywhere from El Salvador to Bali.

 

In the midst of all the daily excitement and accomplishment, however, was a voice inside telling me that I was racing around too fast to really see or enjoy where I was going — or to check whether I was truly happy.

 

Indeed, hurrying around in search of contentment seemed a perfect way of guaranteeing I’d never find it. Too often, I reminded myself of someone going on and on about world peace in the most contentious and divisive terms.

 

So I decided to leave my dream life and spend a year in a small, single room on the backstreets of the ancient Japanese capital of Kyoto. At the time I couldn’t have explained exactly why I was doing this, except that I felt I had enjoyed a wonderful diet of movement and stimulation in New York, and it was time to balance that with something simpler. It was time to learn how to make these joys less external and ephemeral and to learn the art of sitting still.

 

Going nowhere — as my boyhood hero, singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen, would later tell me — isn’t about turning your back on the world; it’s about stepping away now and then so you can see it more clearly and love it more deeply. These four practices can help you experience more quiet in your daily life, no matter where you are.

 

BE FOR REAL

One day — 4 in the morning at the end of December, to be exact — Cohen took time out from his meditations to meet me for an interview and talk about what he was doing at the Mt. Baldy Zen Center near Los Angeles.

 

Sitting still, he said with unexpected passion, was “the real deep entertainment” he had found in his 61 years on the planet. “Real profound and voluptuous and delicious entertainment. The real feast that is available within this activity.”

 

Was he kidding? Cohen is famous for his mischief and ironies. But as he went on, I realized he wasn’t joking.

 

“What else would I be doing?” he asked. “Would I be starting a new marriage with a young woman and raising another family? Finding new drugs, buying more expensive wine? I don’t know. This seems to me the most luxurious and sumptuous response to the emptiness of my own existence.”

 

As I observed the sense of attention, kindness, and even delight that seemed to come out of Cohen’s life of going nowhere, I began to think about how liberating it might be for any of us to practice sitting still — clearing our heads and quieting our emotions.

 

You could start just by taking a few minutes out of every day to sit quietly and do nothing, letting what moves you rise to the surface. You could enjoy a long walk in the wilderness, or take a few days out of every season to go on retreat, exploring what lies deeper within the moment or yourself.

 

You could, as Cohen was doing, try to find a life in which stage sets and performances disappear and be reminded, at a level deeper than all words, about how making a living and making a life sometimes point in opposite directions.

 

TAKE THE ROAD TO NOWHERE

The idea of going nowhere is as universal as the law of gravity. “All the unhappiness of men,” the 17th-century French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal famously noted, “arises from one simple fact: that they cannot sit quietly in their chamber.”

 

After Admiral Richard E. Byrd spent nearly five months alone in a shack in the Antarctic, in temperatures that sank to 70 degrees below zero, he emerged convinced that “half the confusion in the world comes from not knowing how little we need.”

 

Or, as they sometimes say around Kyoto, “Don’t just do something. Sit there.”

 

Yet the world in which Pascal and even Admiral Byrd lived seems positively tranquil by today’s standards. The amount of data humanity collects while you’re reading a book is five times greater than the amount that exists in the entire Library of Congress. Anyone reading my full book, The Art of Stillness, will take in as much information today as Shakespeare took in during his lifetime. Researchers in the field of interruption science have found that it takes an average of 25 minutes to recover from a phone call. Yet such interruptions come every 11 minutes, on average — which means we’re never caught up with our lives.

 

So the more data that comes streaming in on us, the less time we have to process any of it.

 

The one thing technology doesn’t provide is a sense of how to make the best use of it. The ability to gather information, which used to be so crucial, is far less important now than the ability to sift through it.

 

It’s easy to feel as if you’re standing 2 inches away from a huge canvas that’s crowded and changing every microsecond. It’s only by stepping back and standing still that you can begin to take in the larger picture and see what that canvas — which is your life — really means.

 

UNPLUG AND RECHARGE

I’ve always been surprised to find that the people who have worked to speed up the world are often the same ones most sensitive to the virtue of slowing down.

 

One day I visited Library of Congress headquarters to give a talk on the Dalai Lama book I’d written and, like most visitors, I was impressed by the trampolines, the indoor tree houses, and the freedom that workers had to let their minds wander off leash to wherever inspiration might be hiding.

 

Many Silicon Valley employees observe an Internet Sabbath every week, turning off most of their devices from Friday night to Monday morning, if only to regain the sense of proportion and direction they’ll need when they go back online.

 

There is now a meditation room in every building on the General Mills campus in Minneapolis. Congressman Tim Ryan leads his colleagues in sessions of sitting still, reminding them that, if nothing else, scientists have found that meditation can lower blood pressure, help boost our immune systems, and even change the architecture of our brains.

 

A growing percentage of American companies now have stress-reduction programs, and the number is increasing by the day. More than 30 percent of those enrolled in such a program at Aetna, the giant healthcare company, saw their stress levels drop by a third after only an hour of yoga each week.

 

The computer-chip maker Intel experimented with a quiet period of four hours every Tuesday, during which 300 engineers and managers were asked to turn off their email and phones and put up Do Not Disturb signs on their office doors to make space for “thinking time.” The response proved so enthusiastic that the company inaugurated an eight-week program to encourage clearer thinking.

 

After a similar seven-week program at General Mills, 80 percent of senior executives reported an improvement in their ability to make decisions, and 89 percent said they had become better listeners. Such developments are saving American corporations $300 billion a year; more important, they’re a form of preemptive medicine at a time when the World Health Organization has projected that “stress will be the health epidemic of the 21st century.”

 

It may be strange to see mind training — going nowhere, in effect — being embraced by forward-pushing organizations. And it’s true, the businesses that view mindfulness practices as opportunities for advancing their goals may simply be deploying new and imaginative means to the same un-elevated ends: searching for ways to squeeze ever more productivity from their employees.

 

To me, the point of sitting still is to help you see through the very idea of pushing forward; it leads you to a place where you’re defined by something larger. Its benefits lie within some psychological account with a high interest rate but long-term yields, to be drawn upon at the moment when a doctor walks into the room shaking his head, or another car veers in front of yours, and all you have to draw upon is the clarity and focus you’ve collected in your deeper moments.

 

KEEP THE SABBATH

The one word for which the adjective “holy” is used in the Ten Commandments is “Sabbath.” But keeping the Sabbath — doing nothing for a while — is one of the hardest things in life for me. I’d much rather give up meat or wine or sex than the option of checking my emails or getting on with my work when I want to. If I don’t answer my messages today, I tell myself, there will only be more to answer tomorrow (though, in truth, refraining from sending messages will likely diminish the number I receive). If I take time off, I somehow believe, I’ll be that much more hurried when I return to work.

 

Whenever I finally force myself away from my desk for a day, of course, I find the opposite: The more time I spend away from my work, the better the work will be.

 

One day, Mahatma Gandhi was said to have woken up and told those around him, “This is going to be a very busy day. I won’t be able to meditate for an hour.” His friends were taken aback at this rare break from his discipline. “I’ll have to meditate for two,” he explained.

 

I mentioned this once on a radio program and a woman called in, understandably impatient. “It’s all very well for a male travel writer in Santa Barbara to talk about taking time off,” she said. “But what about me? I’m a mother trying to start a small business, and I don’t have the luxury of meditating for two hours a day.”

 

Yet it’s precisely those who are busiest, I wanted to tell her, who most need to give themselves a break. Stress is contagious. If the overburdened mother could ask her spouse — or her mother or a friend — to look after her kids for 30 minutes a day, I’m sure she’d be more relaxed and have more energy and joy to share with her children (and with her business) when she came back.

 

Space, as Karl Marx explained it in another context, has been annihilated by time. This is especially true today. We feel as though we can connect with anyone, almost anywhere, at any moment. And the more we contact others, the more it seems we lose contact with ourselves.

 

When I left New York City for the backstreets of Kyoto, I figured I’d be growing poorer in terms of money, amusements, social life, and obvious prospects, but I’d be richer in what I prize most: days and hours.

 

This is what the principle of the Sabbath enshrines. It is, as the great Jewish theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel put it, “a cathedral in time rather than in space.”

 

The one day a week we take off becomes a vast empty space through which we can wander, without agenda. It’s like a retreat house that ensures we’ll have something bright and purposeful to carry back into the other six days. The Sabbath reminds us that, in the end, all our journeys have to bring us home.

 

It takes courage, of course, to step out of the fray, just as it takes courage to do anything that’s necessary, whether it’s turning away from that sugarcoated doughnut or tending to a loved one on her deathbed. And with billions of our global neighbors in crying need, with so much in every life that has to be done, it can sound selfish to take a break or go off to a quiet place. But as soon as you sit still, you find that it actually brings you closer to others, in both understanding and sympathy.

 

In any case, few of us have the chance to step out of our daily lives often, or for very long. Nowhere can become somewhere we visit in the quiet corners of our lives by just sitting quietly for 30 minutes every morning (a mere 3 percent of our waking hours). The point of gathering stillness is not to enrich the sanctuary or mountaintop but to bring that calm into the motion and commotion of the world.

 

Because, in an age of speed, nothing can be more invigorating than going slow. In an age of distraction, nothing can feel more luxurious than paying attention. And, in an age of constant movement, nothing is more urgent than sitting still.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

In a world obsessed with speed and rife with distractions, there are few things that feel better than sitting still, paying attention — and going nowhere. A celebrated travel writer explains how to get there.

 

When I was 29, I had the life I always dreamed of as a boy: a 25th-floor office in Midtown Manhattan, an apartment on Park Avenue and 20th Street, and an endlessly fascinating job. Writing for Time magazine, I covered the fall of apartheid in South Africa, the People Power Revolution of the Philippines, and the turmoil around Indira Gandhi’s assassination. With no dependents or domestic responsibilities, I took long vacations, traveling everywhere from El Salvador to Bali.

 

In the midst of all the daily excitement and accomplishment, however, was a voice inside telling me that I was racing around too fast to really see or enjoy where I was going — or to check whether I was truly happy.

 

Indeed, hurrying around in search of contentment seemed a perfect way of guaranteeing I’d never find it. Too often, I reminded myself of someone going on and on about world peace in the most contentious and divisive terms.

 

So I decided to leave my dream life and spend a year in a small, single room on the backstreets of the ancient Japanese capital of Kyoto. At the time I couldn’t have explained exactly why I was doing this, except that I felt I had enjoyed a wonderful diet of movement and stimulation in New York, and it was time to balance that with something simpler. It was time to learn how to make these joys less external and ephemeral and to learn the art of sitting still.

 

Going nowhere — as my boyhood hero, singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen, would later tell me — isn’t about turning your back on the world; it’s about stepping away now and then so you can see it more clearly and love it more deeply. These four practices can help you experience more quiet in your daily life, no matter where you are.

 

BE FOR REAL

One day — 4 in the morning at the end of December, to be exact — Cohen took time out from his meditations to meet me for an interview and talk about what he was doing at the Mt. Baldy Zen Center near Los Angeles.

 

Sitting still, he said with unexpected passion, was “the real deep entertainment” he had found in his 61 years on the planet. “Real profound and voluptuous and delicious entertainment. The real feast that is available within this activity.”

 

Was he kidding? Cohen is famous for his mischief and ironies. But as he went on, I realized he wasn’t joking.

 

“What else would I be doing?” he asked. “Would I be starting a new marriage with a young woman and raising another family? Finding new drugs, buying more expensive wine? I don’t know. This seems to me the most luxurious and sumptuous response to the emptiness of my own existence.”

 

As I observed the sense of attention, kindness, and even delight that seemed to come out of Cohen’s life of going nowhere, I began to think about how liberating it might be for any of us to practice sitting still — clearing our heads and quieting our emotions.

 

You could start just by taking a few minutes out of every day to sit quietly and do nothing, letting what moves you rise to the surface. You could enjoy a long walk in the wilderness, or take a few days out of every season to go on retreat, exploring what lies deeper within the moment or yourself.

 

You could, as Cohen was doing, try to find a life in which stage sets and performances disappear and be reminded, at a level deeper than all words, about how making a living and making a life sometimes point in opposite directions.

 

TAKE THE ROAD TO NOWHERE

The idea of going nowhere is as universal as the law of gravity. “All the unhappiness of men,” the 17th-century French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal famously noted, “arises from one simple fact: that they cannot sit quietly in their chamber.”

 

After Admiral Richard E. Byrd spent nearly five months alone in a shack in the Antarctic, in temperatures that sank to 70 degrees below zero, he emerged convinced that “half the confusion in the world comes from not knowing how little we need.”

 

Or, as they sometimes say around Kyoto, “Don’t just do something. Sit there.”

 

Yet the world in which Pascal and even Admiral Byrd lived seems positively tranquil by today’s standards. The amount of data humanity collects while you’re reading a book is five times greater than the amount that exists in the entire Library of Congress. Anyone reading my full book, The Art of Stillness, will take in as much information today as Shakespeare took in during his lifetime. Researchers in the field of interruption science have found that it takes an average of 25 minutes to recover from a phone call. Yet such interruptions come every 11 minutes, on average — which means we’re never caught up with our lives.

 

So the more data that comes streaming in on us, the less time we have to process any of it.

 

The one thing technology doesn’t provide is a sense of how to make the best use of it. The ability to gather information, which used to be so crucial, is far less important now than the ability to sift through it.

 

It’s easy to feel as if you’re standing 2 inches away from a huge canvas that’s crowded and changing every microsecond. It’s only by stepping back and standing still that you can begin to take in the larger picture and see what that canvas — which is your life — really means.

 

UNPLUG AND RECHARGE

I’ve always been surprised to find that the people who have worked to speed up the world are often the same ones most sensitive to the virtue of slowing down.

 

One day I visited Library of Congress headquarters to give a talk on the Dalai Lama book I’d written and, like most visitors, I was impressed by the trampolines, the indoor tree houses, and the freedom that workers had to let their minds wander off leash to wherever inspiration might be hiding.

 

Many Silicon Valley employees observe an Internet Sabbath every week, turning off most of their devices from Friday night to Monday morning, if only to regain the sense of proportion and direction they’ll need when they go back online.

 

There is now a meditation room in every building on the General Mills campus in Minneapolis. Congressman Tim Ryan leads his colleagues in sessions of sitting still, reminding them that, if nothing else, scientists have found that meditation can lower blood pressure, help boost our immune systems, and even change the architecture of our brains.

 

A growing percentage of American companies now have stress-reduction programs, and the number is increasing by the day. More than 30 percent of those enrolled in such a program at Aetna, the giant healthcare company, saw their stress levels drop by a third after only an hour of yoga each week.

 

The computer-chip maker Intel experimented with a quiet period of four hours every Tuesday, during which 300 engineers and managers were asked to turn off their email and phones and put up Do Not Disturb signs on their office doors to make space for “thinking time.” The response proved so enthusiastic that the company inaugurated an eight-week program to encourage clearer thinking.

 

After a similar seven-week program at General Mills, 80 percent of senior executives reported an improvement in their ability to make decisions, and 89 percent said they had become better listeners. Such developments are saving American corporations $300 billion a year; more important, they’re a form of preemptive medicine at a time when the World Health Organization has projected that “stress will be the health epidemic of the 21st century.”

 

It may be strange to see mind training — going nowhere, in effect — being embraced by forward-pushing organizations. And it’s true, the businesses that view mindfulness practices as opportunities for advancing their goals may simply be deploying new and imaginative means to the same un-elevated ends: searching for ways to squeeze ever more productivity from their employees.

 

To me, the point of sitting still is to help you see through the very idea of pushing forward; it leads you to a place where you’re defined by something larger. Its benefits lie within some psychological account with a high interest rate but long-term yields, to be drawn upon at the moment when a doctor walks into the room shaking his head, or another car veers in front of yours, and all you have to draw upon is the clarity and focus you’ve collected in your deeper moments.

 

KEEP THE SABBATH

The one word for which the adjective “holy” is used in the Ten Commandments is “Sabbath.” But keeping the Sabbath — doing nothing for a while — is one of the hardest things in life for me. I’d much rather give up meat or wine or sex than the option of checking my emails or getting on with my work when I want to. If I don’t answer my messages today, I tell myself, there will only be more to answer tomorrow (though, in truth, refraining from sending messages will likely diminish the number I receive). If I take time off, I somehow believe, I’ll be that much more hurried when I return to work.

 

Whenever I finally force myself away from my desk for a day, of course, I find the opposite: The more time I spend away from my work, the better the work will be.

 

One day, Mahatma Gandhi was said to have woken up and told those around him, “This is going to be a very busy day. I won’t be able to meditate for an hour.” His friends were taken aback at this rare break from his discipline. “I’ll have to meditate for two,” he explained.

 

I mentioned this once on a radio program and a woman called in, understandably impatient. “It’s all very well for a male travel writer in Santa Barbara to talk about taking time off,” she said. “But what about me? I’m a mother trying to start a small business, and I don’t have the luxury of meditating for two hours a day.”

 

Yet it’s precisely those who are busiest, I wanted to tell her, who most need to give themselves a break. Stress is contagious. If the overburdened mother could ask her spouse — or her mother or a friend — to look after her kids for 30 minutes a day, I’m sure she’d be more relaxed and have more energy and joy to share with her children (and with her business) when she came back.

 

Space, as Karl Marx explained it in another context, has been annihilated by time. This is especially true today. We feel as though we can connect with anyone, almost anywhere, at any moment. And the more we contact others, the more it seems we lose contact with ourselves.

 

When I left New York City for the backstreets of Kyoto, I figured I’d be growing poorer in terms of money, amusements, social life, and obvious prospects, but I’d be richer in what I prize most: days and hours.

 

This is what the principle of the Sabbath enshrines. It is, as the great Jewish theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel put it, “a cathedral in time rather than in space.”

 

The one day a week we take off becomes a vast empty space through which we can wander, without agenda. It’s like a retreat house that ensures we’ll have something bright and purposeful to carry back into the other six days. The Sabbath reminds us that, in the end, all our journeys have to bring us home.

 

It takes courage, of course, to step out of the fray, just as it takes courage to do anything that’s necessary, whether it’s turning away from that sugarcoated doughnut or tending to a loved one on her deathbed. And with billions of our global neighbors in crying need, with so much in every life that has to be done, it can sound selfish to take a break or go off to a quiet place. But as soon as you sit still, you find that it actually brings you closer to others, in both understanding and sympathy.

 

In any case, few of us have the chance to step out of our daily lives often, or for very long. Nowhere can become somewhere we visit in the quiet corners of our lives by just sitting quietly for 30 minutes every morning (a mere 3 percent of our waking hours). The point of gathering stillness is not to enrich the sanctuary or mountaintop but to bring that calm into the motion and commotion of the world.

 

Because, in an age of speed, nothing can be more invigorating than going slow. In an age of distraction, nothing can feel more luxurious than paying attention. And, in an age of constant movement, nothing is more urgent than sitting still.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

In a world obsessed with speed and rife with distractions, there are few things that feel better than sitting still, paying attention — and going nowhere. A celebrated travel writer explains how to get there.

 

When I was 29, I had the life I always dreamed of as a boy: a 25th-floor office in Midtown Manhattan, an apartment on Park Avenue and 20th Street, and an endlessly fascinating job. Writing for Time magazine, I covered the fall of apartheid in South Africa, the People Power Revolution of the Philippines, and the turmoil around Indira Gandhi’s assassination. With no dependents or domestic responsibilities, I took long vacations, traveling everywhere from El Salvador to Bali.

 

In the midst of all the daily excitement and accomplishment, however, was a voice inside telling me that I was racing around too fast to really see or enjoy where I was going — or to check whether I was truly happy.

 

Indeed, hurrying around in search of contentment seemed a perfect way of guaranteeing I’d never find it. Too often, I reminded myself of someone going on and on about world peace in the most contentious and divisive terms.

 

So I decided to leave my dream life and spend a year in a small, single room on the backstreets of the ancient Japanese capital of Kyoto. At the time I couldn’t have explained exactly why I was doing this, except that I felt I had enjoyed a wonderful diet of movement and stimulation in New York, and it was time to balance that with something simpler. It was time to learn how to make these joys less external and ephemeral and to learn the art of sitting still.

 

Going nowhere — as my boyhood hero, singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen, would later tell me — isn’t about turning your back on the world; it’s about stepping away now and then so you can see it more clearly and love it more deeply. These four practices can help you experience more quiet in your daily life, no matter where you are.

 

BE FOR REAL

One day — 4 in the morning at the end of December, to be exact — Cohen took time out from his meditations to meet me for an interview and talk about what he was doing at the Mt. Baldy Zen Center near Los Angeles.

 

Sitting still, he said with unexpected passion, was “the real deep entertainment” he had found in his 61 years on the planet. “Real profound and voluptuous and delicious entertainment. The real feast that is available within this activity.”

 

Was he kidding? Cohen is famous for his mischief and ironies. But as he went on, I realized he wasn’t joking.

 

“What else would I be doing?” he asked. “Would I be starting a new marriage with a young woman and raising another family? Finding new drugs, buying more expensive wine? I don’t know. This seems to me the most luxurious and sumptuous response to the emptiness of my own existence.”

 

As I observed the sense of attention, kindness, and even delight that seemed to come out of Cohen’s life of going nowhere, I began to think about how liberating it might be for any of us to practice sitting still — clearing our heads and quieting our emotions.

 

You could start just by taking a few minutes out of every day to sit quietly and do nothing, letting what moves you rise to the surface. You could enjoy a long walk in the wilderness, or take a few days out of every season to go on retreat, exploring what lies deeper within the moment or yourself.

 

You could, as Cohen was doing, try to find a life in which stage sets and performances disappear and be reminded, at a level deeper than all words, about how making a living and making a life sometimes point in opposite directions.

 

TAKE THE ROAD TO NOWHERE

The idea of going nowhere is as universal as the law of gravity. “All the unhappiness of men,” the 17th-century French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal famously noted, “arises from one simple fact: that they cannot sit quietly in their chamber.”

 

After Admiral Richard E. Byrd spent nearly five months alone in a shack in the Antarctic, in temperatures that sank to 70 degrees below zero, he emerged convinced that “half the confusion in the world comes from not knowing how little we need.”

 

Or, as they sometimes say around Kyoto, “Don’t just do something. Sit there.”

 

Yet the world in which Pascal and even Admiral Byrd lived seems positively tranquil by today’s standards. The amount of data humanity collects while you’re reading a book is five times greater than the amount that exists in the entire Library of Congress. Anyone reading my full book, The Art of Stillness, will take in as much information today as Shakespeare took in during his lifetime. Researchers in the field of interruption science have found that it takes an average of 25 minutes to recover from a phone call. Yet such interruptions come every 11 minutes, on average — which means we’re never caught up with our lives.

 

So the more data that comes streaming in on us, the less time we have to process any of it.

 

The one thing technology doesn’t provide is a sense of how to make the best use of it. The ability to gather information, which used to be so crucial, is far less important now than the ability to sift through it.

 

It’s easy to feel as if you’re standing 2 inches away from a huge canvas that’s crowded and changing every microsecond. It’s only by stepping back and standing still that you can begin to take in the larger picture and see what that canvas — which is your life — really means.

 

UNPLUG AND RECHARGE

I’ve always been surprised to find that the people who have worked to speed up the world are often the same ones most sensitive to the virtue of slowing down.

 

One day I visited Library of Congress headquarters to give a talk on the Dalai Lama book I’d written and, like most visitors, I was impressed by the trampolines, the indoor tree houses, and the freedom that workers had to let their minds wander off leash to wherever inspiration might be hiding.

 

Many Silicon Valley employees observe an Internet Sabbath every week, turning off most of their devices from Friday night to Monday morning, if only to regain the sense of proportion and direction they’ll need when they go back online.

 

There is now a meditation room in every building on the General Mills campus in Minneapolis. Congressman Tim Ryan leads his colleagues in sessions of sitting still, reminding them that, if nothing else, scientists have found that meditation can lower blood pressure, help boost our immune systems, and even change the architecture of our brains.

 

A growing percentage of American companies now have stress-reduction programs, and the number is increasing by the day. More than 30 percent of those enrolled in such a program at Aetna, the giant healthcare company, saw their stress levels drop by a third after only an hour of yoga each week.

 

The computer-chip maker Intel experimented with a quiet period of four hours every Tuesday, during which 300 engineers and managers were asked to turn off their email and phones and put up Do Not Disturb signs on their office doors to make space for “thinking time.” The response proved so enthusiastic that the company inaugurated an eight-week program to encourage clearer thinking.

 

After a similar seven-week program at General Mills, 80 percent of senior executives reported an improvement in their ability to make decisions, and 89 percent said they had become better listeners. Such developments are saving American corporations $300 billion a year; more important, they’re a form of preemptive medicine at a time when the World Health Organization has projected that “stress will be the health epidemic of the 21st century.”

 

It may be strange to see mind training — going nowhere, in effect — being embraced by forward-pushing organizations. And it’s true, the businesses that view mindfulness practices as opportunities for advancing their goals may simply be deploying new and imaginative means to the same un-elevated ends: searching for ways to squeeze ever more productivity from their employees.

 

To me, the point of sitting still is to help you see through the very idea of pushing forward; it leads you to a place where you’re defined by something larger. Its benefits lie within some psychological account with a high interest rate but long-term yields, to be drawn upon at the moment when a doctor walks into the room shaking his head, or another car veers in front of yours, and all you have to draw upon is the clarity and focus you’ve collected in your deeper moments.

 

KEEP THE SABBATH

The one word for which the adjective “holy” is used in the Ten Commandments is “Sabbath.” But keeping the Sabbath — doing nothing for a while — is one of the hardest things in life for me. I’d much rather give up meat or wine or sex than the option of checking my emails or getting on with my work when I want to. If I don’t answer my messages today, I tell myself, there will only be more to answer tomorrow (though, in truth, refraining from sending messages will likely diminish the number I receive). If I take time off, I somehow believe, I’ll be that much more hurried when I return to work.

 

Whenever I finally force myself away from my desk for a day, of course, I find the opposite: The more time I spend away from my work, the better the work will be.

 

One day, Mahatma Gandhi was said to have woken up and told those around him, “This is going to be a very busy day. I won’t be able to meditate for an hour.” His friends were taken aback at this rare break from his discipline. “I’ll have to meditate for two,” he explained.

 

I mentioned this once on a radio program and a woman called in, understandably impatient. “It’s all very well for a male travel writer in Santa Barbara to talk about taking time off,” she said. “But what about me? I’m a mother trying to start a small business, and I don’t have the luxury of meditating for two hours a day.”

 

Yet it’s precisely those who are busiest, I wanted to tell her, who most need to give themselves a break. Stress is contagious. If the overburdened mother could ask her spouse — or her mother or a friend — to look after her kids for 30 minutes a day, I’m sure she’d be more relaxed and have more energy and joy to share with her children (and with her business) when she came back.

 

Space, as Karl Marx explained it in another context, has been annihilated by time. This is especially true today. We feel as though we can connect with anyone, almost anywhere, at any moment. And the more we contact others, the more it seems we lose contact with ourselves.

 

When I left New York City for the backstreets of Kyoto, I figured I’d be growing poorer in terms of money, amusements, social life, and obvious prospects, but I’d be richer in what I prize most: days and hours.

 

This is what the principle of the Sabbath enshrines. It is, as the great Jewish theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel put it, “a cathedral in time rather than in space.”

 

The one day a week we take off becomes a vast empty space through which we can wander, without agenda. It’s like a retreat house that ensures we’ll have something bright and purposeful to carry back into the other six days. The Sabbath reminds us that, in the end, all our journeys have to bring us home.

 

It takes courage, of course, to step out of the fray, just as it takes courage to do anything that’s necessary, whether it’s turning away from that sugarcoated doughnut or tending to a loved one on her deathbed. And with billions of our global neighbors in crying need, with so much in every life that has to be done, it can sound selfish to take a break or go off to a quiet place. But as soon as you sit still, you find that it actually brings you closer to others, in both understanding and sympathy.

 

In any case, few of us have the chance to step out of our daily lives often, or for very long. Nowhere can become somewhere we visit in the quiet corners of our lives by just sitting quietly for 30 minutes every morning (a mere 3 percent of our waking hours). The point of gathering stillness is not to enrich the sanctuary or mountaintop but to bring that calm into the motion and commotion of the world.

 

Because, in an age of speed, nothing can be more invigorating than going slow. In an age of distraction, nothing can feel more luxurious than paying attention. And, in an age of constant movement, nothing is more urgent than sitting still.

 

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Toxic Chocolate

childeatingchocolate

Toxic Chocolate

 

Consumer health watchdog As You Sow released results today showing that 35 of 50 chocolate products tested, including chocolate bunnies and eggs, expose consumers to lead and cadmium above levels set by California’s Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act.

Testing commissioned by As You Sow, and conducted at independent laboratories, indicates that the chocolate products contain lead and/or cadmium, and they fail to provide the legally required warning to consumers.

 

As You Sow has filed legal notices against chocolate manufacturers, including Trader Joe’s, Hershey’s, Green and Black’s, Lindt, Whole Foods, Kroger, Godiva, See’s Candies, Mars, Theo Chocolate, Equal Exchange, Ghirardelli, Earth Circle Organics, and more, for failure to warn of lead and/or cadmium in their chocolate products.

 

“Lead exposure is associated with neurological impairment, such as learning disabilities and decreased IQ, even at very low levels. In fact, there is no safe level of lead for children,” said Eleanne van Vliet, MPH, As You Sow’s Environmental Health Consultant.

 

“As underscored by the Flint disaster, humans have contaminated our environment with lead, and now we must do everything in our power to protect ourselves and children, who are the most vulnerable of us, from every possible exposure,” said Sean Palfrey, MD, a pediatrician and Professor of Pediatrics and Public Health at Boston University School of Medicine. “Young children and pregnant women especially should avoid exposure to lead.”

“Lead and cadmium accumulate in the body, so avoiding exposure is important, especially for children,” explained Danielle Fugere, As You Sow President. “Our goal is to work with chocolate manufacturers to find ways to avoid these metals in their products.”

 

Scientists have linked chronic cadmium exposure to kidney, liver, and bone damage in humans. Children are more susceptible to especially susceptible to even from low doses over time. Animal studies associate cadmium exposure with decreased birth weight, neurobehavioral problems, and male reproductive harm.

 

Recent revelations of lead contamination in water in Flint, Michigan raised awareness that lead is irrefutably linked to neurological impacts in children.

 

Since 1992, As You Sow has led enforcement actions resulting in removal of lead from children’s jewelry and formaldehyde from portable classrooms.

The brands involved are:

Bissinger’s

Bissinger’s All Natural 60% Dark Chocolate Whole Almonds Lead

Earth Circle Foods dba River Canyon Retreat Inc.

 

Earth Circle Organics Organic Balinese Cacao Nibs Cold Pressed Cadmium

Ghirardelli Chocolate Company

 

Ghiradelli Intense Dark 72% Cacao Twilight Delight Chocolate Bar Cadmium

Ghiradelli Chocolate Premium Baking Bar 100% Cacao Unsweetened Chocolate Lead & Cadmium

Godiva

 

Godiva Chocolatier 50% Cacao Dark Chocolate Sea Salt Lead

Godiva Chocolatier 85% Cacao Extra Dark Chocolate Lead & Cadmium

Godiva Chocolatier 72% Cacao Dark Chocolate Lead & Cadmium

 

The Hershey Company

 

Scharffen Berger Semisweet Fine Artisan Dark Chocolate (62% cacao) Cadmium

Scharffen Berger Extra Dark Fine Artisan Dark Chocolate (82% cacao) Cadmium

Dagoba

 

Organic New Moon Rich Dark Chocolate (74% cacao) Lead & Cadmium

Lake Champlain Chocolates

 

Lake Champlain Chocolates Dark Chocolate (57% cocoa) Lead & Cadmium

Lindt & Sprüngli (USA) Inc.

 

Lindt Excellence 85% Cocoa Excellence Extra Dark Lead & Cadmium

Mars, Incorporated

 

Dove Silky Smooth Dark Chocolate Bar Cadmium

Mondelez International, Inc.

 

Green & Black’s Organic 85% Cacao Bar Lead & Cadmium

Moonstruck Chocolate Co.

Moonstruck Dark Chocolate Chile Variado (68% cacao) Lead

See’s Candies, Inc.

 

See’s Candies Premium Extra Dark Chocolate (62% cacao) Cadmium

The Kroger Co.

 

Private Selection 72% Cacao Dark Chocolate Swiss Bar Lead & Cadmium

Theo Chocolate Theo

 

Organic Fair Trade Pure 85% Dark Chocolate Cadmium

Trader Joe’s Company

 

Trader Joe’s Swiss 72% Cacao Dark Chocolate Lead

Trader Joe’s Dark Chocolate Bar – Toffee With Walnuts and Pecans 70% cacao Lead

Trader Joe’s Pound Plus Dark Chocolate Lead

Trader Joe’s Pound Plus, 72% Cacao Dark Chocolate Lead

Trader Joe’s Dark Chocolate 73% Cacao Super Dark Lead & Cadmium

Trader Joe’s The Dark Chocolate Lover’s Chocolate Bar (85% cacao) Lead & Cadmium

Vosges, Ltd. Wild

 

Ophelia All Natural New Orleans Chili – Dark Chocolate Bar (70% cacao) Lead

Whole Foods Market, Inc.

 

365 Everyday Value Organic Dark Chocolate (56% Cacao) Lead & Cadmium

 

If you have any questions or concerns please contact us for help.

 

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Parkinson’s Disease

parkinsondisease

Parkinson’s Disease

 

Like other diseases this too may originate in the Gut

 

New research suggests additional evidence that Parkinson’s disease may originate in the gut.

 

Though experts called the findings preliminary, Swedish scientists found that patients whose main trunk of the vagus nerve — which extends from the brain stem to the abdomen — was removed were markedly less likely to develop the movement disorder than others who didn’t have the surgery. The patients were followed for at least five years.

 

The study authors said the findings suggest Parkinson’s may start in the gut and spread to the brain through the vagus nerve, which helps control unconscious body processes such as heart rate and digestion.

 

“We were not largely surprised, as other research has also shown evidence for a link between the gut and Parkinson’s disease,” said study author Dr. Karin Wirdefeldt. She’s an associate professor of medical epidemiology and biostatistics at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm.

 

“Our findings are in line with other research in the field, although evidence is scarce,” she added. “Further research is needed.”

 

A progressive, incurable disorder, Parkinson’s disease affects nearly 1 million Americans, according to the National Parkinson Foundation. Stemming from the brain’s lack of production of the chemical dopamine, its symptoms include trembling, stiffness, slow movement and poor balance.

 

Using data from national registers in Sweden, Wirdefeldt and her colleagues compared 9,430 people who underwent vagotomy surgery — which removes the main trunk or branches of the vagus nerve to treat ulcers — to more than 377,000 from the general population over a 40-year period.

 

In those with so-called “selective vagotomy,” in which only some branches of the vagus nerve were removed, the difference in Parkinson’s rates was not statistically significant. But that changed for those who underwent a “truncal vagotomy,” in which the main trunk of the vagus nerve was removed.

 

The 19 people who underwent truncal vagotomy at least five years prior were 40 percent less likely to develop Parkinson’s than those who didn’t have the surgery and had been followed for five years.

 

The results were adjusted for other factors, such as diabetes, arthritis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the researchers said.

 

Only an association, rather than a cause-and-effect link, was found between vagus nerve surgery and Parkinson’s.

 

Parkinson’s experts who weren’t involved in the new research said much more evidence is needed to confirm the link, though they praised the study.

 

“The link is not strong,” said Dr. Olga Waln, a neurologist at Houston Methodist Hospital in Texas. “They did an outstanding job on the study and analyzed a large database, but… I don’t think the conclusions are very convincing.”

 

Waln acknowledged the difficulty of designing such a study, because few patients undergo surgery to remove portions of their vagus nerve.

 

“But what the authors found definitely requires attention from scientists, because if we can somehow confirm the disease starts in the intestines… it could give hope to patients,” she said.

 

James Beck, chief scientific officer of the National Parkinson Foundation, also classified the new findings as “not definitive.”

 

“But it’s interesting that this connection [between the gut and Parkinson’s] seems to be persisting,” Beck said. “It’s not causal, but it underscores something potentially going on in the gut and how that may influence Parkinson’s disease.”

 

The possibility of preventing Parkinson’s “is a long way off” and will require more firmly identifying factors that cause it, Beck noted.

 

“Research like this spur further thought as people try to crack this nut of what is the cause of Parkinson’s disease… or perhaps many causes,” he said.

 

The study was published online April 26 in the journal Neurology.

 

If you have anyone in your family who has Parkinson’s Disease, please contact us for help with turning this diseases around, or preventing you and your family from developing it.

 

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Turmeric Lemonade

turmericlemonade

Turmeric is a versatile spice that I use often and it is also a great natural remedy. It can be used externally to improve skin, can help whiten teeth, and in poultices to soothe rashes. Internally, it supports digestion, the liver, and is high in beneficial antioxidants. You have heard me talk about turmeric before and now you hear about it again, with a twist.

 

This power spice is a cornerstone of Indian cuisine and used in curry powders, mustards and more. Doctors and naturopaths often recommend turmeric as a way to help lower inflammation in the body. Thousands of studies show its benefits in promoting heart health, mental health, reducing inflammation and ensuring balanced blood sugar.

How to Use Turmeric

 

I love to add turmeric to skin scrubs and other beauty recipes. I also put it in many of my homemade spice blends and add it to many recipes.

 

Unfortunately, many of the foods I love adding turmeric in, like soups and stews, aren’t good summer recipes. I find it harder to consume foods and drinks with turmeric in warmer months. But, you can always add turmeric to scrambled.

 

My favorite turmeric recipe of all time is this Turmeric Tea (also called Golden Milk). I make that warm and savory drink with coconut milk and other spices and love it in cooler months.

 

Turmeric Lemonade

 

Unfortunately, when the outside temperatures start hitting 90+ degrees, hot drinks lose some of their appeal. I’ve been experimenting with ways to use turmeric in cooler foods and drinks and come up with a few recipes we love.

 

This iced turmeric lemonade is a delicious summer favorite for our family as I’ve been making it often for the kids while they are playing outside. It is incredibly easy to make and tastes great!

The earthy taste of the turmeric provides gorgeous color but is mostly hidden by the tang of the lemon. Personally, I like to use liquid stevia to sweeten this, though any natural sweetener would work.

 

Iced turmeric lemonade combines earthy and bright turmeric with fresh lemon and natural sweetness for a delicious summer drink.

 

Serves: 4 cups

 

Ingredients:

 

2 cups water

1.5 cup of ice

½ cup fresh lemon juice (or more to taste about 2-3 lemons)

1-2 teaspoons turmeric powder

½ teaspoon stevia drops (or more to taste)- Can substitute other natural sweetener but will need to add more

Tiny pinch of black pepper (increases benefits of turmeric)

Instructions:

 

Combine all ingredients in a high-speed blender and blend for 60 seconds or until ice is completely blended in.

Let rest for about 30 seconds before pouring. Pour into cups to serve. I prefer to serve over more ice.

Consume immediately.

Notes:

 

If you won’t consume all of this at once, make smaller batches by cutting the recipe in half or even fourths. I prefer to use stevia to keep the sugar content down, but any natural sweetener like maple syrup or honey will work well in this recipe. You can also make this with lime juice (same amount as lemon juice) or orange juice (double the juice and reduce the water by ½ cup).

 

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Grass Fed Beef vs. Poultry

grass-fed-beef-climate-change

Grass-Fed Beef is Superior to Poultry

 

For over 50 years red meat has been vilified for its heart clogging saturated fat & cholesterol content.  In Poultry products, have been marketed as the healthiest animal protein due to their low-fat content.  New understandings of health and inflammation now reveal that grass-fed beef is significantly more nutrient dense than poultry.

Saturated fat and cholesterol have been blamed for heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases.  Research indicates that saturated fats and cholesterol are necessary for overall cellular health.  They play an extremely important role in regulating neurological, cognitive and hormone function.  A diet low in these important fats causes lowered immunity, sex hormone function and accelerated aging and brain degeneration.

Beefsnutrutional

Red Meat can be a SuperFood:

 

Red meat could be one of the best foods in an individual’s diet or one of the worst.  The key factor is what the animal is eating.  Naturally, cows eat a near 100% green diet of grass, flowers, shrubs and other wild vegetation.  Grain feeding is genetically incongruent for these animals and leads to excessive weight gain and fat accumulation.

The typical grain-feed is made up of corn and soy due to the low cost associated with government subsidies.  Grain-fed cows are extremely high in omega 6 fatty acids. The average ratio for a cow on a grain-fed diet is roughly 25:1 (omega 6:3). This is genetically incongruent for all mammal species that should naturally be around 4:1

essentialfatcomparison

The Importance of Omega 6:3 Ratios:

 

Humans should naturally have an omega 6:3 ratio around 4:1 or 2:1. When these ratios become skewed, they trigger cellular inflammation and accelerated cellular degeneration. This environment causes an individual to become highly inflamed and to build degenerative disease.

The more grass an animal eats the greater their omega 3 content and the lower their omega 6 levels.  A 100% green-fed diet, which is genetically congruent for a cow would provide an omega 6:3 ratio of 2:1.  This is ideal for the cows long-term health and is highly anti-inflammatory for human consumption.  The omega 3 fatty acids present in this meat are primarily the all-important long-chain variety EPA and DHA.

wall-street-journal-opt

The Poultry Based Diet:

 

Chicken and turkeys cannot live on grass alone.  They lack the highly-specialized digestive tract that allows them to convert grass and roughage into a quality meal.  This is too low in calories and too high in fiber for them.  They need some addition to grass and the vast majority of farmers choose to feed them a mixture of soy and grain.  Chickens can get about 25% of their calories from grass while ducks can go up to about 50%.  The higher the level of grass, the higher the anti-oxidant and omega 3 content of the meat and eggs.

Grass-fed mammals contain high levels of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA).  CLA is considered to be one of the most potent anti-carcinogenic nutrients.   In a study published in Cancer Research, animals given a mere 1.5% of their total calories in the form of CLA had a 60% reduction in tumor growth.   Finnish researchers have found that the greater the amount of CLA in a woman’s diet, the lower her risk of breast cancer.  Women who consumed the largest amount of CLA had a 60% lower risk for breast cancer.

 grassfedbeed

Grass-fed Beef Has Much More Anti-Oxidants than Poultry:

 

Grass-fed mammals are also extremely rich in carnitine and carnosine.  Carnitine helps cellular mitochondria drive energy efficiently from fat metabolism.  Carnitine is the critical gate-keeper that allows fatty acids to pass into the mitochondrial furnace effectively.  Carnosine is a powerful antioxidant that improves muscle, brain & cardiovascular function.  It functions to reduce the effects of stress and aging by protecting the proteins of the body which aids in tissue healing and repair.

Poultry has significantly less CLA, carnitine and carnosine than grass-fed beef.  Beef also contains a lot more branched chain amino acids.  This includes the crucial muscle building amino acid leucine.  Grass-fed beef has an enormous edge over free-range poultry when one compares the fatty acids, proteins, fat-soluble anti-oxidants and minerals such as zinc.

 

Call us and set up an appointment for you Personalized Health Care Plan.  No two bodies are the same!

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Ways to Include Mushrooms in Your Diet

mushroomsindiet

Ways to Include Mushrooms in Your Cholesterol-Lowering Diet

 

Mushrooms are a type of fungus commonly found on the ground and sometimes on trees. This delicious food is chock-full of nutrients, including fiber, vitamin D, minerals, and protein. Since mushrooms are also low in carbohydrates and fat free, this makes them a good food to include in your diet if you are watching your cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Most edible mushrooms do not have a particularly strong taste, so they can be included in practically any dish you create.

 

However, because some mushrooms contain poisons that could harm you, it is always a good idea to be sure that the mushroom you are eating is edible before you put it on your plate. Edible mushrooms – which are commonly available in your local grocery store – are very versatile, and this list will give you some good ideas on how to include mushrooms in your heart heathy diet.

 

Including Mushrooms in Soup

If you’re looking to add a little more fiber and protein to your soup – without the added fat – mushrooms are a good ingredient to have on hand. You can either cook mushrooms to use the broth in the soup, or throw in some mushrooms and cook them with your other soup ingredients. As with any food, you should be careful what you pair with your mushrooms and other healthy ingredients, as this could add fat and calories to your soup. If you wish to add cheeses sour cream to your soup, use a low-fat version instead to decrease the amount of saturated fat added.

 

Low-fat plain Greek yogurt can also be a healthier alternative to sour cream. Speaking of cream – creaming your soups can also add saturated fat to your meal. Therefore, instead of selecting creamed mushroom soup, select soups that have a clear broth (preferably vegetable, mushroom, or low-fat chicken) and are chock-full of vegetables, whole grains, beans, lentils, or lean meats.

 

 

Using Mushrooms in Your Sides

Mushrooms can be cooked, cut up, and added to many side dishes. You can either add it into your favorite vegetable or rice side dish or substitute it for meat in some of your heartier sides. When preparing your mushrooms, make sure that you are cooking them sparingly in an oil, such as vegetable or olive oil. Although it may be tempting to sautee them in butter or margarine, doing so could introduce extra fat into your meal.

 

Mushroom-Filled Entrees

Mushrooms can be used in the main course – whether you decide to add mushrooms as part of the dish or make it the main attraction. There are many heart-healthy ways to prepare your mushrooms, including sautéing, roasting, and braising. You can also throw mushrooms on the grill along with your other lean meats and fish. When preparing your mushrooms for the main course, you should make sure that you are minimizing the amount of salt used – especially if you are watching your salt intake. If you are wanting to cut out extra fat from meat-containing entrée, you can substitute the meat you are using for a larger mushroom – such as Portobello – dice them and combine them with beans to form a meatless patty.

 

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