Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Amish Man Slapped with 6 year Prison Sentence for Growing and Selling His Own Herbal Remedies

amishman

Amish man slapped with six-year prison sentence for growing and selling his own herbal remedies

 

On the morning of June 30 2017, a federal judge sentenced an Amish man to six years in prison. His crimes: making and selling herbal health products that were not “adequately labeled”, and obstructing a federal agency.

 

According to TheDailySheeple.com, the farmer, one Samuel A. Girod of Bath County in Kentucky, was convicted last March 13 for growing, manufacturing, and selling herbal supplements without approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Moreover, Girod was also charged for threatening a person who attempted to provide relevant information regarding his illegal activities to a grand jury.

 

Although he was only recently convicted, Girod first gained the attention of the FDA in 2013. Because of the nature of his Bath County business, Girod had been ordered by a federal court in Missouri to stop distributing his products until he allowed the FDA to inspect his operations, among many other conditions. When two FDA agents attempted to inspect Girod’s family farm, however, they were barred from entering the premises by Girod and others before they were made to leave.

 

Speaking to those gathered in the Kentucky courthouse, Girod, who chose to represent himself, stated that FDA regulations were not applicable to his products because they were herbal remedies, not drugs. Girod added that, as a member of the Old Order Amish faith, requiring the approval of the FDA was a violation of his religious freedom. (Related: Amish farmer facing 68 years in federal prison for making homemade products)

 

Girod’s products include treatments for skin ailments and sinus infections. As stated in an indictment, one particular product, TO-MOR-GONE, is notable for having a corrosive, caustic effect on human skin due to it containing bloodroot extract. Another product by Girod is an extract that he claimed could help cure cancer.

 

Jurors decided that TO-MOR-GONE lacked the appropriate warnings regarding its usage, and that the dosage and manner of use that is recommended on the package is hazardous to health.

 

After serving his time of six years, Girod will be subjected to three years of supervised release, during which Girod must avoid producing and distributing his products. Additionally, Girod must pay a restitution of $14,000 and $1,300 in assessment fees.

 

Girod’s supporters, 75 of whom stood outside the courthouse in downtown Lexington, expressed their disappointment in the ruling. Speaking to Kentucky.com, Arizona native Richard Mack called it a “national disgrace and an outrage”, noting that he used Girod’s Chickweed Healing Salve without experiencing any ill effects. The former sheriff and political activist said that the judge and jury had “created a felon today out of a good, law-abiding citizen” and that Giron was “being punished for being stubborn.”

 

This stubbornness, according to U.S. district judge Danny Reeves, is what led to Girod’s conviction. The judge told Kentucky.com that Girod brought all this onto himself “because he steadfastly refused to follow the law.”

 

Michael Fox, standby attorney for Girod, said that the punishment will deeply affect Girod. “Keep in mind that Sam Girod is Amish. He does not live with electricity, phones, concrete, steel. Those are not normal; those are not natural in his life. An incarceration in a prison setting is going to be more punishment for him than [for] a normal person,” Fox stated.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Roasted Beet and Goat Cheese Herbs

roastedbeete

Roasted Beets with Goat Cheese and Herbs

6 beets, about 1 1/2 lb. total weight, greens removed*

1 tsp. chopped fresh thyme

1 tsp. chopped fresh chives

2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil

Salt and freshly ground pepper

2 oz. fresh goat cheese, crumbled

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400° F.

Wrap the beets individually in aluminum foil and roast until tender when pierced with a fork, about 1 hour depending on their size.

When cool, peel and quarter the beets and place in a serving bowl.

In a separate bowl, mix together the thyme, chives and olive oil. Drizzle the olive oil-herb mixture over the beets, season with salt and pepper, and top with the crumbled goat cheese. Serve right away. Serves 4.

*Don’t throw out those beet greens! They are delicious stir-fried, sautéed or braised.

Servings: 4, calories: 181, Protein 4g, Fat 14 g sat fat, chol 7mg, carbs 11 g, sodium 286mg, fiber 3g,

Remember that beets naturally lower your blood pressure!

In the picture, they used three different types of beets.

 

Happy Holidays

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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Uncategorized

Herbs For Respiratory System

echineacea

 

Herbs for Respiratory System

Most people realize how important their lungs are to overall health, not only providing oxygen needed by every cell in the body but also filtering out small blood clots from the veins and even providing cushioning for the heart. Yet even if someone does not smoke, exposure to air pollution, some medications or even trauma can do damage to the lungs and cause problems like bronchitis, asthma, pneumonia and even lung cancer. Below, however, are herbs which can protect the lungs and promote respiratory health.

Mullein

Mullein has long been used as a remedy for many respiratory complaints, including viral infections like flus and colds, as well as conditions like bronchitis and laryngitis. It is a natural expectorant and can relieve congestion from excess phlegm and can also help quiet bronchial spasms and relieve pain.

Licorice

Licorice is a natural demulcent herb, meaning that it can help to soothe down irritation of the mucous membranes which line the respiratory tract. It also contains lichochalcone, a compound which decreases inflammation and has even been shown to help fight off the proliferation of cancer cells.

Gingko Biloba

Most people think of this as an herb to improve memory and cognition, but it is also useful for respiratory health. One study showed that those undergoing bypass surgery displayed fewer signs of inflammation or irritation in the lungs if given extracts of this herb.

Echinacea

Echinacea is a natural antimicrobial which can fight off bacteria and viruses that can hurt the lungs and can also strengthen the general immune system to make it more effective at warding off illnesses. It does this primarily through increasing the white blood cell count.

Rosemary

Rosemary’s natural oils have antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties which can help to remedy bronchitis, flus and colds, coughs and other respiratory infections. One of its active compounds, called carnosol, is also being tested as an anti-carcinogen.

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus has long been used to treat a number of lung conditions, including sore throat, sinus infections, bronchitis and colds and flus. It has properties which make is an antimicrobial, antispasmodic and a natural expectorant and decongestant.

Irish Moss

Despite its name, this is actually a type of seaweed and is actually already used in an array of prescription medications that are used to treat lung ailments like the flu, pneumonia, and unproductive coughs. It acts as a decongestant and antimicrobial agent.

Hyssop

Hyssop is able to decongest the lungs and respiratory tract and is a natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. When used in a syrup, it is able to treat cough and soothe down the mucous membranes which line the throat and which get irritated by an array of respiratory problems.

Slippery Elm

Slippery elm is an anti-inflammatory, expectorant and antiseptic and can be used to treat conditions from the entire respiratory tract and is beneficial for bronchitis, coughs, and asthma and is excellent for soothing the mucous membranes of the nose and throat.

Coltsfoot

This is a natural treatment for whooping cough, colds, and bronchitis and can help rid the body of mucous and reduce inflammation in the respiratory tract which can accompany a number of lung conditions.

All these herbs are natural and healthy ways to treat lung ailments and to keep the respiratory tract healthy and functioning.

If you have a family member that has had respiratory or cardiac problems, or you live with someone that smokes, have bronchitis,COPD, or other respiratory problems, please call us.

Health and Wellness Associates

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Rx to Wellness

Herbs for Memory Loss

ginko

Memory herbs

Memory loss and other cognitive conditions are issues that a large number of people start to worry about as they age. A lot of us are conditioned by the media to believe that these problems are natural and inevitable consequences of aging, something that happens to us regardless of how well we look after ourselves. Of course, this is not true. Our brains are capable of creating new brain cells at any given age, and diet plays an essential role in how often, and how effectively, they can do so. Although most natural wholefoods contain properties that can help keep our minds in good shape, studies show that the three herbs listed below are particularly effective in this regard.

Bacopa monnieri

Bacopa monnieri, or brahmi, is a thick-leafed herb native to the wetlands of East and Southeast Asia, and is well-known for its brain-boosting properties. It is particularly venerated in Ayurvedic medicine, where it is regularly prescribed for numerous cognitive conditions such as brain fog, poor memory and concentration, and even depression. A large number of studies confirm that Bacopa is good for our minds. For example, a study published in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine in 2012 found that it could “improve attention, cognitive processing, and working memory partly via the suppression of AChE activity.” (1) Another study, featured in Neuropsychopharmacology, discovered that Bacopa could improve memory and recall abilities. (2) Like most brain-boosting foods, Bacopa monnieri can take a while to work. Taking 150 milligrams of it three times a day for a two-month period, for instance, will provide better results than taking the same amount of it over a one-month period.

Ginkgo biloba

There’s a good reason why Ginkgo biloba supplements are one of the most popular herbal remedies in Europe and the United States: the leaves of this unique tree, which is one of the longest-living species in the world, is a fantastic mental aid. For example, a study published in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology in 2014 showed that Ginkgo extracts could “improve working memory function in middle-aged individuals.” (3) A study featured in the September 2013 edition of Toxicology and Industrial Health even found that Ginkgo, along with vitamin C, could correct mental deficits caused by chronic exposure to fluoride. (4) Taking between 240 and 600 milligrams of Ginkgo biloba up to three times a day is optimum for correcting memory-related issues. As with Bacopa, positive effects don’t usually manifest immediately; give it at least a month.

Gotu kola

Gotu kola (Centella asiatica) is a member of the parsley family that grows in the Himalayas. It was (and still is) used to treat countless medical conditions in India and China, including varicose veins, skin lesions, insomnia and blood circulation. However, like Bacopa and Ginkgo, gotu is best-known for its positive impact on our minds. For example, a study published in Ayu in 2013 found that gotu kola, along with other herbs within the Medhya rasayana group, are “quick in action and bring about improvement in memory faster when compared with Yogic practices.” (5) A review published one year earlier also noted that gotu has neuroprotective properties and was reported to treat deficits associated with Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and oxidative stress. (6) Taking one or two 500 milligram capsules of gotu kola a day is a great way to boost our memory naturally and without side effects. Alternatively, gotu can be consumed in tea form. Its bitterness can be masked by adding some honey or lemon. Sources for this article include: (1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov (2) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov (3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov (4) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov (5) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov (6) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov