Foods, Uncategorized

Can Kale Kill You? YES!

Health and Wellness Associates

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Can Kale Kill You?

kale

You’d never eat rat poison — you’re a health nut!

But that’s exactly what the residents of California’s wealthiest county were doing, without their knowledge.

Sounds crazy. But Dr. Ernie Hubbard saw it day after day in his office.

Patients coming in with fatigue, digestive troubles, brain fog, and nausea.

(One poor woman had her blonde hair falling out in clumps!)

The culprit was a shocking neurotoxin — too much kale!

You see, thick leaf-vegetables like kale can actually absorb too much of a heavy metal toxin called thallium out of the ground.

But thallium was originally a rat poison.

So once Dr. Hubbard’s patient stopped eating so much of it, her hair grew right back. And her other symptoms went away too.

You should be okay if you just have a kale salad every once in awhile…

But be careful not to overload on it!    Dont eat too much rat poison!

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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P Carrothers

312-972-9355 (WELL)

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Is Kale Killing You?

kale

 

Is Kale Killing You?

 

You’d never eat rat poison — you’re a health nut!

 

But that’s exactly what the residents of California’s wealthiest county were doing, without their knowledge.

 

Sounds crazy. But Dr. Ernie Hubbard saw it day after day in his office.

 

Patients coming in with fatigue, digestive troubles, brain fog, and nausea.

 

(One poor woman had her blonde hair falling out in clumps!)

 

The culprit was a shocking neurotoxin — too much kale!

 

You see, thick leaf-vegetables like kale can actually absorb too much of a heavy metal toxin called thallium out of the ground.

 

But thallium was originally a rat poison.  That’s right, some kale leaves contain thallium — the same neurotoxin that Saddam Hussein used to assassinate his political enemies!

 

So once Dr. Hubbard’s patient stopped eating so much of it, her hair grew right back. And her other symptoms went away too.

 

You should be okay if you just have a kale salad every once in a while…

 

But be careful not to overload on it, especially if you are eating Kale from California.

 

Tip:  Never eat kale if you have a tendency to have UTI, or have had kidney problems.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

P Carrothers

Preventative and Restorative Medicine

Dir. Of Personalized Healthcare

312-972-9355

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Turmeric Cashews

turmeric-cashews-2

Turmeric Cashews

2 cups raw cashews

1/2 tablespoon toasted sesame oil, plus more if needed

scant 1/4 teaspoon fine grain sea salt, or to taste

half an 8×8-inch sheet nori seaweed  ( I have used Kale or spinach too )

1 1/2 teaspoons sesame seeds

scant 1/4 teaspoon cayenne

1/2 tablespoon ground turmeric

 

Toss the cashews with the sesame oil and sea salt and toast in a 350F oven for 5-10 minutes, or until golden, tossing once along the way. Remove and toast the seaweed for a few minutes. Allow it to cool and crisp, then crumble it. Combine the seaweed, sesame seeds, and cayenne in a mortar and pestle, and grind together. In a bowl (one that won’t stain) toss the cashews with the sesame spices and turmeric, really go for it. If you need to add a few drops of sesame oil, do so to moisten things up a bit. Taste and adjust the seasonings, to taste.

 

Makes 2 cups.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Crunchy Kale Salad with Walnuts and Pecorino

kalesalad

Crunchy Kale Salad with Walnuts and Pecorino

 

 

Ingredients

 

4 cups finely julienne kale, cleaned and stems removed

2 cups finely julienne radicchio, cleaned and core removed

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 lemon, juiced and 1 teaspoon zest

1/2 cup shaved Pecorino Romano, plus extra for garnish

1/4 cup dried currants

2 tablespoons finely sliced fresh basil

Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper

1/2 cup toasted walnuts

 

Directions

 

Toss the kale and radicchio with about half of the oil, lemon juice and zest in a large glass mixing bowl. Let stand about 2 minutes. Add the Pecorino, currants, basil and the remaining oil, lemon juice and zest. Thoroughly mix. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside.

 

Fold in the walnuts just before serving and top the salad with a pile of Pecorino.

 

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Foods, Health and Disease, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Could Broccoli Prevent Prostate and Other Cancers

broccoli-prevent-prostate-cancer-IG

 

Could Broccoli Prevent Prostate Cancer?

 

 

Using food to prevent prostate cancer sounds too easy, doesn’t it?  Research published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute confirmed that it really can be as simple as that.

 

Broccoli, cauliflower, rutabaga, arugula, radish, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, bok choy, greens, watercress, turnips, and kale are members of the cruciferous vegetable family.  Scientifically, they are called Brassicaceae, which translates to “cabbage.”  They are readily available in most markets, inexpensive, and offer a fantastic array of health benefits.

 

Researchers with Cancer Care Ontario evaluated more than 1,300 male patients based on diet and found that cruciferous vegetables in particular lowered risk for an aggressive form of prostate cancer.

 

Of 137 foods on the questionnaire, broccoli and cauliflower seemed to have the greatest impact on overall risk but all the leafy greens showed significant ability to prevent prostate cancer.

 

Authors with the study stated, “Aggressive prostate cancer is biologically virulent and associated with poor prognosis.  Therefore, if the association that we observed is ultimately found to be causal, a possible means to reduce the burden of this disease may be primary prevention through increased consumption of broccoli, cauliflower, and possibly spinach.”

 

Incredible Health Benefits of Cruciferous Vegetables

 

This vegetable family has even more to offer!  They are excellent raw or cooked, useful in all manner of meals, and easy to prepare.

 

5 Benefits of Leafy Greens

 

  1. Weight Control: They are packed with powerful nutrients such as vitamins A, Bs, and C, folic acid, and fiber. They are low in calories so they are an ideal nutrient-dense food if you’re looking to lose weight or maintain a healthy body weight.

 

  1. Antioxidant Bioavailability: Your body loves these veggies and absorbs most of the nutrients they offer. This is especially important in regards to their vitamin C, manganese, beta-carotene, and lutein.  Your digestive tract uses it all so you get the full impact.

 

  1. Cancer Fighter: Aside from preventing prostate cancer, there are many studies linking cruciferous veggies with a lower risk of breast, uterine, lung, liver, colorectal, and cervix cancer. In fact, 70% of the scientific community’s research on cruciferous veggies mention the link to lower cancer risk.

 

broccoli prevent prostate cancer IG

 

  1. Obliterates Oxidation: With the amount of nutrients found in this vegetable family, it is no surprise that 1-2 cups per day drastically reduced patient oxidation by 22% overall. In a comparison to multivitamin impact on oxidation, researchers saw less than one-half of 1% reduction in oxidation for those taking a supplement.  These vegetables are better than any vitamin.

 

  1. Heart Health: If you want to steadily lower the heat of body wide inflammation, the vitamin K and omega-3s in cruciferous vegetables is definitely the way to go. Chronic inflammation due to diet, stress, and poor lifestyle habits is a major bio-marker for heart disease and every other major condition.  These foods can help to cool down inflammation and fight the free radicals that lead to heart attack and stroke.

 

There are so many other great benefits of cruciferous vegetables such as the fiber that helps keep your digestive system healthy and moving properly.  They are abundant in vitamin A which is excellent news for preserving your vision as you age.  The heavy nutrient content in general is a good way to boost your immune system to help you fight illness from the inside out.

 

If you are looking for foods that taste great, don’t cost a small fortune, and are available just about everywhere, look no further than broccoli and the rest of the cousins in the cruciferous veggie family.

 

Their ability to prevent prostate cancer is just the beginning.

 

Please feel free to share with family and loved ones.  Please call us with any questions.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

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Foods, Health and Disease

Six Foods with More Nutrients than Kale

kale

Six Foods That Have More Nutrients Per Ounce than Kale

Kale is still a wonderful value at as little as $1.99 for a bunch even in the organic section.

But can you really call it the #1 superfood among greens?

Not according to the 2014 CDC study ‘Defining Powerhouse Fruits and Vegetables: A Nutrient Density Approach.’

It ranked produce on a scale of 1-100 to find out which foods were the most nutritious.

Kale checked in at a  respectable nutrient density score of 49.07.

But the following greens have it beat:

1. Chicory

Resembling the dandelion green, this unheralded veggie can be added to salads. It checked in with a nutrient density score of 73.36. It has a nice profile of Vitamins A, C, and E among others.

2. Spinach

Long thought to have less nutrients than kale, spinach actually scored far better with a total of 86.43.

It’s a great source of Vitamin K, Vitamin A (in the form of carotenoids), manganese, folate and more.

3. Beet Green

Think you should throw these away? Think again!

They scored a whopping 87.27 in the study. Add these to your diet for added Vitamin A, K and lutein/zeaxanthin (for vision health).

Don’t forget to eat the greens on top of the beet as well.

4. Chard

Also known as Swiss chard, this cousin of collard greens came in at 89.27. It’s a great change-of-pace to kale and a wonderful source of Vitamins A, K, and the important mineral magnesium.

5. Chinese Cabbage

Most people know this veggie as bok choy but few actually buy it. That’s a big mistake!

Bok choy scored a 91.99 on the nutrient density scale and is rich in silica for great hair, skin and nails as well as Vitamins A, B and K.

6. Watercress

A great source of magnesium, folate, pantothenic acid and many different vitamins and minerals, watercress comes in at #1 with a perfect score of 100.

It’s so easy to pass up in the grocery store and so hard to find that we don’t see it passing kale in terms of its reputation for being a top health food any time soon.

But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t pass up a chance to add it to your shopping cart if you get the chance…your body will thank you!

Health and Wellness Associates

N. Meyer

P. Carrothers

Archived Article

312-972-WELL

Foods

Hail to the Kale

kale

Hail to Kale!

Botanical name: Borecole

Thriving even in frost, kale is an easy-to-grow green that keeps on giving: cut the smaller, paler green leaves to anchor or mix into fresh garden salad; use the larger, dark greens for stir-fries, pizza topping, or soup, while the plant keeps right on growing.

One variety is known as dinosaur kale in Tuscan regions for its glossy, crinkly, green-to-violet-colored leaves. Kale has a relatively short life in terms of crispness, so it’s best to use within a few days of harvesting.

Health Benefits of Kale

If vitamins could be packaged and labeled as such, they would look very much like kale. That’s because the vitamins offered by just one cup of this relatively little-known veggie can trump a whole week’s worth of other foods: 684% of the daily value of vitamin K, 206% of the suggested daily amount of vitamin A, and 134% of vitamin C (and even more vitamin C in the Scottish curly-leaf variety).

Kale can legitimately be called a superfood, if only after one particular study, which reported the high antioxidant activity in this vegetable. The phytonutrient indole-3-carbinol aids in DNA cell repair, while at the same time slowing the growth of cancer cells. With its sulforaphane content, kale protects against prostate and colon cancers. It also has properties that studies show ca ease lung congestion, and is beneficial to your stomach, liver, and immune system. It contains lutein and zeaxanthin, which help protect your eyes from macular degeneration.

Kale has been compared to beef, which is known as a “go-to” food for iron, protein, and calcium. Kale’s anti-inflammatory capabilities are unrivaled among leafy greens, especially relating to the prevention and even reversal of arthritis, heart disease, and several autoimmune diseases.

Omega-fatty acids are called essential because your body needs them to remain healthy, but they need to come from sources outside the body; kale is an excellent source of these healthy fats. Benefits of these often-talked about but little understood compounds include their ability to help regulate blood clotting, build cell membranes in your brain, and protect you against heart disease and stroke. They may also help combat autoimmune diseases, such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis.

One serving of kale contains 121 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acids and 92.4 milligrams of omega-6 fatty acids.

Kale Nutrition Facts

Serving Size: One cup (67 grams) of raw kale

Amt. Per Serving
Calories 33
Carbohydrates 7 g
Protein 2 g
Fiber 1 g
Potassium 299 mg

Studies Done on Kale

According to one study1, among all the foods involved in the research, kale was shown to have the highest protective effect against bladder cancer, the sixth most commonly diagnosed cancer in the U.S.

Kale has a very impressive number of flavonoids, each with its own healthy job to do in your body, including 32 phenolic compounds and three hydroxycinnamic acids, which can help keep cholesterol levels within the normal range and scavenge harmful free radicals in your body2. Two of the most important flavonoids kale has in abundance are kaempferol and quercetin.

It should be noted that the effectiveness of several antioxidants and vitamins in kale are diminished when cooked3.

Kale Healthy Recipes: Tuscan Bean and Kale Soup

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound dried cannellini beans
  • 2 Tbsp. coconut oil
  • 1 large onion, minced
  • 2 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 Tbsp. minced fresh sage
  • 2 tsp. minced, fresh rosemary
  • 7 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1/3 pound of kale, ribs removed, coarsely chopped
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Procedure:

  1. In a large saucepan, cover the dried beans with water (completely) and soak overnight. Drain and rinse.
  2. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a large pot over moderate heat. Add onion and sauté until soft, about 5 minutes. Add garlic, sage and rosemary and sauté for 1 minute.
  3. Add beans and stock. Cover and adjust heat to maintain a gentle simmer, cooking until the beans are almost tender – about 1 hour, then add the kale.
  4. Cover and continue simmering until the beans and vegetables are tender.
  5. Remove pot from heat and mash some of the beans against the side of the pot until soup is a nice, hearty consistency, adding water if necessary. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

This recipe makes six servings.

(From Healthy Foods for Your Nutritional Type by Dr. Joseph Mercola)

Kale Fun Facts

Kale was first cultivated from wild varieties by the Greeks and Romans and later spread throughout Europe, where the leaves were called “coles,” and then to the British Isles. From there it was transported to the Americas. The first time it was recorded in the U.S. was in 1669, referred to as “colewarts.”

Summary

A Brassica that’s made a name for itself as one of the healthiest foods grown in the garden – or found in local farmer’s market or supermarket produce section, for that matter – kale is becoming better known in the U.S., not just for the distinctive flavor it brings to soups and salads, but because of the many health benefits it provides. Loaded with vitamins, eating this green vegetable helps you fight cancer, heart disease, autoimmune diseases, and even macular degeneration. With all these good things, it could be what’s for dinner.

Foods, Health and Disease

Super Energy Kale Soup

superenergykale soup

Super Energy Kale Soup

Eating kale and other cruciferous vegetables two to three times a week or, even better, four to five times a week, is an easy way to significantly boost your health. Just one cup of kale will flood your body with disease-fighting vitamins K, A, and C, along with respectable amounts of manganese, copper, B vitamins, fiber, calcium, and potassium.

With each serving of kale, you’ll also find more than 45 unique flavonoids, which have both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits.1 In terms of green leafy vegetables, you really can’t go wrong… but kale is definitely worthy of its reputation as “king of veggies.”

And here’s a secret: kale’s flavor gets sweeter after it’s been exposed to a frost, making winter the ideal time to eat it (and it is in season starting mid-winter). When the temperatures drop you might not feel like eating a raw kale salad, but what about a bowl of warm kale soup?

The recipe that follows, from the George Mateljan Foundation,2 will not only warm you up and boost your nutrition, it’ll give you a nice energy boost, too.

Super Energy Kale Soup

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 5 cups chicken or bone broth
  • 1 medium carrot, diced into 1/4-inch cubes (about 1 cup)
  • 1 cup diced celery
  • 2 red potatoes, diced into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 3 cups kale, rinsed, stems removed and chopped very fine
  • 2 tsp dried thyme
  • 2 tsp dried sage
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

1.Chop garlic and onions and let sit for 5 minutes to bring out their health benefits.

2.Heat 1 TBS broth in a medium soup pot.

3.Sauté onion in broth over medium heat for about 5 minutes stirring frequently.

4.Add garlic and continue to sauté for another minute.

5.Add broth, carrots, and celery and bring to a boil on high heat.

6.Once it comes to a boil reduce heat to a simmer and continue to cook for another 5 minutes. Add potatoes and cook until tender, about 15 more minutes.

7.Add kale and rest of ingredients and cook another 5 minutes. If you want to simmer for a longer time for extra flavor and richness, you may need to add a little more broth.

Serves 4

Kale May Fight at Least Five Types of Cancer

Like other cruciferous vegetables, kale is a good source of cancer-fighting sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol. To date, kale has been found to lower the risk of at least five types of cancer, including bladder, breast, colon, ovary and prostate.3

The glucosinolates in kale and other cruciferous vegetables break down into products that help protect DNA from damage.4 As noted by the George Mateljan Foundation:5

“Kale’s special mix of cancer-preventing glucosinolates has been the hottest area of research on this cruciferous vegetable.

Kale is an especially rich source of glucosinolates, and once kale is eaten and digested, these glucosinolates can be converted by the body into cancer preventive compounds. Some of this conversion process can also take place in the food itself, prior to consumption.”

While some research suggests raw kale is best for cancer prevention, other studies suggest lightly cooked is best, in part because it improves kale’s ability to bind with bile acids in your digestive tract.

This makes the bile acids easier for your body to excrete, which not only has a beneficial impact on your cholesterol levels, but also on your risk of cancer (bile acids have been associated with an increased risk of cancer). According to one study in Nutrition Research:6

“Steam cooking significantly improved the in vitro bile acid binding of collard greens, kale, mustard greens, broccoli, green bell pepper, and cabbage compared with previously observed bile acid binding values for these vegetables raw (uncooked).

Inclusion of steam-cooked collard greens, kale, mustard greens, broccoli, green bell pepper, and cabbage in our daily diet as health-promoting vegetables should be emphasized.

These green/leafy vegetables, when consumed regularly after steam cooking, would lower the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer, advance human nutrition research, and improve public health.”

Eat Kale to Support Natural Detoxification

Foods that support both Phase 1 and Phase 2 detoxification are key to supporting your body’s daily removal of harmful substances from your body. Phase 1 detoxification is when toxins are broken down into smaller particles, while during your body’s Phase 2 detoxification process, the broken down toxins are shuttled out of your system.

If you eat foods that support Phase 1, but not Phase 2, the broken-down toxins may begin to accumulate in your body. But the isothiocyanates (ITCs) in kale help to promote both Phase 1 and Phase 2 detoxification. The George Mateljan Foundation explained:7

“In addition, the unusually large numbers of sulfur compounds in kale have been shown to help support aspects of Phase II detoxification that require the presence of sulfur.

By supporting both aspects of our cellular detox process (Phase I and Phase II), nutrients in kale can give our body an “edge up” in dealing with toxic exposure, whether from our environment or from our food.”

Kale Earns Its Reputation as a Superfood

Kale is one vegetable that lives up to its nutritional hype. It’s loaded with both lutein and zeaxanthin at over 26 mg combined, per serving, for starters. Of all the carotenoids, only zeaxanthin and lutein are found in your retina, which has the highest concentration of fatty acids of any tissue in your body.

This is because your retina is a highly light- and oxygen-rich environment, and it needs a large supply of free radical scavengers to prevent oxidative damage there.

It is theorized that your body concentrates zeaxanthin and lutein in your retina to perform this duty, and consuming these antioxidants may help to ward off eye problems like age-related macular degeneration.

And as far as calcium is concerned, one cup of kale will give you 90 milligrams in a highly bioavailable form. One calcium bioavailability study found that calcium from kale was 25% better absorbed than calcium from milk.8 What else do you gain when you eat kale?

  • Anti-inflammatory properties that may help prevent arthritis, heart disease and autoimmune diseases
  • Plant-based omega-3 fats for building cell membranes, protecting against heart disease and stroke, and regulating blood clotting
  • An impressive number of beneficial flavonoids, including 32 phenolic compounds and three hydroxycinnamic acids to help support healthy cholesterol levels and scavenge free radicals

Choose Organic Kale When You Can

When choosing kale, look for firm, fresh deeply colored leaves with hardy stems. Avoid leaves that are brown or yellow or that contain holes. Kale with smaller leaves tends to be more tender and milder than larger-leaved kale. Choose organic varieties (or grow your own), as kale is frequently sprayed with pesticides, and particularly toxic pesticides at that. One study by the Environmental Working Group detected 51 pesticides on kale, including several they described as “highly toxic.”9 For best results, store kale in your refrigerator (unwashed) in a plastic storage bag. Remove as much air as you can. Ideally, eat kale as soon as you can, because the longer it sits the more bitter the flavor becomes.

If you want to learn even more about what’s in the food you’re eating, visit our Food Facts library. Most people are not aware of the wealth of nutrients available in healthful foods, particularly organic fruits and vegetables. By getting to know your food, you can make informed decisions about how to eat healthier and thereby boost your brain function, lower your risk of chronic disease, lose weight, and much more.

Food Facts is a directory of the most highly recommended health foods to add to your wholesome diet. Its purpose is to provide you with valuable information about various types of foods including recipes to help you maximize these benefits. You’ll learn about nutrition facts, scientific studies, and even interesting trivia about each food in the Food Facts library. Remember, knowing what’s in your food is the first step to choosing and preparing nutritious meals each and every day. So visit Mercola Food Facts today to get started.

Health and Wellness Associates

312-972-WELL (9355)

Archived Article : M

Foods, Health and Disease

Fighting Breast Cancer with Flax and Chia Seeds

flaxandchiaseeds

Fighting breast cancer with flax and chia seeds

What are lignans?

Plant lignans are one of the four classes of phytoestrogens (isoflavones, lignans, stilbenes, coumestans), phenolic compounds that are structurally similar to the main mammalian estrogen, estradiol.1 Plant lignans are modified by bacteria in the human digestive tract into enteroligans. It is important to recognize the role of healthy bacteria in this process, because antibiotics can destroy beneficial bacteria in the gut resulting in long-term reduction in enteroligans.2 Eating commercial meats exposes us to antibiotics, as does the overuse and inappropriate prescribing by physicians.

Which foods are good sources of plant lignans?

Flaxseeds are the richest source of plant lignans, having about 3 times the lignan content of chia seeds and 8 times the lignan content of sesame seeds (note that flaxseed oil does not contain lignans — they bind to the fiber). The other plant foods on the list have about one-tenth or less the amount of lignans as sesame seeds per serving.2, 3

  • Flaxseeds (85.5 mg/ounce)
  • Chia seeds (32 mg/ounce)4
  • Sesame seeds (11.2 mg/ounce)5
  • Kale (curly; 1.6 mg/cup)
  • Broccoli (1.2 mg/cup)

Anti-cancer effects of lignans

Enterolignans are structurally similar to estrogen and can bind to estrogen receptors — this capability allows lignans to either have weak estrogenic activity or block the actions of estrogen in the body. For this reason, plant lignans are classified as phytoestrogens, and there has been much interest in the potential contribution of lignan-rich foods to reduced risk of hormone-related cancers.2, 6 Enterolignans inhibits aromatase7 and estradiol production in general, lowering serum estrogen levels.8 Plant lignans also increase concentration of sex hormone binding globulin, which blunts the effects of estrogens.9-11 These benefits were documented when 48 postmenopausal women consumed 7.5 g/day of ground flax seeds for 6 weeks, then 15 g for 6 weeks — and significant decreases in estradiol, estrone, and testosterone were noted with a bigger decrease in overweight and obese women.12

In a mouse model, a flaxseed diet (5%, 10%) shows dose-dependent inhibition of breast tumor growth.13 Human trials also confirmed similar beneficial effects. A double-blinded, randomized controlled trial of dietary flaxseed demonstrated dramatic protection. Women ate either a control muffin with no flax seeds imbedded or 25g flax-containing muffin starting at time of diagnosis of breast cancer for just 32-39 days until surgery. Tumor tissue analyzed at diagnosis and surgery demonstrated surprising benefits even in this short timeframe. There was a significant apoptosis (tumor cell death) and reduced cell proliferation in the flaxseed group in just the one month.14 Likewise women eating more flaxseeds with a documented higher serum enterolactone were found to have a 42% reduced risk of death from postmenopausal breast cancer and a dramatic (40 percent) reduction in all causes of death.15, 16 Flaxseeds are clearly super foods; even with a mediocre diet they offer powerful protection against breast cancer. Another interesting study on flax followed women for up to 10 years and found a 51% reduced risk of all-cause mortality and a 71% reduced risk of breast cancer mortality. The intake of dried beans was also associated with a 39% reduced risk of all-cause mortality.17 Endometrial and ovarian cancer have not been as extensively studied, but the few studies that have been conducted suggest a protective effect.2, 18

Bottom line; don’t forget to take your ground flax seeds (or chia seeds) every day. I sometimes forget too, but reviewing the science encourages me to remember. When used in conjunction with dietary exposure to greens, onions, mushrooms and beans, dramatic reductions in the risk of breast cancer are possible.

References: 1. Mense SM, Hei TK, Ganju RK, et al: Phytoestrogens and breast cancer prevention: possible mechanisms of action. Environ Health Perspect 2008;116:426-433. 2. Higdon J: Lignans. In An Evidence-Based Approach to Dietary Phytochemicals. New York: Thieme; 2006: 155-161 3. Milder IE, Arts IC, van de Putte B, et al: Lignan contents of Dutch plant foods: a database including lariciresinol, pinoresinol, secoisolariciresinol and matairesinol. Br J Nutr 2005;93:393-402. 4. Nemes SM, Orstat V: Evaluation of a Microwave-Assisted Extraction Method for Lignan Quantification in Flaxseed Cultivars and Selected Oil Seeds. Food Analytical Methods 2012;5:551-563. 5. Coulman KD, Liu Z, Hum WQ, et al: Whole sesame seed is as rich a source of mammalian lignan precursors as whole flaxseed. Nutr Cancer 2005;52:156-165. 6. Adlercreutz H: Lignans and human health. Crit Rev Clin Lab Sci 2007;44:483-525. 7. Adlercreutz H, Bannwart C, Wahala K, et al: Inhibition of human aromatase by mammalian lignans and isoflavonoid phytoestrogens. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 1993;44:147-153. 8. Brooks JD, Thompson LU: Mammalian lignans and genistein decrease the activities of aromatase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in MCF-7 cells. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 2005;94:461-467. 9. Adlercreutz H, Mousavi Y, Clark J, et al: Dietary phytoestrogens and cancer: in vitro and in vivo studies. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 1992;41:331-337. 10. Adlercreutz H, Hockerstedt K, Bannwart C, et al: Effect of dietary components, including lignans and phytoestrogens, on enterohepatic circulation and liver metabolism of estrogens and on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). J Steroid Biochem 1987;27:1135-1144. 11. Low YL, Dunning AM, Dowsett M, et al: Phytoestrogen exposure is associated with circulating sex hormone levels in postmenopausal women and interact with ESR1 and NR1I2 gene variants. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2007;16:1009-1016. 12. Sturgeon SR, Heersink JL, Volpe SL, et al: Effect of dietary flaxseed on serum levels of estrogens and androgens in postmenopausal women. Nutr Cancer 2008;60:612-618. 13. Chen J, Power KA, Mann J, et al: Flaxseed alone or in combination with tamoxifen inhibits MCF-7 breast tumor growth in ovariectomized athymic mice with high circulating levels of estrogen. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 2007;232:1071-1080. 14. Thompson LU, Chen JM, Li T, et al: Dietary flaxseed alters tumor biological markers in postmenopausal breast cancer. Clin Cancer Res 2005;11:3828-3835. 15. Buck K, Vrieling A, Zaineddin AK, et al: Serum enterolactone and prognosis of postmenopausal breast cancer. J Clin Oncol 2011;29:3730-3738. 16. Buck K, Zaineddin AK, Vrieling A, et al: Estimated enterolignans, lignan-rich foods, and fibre in relation to survival after postmenopausal breast cancer. Br J Cancer 2011;105:1151-1157. 17. McCann SE, Thompson LU, Nie J, et al: Dietary lignan intakes in relation to survival among women with breast cancer: the Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer (WEB) Study. Breast Cancer Res Treat 2010;122:229-235. 18. Bandera EV, King M, Chandran U, et al: Phytoestrogen consumption from foods and supplements and epithelial ovarian cancer risk: a population-based case control study. BMC Womens Health 2011;11:40.

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